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Student Teaching Lesson Plan Outline

Student teachers are expected to make and keep comprehensive written plans for each lesson they
teach. All lesson plans must follow the format listed and described below:

Introduction
• Era VII: Era of Global Wars, 1914 to 1945
• Length of Lesson (estimated) – 90 minutes
• VA Standards of Learning - WHII.11section A: The student will
demonstrate knowledge of the worldwide impact of World War II by explaining
economic and political causes, major events, and identifying leaders of the war,
with emphasis on Franklin D. Roosevelt, Harry Truman, Dwight D. Eisenhower,
Douglas MacArthur, George Marshall, Winston Churchill, Joseph Stalin, Adolf
Hitler, Hideki Tojo, and Hirohito;

Learning Objectives
Students will demonstrate knowledge of the worldwide impact of World War II by explaining
economic and political causes, major events, and identifying leaders of the war, with emphasis
on Franklin D. Roosevelt, Harry Truman, Dwight D. Eisenhower, Douglas MacArthur, George
Marshall, Winston Churchill, Joseph Stalin, Adolf Hitler, Hideki Tojo, and Hirohito;

Teaching and Learning Sequence
Introduction/Anticipatory Set – Class will begin with a short five minute video featuring an
interview with WWII veteran sergeant Albert Adams of the U.S. Army Recon Platoon, 21st
Armored Infantry Battalion, 11th Armored Division which served in England; France; Belgium;
Germany; Austria and Luxembourg. The video will be accessible through the Library of
Congress website as a part of the veteran’s history project. A brief discussion will follow the
video to gain student feedback and first impressions of the topic; as well as evaluate the student’s
pre-existing knowledge of WWII. Approximately 10 – 15 minutes.

Lesson Development – A lecture explaining the economic and political causes, major events, and
leaders of the war will be supported by a power point presentation containing numerous images
of key battles, figures, places and events captured during WWII. These images will be presented
in chronological order and students will be encouraged not to take notes during the lecture in
order to gain their undivided attention and promote student interaction in the form of questions
and discussion. An outline will be distributed to the class following the lecture containing
specific facts, dates, people and places while reiterating key points covered during the lecture for
students to take home and review in preparation for a multiple choice test at the end of the unit.
Approximately 25 – 35 minutes.
Students will then participate in a writing activity that involves communicating to living World
War II veterans by letter. The teacher will assign each student a veteran to write to and will
provide a list of required questions to ask for example: age of the individual while enlisted, why
they enlisted and where they were stationed. Students will be required to come up with a series
of their own questions to ask their veteran based on personal interest and material covered in
class. Each student will compose a rough draft in class to be submitted and reviewed by the
instructor for appropriateness and form. For homework the students will compose a completed
final copy of their formal letter to be turned in for grading and mailing during the following class
period. A grading rubric for the homework will be handed out to students at the end of class.
This assignment will give students the opportunity to reflect on material covered in class while
associating history with a living individual who experienced WWII first hand. The writing
assignment will also provide students a primary historical resource to learn from and pose
questions to. Approximately 35 – 40 minutes.

Closure – The teacher will give the students a short answer quiz consisting of five questions
pertaining to the day’s lecture and students will be given five minutes to complete the quiz.
Upon finishing the quiz the students will exchange papers with another student and the quiz will
be graded as a class. The quiz will be collected and reviewed assess whether or not the students
understand the key points of the lecture. Student will be instructed to study the questions they
got wrong since the question will appear on the unit test. Approximately 10 minutes.

Homework
For homework the students will compose a completed final copy of a properly formatted letter to
be turned in for grading and mailing during the following class period. The teacher will have
already assigned each student a veteran to write to and provided a list of required questions to
ask for example: age of the individual while enlisted, why they enlisted and where they were
stationed. Students will be required to come up with a series of their own questions to ask their
veteran based on personal interest and topics discussed in class. A grading rubric for the
homework will have been handed out to students at the end of class.

Assessment
Formative – Students will be continually assessed through classroom discussions and
interactions to gauge understanding of key concepts. Students will also be assessed and receive
feedback during the rough draft portion of the writing assignment.

Summative – Students will be graded on the final drafts of their writing assignments based on the
grading rubric. An end of lesson short answer quiz will be administered at the conclusion of class
to assess whether or not the students understand the key points of the lecture and promote student
questions to the teacher or home study of those concepts which need clarifying. Students will
also be tested in the form of a 40 question multiple choice examination that will be given at the
end of the unit based on material covered in class and lecture outlines handed out as study
guides.

References

"Curriculum Framework." Virginia Department of Education. 2001. Web. Oct. 2009.
www.doe.virginia.gov.

"Enhanced Scope and Sequence.” Virginia Department of Education. 2001. Web. Oct. 2009.
www.doe.virginia.gov.

"Virginia Standards of Learning." Virginia Department of Education. 2001. Web. Oct. 2009.
www.doe.virginia.gov.
Appended Materials

Library of Congress, Veteran’s History Project: http://www.loc.gov/vets/, web access October
2009.

R., Palmer, R., Joel Colton, and Lloyd Kramer. A History of the Modern World, Volume 2, with
PowerWeb. New York: McGraw-Hill Humanities/Social Sciences/Languages, 2006. Print.