YOUR GUIDE TO VISUAL COLLABORATION

TELEPRESENCE
SUMMER 2014 • THE “TELEPRESENCE IS DEAD, LONG LIVE TELEPRESENCE” ISSUE • VISUAL COLLABORATION
Cisco’s Susie Wee and Array’s Herold Williams are about to
CRANK TELEPRESENCE
BACK UP TO 11
6 www.TelepresenceOptions.com Summer 2014 7
TELEPRESENCE ENTREPRENEUR
HEROLD WILLIAMS
Rides Again!
Herold Williams is the quintessential entrepreneur, telepresence or otherwise.
Array Telepresence is the 20th company he has started since he was 21 and
his second telepresence venture. He has never worked for anyone other than
himself. He is 64 years old now and remains sharp, creative, and focused
and he’s about to revolutionize telepresence yet again!
Profle and Interview by Howard S. Lichtman,
Publisher, Telepresence Options. In the spirit of full
disclosure, Herold’s longtime friend and business
partner in Array Telepresence and thus uniquely
positioned to tell his story.
8 www.TelepresenceOptions.com Summer 2014 9
H
erold understands the human body in a telepresence
setting with an architect’s eye and an inventor’s passion.
He knows exactly how many degrees you’ll turn to
look at someone in front of a conference table, right
down to the individual pivots of your neck (25 degrees), torso (25
degrees) and chair (25 degrees). He knows how to seat you so that
whether you’re tall or short, you won’t be of his preferred vertical
eye-line of 46 ½ inches from the ground by more than one or two
inches, making you both seem and feel more natural on video. He
can tell you the specifc horizontal and vertical gaze angle from
the camera in every major telepresence group system from each
specifc seat. Ten he can tell you the specifc percentage from
each specifc seat that Array is better.
Williams consulted with DreamWorks on what became HP Halo.
He also created the world’s frst surgical telepresence environment
at Barrow Neurological. But he’s mostly called the “father of the
telepresence industry” for his revolutionary 1998 invention
of TeleSuite, the world’s frst commercially successful life-size
telepresence environment. When the rest of the videoconferencing
industry was focused on miniaturizing equipment and getting
the cost out of the $25,000 videoconferencing codec, Williams
went in the completely opposite direction, creating room-sized
environments costing hundreds of thousands of dollars that
replicated the human factors of participants: life-size images,
fuid motion, superb acoustics, concealed eye-line cameras, and
a seamless 16-foot video wall. Te system achieved usage fve to
ten times that of traditional videoconferencing, and big, name-
brand companies like 3COM, PriceWaterhouseCoopers, Cigna,
GlaxoSmithKline, and AOL-Time Warner began buying dozens of
systems. HP and Cisco quickly copied his split-table environmental
telepresence approach and telepresence went from zero to the
speed-of-light with an estimated 10,000 multi-camera, multi-codec
telepresence group systems connecting the globe today.
Williams and the TeleSuite team also created one of the world’s
frst managed Video Network Operations Centers to keep in check
all the multi-vendor IT gear under the hood of any telepresence
environment.
Polycom bought Destiny Conferencing, which held the intellectual
property, customers, and manufacturing capability for the TeleSuite
from David Allen, Williams’s business partner, in 2007 for $57
million. Williams had been diluted out of the company by then
and saw very little from his revolutionary work. Yet he never
got telepresence out of his system, always noodling with the big
idea of how to create cost-efective telepresence environments in
regular conference rooms using existing
videoconferencing codecs. By 2011,
he had the time, a friend helped him
secure some strategic funding and he launched Array in stealth
to revolutionize things again.
Array’s R&D lab is in a non-descript, two-story building in West
Chester, Ohio, almost halfway between Cincinnati and Dayton.
Williams’ desk faces the pastoral serenity of the woods seen through
an entire wall of windows along the back. A fascinating assortment
of tech, low and high, flls the rest of the room: Diferent-size
tables in various stages of assembly, videoconferencing systems,
fat-panel displays, curved displays, and the tools and machinery
required to manufacture precise components from scratch on-site.
Williams has been hard at work on Array for three years, designing
and building prototypes for camera housings, board enclosures,
and display stands. Williams and Array are the videoconferencing
industry’s equivalent of Jessie James and Monster Garage, except it
is a kinder, gentler grandfather slicing, dicing and pro-modifying
visual collaboration environments while inventing his own tech for
added horsepower. When Williams wanted to test curved displays
before they were announced over a year ago, he and Bryan Hellard,
his senior engineer and long-time collaborator, disassembled a 55-
inch fat-panel display and fashioned the LED LCD innards into a
curved wooden frame they built themselves just to test the efect.
When he realized the logistical challenge of demonstrating Equal-i
on the road, he designed and built a fascinating feather-weight,
full-size portable conference table that, when fully assembled,
weighs about the same as a Cannondale racing bike and folds up
into a shipping case smaller than a tuba.
But don’t mistake Williams for just an inventor that likes to tinker.
He has the business acumen you would expect from someone who
has raised and deployed hundreds of millions of dollars in capital
and whose intellectual property has sold for 8 fgures. From little old
West Chester, Ohio where Herold can stay involved with his kids
and grandkids Array is connected to the world. Te company is a
true virtual organization using visual collaboration to connect up
a rapidly-growing high-quality team. Tier-one engineers in Grass
Valley, California who cut their teeth building highly-available
video platforms for the broadcast industry. Lens designer in Boston,
productization experts, channel sales, business development, and
contract manufacture in Denver, management and marketing in
Northern Virginia, and product management in Connecticut.
Telepresence Options sat down with Williams when he was visiting
Northern Virginia for an Array Open House event in McLean
outside of Washington DC.
TELEPRESENCE OPTIONS (TPO): How did Array Telepresence
come about? What was the impetus of the idea?
HEROLD WILLIAMS (HW): Te years that we spent trying to
get TeleSuite accepted in the market were somewhat frustrating
because we were a small company with technology and concepts
that were before their time. We were able to prove highly immersive
telepresence and we got quite a few Fortune 100 companies
interested in the concept. However, we constantly found that afer
there was buy-in of the value proposition, the implementation
problems began to manifest themselves immediately as companies
started to understand the costs in physical space and room
remediation around creating a 400+ sq. feet required for the
“split-table” approach of the TeleSuite.
We constantly had the same objections and questions from our
clients’ executives, managers and employees and it went like this:
We love what telepresence does for us. We love the fact that you
The TeleSuite Video Network Operation Center (Circa
2006) was spun out as Iformata Communications when
Polycom bought Destiny Conferencing and recently
acquired by AVI-SPL. Williams, on-screen (third from left) in an early TeleSuite, circa 2002.
TOP: The view into the world’s frst telepresence
surgical educational environment at Barrow
Neurological Institute.
RIGHT: The surgeon’s view into the neurological
surgery classroom.
10 www.TelepresenceOptions.com Summer 2014 11
ARRAY TELEPRESENCE’S EQUAL-I TECHNOLOGY
So what’s the Big Idea?
P
robably the biggest knock against immersive
telepresence has been the cost in gear, bandwidth
and physical space. Enter Herold Williams and
Array Telepresence. The company has developed a
revolutionary Dual-Camera and Image Improvement Processor
called Equal-i. This technology perfects the videoconferencing
scene in any room with an elongated table. It also works
with any videoconferencing codec that accepts HDMI or HDCI
camera inputs in use in an estimated 2,000,000 conference
rooms around the world.
Array conceals the Dual-Camera between two displays at eye-
level, each camera head capturing half the participants at the
table. An Image Improvement Processor (IIP) flled with FPGA
and dedicated geometry-warping chips in between the camera
and videoconferencing codec perfects the scene by bringing
the farthest participants “up close and personal.” This
increases the amount of pixels on the farthest participant’s
face by six and a half times that of a standard Pan-Tilt-Zoom
videoconferencing camera. The size of farthest participant
is “Equal-i-zed” to the size of the closet participant. Being
able to center the camera at eye-level between the displays
improves vertical eye-line and enables stand-up capture.
Meanwhile, pulling the farthest participants “up-close-and-
personal” creates a more “across-the-table” meeting format.
The IIP powers dual displays that use a single codec to
combine scenes from both camera heads into one for the
trip across the wire. The Equal-i IIP on the other side splits
them back across dual displays, doubling the screen real
estate with no impact on network bandwidth. If you don’t
have an Equal-i set up on the other end, the site receives a
“cropped and stacked” version of two rows of four to six+
participants depending on the size of the table. Though you
lose the effect of dual displays, you still end up with a better
experience than a PTZ camera because the facial features
are more discernable.
Most multi-site meetings involve three locations, which is
where Equal-i excels. Powered by the speedy and thorough
FPGA chips, the system “crops and stacks” incoming
and outgoing images before handing the scene to the
videoconferencing codec. With a second codec it can marry
three Equal-i systems in “telepresence multi-point,” creating
“global round tables” with each of the screens displaying
half the participants in each remote location. Throw quad
displays and video walls into the mix and it gets even more
interesting.
THE ECONOMICS
The product is a dream come true for Pro-AV and systems
integrators. Refreshing an existing videoconferencing system
(or building a next-generation Equal-i room from scratch) drives
a lot of associated spending. The camera and the IIP cost
$13,995, making it feasible to cost-effectively upgrade and
refresh dozens, hundreds or even thousands of systems in
the larger organizations that use video.
Array launched Equal-i at InfoComm in June and is gearing
up to deliver systems this fall.
The view from a standard Pan-Tilt-Zoom videoconferencing camera showing the enormous virtual distance. The Equal-i 2S Dual-Camera brings the
farthest participants “up close and
personal,” improves the eye-line, meeting
format, and powers dual displays using a
single videoconferencing codec.
12 www.TelepresenceOptions.com Summer 2014 13
feel like you’re really meeting with someone face-to-face, but can’t
you do that in our regular conference room? Can’t you do that with
the videoconferencing gear and conferencing tables we already
own? Te unfortunate answer was always no. It was always in my
mind that something needed to be done to create an immersive
experience in a regular conference room and the value and utility
that would provide.
TPO: What’s the pay-off for the companies that upgrade
their telepresence and visual collaboration capabilities?
HW: What we proved at TeleSuite was that if you improve the human
factors of the experience, people will use it a lot. During a time that the
average usage of videoconferencing was
around 15 hours, per endpoint, per
month we had TeleSuites averaging
150 hours a month. We knew that
we were on to something. It was a
matter of getting enough scale and
getting enough systems out to build
a company.
Getting back to the conventional
conference room, they’re nearly all
the same because of architectural
best practices. They’re typically
elongated rooms, with a width that
is probably in the range of 25 percent
narrower than the length. Tere’s
typically an elongated table, seating
a number of people in two rows and
perhaps one person on each end.
Tey continue to be that way. Tere
are some changes afoot to reconsider
that shape and size, but essentially
there are about 2,000,000 conference
rooms out there today with HD
video conferencing endpoints at
the end of an elongated table. Te industry has tried to solve
this problem with robotic cameras that triangulate on whose
speaking but in many ways it makes the problem worse. Nothing
breaks a sense of immersion like obvious cameras panning,
tilting, and zooming in the front of the room or a constantly
changing perspective on the other side. Tey have their uses,
notably distance learning with big classrooms but you’re not
going to feel like you’re in the same room with someone if the
“Bad Robot” is there as well.
Our goal was to overcome the lack of immersion and leverage the
overwhelming uniformity of the conventional conference room
with its boat-shaped table and create an experience that rivals
and exceeds the quality of the only viable alternatives to improve
the videoconferencing experience: the $300,000+ multi-camera,
multi-codec group systems: the Polycom RPX, the Polycom OTX,
Teliris Express and VirtuaLive, DVE Immersion Room, the Cisco
TX9000 series. Tat uniformity has been the videoconferencing
industry’s biggest obstacle and we just completely fipped it into
a strategic competitive advantage.
When I say our $14,000 Equal-i System added to an existing
codec produces a scene that exceeds the quality of these $300,000
systems, I don’t just make the claim lightly. Te resulting image
is measurably and demonstrably better. Better eye-contact, less
horizontal gaze angle, concealed camera, stand up capture, less
real estate, less bandwidth, and a better “around-the-table” format
for local interaction.
TPO: What were some of the complexities that you had to
overcome to develop Equal-i?
HW: One of the biggest concerns was what type of architecture would
we implement? Would it be PC-based? Would it be sofware? Would
it be dedicated hardware? We knew that
we had to build our own camera
because we were revolutionizing
what a videoconferencing camera
is, what it does and where it goes.
We are creating an entirely new class
of products in visual collaboration
that we call: Image Improvement.
Yes, we build a camera, but what
we’re really about is improving
the scene before we hand it to the
videoconferencing codec for the trip
across the wire.
We’re doing very sophisticated image
improvement and equalization,
custom algorithms applied to the
images in order to improve the
scene and create improved multi-
point experiences. In order to
avoid even a single frame bufer
and to keep additional latency
nearly non-existent, we decided on
dedicated hardware using FPGA
programmable chips, geometry
processors, all married into a fabric of high-speed hardware.
TPO: You had to build a lot of your own parts. You had
to machine the camera yourself. Can you give me some
background on what that’s like and some of the complexities
involved?
HW: Tere were no real comparables out there, so we were not
taking another piece of hardware or a codec and redesigning it
and making it slightly better. Tis was new, clean sheet of the
paper approach to these issues and so to answer the question,
what were the biggest complexities? It was fguring out how to do
it! Typically cameras are designed and built for mass production,
so you have the advantage of essentially all of the methods that
are out there to marry pan-tilt-zoom lenses to camera boards
and camera sensors. What we were doing was something quite
diferent. We had to work with custom optics and integrate them
tightly with our camera in order to marry the experience to the
Image Improvement Processor. Creating the dual-camera required
very intricate and precise machining and tolerance for the camera
heads. We had to design lens, rapidly prototype parts some using
Most people don’t know it but the world’s frst com-
mercially-available H.264 HD Video Codec was built by
Herold Williams and Dr. Stephan Wenger in 2004 and
delivered 2048 x 768 across a 16 foot video wall and
could connect TeleSuites in fve separate cities together
using IP multi-cast.
3D printing, and much custom fabrication using a network of
world-class US-based contract manufactures that are gearing up
to move from prototypes to real production.
TPO: What does the technology road map for Equal-i look
like? What’s next?
HW: We are already working on a single screen system that uses
dual cameras set up on the right and lef hand side of the display
at eye-line.
We are also identifying even more advanced and higher resolution
sensors to 4K and assessing 4K to be able to meet 4K when it lands in
the board room and conference room. We see extraordinary eforts
by the consumer television manufacturers around 4k and getting
the cost out of 4K displays. We think there will be an interesting
play as companies refresh their meeting rooms and consider
4K displays rather than 2K and so we really want to be ready to
embrace 4K as codec manufacturers start to marry their solutions
with displays that are already available today at great prices.
We will be continually evaluating how our system can be enhanced
over time, what we really want now is serious feedback from
end-users on how our current feature set meets their needs. We
will also be looking to work with innovative visual collaboration
designers that will inevitably create solutions that value-add the
product over and above what we can do ourselves.
TPO: What’s next for Array in the short term?
HW: Te thing that I am most excited about is the ability to show
Equal-i of to the Pro-AV and System Integration community
at InfoComm in June. We are giving telepresence back to the
integrators with a high margin product that drives a lot of associated
spending. We are also giving architects and videoconferencing
room designers a sharp tool to dramatically improve the quality
of their rooms cost-efectively.
Now that we are no longer operating in stealth, we are starting to
talk to potential partners and vendors interested in integrating
Equal-i into their oferings. We are talking to enterprise customers
that are interested in upgrading dozens and hundreds of rooms
to Equal-i for a fraction of the cost of alternatives using the
video-conferencing gear they already own. And we are starting
to experiment with how the Equal-i System can be integrated into
existing telepresence environments and with diferent display
technologies: projection, curved displays, video walls. We think
we might be able to help improve a lot of the visual collaboration
environments like Oblong Mezzanine, Prysm’s Collaboration Wall
and Cisco’s Spring Roll.
We are also working on a single-screen system that uses two
cameras: one on each side of the display at eye-level that “cross-
fre” to capture the other side of the table. Tis shines for a number
of growth areas in videoconferencing: Team Tables, where the
existing paradigm of putting a PTZ camera or webcam on top of
a display where the participants are only 4-5 feet away is a wholly
unworkable methodology. Te upcoming Equal-i 1S will allow for
eye-line capture and will provide the best experience anywhere.
Te other important trend we support is larger displays. Our
“capture-from-the-edge-of-the-display-at-eye-line” approach works
better than a PTZ because you are getting a more “head-on” view
of the participants across the table. Te bigger the display the better
quality perspective for a head-on capture so the technology scales
nicely as the price on 80, 90 and 100+ inch panels continues to drop.
Even though Equal-i will work with any elongated table we
have reference designs for a number of optimal tables that both
optimizes the Equal-i experience and moves data to 21-inch
displays between each participant where fne detail is more easily
read. We plan on adding additional environmental telepresence
options in 2015 at equally revolutionary price points. Tat should
keep us busy for a while. TPO
A prototype of the upcoming Equal-i 1S Team Table which places
one eye-level camera on each side of a single screen display. The
bigger the display (80, 90, 100+ inches) the better the capture
perspective when shooting “crossfre”across the Team Table
ABOUT THE AUTHOR
In the spirit of full disclosure, Howard S. Lichtman
is a Board Director, Investor, and C2O at Array
Telepresence, president of the telepresence and
visual collaboration consultancy Human Productivity
Lab and, coincidently, publisher of Telepresence
Options. Since he has known Herold for over a
decade, was vice president of business development
at TeleSuite and has been intimately involved with
Array he couldn’t think of a better person to write a
profle of Herold and conduct this interview.
74 www.TelepresenceOptions.com Summer 2014 75
å
CONCEALED CAMERA
å
STAND UP CAPTURE
å
SMALLER FOOTPRINT
å
LESS BANDWIDTH
å
PERFECT VERTICAL EYE LINE
å
USE YOUR EXISTING ROOMS
AND FURNITURE
å
POWER DUAL-DISPLAYS WITH
SINGLE CODEC…
å
AND A SINGLE BIT STREAM
å
WORKS WITH ANY CODEC THAT
ACCEPTS AN HDMI OR HDCI
CAMERA INPUT
BENEFITS
å
EXECUTIVES LOOK BETTER
å
BETTER VISUAL INFORMATION:
BODY LANGUAGE / EXPRESSIONS
å
INCREASED MEETING PRODUCTIVITY
å
MORE USAGE =LESS TRAVEL
å
IMPROVED ROI ON VIDEO INVESTMENT
Traditional Video
Conferencing Rooms
VS
Array
Telepresence
Array Telepresence is changing visual collaboration with its breakthrough
technologies – the Equal-i 2S dual-camera and Image Improvement Processor (IIP).
Array enables immersive telepresence in existing rooms that far exceeds the quality
of both traditional videoconferencing and $300,000+ telepresence group systems.
Array Telepresence is Measurably Better:
ARRAYTELEPRESENCE.COM
INFO@ARRAYTELEPRESENCE.COM
PHONE 800.779.7480
THE VI EW FROM A STANDARD PTZ CAMERA WI THOUT ARRAY
ARRAY’S EQUAL-I 2S DUAL-CAMERA I MPROVI NG THE I MAGE AND SPREADI NG
THE SCENE OVER DUAL DI SPLAYS USI NG A SI NGLE VI DEOCONFERENCI NG CODEC
Visual Collaboration
Architects, System
Integrators & The Pro AV
Community...
Array is giving telepresence
back to the integrator!
The world’s 2,000,000 HD
videoconferencing rooms stand ready!
Our revolutionary Equal-i dual camera technology and
Image Improvement Processor(IIP) allow you to
cost-efectively elevate traditional videoconferencing
rooms to telepresence-quality environments that exceed
the immersive experience of 3-screen group systems from
Cisco and Polycom in less space at 1/20th the cost.
Our system allows you to deploy solutions that you design
and you install that meet your clients’ specifcs needs.
Our reference designs will get you started creating
amazing immersive environments.
We can’t wait to see what you create with
EQUAL-I SINGLE SCREEN TEAM TABLE
EQUAL-I THREE SCREEN 8 SEAT TABLE
EQUAL-I DUAL SCREEN 8 SEAT TABLE
EQUAL-I DUAL SCREEN 12 SEAT TABLE
ARRAYTELEPRESENCE.COM
INFO@ARRAYTELEPRESENCE.COM
PHONE 800.779.7480
Equal-i Reference Designs for
Visual Collaboration Architects
28 TELEPRESENCE OPTIONS CATALOG www.TelepresenceOptions.com Summer 2014 TELEPRESENCE OPTIONS CATALOG 29
T
E
L
E
P
R
E
S
E
N
C
E

R
O
O
M
S
T
E
L
E
P
R
E
S
E
N
C
E

R
O
O
M
S
Equal-i Technology
Equal-i Technology enables
telepresence quality in
traditional conferencing
rooms using your existing
videoconferencing codec.
Overview
• Up Close and Personal
• Better Eye-Line
• Concealed Camera
• Across-the-Table Format
• Improved Multi-Point
• Stand-Up Capture
• Single-Screen Version
• Low-Cost
• Better Horiz. Gaze Angle
• Use Your Existing Codec
• Use your existing furniture
Key Features
W
ArrayTelepresence.com
C
Array Telepresence
$
$13,995
Address
7593 Tylers Place Blvd.
Suite 102
West Chester, OH 45069
Phone
800-779-7480
Web
ArrayTelepresence.com
Equal-i is the name of Array
Telepresence’s patent-pending image
improvement algorithms, dual-camera
and Image Improvement Processor (IIP)
that dramatically improves the scene for
telepresence-quality experiences using
your existing videoconferencing codec
in any standard conferencing room. The
system is designed to work with standard
elongated conference room tables and
boardroom tables.
For dual-screen systems the Array Equal-i
2S dual-headed camera is concealed at
eye-level in a 1 inch space between two
displays (Curved or fatpanel. Video walls
are feasible as well) and then the camera
and space are concealed with a cover.
The Image Improvement Processor (IIP)
sits between the specially-designed
dual-camera and the videoconferencing
codec. It is running Array’s custom image
improvement and equalization algorithms
on high-speed FPGA and geometry warping
chips that dramatically improve the
scene from two separate cameras each
capturing ½ the room before sending
it to the videoconferencing codec for
compression.
On the other side of the videoconferencing
call, the Equal-i IIP receives a single
videoconferencing stream from its codec
and splits the stream into two different
high-defnition streams allowing a single
codec to power dual displays.
The resultant experience is measurably
superior to 3 screen telepresence
environments from Cisco and Polycom
that cost $300,000+ for 1/20th the cost.
The farthest participants are brought “up
close and personal” increasing the pixel
count on their faces by 6.5Xs that of a
PTZ camera while “Equal-i-zing” their size
to that of the closest participant.
Vertical eye-line is improved by ~13% over
PTZ, meeting format is improved to a more
“across the table” feel, stand-up capture
is enabled, and the system powers a wide-
format dual-display using a single codec
with no impact on bandwidth.
The Equal-i 2S easily and
affordably transforms a
traditional videoconferencing
room into an effective immersive
telepresence environment for
$13,995.
Overview
• Fraction of the Cost of Traditional
Systems
• Improved Immersive Experience
• Increased Usage
• Improved Return on Investment
• Compatible with existing systems
• Easy to Deploy
Key Features
The Equal-i 2S is Array Telepresence’s
revolutionary dual-camera and Image
Improvement Processor (IIP) that
dramatically improves the experience of
traditional videoconferencing systems in
regular conference rooms with regular
furniture.
Integrates with Existing Systems
The Equal-i 2S plugs into any
videoconferencing system that accepts
an HDMI or Polycom HDCI camera input.
The Equal-i camera replaces or augments
the pan-tilt-zoom camera that came with
your codec and is concealed between
dual displays at eye-level.
Between the camera and your
videoconferencing codec sits our patent-
pending Image Improvement Processor
(IIP). The IIP works at high-speed to
improve the image before it is sent to
the videoconferencing codec for the trip
across the wire.
The farthest participants are brought “up
close and personal”, eye-line is improved,
meeting format is improved, stand-up
capture is enabled, and the IIP powers
dual displays using a single codec.
Effective Multi-Point
The Equal-i 2S enables effective multi-
point – Example: With 3 Equal-i 2S
locations with dual 65inch displays using
8 seat tables you can “Crop & Stack”
and show up to 16 participants in two
rows across both displays . Using 12
seat tables and 80inch displays the total
rises to 24 participants.
While the Equal-i 2S will power dual
displays using a single codec, adding
a 2nd codec will enable “telepresence
multi-point” with ½ of each remote room
(4-6 essentially life-size participants from
each remote site) visible on each screen
in a “global roundtable” format.
W
ArrayTelepresence.com
C
Array Telepresence
$
$13,995
Equal-i 2S – Dual-Camera and Image
Improvement Processor
Address
7593 Tylers Place Blvd.
Suite 102
West Chester, OH 45069
Phone
800-779-7480
Web
ArrayTelepresence.com
TELEPRESENCE OPTIONS | SOLUTION SNAPSHOT TELEPRESENCE OPTIONS | SOLUTION SNAPSHOT
Summer 2014 TELEPRESENCE OPTIONS CATALOG 77
TELEPRESENCE AND VIDEOCONFERENCING CATALOG
76 TELEPRESENCE OPTIONS CATALOG www.TelepresenceOptions.com
C
O
M
P
A
N
Y

P
R
O
F
I
L
E
S
W
ArrayTelepresence.com
H
West Chester, OH
F
2011
S
Privately Held
S Telepresence Rooms
S Appliances
S Immersive Virtual Experiences/
Other
S Cameras/Furniture/Peripherals
S AVI-SPL
S MCW Technologies
Industry Categories
Herold Williams
Founder and President
Howard S. Lichtman
Board Director & C
2
O
Andy Howard
Board Director
Doug Howard
Board Director
Bryan Hellard
Director of Product Engineering
Key Executives
Resellers and
System Inegrators
Array Telepresence
Array Telepresence is transforming
visual collaboration by creating
innovative solutions to the big
problems of quality-of-experience,
affordability, and deploying quality
video in conference rooms with
elongated tables.
Array Telepresence’s President
and Founder, Herold Williams, has
been at the forefront of immersive
telepresence since its inception.
Williams was the inventor of the
TeleSuite, now called the Polycom
RPX after Polycom bought the
technology in 2007.
Williams now stands ready to once again
propel the industry forward with his latest
innovation: Equal-i - a revolutionary, patent-
pending telepresence dual-camera and image
improvement processor (IIP) with the ability
to turn a traditional videoconferencing codec
into a life- size telepresence environment for
$13,995 and the cost of an additional display.
The Equal-i camera and IIP work with any
videoconferencing system that takes an HDMI
or Polycom HDCI camera input. The camera is
concealed at eye-level between dual displays
and the IIP dramatically improves the scene
before handing it off to the codec for the trip
across the wire.
The farthest participants are brought “Up
Close and Personal”, the amount of pixels
on the farthest participants are increased by
6.5xs that of a PTZ, the eye-line and format
are improved, and the IIP powers large format,
dual-displays using a single videoconferencing
codec with no impact on bandwidth or video
network infrastructure.
The solution is superior to three-screen
telepresence environments from Cisco and
Polycom costing $300,000+ on a variety of
fronts: Better eye-line, concealed camera,
stand-up capture, better horizontal gaze angle,
less-bandwidth usage, and unlike the “split-
table” approach of three-screen environments,
Equal-i fts into regular size conference rooms
and is an excellent format for local meetings
vs. everyone facing the same direction.
This combination of low-cost, ease-of-use,
and easy deployability means organizations
can now cost-effectively upgrade dozens,
hundreds, or even thousands of traditional
videoconferencing rooms into immersive
telepresence environments for a fraction of the
cost of the existing alternatives.
Improved human factors translates into
additional usage, and end-user satisfaction
which equals an improved ROI on your existing
video investment. Just as important: Key
executives are more visible and look better
when communicating with partners, vendors,
customers, analysts, and the press.
The company has additional innovations in the
pipeline including a solution for large-format
single-screen displays, 4k resolution and
corporate board room solutions using quad
Equal-i processing.
The company is actively signing up resellers,
systems integrators, and Pro-AV partners to
begin upgrading the world’s 2,000,000 sub-
standard HD videoconferencing systems.
Address
7593 Tylers Place Blvd.
Suite 102
West Chester, OH 45069
Phone
800-779-7480
Web
ArrayTelepresence.com
TELEPRESENCE OPTIONS | COMPANY PROFILES
ARRAY TELEPRESENCE
Reference Design: Surround Presence - Highly
Immersive Telepresence Environment
Reference Design: Highly Immersive 8 Seat Environment with lighting,
acoustics, matched environmentals, integrated data collaboration,
“Bring & Fling”, ceiling-mounted visualizer, interactive whiteboard,
collaborative PC and the Array Equal-i 2S camera to improve the scene.
ARRAY TELEPRESENCE
Reference Design: Front Display System &
Integrated Rack
This reference design for a front system to ideally position the Array
Equal-i-2S Camera and support Dual Displays from 55-80 inches is one
of several available from Array for Systems Integrators. Options include:
Equipment rack and cable management, storage, and lighting. The
company is interested in talking with furniture manufacturers that are
interested in licensing compatible solutions optimized for Equal-i.
ARRAY TELEPRESENCE
Reference Design: Array Collaboration Table -
8 or 12 Seat Options
The Array Collaboration Table Reference Design is a table shape and
data collaboration confguration optimized for: Equal-i Technology
and the Equal-i 2S Camera. Assumption: Data moves from the 2nd
front display that will now be used for immersive telepresence to 21
inch data displays between each participant in the table where fne
detail is also visible. BYOD participants would be enabled by various
“Bring & Fling” wireless data collaboration options. Other Data
Collaboration Options Include: Interactive whiteboards and ceiling
mounted visualizers. Display Options range from 55inch fat or curved
panels up to 80+ inch fat or curved panels supported by mounts or
a front display system for which we also have a reference design.
Quad-screens, video walls, front projection, rear projection, interactive
touch screens, and other display technologies are all feasible. Array
is interested to talking to high quality furniture manufacturers about
producing furniture solutions optimized for Array.
ARRAY TELEPRESENCE
Reference Design: Array 8 Seat Collaboration
Table From the Front
An image of the Array 8 Seat Collaboration Table - Reference Design