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BIRTH. MOVIES.DEATH.

/ APRIL 2014
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140384_SHI-14074_Alamo 1 5/30/14 7:33 PM
LETTER FROM THE TEAM LEADER
CONTENTS
THE MOVIES
A Comics History Of THE GUARDIANS OF THE GALAXY
A Comics History Of TEENAGE MUTANT NINJA TURTLES
Popeye Vs Dracula: THE DRAGON LIVES AGAIN’s Insane Cross-Cultural Teamup
The Brilliant Elasticity of The Marx Brothers
They Did The Mash: A Brief History Of “Monster Rally” Pictures
drafthouse.com badassdigest.com birthmoviesdeath.com drafthouseflms.com fantasticfest.com mondotees.com
Editor-in-Chief
Devin Faraci

Managing Editor
Meredith Borders

Associate Publisher
Henri Mazza

Art Director
Joseph A. Ziemba

Graphic Designers
Zach Short, Stephen Sosa, Kelsey Spencer

Copy Editor
George Bragdon

Contributing Writers
Robert Saucedo, Andrew Todd, Devin Faraci, Evan Saathoff, Phil Nobile Jr, Bill Norris,
Brian Collins, Meredith Borders

Public Relations Inquiries
Brandy Fons | brandy@fonspr.com

Public Relations Inquiries
Brandy Fons | brandy@fonspr.com
Punch! The Ultimate Team Cocktail
THE EXPENDABLES Is Every 11-Year-Old Boy’s Fantasy Fulflled
Growing Up: Richard Linklater On His 12 Year Journey Through BOYHOOD
High Times. Hard Bodies. Soft Rock:
The Perfect Ensemble Of WET HOT AMERICAN SUMMER
GUARDIAN OF THE GALAXY: James Gunn On Making Marvel’s Weirdest Movie Yet
Zoe Saldana: Bringing The Streets To Outer Space In GUARDIANS OF THE GALAXY
Written & Directed by
Richard Linklater
PATRICIA
ARQUETTE
ELLAR
COLTRANE
LORELEI
LINKLATER
ETHAN
AND HAWKE
COMING SOON TO AN ALAMO DRAFTHOUSE NEAR YOU
12 YEARS
IN THE
MAKING
‘‘
ONE OF THE MOST
EXTRAORDINARY
MOVIES OF THE 21ST CENTURY.
’’
A.O. SCOTT
‘‘
A MASTERPIECE
OF AMERICAN MOVIEMAKING.
A MOVING and MEMORABLE 12-YEAR EPIC of family life
that isn’t quite like anything else in the history of cinema.
’’
ANDREW O’HEHIR
‘‘
#### THE BEST FILM OF THE YEAR.
UNIQUE AND UNFORGETTABLE.
’’
PETER TRAVERS
‘‘
A UNIQUE CINEMATIC LANDMARK.
IT WILL BLOW YOUR MIND.
’’
BEN DICKINSON
For the full
cinema schedule go to
drafthouse.com
or ifc.com
ASSEMBLING
THE TEAM
SUNDAY
NIGHTS
Don’t Get Picked Last
And On TV
August At
BIRTH. MOVIES.DEATH. / APRIL 2014
09
There wouldn’t be any movies without teamwork.
Almost every single movie ever made has a team
behind it -- actors, writers, directors, set builders,
editors, production assistants, costume designers,
hair and make-up people, script supervisors, drivers,
producers… I could go on, but you get the point. It
takes a whole lot of teamwork to get a movie from
someone’s brain onto your local screen.
This month we’re celebrating teamwork, that
magical moment when a bunch of people get
together and do something they couldn’t accomplish
on their own. WET HOT AMERICAN SUMMER
might be funny if it was just the members of THE
STATE, but it was when they also got all their
friends involved that it became a classic. We all
love Frankenstein’s Monster and The Wolfman and
Dracula on their own, but how awesome was it when
they would crossover in everything from Universal
classics to THE MONSTER SQUAD? Any one of
those Marx Boys could have been a comedy great,
but put them together as Brothers and you have all-
timers like DUCK SOUP and A NIGHT AT THE
OPERA. And sure, any single juice is nice, but when
you put them together in a punch (and add some
booze) you’re getting serious (yes, we have a great
article about punch this issue!).
All of this is inspired by GUARDIANS OF THE
GALAXY, the latest movie from blockbuster
behemoth Marvel Studios. We talked to director
James Gunn and star Zoe Saldana about bringing one
of the lesser known comic teams to big screen life.
This is a pretty good time for me to thank the
amazing team who helps bring this magazine to life
every month, especially managing editor Meredith
Borders, who is the only thing standing between
absolute chaos and the production of any given
issue, our art director Joseph Ziemba, the amazing
(and patient) graphic designers Zach Short and
Stephen Sosa, and the eagle-eyed George Bragdon,
who catches so many errors he makes me question
my own ability to read. 6
LETTER FROM THE
TEAM LEADER
DEVIN FARACI
Badass Digest Editor in Chief
@devincf
Read more at badassdigest.com
TABLE OF CONTENTS
BIRTH. MOVIES.DEATH. / APRIL 2014
This August, the Alamo Drafthouse is offering a lineup of flms that put the T in TEAM. In honor
of James Gunn's GUARDIANS OF THE GALAXY, we're showing a month of programming that
features some of the best and wildest team-ups in cinematic history! For tickets, showtimes,
formats, and a full list of titles, visit drafthouse.com.
Screening In August
at the Alamo Drafthouse
WET HOT AMERICAN SUMMER
Dir: David Wain, 2001, R, 97 min
“You taste like a burger. I don't like you anymore.”
It’s the last day of the summer season at Camp Firewood,
and all the campers and counselors are trying to make
sure they create memories that will last a lifetime. For
some, that means finally experiencing “the Ultimate”
(not just dick-in-vagina, but SEX, you dummy!); for
others it just means chewing some gum and then
frenching a lot. Oh, and then there’s that satellite that’s
threatening to fall from the sky and crush the camp --
during the big final talent show of the season!
So of course there’s plenty of quoting to do with this
show, and the Action Pack will be highlighting so many
great lines and bringing in special summer camp games
before the movie. Plus participating Alamo Drafthouse
locations with full bars available will have special S’mores
martini cocktails available so you can taste the last days
of summer and make your breath all chocolatey before
you make out with that special someone on the pier
instead of saving kids from drowning!
“If you wanna smear mud on your ass, smear mud on your ass
-- just be honest about it.” -- Can of Vegetables (Henri Mazza)
THE WARRIORS
Dir: Walter Hill, 1979, R, 92 min
Warriors...come out to play-ee-ay.
Tese are the Armies of Te Night. Tey are 60,000 strong.
Tey outnumber the cops three to one. Tey could run
New York City. Tonight they're all out to get the Warriors.
Preposterously themed street gangs, electrifying synths,
raging fisticuffs and a lean, mean, macho man story.
Cyrus is the toughest, baddest all-round coolest gang
leader around and he's assembled all of the gangs in
New York City to unify them. But when Cyrus ends
up dead, Te Warriors take the wrap and every face-
painted, spiked bat-carrying, homicidal maniac in the
city is out to kill them as our true-hearted, iron-willed
Coney Island rumblers punch, bite and bleed their way
home through the labyrinth of Manhattan.
Once you see THE WARRIORS all you will ever
want to see is THE WARRIORS again. Walter Hill
can film a city and make it sweat with toughness as
he captures the filthiness of urban decayed vacant
subways, crooked alleys and abandoned buildings to
turn them into a spectacularly violent playground
of insanity. "Now, look what we have here before us.
We got the Saracens sitting next to the Jones Street
Boys. We've got the Moonrunners right by the Van
Cortlandt Rangers. Nobody is wasting nobody. Tat...
is a miracle. And miracles is the way things ought to be.
CAN YOU DIG IT?" (Greg MacLennan)
THE MONSTER SQUAD
Dir: Fred Dekker, 1987, PG-13, 82 min
Te End of the World Starts at Midnight.
Only one '80s masterpiece can claim the title of Te
Killingest, Swearingest, Monster-est Kids Movie of All
Time. You know who to call when you got ghosts, but
where do you turn when you have MONSTERS!?
Dracula is alive and primed for world domination
as he assembles all of the legendary monsters of the
world. Bullets can't kill him, grenades cannot slow
him and it seems like no one can stop him except
for...THE MONSTER SQUAD. A group of horror-
obsessed adolescents are all that stand in the way
of Dracula and his nefarious plan. Tey just love
comics and movies, but when the world requires their
expertise their childhood innocence will be forever
lost in a blinding storm of silver bullets, sharpened
stakes and enormous explosions.
Tis child-sized chunk of anti-monster justice was
unleashed on cinemas with such savage fury that few
recognized its true greatness, but it has since been
rediscovered as the classic it truly is! So grab your
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TABLE OF CONTENTS
BIRTH. MOVIES.DEATH. / APRIL 2014
tickets before the full moon and be here for this show
or we’ll kick you right in the...genitals. (Zack Carlson
& Greg MacLennan)
STEEL MAGNOLIAS
Dir: Herbert Ross, 1989, PG, 117 min
To find the greatest team of women ever assembled,
head to the home of big hair and even bigger gossip:
Truvy's Beauty Salon.
In this charming little parlor, you don't just get your
hair and nails did -- you get life lessons from some of
the best and sassiest actresses to ever grace the screen.
Without STEEL MAGNOLIAS, how would you
know that there are so many different shades of pink
(including Blush and Bashful), or that all gay men have
track lighting? Without Ouiser Boudreaux (Shirley
MacLaine, in all of her cantankerously awesome glory),
how would you discover that it's possible to be in a
bad mood for 40 years? And without Clairee Belcher
(Olympia Dukakis), how would you learn that the
only thing that separates us from the animals is our
ability to accessorize? Don't even get me started on
Truvy Jones (Dolly Parton), whose folksy wisdom and
bedazzled ensembles basically make life worth living.
Tese ladies are guaranteed to inspire you just as
sure as they'll make you bawl your eyes out and then
crack you up. Because we all know laughter through
tears is the best emotion. So tease up your hair, grab
your bestie and join us for a cinematic celebration of
friendship, perms and Southern living. It'll be even
better than a slice of armadillo cake. (Sarah Pitre)
STAND BY ME
Dir: Rob Reiner, 1986, R, 89 min
Rob Reiner’s film about the sadness that comes with
the end of childhood innocence still maintains an
emotional resonance decades later. Starring the very
talented young quartet of River Phoenix, Wil Wheaton,
Jerry O’Connell and Corey Feldman, STAND BY ME
encompasses all the joy and pain of adolescence with
an honest and deft touch, something that is rarely seen
in the genre these days.
Te story centers on Gordie (Wheaton) and his three
friends as they trek out into the woods outside their
Oregon hometown to find the rumored dead body
of a young boy who went missing. What starts out as
a fun adventure (well, as fun as finding a dead body
can be) soon turns into a subtle, but undeniably life-
changing event for the four boys. Entertaining, moving,
beautifully shot and naturally acted, STAND BY ME
is one of the most unpretentious looks at that too-often
used buzz term of "coming of age." (RJ LaForce)
RESERVOIR DOGS
Dir: Quentin Tarantino, 1992, R, 99 min
Every dog has his day.
Tat's right! You're about to get stuck in the middle
with the Quentin Tarantino classic, RESERVOIR
DOGS. Diamond heists, double crosses and
undercover cops are the name of the game in this fast-
talking, macho crime caper.
Put on a super snazzy all-black suit, stop referring to
yourself by your real name and prepare to super-slo-
mo-cool-as-fuck walk yourself with at least four of your
friends to the Alamo Drafthouse, because we're setting
you up with one of the slickest, coolest movies to blast
out of the '90s.
Stop pointing that gun at my dad and come learn the
relative importance of tipping, who starred in Get
Christie Love!, and what to do when you enter a men's
room full of cops carrying a briefcase full of marijuana.
Don't give yourself any excuses to miss this on the big
screen; the words "too fuckin' busy" should not be in
your vocabulary. (Greg MacLennan)
DUCK SOUP
Dir: Leo McCarey, 1933, Passed, 68 min
Over their storied careers the Marx Brothers have
created so many classic moments you can't come
close to counting them on all of your fingers and toes.
Because of this, it's so hard to name their definitive
masterpiece. But we're going to tell you a little secret in
case you ever find yourself in a life-or-death situation
and need to choose: Te answer is DUCK SOUP.
Over the course of a frantic, hysterical 68 minutes the
Brothers Marx showcase their collective comedic and
performance genius from one brilliant set piece to
another. Directed by Hollywood vet Leo McCarey, this
is the most polished of the Marx's films, which is no
easy task. McCarey's collaboration is the main reason
Groucho believes this to be their best film.
Tey spread anarchy over every frame and make
a brilliant political satire that's not interested in
saying anything political. It's madcap. It's insane. It's
positively, absolutely the zaniest creation from the
masters of being zany. It also marked the end of their
stint with MGM and boy, what a way to go out!
(RJ LaForce) 6
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TABLE OF CONTENTS
BIRTH. MOVIES.DEATH. / NOVEMBER 2013
BIRTH. MOVIES.DEATH. / APRIL 2014
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BIRTH. MOVIES.DEATH. / APRIL 2014
BIRTH. MOVIES.DEATH. / APRIL 2014
BIRTH. MOVIES.DEATH. / APRIL 2014
A Comics History Of THE
GUARDIANS OF THE GALAXY
Who are the Guardians of the Galaxy? It depends on
who you ask.
For comic book fans of the ‘70s, the Guardians of the
Galaxy are a team of 31st century superheroes -- the
last survivors of their race, bound by desire to protect
the universe from the villainous Badoon. Led by Major
Vance Astro, a 20th century earthman who was put
in suspended animation, the Guardians were a motley
crew of strange heroes including Charlie-27, a bruiser
from Jupiter; Yondu, a blue-skinned mohawked proto-
Na’vi armed with a bow and arrow; and Starhawk,
an omnipotent demigod stuck in an endless cycle of
rebirth. During the ‘90s, the Guardians were given a
slightly grimmer, slightly grittier rebirth and saw its
membership swell to include future versions of Ghost
Rider and Wonder Man, among others.
In 2006, while most of the Marvel Universe was
caught up in the Civil War -- a mini-series that saw
Marvel’s heroes turn against each other -- Marvel
dusted off an assemblage of some of their most
popular cosmic heroes to combat an invasion from
the Negative Zone. Heroes such as Nova, Starlord
and Gamora would unite for the first time and fans
ate it up. Over the next few years, Marvel continued
slowly nurturing this strange, exciting corner of
their universe. Forgotten heroes such as Rocket
Raccoon (a genetically modified animal with a love
of firearms) and Warlock (a cocoon-bred space god)
were resurrected and partnered up with even stranger
heroes -- including Cosmo (a telepathic Russian dog
who had been shot off into orbit during the space
race) and Bug (a member of the Micronauts that
Marvel managed to retain thanks to a legal loophole).
Most recently, Marvel has once again revamped
the Guardians of the Galaxy in preparation for this
summer’s big movie. Te team is very similar to the one
audiences will see on the big screen: Starlord, a half-
Earthling who is running from his royal alien lineage,
leads a team of heroes that includes Groot, a sentient
tree with a soft side, and Drax, a family-man who was
killed by the space tyrant Tanos only to be resurrected
by Tanos’ dad as an avatar of revenge. Marvel has
even included several of its popular Earth heroes on
the team. Iron Man, Captain Marvel and Venom
(yes, the Spider-Man villain -- it’s a long story) have
all joined the team in recent years. Perhaps the most
notable addition is Angela, a character who was recently
revealed to be Tor’s long-lost sister but in reality is
essentially a big middle finger to SPAWN creator Todd
McFarlane, who lost the character in a legal battle with
co-creator Neil Gaiman, who then proceeded to sell her
to Marvel Comics.
If you’re interested in reading more about the Guardians
of the Galaxy, visit a local comic book store and ask
for GUARDIANS OF THE GALAXY BY ABNET
& LANNING: THE COMPLETE COLLECTION
VOLUME 1 or GUARDIANS OF THE GALAXY
VOLUME 1: COSMIC AVENGERS. 6
ROBERT SAUCEDO
Houston Alamo Drafthouse Programming Director
Read more at badassdigest.com
@robsaucedo2500
A Comics History Of
TEENAGE MUTANT
NINJA TURTLES
Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles is a joke.
I mean that literally. TMNT began in 1983 with two
friends, Peter Laird and Kevin Eastman, fooling around
with sketches. Tey drew a turtle on its hind legs and
laughed. Tey added a mask and weapons and laughed
some more. Tey wrote “Ninja Turtle” above the drawing
and then added “Teenage Mutant” above that, because it
made them laugh. And then they drew some more turtles,
with other weapons, and they decided they wanted to
make a comic book about these weird creatures.
In that book, intended as a black and white one-shot,
they were riffing on some of the popular comics of the
time, like DAREDEVIL, X-MEN and Frank Miller’s
RONIN. Te Turtles’ origin is actually tied directly
into that of Daredevil -- the same toxic waste accident
that blinded Matt Murdock and gave him super senses
mutated the four turtles into teenaged ninjas. Where
Daredevil battled ninja clan Te Hand, the Turtles faced
off against Te Foot. Daredevil’s sensei was Stick, while
Splinter was the rat mutated along with the Turtles in
that accident.
Tey spent all their money printing 3000 copies of
that comic… and it sold out in weeks. Future printings
sold out faster. Te entire comic book industry
convulsed, and indie black and white satire comics
like RADIOACTIVE ADOLESCENT BLACKBELT
HAMSTERS and PRE-TEEN DIRTY GENE KUNG-
FU KANGAROOS tried to get in on the action.
Eastman and Laird decided to make the book a regular
series, but rather than stick with the silly satire they took
the Turtles and followed their adventures fairly seriously,
even as they visited alternate dimensions, crossed over
with Cerebus the Aardvark and battled Triceratons.
Continuity was never a big deal to them -- they
preferred following new ideas to being stuck matching
up with previous issues. While they eventually sold the
concept off to cartoons and toys, their black and white
comics were aimed at an older teen audience, not the
kids who discovered pizza-munching heroes on the
half-shell (the Turtles had no particular affinity for pizza
in the original comics). Over the last three decades the
original Turtles experienced love, loss, murder, betrayal,
PTSD and even ended up in their 30s in the latest
series, simply titled TMNT (Tirtysomething Mutant
Ninja Turtles?).
It’s strange that what began as a joke turned into both a
fairly serious and mature adventure series and an eternally
childish cartoon and movie series. Tese two versions of
the TMNT couldn’t be any more different, and it’s great
that both versions somehow exist side-by-side. 6
DEVIN FARACI
Badass Digest Editor in Chief
Read more at badassdigest.com
@devincf
TABLE OF CONTENTS
ANDREW TODD
Badass Digest Gaming Editor
Read more at badassdigest.com
@mistertodd
Popeye Vs Dracula:
THE DRAGON LIVES
AGAIN’s Insane
Cross-Cultural
Teamup
TABLE OF CONTENTS
The craziest teamup movie of all time was 100%
unlicensed, unauthorized and uncontrollable.
Team-up movies are all too frequently careful,
calculated products. Marvel has THE AVENGERS,
DC and Warner Brothers have their upcoming
JUSTICE LEAGUE and Lionsgate has THE
EXPENDABLES. Even back in the day, Universal
threw Abbott and Costello in with their familiar
versions of Frankenstein, the Wolf Man and
Dracula. It’s a strategy predicated on the notion that
if audiences love those characters separately, they’ll
love them even more together, and it often pays off.
But for gleeful, ridiculous alternatives, we turn to
the wonderful world of exploitation.
Third World movies have a long, proud tradition
of low-budget, unauthorized knockoffs of popular,
copyrighted characters. STAR WARS, THE
EXORCIST, E.T., JAWS, RAMBO, the JAMES
BOND series and even SATURDAY NIGHT
FEVER have generated batshit insane facsimiles
from well outside Hollywood’s legal reach: largely
Turkey, Africa, India and Southeast Asia. It’s a
tradition that continues to this day.
If you’re disregarding copyright anyway, the next
logical step is to mash those appropriated icons
together. Turkish actioner 3 DEV ADAM teamed
Captain America with luchador legend Santo
to fight the villainous Spider-Man, and THE
EXPENDABLES was predated by 28 years in KILL
SQUAD’s all-American action substitutes. But
cinema has never assembled a list of pop culture titans
as comprehensive as the one in 1977 Hong Kong
martial arts comedy THE DRAGON LIVES AGAIN.
Part of the bountiful Brucesploitation subgenre
birthed the moment Bruce Lee drew his final breath,
THE DRAGON LIVES AGAIN isn’t content to
simply imitate extant Lee titles. It takes the unusual
step of starting at the moment of Lee’s death,
following both his descent into the Underworld and
his fight to escape it.
“Bruce” Leung Siu-lung isn’t the most convincing
Bruce Lee-alike in the business. Visually, he’s the
halfway point of Bruce Lee Animorphing into his
ENTER THE DRAGON opponent Bolo Yeung
(who appeared in several Brucesploitation films
himself ), though he doesn’t quite have the martial
arts prowess of either. But the creators of THE
DRAGON LIVES AGAIN went for a quantity
over quality approach, matching up fake Bruce Lee
against fake Everybody Else.
From its opening titles sequence, featuring fake
Bruce Lee fighting fake James Bond, it’s clear THE
DRAGON LIVES AGAIN cares not for intellectual
property law -- only the law of badassery. Soon
Zatoichi enters the fray, followed by Dracula and
Clint Eastwood. By the time the film reaches its
triumphant “The End” credit, we also meet fake
Caine, fake The Godfather, fake The Exorcist, fake
Popeye, and fake Emmanuelle (!). Everyone refers
to each other by their full name or title, so we don’t
forget who’s who. The Exorcist is just The Exorcist,
and so on.
The imitation even extends to music. Fake Ennio
Morricone, fake Lalo Schifrin, fake Sammy
Lerner and fake Monty Norman all appear on the
soundtrack, often chopping harshly between themes
depending on which character is onscreen.
THE DRAGON LIVES AGAIN’s story is actually
somewhat clever, a comfortable bedfellow to the
most out-there comic book teamups. After death,
these iconic characters are dismayed their influence
in pop culture purgatory is less than that on
Earth, so they stage a coup against the King of the
Underworld. It’s up to fake Bruce Lee to stop them
and maybe earn his freedom in the process. Who’s a
hero and who’s a villain in this scenario is somewhat
arbitrary, given that most of the characters started
out as good guys. The villains score the bulk of the
A-listers, though, with only best friends Popeye and
Caine coming to Bruce Lee’s aid. The film delights
in its mismatched characters -- its best sequences
have them just chilling and shooting the breeze.
It’s also a crazy martial arts comedy with side orders
of sex and the supernatural. A skeleton walks out of
a doctor’s office thanking him for the help. Kung-
fu mummies play ring-around-the-rosie in combat.
At one point European sex symbol Emmanuelle
has boisterous sex with the aging King, attempting
to induce a heart attack. You’re never stuck for
entertainment with THE DRAGON LIVES AGAIN.
Like other titles of its ilk, this film could only
have been made in an isolated industry far from
Hollywood, a Wild East of entertainment and
insanity. THE DRAGON LIVES AGAIN occupies
a curious nexus between ripoff, homage and fan film.
Legally speaking it’s pretty indefensible, but like the
best exploitation films, there’s a charming naiveté to it.
It feels innocent, like a kid playing with action figures.
To not have James Bond and Dracula join forces
would be a waste of a good toy. No toy goes to waste
in THE DRAGON LIVES AGAIN. 6
TABLE OF CONTENTS
BIRTH. MOVIES.DEATH. / APRIL 2014
TABLE OF CONTENTS
It is difficult to imagine a comedy team more talented,
impressive, flexible and just downright hilarious than
the Marx Brothers. Comedy certainly hasn't produced
their equal at this point in time. Te Judd Apatow
crew, the Christopher Guest crew, the Not Ready
for Prime Time Players, Monty Python, a million
wonderful and timeless comedy duos -- all great, but
none quite on that Marx Brother level.
Tat sounds hyperbolic, but the statement's size seems
appropriate given the comedians we are dealing with.
In all honesty, can you imagine anyone matching wits
with Groucho Marx? Or a mute performer who can
meet the effortless mixture of sweetness and malice
displayed by Harpo? How about an actor who is
the equal to Chico's unique combination of comic
ignorance and charming chicanery? We've seen a lot of
The Brilliant Elasticity of
The Marx Brothers
EVAN SAATHOFF
Badass Digest News Editor
Read more at badassdigest.com
@sam_strange
Marx imitators -- Alan Alda and Bugs Bunny definitely
have a Groucho thing going on, and I've always
seen a lot of Harpo in Martin Short's CLIFFORD
performance (yes, I just referenced Martin Short's
CLIFFORD performance) -- but those are just attempts
at a type these guys invented and fully embodied.
But perhaps the biggest strength offered by the Marx
Brothers is the wide range of comedy styles they were
able to mine from their three (sorry Zeppo fans!) very
distinct comic personalities. By himself, Groucho is the
acerbic wit and the brother most capable of carrying
screentime without the rest of his team, as he did for
years hosting television's YOU BET YOUR LIFE.
Harpo's the destructive clown, amazing to watch for any
amount of time so long as there's someone or something
for him to mess with or destroy. Chico, however, is
much harder to define because he, far more than his
brothers, requires directed conversation (even if it's
against the mute Harpo) to be effective and reflects a
little differently depending on each scene's partner.
But that's also part of Chico's brilliance and key to the
Marx Brothers' elasticity as a whole. To varying degrees,
they each have unmistakable comic personas. But their
characters also have the ability to take on different
dimensions when combined in different ways.
When you see Chico and Harpo together, for instance,
you get the sense that you are watching two pals with a
long shared history. You don't really believe any of the
details each film offers to explain their partnership, but
the fact that they are always together seems evident.
Chico displays a kind of weird but sweet responsibility
for Harpo. Tis is largely because it often falls to him
to explain Harpo to others or translate for him. Tey
are both miscreants, so it certainly doesn't mean he
keeps Harpo out of trouble, and he shows little interest
in protecting the world from Harpo's destructive
insanity. Nevertheless, between the two of them, he
comes closest to providing direction and focus, poor
and misguided as it may be.
As Chico and Harpo enjoy their shared adventures --
stealing works of art, bullying lemonade vendors and
kidnapping football players -- we usually find Groucho
in a much different situation, subverting the upper
class from within, a job for which is he is magnificently
suited thanks to his utter disdain for every stuck up
affectation he sees. What's fascinating about Groucho,
however, and the Marx Brothers as a whole, is the way
he often becomes a de facto member of that class in the
face of Harpo and Chico's shenanigans.
Tis is mostly true with Chico, who can speak and
therefore offer Groucho more fertile opportunities
for comic back and forth. Many of their one-on-one
scenes revolve around Groucho's need for Chico's help
or something he possesses. Te comic mode is pretty
simple: Chico's tenuous grasp on the English language
and lack of knowledge in general lead to a ton of
hilarious verbal misunderstandings.
Groucho battles these with a parade of witty asides, but
make no mistake -- Chico's comic voice transforms
Groucho, a notable warrior against convention, into
the world's wittiest and most unlikely straight man.
Speaking personally, these are my absolute favorite Marx
Brothers scenes (save for any scenes involving Chico
playing the piano -- but sometimes they overlap!). I
can barely breathe while watching stuff like the "Why a
Duck" bit from THE COCOANUTS, the "Swordfish"
scene from HORSEFEATHERS or the "Sanity Clause"
scene from A NIGHT AT THE OPERA.
Tis is somewhat true of Groucho's interactions with
Harpo as well. Despite their shared stance as agents
of comic chaos, Groucho finds himself no safer from
Harpo's assault on physical comfort zones and personal
belongings than any of Margaret Dumont's characters.
But while Groucho's interactions with Chico carry
with them a crescendo of exasperation, his often quits
the fight with Harpo early and just rolls with it. Te
famous "Mirror Scene" from DUCK SOUP offers a
great example of Groucho deciding he'd rather play
and have fun than actually investigate Harpo's mischief
as a figure of authority.
Of course, all bets are off when the three brothers
finally get to come together as a team. Tis happens a
lot but perhaps not as frequently as those unfamiliar
with the films might expect. With the three Marx
Brothers going all at once, Groucho might still play
straight man to Chico or they might end up totally
in cahoots. Harpo's objects of abuse can shift from
any of the brothers to anyone else in the room and
even to the physical room itself. Tere are precious
few rules when it comes to the Marx Brothers, which
makes this goofy exploration a sort of fool's errand
filled with easily disproved generalizations. But that's
just another reason why, almost a hundred years since
the release of THE COCOANUTS, no one has yet to
match their comic insanity. 6
TABLE OF CONTENTS
PHIL NOBILE JR.
Badass Digest Contributor
Read more at badassdigest.com
@philnobilejr
They Did The Mash:
A Brief History Of
“Monster Rally" Pictures
Something peculiar happens -- or more accurately,
doesn’t happen -- in 1944’s HOUSE OF
FRANKENSTEIN, the first “monster rally” from
Universal Studios: at no point in the film do the
monsters meet up with one another! Filmed under the
working title THE DEVIL’S BROOD, the movie’s
promotional materials promised the first-ever onscreen
team-up of Frankenstein’s Monster, the Wolf Man and
Dracula. But HOUSE OF FRANKENSTEIN not only
skimps on delivering the monstrous goods, it fails to
give its monsters a single scene together.
Dracula is played here for the first time by John
Carradine; theories vary as to why Bela Lugosi
didn’t reprise the role, but his disastrous turn in
FRANKENSTEIN MEETS THE WOLF MAN,
where he was largely replaced by a stuntman, couldn’t
have helped his relationship with the studio. On
top of that, records indicate Lugosi was performing
in a touring stage production of ARSENIC AND
OLD LACE in Newark when HOUSE OF
FRANKENSTEIN began filming, a rotten bit of
timing for the unlucky actor. Bruised ego aside, the
role would have hardly been worth the plane trip for
Lugosi; the Count is introduced and dispatched before
the 30 minute mark, completely segregating him from
the Wolf Man (Lon Chaney Jr.) and Frankenstein’s
Monster (Glenn Strange), neither of whom see
any real action until the film’s final 15 minutes.
Indeed, the big draws pop in and out of an episodic
programmer plot that focuses on a pair of escaped
criminals (Boris Karloff and J. Carrol Naish) in search
of Dr. Frankenstein’s research materials for their own
nefarious means. At a brisk 70 minutes and with its
weird “no monster overlap” policy in place, it’s a pretty
thin outing, though Universal’s team of journeymen
creatives ensure that, aesthetically at least, the film is
never a chore to experience.
1945’s HOUSE OF DRACULA repeats the formula
as well as the failings, featuring parallel plots in which
Dracula and Larry Talbot (Carradine and Chaney
once again) seek cures to their respective curses from
a well-meaning scientist. Once again, the monsters
are kept out of each other’s hair, with Frankenstein’s
Monster (Strange) relegated to another cameo at the
end, resurrected just long enough for a burning lab to
collapse onto him. On the plus side, we get to see a
man turn into a vampire onscreen for the first time in a
Universal film, sort of the bloodsucker equivalent of the
Wolf Man’s famous transformation scenes. Te Wolf
Man gets a memorable moment as well, transforming
inside a jail cell in front of astonished onlookers. But it
was clear the monsters were losing their power by now.
Tere was no trace of the hypnotic dream world of
Tod Browning’s DRACULA; none of the expressionist
shadows of James Whale’s FRANKENSTEIN
remained. Crowding them all onto one bill and trotting
them out with all the nuance of a carnival sideshow
only seemed to dilute the monsters further.
In 1948, Bud Abbott and Lou Costello cracked the
formula for a successful monster rally: the monsters
could share the screen, interact even, as long as
the parade came with a built-in excuse to giggle.
Embracing the inherent absurdity, ABBOTT AND
COSTELLO MEET FRANKENSTEIN turned the
horror icons into straight men for the comedic duo,
and it worked like gangbusters. In a series of classic
scenes, the Universal Monsters (Chaney, Strange and
a returning Lugosi) were allowed to keep their dignity,
while Abbott and Costello delivered the panicked
pratfalls and petrified punchlines. Te film, Universal’s
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second-lowest budget release of 1948, was a huge
hit, and it had the odd side effect of sending the two
comedians into a tailspin of monster interactions
(ABBOTT AND COSTELLO MEET THE
MUMMY, ABBOTT AND COSTELLO MEET THE
INVISIBLE MAN, ABBOTT AND COSTELLO
MEET DR. JEKYLL AND MR. HYDE).
Bud and Lou’s onscreen social schedule wasn’t the
only casualty: the iconic Universal Monsters were now
officially kid stuff, to be either lampooned or avoided
going forward. In fact, an argument could be made that
just about every iteration of the classic monsters from
this point on were, in a way, spun out from Abbott and
Costello’s use and abuse of the horror legends.
Hammer Studios ran screaming from the wreckage.
Its lusty and busty offerings drastically reinvented
the familiar characters one by one, self-consciously
zigging where Universal had zagged. Te results were
enormously successful, but Hammer always kept its
monsters out of each other’s respective sandboxes, and
not just because Christopher Lee was playing most of
them. While the British studio swam against the tide
of parody, the rest of pop culture got on board with
the silly. THE MUNSTERS reimagined the familiar
characters as a sitcom family. MAD MONSTER
PARTY was a Jack Davis MAD MAGAZINE strip
brought to stop-motion life. By the 1970s, the
monsters had become both literal and metaphorical
comfort food, as kids spent their Saturday mornings
eating Count Chocula and Frankenberry cereal while
watching either THE GROOVIE GHOULIES, a
cartoon which turned Drac, Wolfie and Frank into
a Monkees-esque pop band; or THE MONSTER
SQUAD, a live-action confection which featured the
triumvirate as unlikely crime fighters.
In many ways, 1986’s THE MONSTER SQUAD
(no relation to the aforementioned TV show) feels
like the final word on the subject. Full of affection
for its beleaguered monsters and packed with
charm to spare, the film is very much the spiritual
successor to ABBOTT AND COSTELLO MEET
FRANKENSTEIN, upgrading that film’s protagonists
to a group of foul-mouthed, monster-crazy kids who
find themselves reluctant heroes when Dracula and his
very Universal-influenced crew of creatures descend
upon their small town to kick off nothing less than the
Apocalypse. Scares and laughs are had, PG-13 rating
limits are pushed, and nards are kicked. Bud and Lou
would have likely been pleased.
But is the film truly the final word on monster
rallies, or just the apex? From THE EVIL DEAD to
GHOSTBUSTERS to THE MONSTER SQUAD,
the 1980s seems to be the last decade in which the
scary and silly were really encouraged to co-exist.
(Possible exception: Charles Band’s all-dwarf monster
rally from 1997, THE CREEPS.) Hollywood
keeps trying to reinvent the formula in a climate
where genre fans will tolerate no such silliness. But
from VAN HELSING to TWILIGHT to BEING
HUMAN, the industry keeps proving that delivering
a “serious” monster team-up is no guarantee it will
be taken seriously. (Tat hasn’t deterred MONSTER
SQUAD producer Rob Cohen from trying --
unsuccessfully, as of this writing -- to get a remake
off the ground.) Making these monster mashes fly is
a tricky balancing act, and the number of times it’s
legitimately worked onscreen can be counted on one
hand. Tose few instances are special films indeed. 6
BIRTH. MOVIES.DEATH. / APRIL 2014
Come landlord fill a flowing bowl until it does run over,
Tonight we will all merry be -- tomorrow we’ll get sober.
John Fletcher, Rollo Duke of Normandy, Act II. Sc.
2., circa 1612
Te problem has bedeviled hosts since time
immemorial: how to best keep the whistles of your
guests wet whilst enjoying your own shindig? After
a certain age, the college solution of laying out a keg
and a handle of this or that along with what mixers
you might afford begins to feel a touch inadequate.
But wed yourself to mixing cocktails for your guests
and you end in the unenviable position of spending
the bulk of your night behind the stick, shaking and
stirring up the fancies of your friends with little time
to mingle and indulge your own thirst (or, worse,
continuous nips from your bottles take you too far
into intoxication, too fast).
Fortunately, the solution is at least 400 years old,
versatile and, with just a little forethought and
preparation, simple and delicious. It is found in the
flowing bowl, the delights of which spring from the
murky history of colonization, take firm root in the
savageries of empire and come into their own in the
wilds of early America.
It can be safely assumed that as distillation was
discovered, someone set to doctoring the resulting
spirit with alacrity; it is fairly easy to make liquor (boil
some beer or wine and somehow catch the steam and
re-condense it), but it is quite difficult to make palatable
liquor. Tere are records of distillation occurring in
Europe and parts of Asia and what we now call the
Middle East as far back as the 15th Century, and
archeological digs at the headwaters of the Indus River
in what is now Pakistan revealed stills that date back
to the time of Christ. Given that Alexander the Great
found sugarcane growing in the same region, and that
limes and many spices are native to the area, it is not
unlikely that a proto-rum punch was being consumed
somewhere on the Indian subcontinent a couple of
thousand years ago.
By the 1600s, accounts of punch drinking turn up
regularly in the chronicles of Englishmen out working
the colonial beat. Many of them claim that the drink
was consumed by the “natives” (though there are no
records written by the colonized that mention any
punch drinking prior to the arrival of the English), and
there are several accounts that claim that the word
Punch itself comes from the Hindi, , pronounced
paanch and meaning “five.” Tis has some plausibility, as
there are frequently (though not always) five ingredients
in classic early punches: strong spirits, citrus, sugar,
spices and water.
To greatly simplify: somewhere in the process of
building an Empire, English sailors took a liking to
mixing those five things together, brought it home
where it became fashionable and spread it to wherever
they carted canon and dropped anchor. By the time
of the American colonies, there was already sugarcane
and citrus helpfully planted by the Spanish in the
Caribbean and a healthy local traffic in rum (and
slaves) that made Punch the drink commonly found
in the American tavern. Indeed at the Constitutional
Convention in 1787, the delegates’ rather impressive
bar tab included seven bowls of alcoholic punch so
large that “ducks could swim in them.” Tis is not an
accident. Many of our early statesmen were vintners,
brewers and distillers, but they were also frequently
soldiers, and there was a great tradition, lasting until
even the Civil War, of American regiments coming up
with their own (frequently sneakily deadly, and often
secret) punch recipes.
By the middle of the 1800s, the short and snappy
cocktail nearly killed off punch. It only survived as a
holiday indulgence or as a sickly sweet non-alcoholic
drink made with sherbet and 7-up. And, that, really,
is a shame. Because taking the time to assemble the
Punch! The Ultimate
Team Cocktail
BILL NORRIS
Alamo Drafthouse Beverage Director
Read more at badassdigest.com
@wnorris3
TABLE OF CONTENTS
ingredients for a punch and setting out a bowl of the
stuff for your friends can well lubricate a gathering, but
without the massive alcoholic intake that would occur
if you were slamming back Old Fashioneds or Martinis.
It is somehow more convivial and, depending on the
spirits used, the citrus at hand and the spices employed,
various and delicious in flavor. Punch can be made with
gin or rum, whiskey or tequila, Mezcal or Cognac. It
could be made -- though why bother? -- with Vodka. It
can be a simple affair or it can be fancified with cordials,
liqueurs, fancy fruits and bubbly wine.
Te first step in preparing your punch is to create
what practioners of the punchy arts refer to as the oleo
saccharum, by removing the peels from your citrus
(avoiding the pith) and mixing them in with the
quantity of sugar you will be using. Best done a day
in advance, the sugar will leach out the aromatic and
flavorful oils from the citrus peels, creating a fragrant
sugar mixture that forms the base of your punch.
Ten it is a matter of mixing in the remainder of your
ingredients, pouring it all into a bowl along with, when
available, a large hunk of ice, and providing cups and a
ladle. If preparing a punch from what you have at hand,
the Barbadian rhyme, "One of Sour, Two of Sweet,
Tree of Strong, Four of Weak,” is a great starting place.
Te sour is your citrus, the sweet your sugar, the strong
your spirit, and the weak water (or, better, tea). Tese
proportions will rarely steer you wrong.
But, in honor of THE GUARDIANS OF THE
GALAXY, we offer you something more stout. Here
is Chatham Artillery Punch, which according to THE
AUGUSTA CHRONICLE, is so strong that “As a
vanquisher of men its equal never has been found.”
Chatham Artillery Punch
12 Lemons
2 Cups Light Raw Sugar
Water
750 ml bottle VSOP Cognac (Pierre Ferrand 1840
would be an excellent choice)
750 ml bottle bourbon (make it something nice, but
save the Pappy Van Winkle for sipping)
750 ml bottle Jamaican Style Rum (Hamilton
Jamaican Pot Still Black Rum or something aged from
Appleton will work here)
3 bottles chilled brut champagne (Gruet Blanc de
Blanc from New Mexico would be a budget-friendly
choice here. Real champagne is always best.)
A day in advance, prepare your oleo saccharum by
mixing the peels of your lemons and the sugar. Reserve
your peeled lemons for juicing. When ready to serve,
juice your lemons until you have one pint of juice. Add
that juice to your sugar mixture and stir until all the
juice is dissolved. Strain the sweetened juice mixture
into an empty 750 ml bottle and top up with water
until the bottle is full. Seal and refrigerate until cold.
Fill a 2 ½ gallon punch bowl with finely cracked or
crushed ice, pour in your cold, sweetened lemon juice
mixture and add the rum, bourbon and Cognac. Top
off with three bottles of champagne and stir gently to
combine. Serves a multitude.
Enjoy. 6
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BIRTH. MOVIES.DEATH. / APRIL 2014
TABLE OF CONTENTS
THE EXPENDABLES
Is Every 11-Year-Old Boy’s
Fantasy Fulflled
I still remember being around 11 or 12 and hearing
a friend express his desire to see Bruce Willis, Arnold
Schwarzenegger and Sylvester Stallone in a movie
together, to which I replied "It'll never happen!" I may
not have known much, but I knew those guys would
never join forces for a single film while they were still
competing to be the world's biggest action star. But I
couldn't deny it would be amazing to see a few of those
guys in one movie, either fighting against each other or
teaming up against a bigger enemy (this being the early
‘90s, that enemy would probably be some Eurotrash
terrorists). For a long time, it seemed UNIVERSAL
SOLDIER would be the best we'd ever get, as it had
Jean Claude Van Damme (nearing the peak of his big
screen popularity) pitted against Dolph Lundgren (sadly
in the twilight of his); a sort of B-movie variant on
seeing Arnold take on Sly.
Over the years, similar playground daydreams would
be realized -- debates over whether Freddy could
take on Jason were settled by Ronny Yu in 2003,
and the following year gave us a big-screen ALIEN
VS. PREDATOR. Neither film was as good as what
we pictured in our heads, but they made for a fine
opening night celebration with a theater full of rowdy
fans, letting nostalgia trump the more intelligent part
of our brains for 90 minutes. However, those were
just appetizers for 2010's THE EXPENDABLES,
where Stallone (working as director, co-writer and
star) did the unthinkable and assembled a dream team
of the past 20 years' action heroes, offering a poster
that looked like an AFM pipe dream instead of a real
movie. Stallone! Statham! Li! Lundgren! Willis! Uh...
Rourke! Roberts?
BRIAN COLLINS
Badass Digest Contributor
Read more at badassdigest.com
@brianwcollins
OK, so some of the casting selections were a little
odd -- in addition to a few out-of-nowhere choices
(Randy Couture?), basically anyone who ever worked
with Stallone was fair game (Rourke being his GET
CARTER co-star; Roberts was a sub-villain in THE
SPECIALIST), even if they weren't exactly action
icons. Further watering down the experience was
the fact that the plot was seemingly half-dictated by
availability (Rourke was only on set for two days; more
than one character was dropped from the script because
Sly couldn't get anyone worthy to fill the role), but,
ultimately, who cares? Te fact that the movie even exists
is enough of a win; just as AVENGERS and FAST FIVE
would later prove, there's just something about seeing a
group of beloved characters or actors come together for
the first time that can stir nerd emotions like no other
film can. Te narrative suited the inner ten-year-old in
all of us: a bunch of badasses (led by Sly, of course) go
off to an island to take out a dictator, allowing for both
massive shootouts and individual one-on-one fights
aplenty, with little more plot complication than we'd
bother with if conjuring up the movie with assorted
action figures in our backyard (though we'd probably
skip Rourke's monologue). Classy cinema it is not, but
neither is the average movie starring these guys in their
prime -- is EXPENDABLES really that much sillier
than COBRA or RUNNING MAN?
And regardless, all sins are forgiven roughly 20
minutes into the film, when it comes time for the real
draw. Despite its brevity, any self-respecting crowd
would thunderously applaud for a scene that proved
11-year-old BC wrong: during a meeting with Bruce
Willis' character Church, none other than Arnold
Schwarzenegger (also unbilled, and still the governor
of California at the time) strolled in for a cameo,
allowing these three titans of action cinema (and
chain restaurants) to share the screen for the first time.
Te scene doesn’t amount to much more than the
three of them trading a few jabs, and the surprise was
sadly spoiled by the trailer, but even though it lacked
explosions or gunfire, it was hard to deny how goddamn
exciting it was for everyone who grew up watching their
movies on VHS. It's a sad irony that my generation
worshipped these guys but were too young to see many
of their classics on the big screen -- that is, unless their
parents were cool (mine were; DIE HARD 2 was in
fact the first R-rated film I got to see on the big screen,
though they vetoed TOTAL RECALL).
Along the way we got to see some other terrific
highlights: the hulking Lundgren engaged in hand-
to-hand combat with the smaller (but deadly) Jet Li;
Steve Austin and Stallone beating each other to a pulp
(with Sly breaking his neck during the filming of the
scene), DTV mainstay Gary Daniels in a movie that
was playing on thousands of screens... You just couldn't
deny the immediate thrill of watching all these guys
throwing punches and one-liners in one big summer
movie. Te first sequel upped the ante, expanding
Willis and Schwarzenegger's roles considerably and
adding Van Damme, Scott Adkins and even Chuck
Norris into the mix. Te upcoming third film continues
the trend; Willis has dropped out but they've added
Harrison Ford and Mel Gibson to fill the void, not
to mention Wesley Snipes and Antonio Banderas
(Stallone's antagonists from DEMOLITION MAN and
ASSASSINS, respectively). Te marketing has suggested
that this is the last entry of the series, but if it performs
well I'm sure Sly can be convinced to rope everyone
back for another go-round. After all, until he gets Jackie
Chan and Steven Seagal signed on, there are still some
adolescent dreams to fulfill. 6
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Growing Up:
Richard Linklater On His
12 Year Journey Through
BOYHOOD
DEVIN FARACI
Badass Digest Editor in Chief
Read more at badassdigest.com
@devincf
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TABLE OF CONTENTS
BIRTH. MOVIES.DEATH. / APRIL 2014
TABLE OF CONTENTS
Starting in 2002 Richard Linklater had an annual
tradition. He gathered a film crew, he gathered young
actor Ellar Coltrane, his own daughter Lorelei Linklater
and actors Ethan Hawke and Patricia Arquette and for
one week a year they shot a movie. Tey did that for
twelve years, and the end result, BOYHOOD, sketches
the arc of a life in America at the dawn of the 21st
century. It’s ambitious and yet very small, it’s universal
and yet incredibly personal. It’s a triumph of cinema,
and it’s the Drafthouse Selects film of the month.
We sat down with Linklater to talk about his approach,
what the film taught him about the culture and, in the
end, what the film taught him about himself.
Q: Watching this movie with a younger crowd I
was impressed by how many of their nostalgia
buttons you hit. Tey reacted big to stuff like
DRAGONBALL Z and the Game Boy. How much
of that was something you were cognizant of in the
moment and how much was stuff that you went
back in different iterations of the editing to make
sure was in the movie? Te scene where they wonder
whether there will ever be another STAR WARS was
particularly funny in the new, current context.
L: Te STAR WARS, we shot it at the time. Whatever
it was, six years ago. I figured it was interesting either
way, that whether or not a STAR WARS emerged, it
was in the air. You just have to pick it at the time. I
spent a lot of time thinking about stuff like that. Te
scene where they’re doing the boxing match on the
Wii, there was a window when the Wii came out and
people were throwing out their arms, getting hurt --
Q: Breaking stuff in their living rooms.
L: Yeah! I thought, this won’t last forever. Having lived
long enough you see trends, you see things come and
go. It would have been interesting either way, if it had
ended up being something people did for the rest of
the time, it would be like, “Oh, that’s when it started.”
But if it was something short-lived, that would be
interesting too. It was weird making this period film in
the present tense, just kind of guessing.

But at the end of the line here I’m more amazed
that the culture didn’t change that much. All of our
movement, visually and culturally, was in the realm of
technology. Gaming, phones. Not much has changed
in the culture. If you really look back at 2002 and
squint your eyes, even the cars [have barely changed].
What does that say? I’m old enough to have lived
through the late ‘60s and the ‘70s; if you picked 69-
81 [as a 12-year span for a movie] cars are different,
music is different. Tings change. Maybe I’m older
and a young person would see it differently, like on
the fashion nuances. I don’t see big cultural shifts. I
didn’t see the emergence of a new artform. I didn’t see
punk rock or hip hop or a new thing happen. I saw
little stuff.
Q: You started this in 2002, making it a document of
the post-9/11 era. Was that something on your mind
when you started it?
L: Not really. I was already committed when 9/11
happened. It was already in the works. And I didn’t
want to comment on 9/11 too much. Tere are a
couple of mentions of the war and that, but it was the
backdrop. We did start pre-invasion, though, so it’s
post-9/11, pre-Iraq War. I wanted the movie to feel
like a remembrance, so I wondered, ‘Is this something
a kid would remember?’ I thought the beginning of
a war and horrific footage on TV -- I remember that
from my childhood, with the Vietnam War. Tat’s a
backdrop, and a parent’s politics can play into it, but
I didn’t want the movie to be political.
Q: When you’re casting your lead for the movie you
know sort of where you want the story to go, but
you’re also at the mercy of this kid as he grows up.
If Eller had grown up to be a total jock would the
movie have changed, or would you have tried to fit
him into the artist that Mason becomes in the film?
L: Tat would have been cool. Tat would have been
a choice. It could have been about a pretty cool jock
and his friends. I made that movie, DAZED, and all
those guys were kind of jocks. But I knew that the
movie was going to go where Eller went to whatever
degree. It would incrementally go in that direction.
He was an arty kid and I could tell [when he was
cast]. His parents were artists, and his tastes were
beyond… he had older friends, I think. He was seven
when we started shooting but his friends were like
eleven. We found this video of him from the first
year interview and he talked about what bands he
listened to and he said System of a Down, Tool and
Rage Against the Machine were his favorites. And he
dressed like a little rock star. He had cool pants with
these holes in him. He looked like a cool 15-year-old
[at age 7]. And he had a lot of charisma; kids followed
him around. We would go into a scene and the extra
kids would come up and put their arm around them
and he was like, ‘Hey man, back off, don’t touch me.’
He was the rock star.

We were sort of dorking him -- him and Lorelei --
making them more normal. We put a cap on them
the first few years so it would feel like they grew into
who they really were, starting from here. I didn’t
depict where they were really starting from, because
it was a little outside what I thought was probably
the norm.

BIRTH. MOVIES.DEATH. / APRIL 2014
TABLE OF CONTENTS
Q: How much is your perspective on the whole thing
different in year twelve than it was in year one? Not
just on the movie but on you, the changes you’ve
gone through in the twelve years.
L: I know. God, it’s one of the mysteries of life. I feel
like the exact same person but I’ve got twelve more
years under the belt. I’ve got two more kids I didn’t
have then, I got a bunch more films. I got a bunch
more life. Tis thing was such a life project, it’s been
a real wonderful demarcation thing, all along the way.
Every year you had to ask yourself these questions,
you had to really study the world and see it in a new
way. I think we should all take on these life projects
that just make you -- whatever the final result is --
pay attention. Tat’s what I like about the arts, that
they make you see the world in a way you might not
be attuned to.

Every film is so much work the subject matter better
be something you find infinitely fascinating. If
you can just explain it and be done with it, you
shouldn’t be making it. Every film I’ve done
I’m really feeling my way through that subject
-- what don’t I know, what do I want to discover?
And usually in the process of making the film
I feel I do get to know what I was after. Tis,
with a twelve year commitment, had to be about
something inexhaustible. And that was about
growing up, parenting, the culture around it, the
world changing. I knew that well would never
come close to going dry. And it didn’t. It didn’t.
You had to stay so in touch with these people as
they changed, and not just the kids but also the
adults. You do that as a parent, you do that as a
friend, but it was interesting to see that refracted
through this one work of art, that you’re trying to
take Eller and Lorelei and Ethan and Patricia and
you’re taking what’s going on in their lives and
I’m trying to take what went on in my life at that
age and my own role as a parent -- it was an all-
encompassing refraction of the world. It was an
incredible collaboration not just amongst us but
also between our own parents and the unknown
future. But that’s the life metaphor here -- we’re
all collaborating constantly with a future we
think we’re trying to control, but we only can to a
certain degree.
Q: Is that why Mason is a photographer, to allow him to
control those moments?.
L: I did like that he ends up an observational, behind
the camera guy. Tat’s closer to who I was, but that
came from Eller himself, who had an interest in
photography. I would have bet he would have grown
up and become a musician. When he was into
photography I decided I wanted to see that manifest
in Mason in high school.
Q: In the end they’re in the mountains and they’re
tripping and he has that understanding that it’s
always right now. It’s one of those statements
that’s profound and simple at the same time. You
have a college freshman saying it; you have this
moment of understanding, but it’s coming from
the one kind of guy at whom we might roll our
eyes. “Great, college freshman -- come back to me
in twelve more years and we’ll see what you think
of life.” But you’re very much ending on that note
specifically -- why that note?
L: I think he earned it. I think Eller himself deserved
it. Tat’s all it is, really, and once you come to that
realization… I think Eller himself came to that, and
people spend their whole lives kind of trying to be
in the moment and to find that, whether it’s through
religion or psychedelics, to be aware in the moment.
If you can at least acknowledge that as the reality at
a young age, you’re doing pretty well. So much of
your life as a young person has been conditioning
you to look to the future, you’re being conditioned
to be the future productive citizen. Te cookie cutter
is stamping you out to be that citizen, but it’s really
something else. It’s really about your perception of
your own moment.

It’s a funny line and a very real line, and it felt like the
absolute last line.
To read the entire interview, visit BadassDigest.com! 6
BIRTH. MOVIES.DEATH. / APRIL 2014
MEREDITH BORDERS
Badass Digest Managing Editor
Read more at badassdigest.com
@xymarla
High Times.
Hard Bodies. Soft Rock:
The Perfect Ensemble
Of WET HOT AMERICAN
SUMMER
TABLE OF CONTENTS
BIRTH. MOVIES.DEATH. / APRIL 2014
When David Wain and Michael Showalter’s WET
HOT AMERICAN SUMMER was first released, it was
critically panned and commercially ignored. Te movie
made a woeful $7000 its first weekend in theaters after
an almost nonexistent marketing campaign by USA
Films. But after the film’s DVD release -- and the advent
of Netflix, and the relentlessly rising stars of nearly
every lead in the movie, most of whom were unknowns
in 2001 -- something special happened. WET HOT
AMERICAN SUMMER gained the eternally coveted
and rarely achieved cult following.
So how did it happen? WET HOT is an enormously
funny film, layered with absurdist humor and a
surprising darkness that contradicts its few genuinely
sweet moments -- mostly due to Showalter’s Coop,
though the angelically lit, solemn love scene between
Michael Ian Black’s McKinley and Bradley Cooper’s
Ben also comes to mind. But what WET HOT
AMERICAN SUMMER delivers better than any other
film is the pure equality of its ensemble cast. Each
member is as hilarious and crucial and then utterly
disregarded as the next. It’s like the scene where one
moment J.J. (Zak Orth) is giving a line and the next,
he just walks off the pier into the water. His part’s done,
and now it’s time for him to get out of the scene and let
someone else shine. Tat’s essentially the entire ethos
behind WET HOT AMERICAN SUMMER.
Janeane Garofalo’s frenzied phone panic, Paul Rudd’s
petulant cleaning session, Chris Meloni tenderly
humping the fridge, Showalter’s proclamation of
love to Marguerite Moreau, that chase scene between
Ken Marino and Joe Lo Truglio, Amy Poehler’s
scarcely contained rage, Molly Shannon’s trembling
vulnerability: I have no hopes of choosing a favorite
scene or performance among them. Each weird,
wonderful vignette is as valuable to me as my own
favorite memories from camp.
Tis is largely because the filming of WET HOT
AMERICAN SUMMER was camp. In an oral history
the cast and Wain gave to DETAILS magazine for the
film’s tenth anniversary, we learn that the stars spent
28 cold, rainy days bunking together at Honesdale,
Pennsylvania’s Camp Towanda. Rudd said, “We would
eat in the chow hall. We slept where the campers slept.”
Michael Ian Black added,
“I don't know what they were fucking thinking, but
they contracted the actual people who make food for
the camp to make food for us. And, you know, pizza
bagels every day when you're 11 years old is a dream.
When you're 30, and it's pizza bagels every day, you
wanna kill somebody.”
Te actors -- many of whom, along with Wain, were
improv friends in college through a group that later
became known as Te State -- didn’t just eat and sleep
together. Tey partied together. From Poehler: “We
were being given the chance to take one more shot at
summer camp, only we were wiser, better drinkers, and
more sexually experienced.”
Tey got in trouble with the actual camp director,
Towana’s Mitch Reiter, who wasn’t prepared for set
antics at his family camp. Tey drank, lots, day in and
out, Jim Beam and Jack Daniel’s and beer from the
local Walmart. Rudd said, “Everyone stayed up late.
Everybody partied. Tere were no sticks in the mud.”
Poehler added, “Tere would just be a lot of guitar
circles, and people singing outside and getting really
wasted.” You know, like camp.
And like camp, it all culminated in a big dance where
everyone got a chance to make out a little. Tey hired a
DJ, Mr. Blue, who played ‘80s music as they all enjoyed
a rave on the campgrounds. Wain says of the party, “As
luck would have it, for that moment in time, it stopped
raining. It was this magical night, and we all went out
on the dock in the pitch black and hung out…Tere
were totally random hookups.” You know, like camp.
Te camaraderie created by the impossibly rainy
conditions, the close quarters and crummy food
and random hookups resulted in the single greatest
ensemble comedy of our generation. Each viewing
reveals new gags, new line deliveries that stand out as
genius, new dynamics between the now star-studded
cast. And in June, we learned that Netflix -- the very
thing that’s partially responsible for WET HOT
AMERICAN SUMMER’s cult status -- is in talks to
create a prequel with David Wain and the original cast.
Yes, a prequel -- the actors who were already a decade
too old to play their parts will now be two decades too
old, a sight gag that will probably be twice as funny
now. It’s enough to make you want to write the good
news in your gournal. 6
TABLE OF CONTENTS
BIRTH. MOVIES.DEATH. / APRIL 2014
GUARDIAN OF THE
GALAXY: James Gunn On
Making Marvel's Weirdest
Movie Yet
With GUARDIANS OF THE GALAXY, James Gunn
-- long a favorite filmmaker of the Drafthouse -- makes
the jump from smaller, weirder movies to a bigger, still
weird movie. Sure, it’s a Marvel Comics movie, but
GUARDIANS isn’t your standard superhero fare -- it’s
about five intergalactic criminals who team up to stop
a great evil from destroying the universe. Chris Pratt
stars as the human leader of the team, Peter Quill aka
Star-Lord, and his group includes Zoe Saldana as the
green-skinned assassin Gamora, wrestler Dave Bautista
as berserker Drax the Destroyer, Bradley Cooper doing
the voice of the weapon-toting Rocket Raccoon and Vin
Diesel as Groot, a sentient tree who is Rocket’s buddy
and helper. It’s weird, but what else do you expect from
the guy behind the body horror of SLITHER and the
twisted heroics of SUPER?
Q: What movies were your points of reference when you
were developing GUARDIANS OF THE GALAXY?
G: THE DIRTY DOZEN. I’m just very attracted to
guys of an amoral character who find something
inside themselves that is good, and that’s what’s
interesting about THE DIRTY DOZEN. I also find
characters with shades of grey more interesting than
characters who are just black and white, good and
bad. I think we have that with the Guardians -- at the
end of the day some of the characters are better than
others, and some are still a little insane and some
are amoral in different ways. Tey learn to like each
other at least.

Tere’s a visual thing with FANTASTIC VOYAGE
and FORBIDDEN PLANET. I wanted to bring
color back to space. Tat was the biggest thing
-- even before I went in to pitch myself to Marvel I
wrote this long document about what the visual look
of GUARDIANS would be, and I went through
exactly this mix of old pulp space operas mixed with
the grittiness of ALIEN. Te workaday aesthetic of
that. I wanted to create a movie that was uniquely
mine but at the same time pulled in a bunch of the
other traditions of space epics and put them together
in one film.

Q: When we talk about space epics you can go two ways.
You can be more realistic and worried about how the
space travel works or you can be like STAR WARS,
where they just show up with a hyperdrive and there’s
sound in space. Which way do you go here?
G: It’s one thousand percent space opera. I love hard
science fiction and I think there’s something
different at the center of those stories. Tis is much
more a fantasy film, and it’s much more with the
characters themselves. In a lot of ways we have more
in common with GAME OF THRONES as we do
with 2001.

Listen, we had a lot of things in there about how
space flight works. We had that in there, we had it
as part of the visuals, and then as time went on it
didn’t end up being the most interesting part of the
movie. Tere’s an uphill battle with GUARDIANS
to begin with because, unlike THE AVENGERS
where you come in knowing the characters, we
had to introduce all of our characters. We had to
introduce all of the Guardians plus our villains plus
[all of the supporting characters].
Q: Te modern take with these movies is to make them
more grounded. It seems like just about none of this
movie takes place on Earth. How much did Marvel
push you to keep it way out in deep space?
DEVIN FARACI
Badass Digest Editor in Chief
Read more at badassdigest.com
@devincf
TABLE OF CONTENTS
BIRTH. MOVIES.DEATH. / APRIL 2014
G: Marvel didn’t push me to do anything, ever. Tere
was a script there when I was onboard and it didn’t
work for me so I rewrote the whole thing and this
is where it ended up. [Marvel Studios President]
Kevin Feige just admitted he was scared shitless the
whole time I was rewriting, because who knew what
I would bring back. But they were happy, and I guess
relieved, when they saw we were all on the same basic
page as to what this movie should be. Tere were
tons of drafts and tons of work done on the script
until the time we started filming, and I would bet we
were the most finished script ever on a Marvel movie
before we went into production. Te five major
characters, their story is basically the same from
when I wrote that first draft of the script.
Q: You seem to have a growing team of people you
like to work with. Your friend Michael Rooker is
here as Yondu, and you have your brother Sean
standing in for Rocket Racoon and he plays
Kraglin, Rooker’s first mate. Did anyone join your
team after making this movie?
G: I will work with Chris Pratt as many times as he
lets me. Chris Pratt and I have become complete
brothers through this process. I’ve never directed
a movie where I’ve been on set for five months
before, so it makes sense, but I don’t think I’ve ever
worked as intimately with a performer as I did with
Chris. We have a great relationship and I think we
complement each other very well. I can go through
six or seven of the biggest laughs in the movie and
I can explain to you how it was a combination of
Chris and I coming up with those jokes. He’s the
only guy I’ve really allowed to improv on set because
he’s so good at it. And we have the same sense of
humor, so I was able to complete his improvs in a
way that I don’t think is normal.
Q: We’ve seen Zoe Saldana playing an assassin before,
but Gamora seems much more of a hardcore
character for her.
G: For Zoe I think it was about creating a character who
was a strong female character -- and I mean actually
physically strong, and able to kill. She’s an interesting
character, morally. Of all the Guardians she is the
most evil in one respect, in that she was raised by
Tanos, and she was raised from childhood and has
been trained to murder people. Tat’s what she does.
She kills people. At the same time she becomes the
moral guidance of the group because she’s the first
one who wants to get the fuck away from that.
Q: We’ve seen Zoe Saldana playing an assassin before,
but Gamora seems much more of a hardcore
character for her.
G: For Zoe I think it was about creating a character who
was a strong female character -- and I mean actually
physically strong, and able to kill. She’s an interesting
character, morally. Of all the Guardians she is the
most evil in one respect, in that she was raised by
Tanos, and she was raised from childhood and has
been trained to murder people. Tat’s what she does.
BIRTH. MOVIES.DEATH. / APRIL 2014
She kills people. At the same time she becomes the
moral guidance of the group because she’s the first one
who wants to get the fuck away from that.

Listen, Zoe has a lot of street in her, and so does
Gamora. Tat’s what she brings to that character. Zoe’s
got a lot of street! She’s a feisty character. When I first
talked to her on the phone I couldn’t believe how
fast she talked and how feisty she was, and I knew I
needed that energy for the role, but at the same time I
was like “Oh my god she’s going to be such a pain in
the ass!” And she IS a pain in the ass! Zoe is the only
one where I would get into a full-on argument on set
about stuff. Zoe and I are both able to do that in a
way where we’re not angry. We’re both so incredibly
passionate about what we do and because of that we get
on the same page. Tat feistiness, that heat -- she has
a thing where she can turn on a dime and get pissed
off, and that is completely part of Gamora’s character,
who is completely uncomfortable with any emotions
whatsoever. Any time she experiences any emotion
other than anger she transforms it, through alchemy,
into anger.
Q: Tell me about the tone of the film. Te initial clips
we saw leaned heavily on comedy, especially with the
use of the AM radio one hit wonders, but the newer
trailers have focused more on action. What is the
tone of GUARDIANS OF THE GALAXY?
G: I think it’s just a space adventure, which has a lot
of elements to it. Tere’s a hell of a lot of action in
it -- there’s a crazy amount of action. And there’s a
hell of a lot of comedy -- the characters are very, very
comedic. And there’s way more drama in the movie
than people are expecting. It’s a heartfelt movie on
my part, and there’s a lot of warmth to it. It’s all
those things.


One of the cool things with a big movie like this is
that you get a bit more freedom to explore more
aspects of what you like in cinema and create
something entertaining. For me it was trying to do
the inverse of what I did with SUPER, which was
a movie that had a bunch of tonal differences that
were purposefully juxtaposed against each other to
give people -- for lack of a better term! -- a creepy
feeling. To fuck with somebody, in an interesting
way, in a way I get off on. But I knew it was for a
very limited audience, and GUARDIANS is that
turned inside-out. It has different tones, and it plays
with all those tones, but it moves smoothly from
one to the next to create the most fun and moving
movie possible. Tere’s none of the weird cinematic
stuff that was in SUPER.
Q: Your previous films have that sensibility that can
be niche and edgy. When you’re making a PG-
13 blockbuster are you hyper-aware of where the
boundaries are, or is it easy to fit your sensibility into it?
G: You’ll tell me when you see the movie. Who the
fuck knows? Te movie is still edgy; there’s still dark
comedy. But when I tell a story I think about who
I’m telling that story to, and this is a story that’s
being told to many more people than SUPER is. To
my mind SUPER really worked in the way I wanted
it to work. SLITHER worked pretty well, and
though I love SLITHER as a movie, it was the first
time I directed a film. I think I was kind of learning
what that language was, and who I was speaking to.
I think GUARDIANS is a James Gunn film. People
who know my work will see me in there. Tere was
a real effort on my part to not push people away
when making the movie. I love David Lynch films,
but I didn’t want this to be a David Lynch film.
And there were times when you could make a turn
just a little too far to the left and it becomes weird.
I wanted to be as weird and wonderful and exciting
as possible without knocking people off balance. I
don’t want it to be something people feel freaked
out by or weirded out by. I want them to get off on
the novelty of it and get off on what’s cool about
it without it being so odd or weird or out there
that they can’t relate to the characters. A lot of that
comes from the characters themselves.

And frankly the music is another big part of it. To
have these pop songs in the movie is grounding,
because we’re familiar with them but at the same
time they’re strange because they’re not normally
seen against the backdrop of a dead planet with an
evil temple! 6
TABLE OF CONTENTS
BIRTH. MOVIES.DEATH. / APRIL 2014
Zoe Saldana:
Bringing The Streets
To Outer Space In
GUARDIANS OF
THE GALAXY
DEVIN FARACI
Badass Digest Editor in Chief
Read more at badassdigest.com
@devincf
BIRTH. MOVIES.DEATH. / APRIL 2014
Zoe Saldana’s first credited role was a small part in a
1999 episode of LAW & ORDER. Fifteen years later
she rules the world of geek blockbusters, being a part
of the ongoing AVATAR saga (films two through
four start shooting next year), the rebooted STAR
TREK series and now, with GUARDIANS OF THE
GALAXY, the Marvel Cinematic Universe. If she can
get a part in any of the upcoming STAR WARS movies
her dominance will be complete.
In GUARDIANS OF THE GALAXY she plays a
character very, very unlike her previous roles. Gamora
is a cold-blooded assassin, a green-skinned warrior who
was raised from childhood simply to murder. When
talking to director James Gunn for this issue (see the
interview on page 38) he revealed the secret to why he
cast Saldana: she seemed like a big pain in the ass. So I
had to ask her about that.
Q: I was talking to James Gunn and he told me about
the first time he talked to you on the phone and he
thought, from that conversation, that you would be
a big pain in the ass. He said that he wanted exactly
that energy for Gamora. Can you talk about your
working relationship with James?
S: My working relationship with James is actually really
great. He’s tough, he’s very determined, he’s very
passionate, he knows what he wants. Tat gives you,
as an actor, a sense of security you sometimes don’t
find in other filmmakers. Sometimes it’s good to have
a platform from which you can jump, and James
provides that without making you feel limited, by
giving you the room to add things.

It’s funny -- when I got off the phone with James, I
didn’t think he was going to be a pain in the ass but
I certainly thought he was going to be someone who
would fight for what he believes. Tat’s the way I like
to work and the way I like to live my life. I like to be
around people who are very passionate. People that
won’t fight but that will be very over-protective and
outspoken about their opinion, their point of view,
their ideas. Tat’s who James Gunn is and that’s who
I am too. Our debates were sometimes intense, but
they were always with so much love because in the
end of the day it was never personal. It was always
for the sake of trying to do a better job for Gamora,
for the movie, for the moment.
Q: He said there was a similarity you have with Gamora
-- that you both have a lot of street in you. Can you
talk about how you see this character?
S: If I ask you to play a badass for me you’re going to
bring whatever your background’s idea of a badass is.
I’m from Queens, New York, I partially grew up in
the Caribbean, there’s a little urban in me! I kind of
thought I wanted to make her fighting very stealth, I
always thought she was a fencer because the sword was
her weapon of choice. She’s very primal, she chooses
to fight with her hands and with knives as opposed
to rapid weapons that don’t give you any physical
contact. She has to have a level of street in her to make
all these choices she’s made in her life.
Q: We talk a lot these days about women in film and
strong female characters. Do you consider Gamora to
be a strong character beyond her physical strength?
S: I think her strength comes from wanting to protect
herself, from keeping her guard up. She was very
abused, she was taken from her planet, she was
forced into a life of violence and treachery and at the
end of the day that wouldn’t have been the route she
would have taken had she had the right to choose.
Tere’s a vulnerability about Gamora that makes
her strong, in my eyes. She has a sense of justice
because she’s seen so many wrong things being
done to creatures all around the galaxy and on her
own planet and she just wants it over. She’s willing
to die to not have to fight anymore. I saw that as a
vulnerability that made her very fragile to me.
Q: What is the role Gamora has on this team?
S: She’s sort of the one who has common sense. Rocket
comes off to her like this mad scientist, like he’s
just out of his mind. Quill is a thief, so therefore he
cannot be trusted -- he’s a liar and a womanizer. Drax
is a man with a lot of baggage! I think she questions
his level of intelligence. Ten she has Groot, and
I think Groot is the only creature where she goes,
‘You’re all right. You get it.’ She’s with these guys
and they’re all stuck in their own minds and feeling
sorry for themselves and being selfish and she’s going,
‘Don’t think about yourselves, think about what
you’re doing to others.’ She’s the voice of reason.
Q: You occupy an interesting space in the nerd world,
in that you’re now involved in three major geek
franchises. You have AVATAR, you have STAR
TREK and now you’re in the Marvel Cinematic
Universe. What is it about these scifi movies that
attracts you?
S: A compilation of things. I get to work with amazing
filmmakers who are visionaries. Tey give themselves
the right to imagine the unimaginable. I’m the kind
of person that, even if I wasn’t in this business, and I
was at a BBQ and someone like James Cameron and
Steven Spielberg and JJ Abrams was at that BBQ
-- and they weren’t filmmakers -- we’d still end up
talking. I’d be in that group. I’d gravitate towards
TABLE OF CONTENTS
BIRTH. MOVIES.DEATH. / APRIL 2014
those people more -- they’re such interesting creatures
to me! You find a way to work with people you have
more in common with.

I like being in space because there are better parts
for women in space. I don’t have to subject myself to
just being the love interest or playing a character that
doesn’t feel relevant to the story or playing a woman
that doesn’t feel like an actual depiction of a real
woman. When I read films in space and I’m working
with these kinds of filmmakers there’s a neutral sense
to the way they develop characters. It makes me feel
very significant, very relevant and very excited.
Q: Te franchise model requires you to sign on for
multiple pictures, and you’re on multiple series with
multiple picture commitments. Is it hard for you to
look at these commitments and realize at some point
you may have to turn down an interesting smaller role
because you’re locked into AVATAR 3 years in advance?
S: I hope not. If there is a great role I hope they’ll wait
until I finish AVATAR 3! I like the opportunity being
a part of these films has provided for my career in
other genres. Te notoriety that I’ve gotten by being
part of these films that are liked by so many people
around the world allows me, on the off-time from
these films, to do great characters or to be part of
great projects that are small but just as special. I’m
able to also keep working with great filmmakers and
actors and crew people. 6
TABLE OF CONTENTS
BIRTH. MOVIES.DEATH. / APRIL 2014
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CHOOSE YOUR
BEACH
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BETTER
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Drinking plenty of clean,
healthy, filtered water is the
best thing you can do for
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✔ Reusable BPA-free glass bottles
✔ Optimal hydration with
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✔ Filters out tap water chemicals
BETTER
FOR THE
PLANET
Plastic bottle waste is
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BETTER
FOR THE
PLANET
Plastic bottle waste is
choking our planet.
Bottle your own and stop
the growth of this global
trash epidemic.
BETTER
FOR YOU
Drinking plenty of clean,
healthy, filtered water is the
best thing you can do for
your body of water.
CHOOSE AQUASANA:
✔ High performance filtration
✔ Reusable BPA-free glass bottles
✔ Optimal hydration with
healthy minerals
✔ Filters out tap water chemicals
AQS_Choose_ad.indd 1 4/1/14 4:25:12 PM
BIRTH. MOVIES.DEATH. / APRIL 2014
BIRTH. MOVIES.DEATH. / APRIL 2014
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Annette Patterson, REALTOR
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BIRTH. MOVIES.DEATH. / APRIL 2014

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