Thursday, July 17, 2014

Vol. 130, No. 2
Faith MajorsCulp is rarely
seen without
a smile while
competing in
4-H shooting
sports. She
is pictured
behind a bow
after a prefair indoor
archery round
June 28 at
the Stoughton
Conservation
Club.
Photo by
Samantha
Christian

Focused on fun
Mighty Mite fires off shells
and smiles during fair
Samantha Christian
Unified Newspaper Group

On the Web

“Don’t Be Hatin’
Thousands of
Because I Shoot Like A
youth projects
Girl,” is printed in bold
letters on the neon yellow
will be on display
shirt worn by Faith Majorsduring the Dane
Culp. The 14-year-old steps
to the line in her pink shoes,
County Fair.
hair tie and ear protectors,
For a schedule
yells “pull” and fires off
five rounds with her shotof events, visit
gun at the Stoughton Condanecountyfair.
servation Club.
com.
Majors-Culp was not
intimidated by the boys
next to her while shooting trap, one of eight classes she
entered for the Dane County Fair last month. The other
events included outdoor 3D archery, indoor archery,
muzzleloader, .22 pistol, air pistol, .22 rifle and air
rifle.
Although the fair officially kicked off Wednesday
and runs through Sunday at the Alliant Energy Center,
some competitions were held early. Nearly 130 youths,
from third-graders to recent high school graduates participated in shooting sports this year, but not many tallied up the number of events Majors-Culp did.
In fact, she would have competed in all nine, but does
not yet qualify for skeet because of her age and inexperience in trap. She intends to add it to the list in two
years.
A five-year member of the Brooklyn Mighty Mites
4-H Club, Majors-Culp has quickly progressed in the
sport, adding events each year. This year was her first
time shooting shotgun trap and .22 pistol. She even
took reserved champion
in air rifle.
But Majors-Culp isn’t
focused on the score; she
What: Dane County Fair
just wants to learn and
When: July 16-20
have fun. Her positive
Where: Alliant Energy
attitude was especially
Center, Madison
present during the last
Info: 224-0500
Turn to Fair/Page 7

If you go

Oregon, WI

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112 Janesville Street, Oregon, WI 53575
Phone: 835-8276 • Fax: 835-8277
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Oregon Observer
The

Rooted
in
a
Cause
Arborist group cleans up tornado damage for veteran
Samantha Christian
Unified Newspaper Group

Stan Gefke sat in awe on
a bench outside of his front
door Saturday, but it wasn’t
because of the destruction
the EF1 tornado left in his
yard the night of June 29.
He was grateful to witness about a dozen expert
volunteers joining together
to tackle a cumbersome
project with ease.
An arborist network had
showed up that morning at
his home perched on a hill
on Schneider Drive to help
remove the numerous oak,
cherry and box elder trees
on his Town of Dunn property that fell or were damaged during the storm.
“I was home (and) just
had gone to bed … I heard
it storm, and then I turned
on the television in my bedroom in the morning and
they said Schneider Drive
had been hit by a tornado,”
Gefke said. “I thought, I
better get up and see where
that is. I (came) down and
open(ed) up my garage
door and I couldn’t get out
– a big oak tree was lying
right across.”
While his home sustained
only minor structural damage, including a ripped
screen and broken gutter and railing, the trees –
some more than 100 years
old – took the brunt of the
storm. This wasn’t the first
time his property had been
hit, either - nine years ago
it was in the path of the

Photo by Samantha Christian

Stan Gefke, an 89-year-old WWII veteran, stands on his property along Schneider Drive in the Town of
Dunn on Saturday to watch a dozen volunteers clean up the trees that were damaged from the June 29
tornado.

deadly F3 tornado that
ripped through the area on
the way to Stoughton, taking some of his oak trees
with it.
The lifelong Oregon
resident has experienced
many obstacles in his 89
years, so a few downed
trees weren’t going to keep
him from flashing smiles
while he intently watched
the cleanup efforts unfold

this weekend – especially
when the chipper noisily
yet effortlessly swallowed
thick brush and tree limbs.
No stranger to scenes of
destruction, Gefke served
as an Army infantryman
during World War II, surviving the largest and
bloodiest battle the United
States was involved in,
the Battle of the Bulge.
A recipient of two Purple

Oregon School District

Referendum talk heats up
Board considering
fall ballot question
Scott De Laruelle
Unified Newspaper Group

More than two years after
voters rejected a pair of
Oregon School District referendum questions, district
officials are continuing to
gather information about a
potential Nov. 4 referendum that’s looking more
and more likely.
Board
members

announced at Monday’s
meeting that they have
scheduled a pair of special
meetings later this summer to talk about a possible
referendum – 5:30 p.m.
Wednesday, July 23 and
6:30 p.m. Tuesday, Aug.
19. After the clear defeat of
the last referenda, district
officials have made slow,
but steady steps in recent
months to bring the possibility of a new one to the
forefront.
In February 2012, voters said “no” to a pair of

questions: one that would
have allowed the district to
borrow up to $33 million to
add or renovate parts of the
high school, middle school
and athletic fields south of
the high school, and another to have the authority to
exceed revenue caps by
$150,000 a year to operate
the new high school facilities. The first measure was
defeated 58 percent to 42
percent; the second, 56-44.
Some public feedback
suggested voters didn’t
know enough about what

Hearts, he spent 16 months
in and out of European and
American hospitals.
“I got shot up a little bit,
that’s why I can’t stand up
too long,” he said, pointing to his hip, knee, back
and shoulder, where he was
injured by shrapnel. “They
wanted to take it (my leg)
off, but I said, ‘Naw, I’ll
keep it.’”

Turn to Trees/Page 8

If you go
What: Oregon School
Board special meetings on
possible referendum
When: 5:30 p.m.
Wednesday, July 23; 6:30
p.m. Tuesday, Aug. 19
Where: District
offices, 123 E. Grove
St. and Rome Corners
Intermediate School, 1111
S. Perry Pkwy
Info: 835-4000
the district was asking for
and why. In a survey of
residents later that year,
nearly 1,400 said they

Turn to School/Page 13

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2

July 17, 2014

Oregon Observer

ConnectOregonWI.com

Photos by Scott Girard

Zoo to you
An audience member pets the blue-tongued skink. Unfortunately, the
skink did not show off its colorful tongue while it was out of its cage.

The Henry Vilas Zoo sent some animal ambassadors and their animals to the Oregon Senior Center July 11. The program’s attendees
had a chance to pet many of the animals, including a lizard and a ferret, and learn about the animals from the ambassadors.
Above, Valentina Rizzo, 7, of Woodbury, Minn., pets a black-footed ferret, an animal that the animal ambassadors said can be a pet,
but often gets into sticky situations like climbing inside a Lazyboy chair. Rizzo and her brother Antonio, 11, were visiting their grandmother at the senior center.

Vera Hanson adjusts her glasses to get a better look at the horned frog, nicknamed the “PacMan Frog”
because it eats everything in its way, the ambassadors said.

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An umbrella cockatoo flaps its wings as an animal ambassador shows it to the crowd at the senior
center. The cockatoo sang and said “hello” to the delight of the crowd a few times while it was out of
its cage.

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July 17, 2014

3

Oregon Observer

Village of Oregon

Town of Rutland

Commission approves bank changes

County committee backs
town’s veto of radio tower

Mark Ignatowski
Unified Newspaper Group

Seth Jovaag

The Village of Oregon
Planning Commission
made quick work of a few
small items on this month’s
agenda at their monthly
meeting last week.
The commission
approved facade improvements to Oregon Community Bank, additional
outdoor storage at Trachte
and gave the go-ahead to
several other minor items.
Village of Oregon
Rendering courtesy Keller, Inc.
administrator Mike Gracz A new tower feature will welcome customers to Oregon Community Bank and Trust on Main Street.
said there were no major Interior remodeling is also planned. The building will be closed during remodeling, but customers
issues with any of the can still access services from the Alpine location.
agenda items.
Oregon Community
Bank will get a new look –
both inside and out – after
some facade improvements
were approved by the commission.
The bank will have a
small tower feature for the
entrance on Main Street
and new roofing. Other
interior improvements are
planned, as well as some
minor exterior changes.
The bank will have new
walls, ceilings cabinetry,

flooring, a teller line and
customer service areas.
The remodeling project
will begin on Aug. 1 and
is targeted for completion
prior to year end, according to a news release from
the company.
“Due to the size of the
remodeling project, and
for the safety of bank staff
and clients, the Main Street
office will be temporarily
closed during remodeling,”
the company said. “All
bank staff will be relocated

to the Alpine Branch of
the bank (located at 101 S.
Alpine Parkway) to better
serve clients at that location during the renovation.”

Trachte storage
The commission gave
their go-ahead to Trachte
to lease about four acres
from Lycon near Braun
Road to allow for outdoor
storage of their prefabricated steel buildings.
About 1.5 acres will be

A Tomah company’s yearslong quest to erect a 486-foot
radio tower in Rutland hit
another roadblock last week.
Backing a June 12 vote by
Town of Rutland officials,
members of the Dane County
Zoning and Land Regulation committee last Tuesday
voted unanimously not to
rezone a 15.5-acre parcel near
Old Stage Road, where Magnum Communications wants
to build the tower to service
Stoughton’s first FM station.
Before the vote, an attorney
for Magnum said the town
and county were ignoring a
2013 change in state law that
prohibits municipalities from
rejecting broadcast towers
unless they would harm public health and safety.
Last week’s vote comes
almost three years after the
town and county committee took identical stances. In
both cases, town leaders felt
the tower wouldn’t conform
with state and county rules
designed to preserve farmland, and county officials followed suit, saying they were
bound by state law to follow
the town’s lead.
Magnum last year unsuccessfully sued in Dane County Circuit Court to overturn
the town and county’s earlier rejection. At last week’s
meeting, attorney William
White said another legal fight
could be coming.
“The next step is, you
know, here we go again, and
it’s not really in anybody’s
interest to do that,” he said.
ZLR committee members
sided with the county’s attorney, David Gault, who said in

used for outdoor storage of
finished products. The outdoor storage is necessary,
village documents show,
because “there can be a
period of time before our
customers take delivery of
the building. It is during
this period we need to pull
the building outside and
store it until shipping can
be arranged.”
The conditional use permit required to allow this
will head to Oregon Village Board for discussion.

Election 2014

State reps, senators vie for
local votes in partisan primary
Mark Ignatowski
Unified Newspaper Group

Perhaps you’ve heard
there’s a gubernatorial seat
up for grabs in about four
months.
While that statewide
race will draw many of the
headlines leading up to the
November election, local
seats for the state assembly
and senate are also being
contested.
Voters will be able to
cast ballots Aug. 12 during the partisan primary
election to see who will
be on the final ballot come
November.
Oregon area voters will be
able to cast votes for Assembly District 43 and Senate
District 15.
Half of the Village of Oregon lies in A.D. 43, along
with the towns of Dunkirk
and Rutland. Republicans
Herschel Brodkey and Leon
L. Hebert are vying for a
spot on the November ballot
against democrat incumbent
Andy Jorgensen.
Brodkey, of Janesville, is
a 19-year-old University of
Wisconsin-Madison student.
Hebert, 76, is a Fort Atkinson farmer and former airline pilot.
There will also be a democratic primary for Senate
District 15 - an area that
covers part of the Village
of Oregon, as well as part
of the Town of Dunkirk and
all of the Town of Rutland.
Three democrats are seeking the seat vacated by Tim

Cullen.
Challengers include Janis
Ringhand, Mike Sheridan
and Austin Scieszinski.
When: Tuesday, Aug. 12
Ringhand, of Evansville, is a
Info: gab.wi.us
member of the state assemWho’s on the ballot:
bly. Sheridan, of Janesville,
• Assembly District 43: Herschel Brodkey and Leon L.
is a former state speaker of
Hebert
the house but was defeated
in 2010. Scieszinski, of
• Senate District 15: Janis Ringhand, Mike Sheridan
Janesville, is a project manand Austin Scieszinski.
ager with a real estate firm
and former aide and campaign manager for Cullen.
democratic and republican to the state’s Government
primary for state treasurer. Accountability Board.
Statewide races
“A voter may indicate
a party preference on the
The biggest statewide Dane County races
race this fall will be for
Dane County voters can ballot which ensures that
governor. Incumbent Scott cast a vote for democratic votes for candidates of
Walker will face a chal- candidates for Dane Coun- that party will be counted
lenge from one of two ty sheriff. Incumbent Dave in the event candidates
democrats facing off in the Mahoney will face a chal- from another party were
August primary.
lenge from former sheriff’s inadvertently selected,”
Mary Burke and Brett deputy N. Peter Endres, of the agency said in a news
release.
Hulsey will be on the Waunakee.
Polls will be open from 7
August ballot.
Wisconsin has an open
Burke is a former Trek p r i m a r y w h e r e v o t e r s a.m. until 8 p.m. Tuesday,
Bicycles executive and can cast a ballot without Aug. 12.
For more information,
was secretary of commerce declaring affiliation with
under Gov. Jim Doyle. a political party. How- sample ballots and answers
Hulsey is a member of the ever, primary voters may to common election quesstate assembly.
only vote for candidates tions, visit gab.wi.us
Racine democrat John of one party, according
Lehman and Madisonian
Mary Jo Walters will vie
for a spot to challenge
incumbent lieutenant governor Rebecca Kleefisch.
Three democrats are
vying to run this fall for
the state attorney general:
Susan V. Happ, of Jefferson,
Dane County district attorney Ismael Ozanne and Jon
Richards of Milwaukee.
Julian Bradley of
Lacrosse will face Gary
Beis of Sister Bay in the
primary for secretary of
state.
There will be a

Partisan primary 2014

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a July 1 memo that the 2013
law change doesn’t trump
existing statutes governing
farmland preservation.
The land in question –
owned by long-time local
farmers and siblings David
Soldwedel and Sue Wollin -is zoned exclusively for agriculture.
Opponents have claimed
the tower would harm nearby
property values and the rural
landscape, while proponents
say it could help improve
emergency communications
and allow broadcasts of local
high school sporting events.
Dist. 31 supervisor Jerry
Bollig, who represents Oregon on the county board, said
he was “uncomfortable” voting against the tower but felt
he had “no choice,” given the
advice of the county’s attorneys.
The committee’s recommendation heads Thursday to
the full county board.
During and after last
week’s meeting, Dist. 1
supervisor Mary Kolar said
last year’s revision to state
law troubled her.
“It still comes back to, in
America’s dairy land, we
have legislation that’s very
young, that’s saying radio frequency towers trump agriculture,” she said.
Committee chair Patrick
Miles, the Dist. 34 supervisor from McFarland, also
found White’s interpretation
of the new legislation “very
concerning” because it would
mean municipalities have no
say over where towers should
be located.
“I have a hard time believing that was the intent of the
legislative change,” Miles
said.

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Bank improvements

Observer correspondent

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4

July 17, 2014

Opinion

Oregon Observer

ConnectOregonWI.com

Letters to the editor

Interim chief warns of crime wave
In the past couple of weeks, the
village has experienced a rash of
thefts and burglaries.
The overwhelming majority of
these have occurred from unsecured vehicles, garages and in a
few cases residences. Items taken
included cash, tools, electronics,
jewelry and pretty much anything
and everything that might have
value.
The Oregon Police Department
has evidence indicating that those
responsible for many of these
crimes are heroin and/or other
drug abusers.
We want to let the community
know that we believe we know
who is responsible and that we
are actively working to obtain the
necessary evidence to tie them to
these crimes.
In the meantime, residents
should keep their homes (including garages) and vehicles secured
at all times. While many of these
crimes have occurred during hours
of darkness, when a drug abuser
is desperate, the time of day and

level of activity around them will
not be a deterrent to them taking
advantage of whatever opportunity you present them with. Crimes
of opportunity are the easiest to
prevent. You simply take away
the opportunity by keeping your
valuables locked up and out of
sight.
Please keep your outside house
lights on at night as this is a proven cheap and effective deterrent to
residential thefts. Report in-progress suspicious behavior to 9-1-1
and look out for your neighbors.
Crime prevention is a community
effort.
If you know someone who is a
drug abuser, get help for them or
let us know. We will not allow
drug abusers to continue to victimize our residents.
Call 835-3111 if you have information regarding these or any other crimes.
Dale Burke
Interim Chief of Police
Village of Oregon

Submit a letter
The Oregon Observer encourages citizens to engage in discussion
through letters to the editor. We take submissions online, on email and
by hard copy. All letters should be signed and include addresses and
phone numbers for verification. Anonymous letters will not be printed.
Special rules apply during election season or other times of high letter volume, and the editorial staff reserves the right not to print any
letter, including those with libelous or obscene content. We can accept
multiple submissions from local authors, but other letters will take priority over submissions from recently printed authors. Please keep submissions under 400 words.
Deadline is noon Monday the week of publication. For questions
on our editorial policy, call editor Jim Ferolie at 845-9559 or email
ungeditor@wcinet.com.

Corrections

Community Voices

Better access needed,
not bigger highways
E

very family that lives
The Oregon Observer does not sweep errors under the rug. If you see
within a budget knows
something you know or even think is in error, please contact editor Jim
there are big differences
Ferolie at 845-9559 or at ungeditor@wcinet.com so we can get it right. between needs and wants.
But not the Wisconsin Department of Transportation (WisDOT) – or the many champions
of big transportation spending
inside public office and out.
Thursday, July 17, 2014 • Vol. 130, No. 2
They insist
everything
USPS No. 411-300
is a “need”
Periodical Postage Paid, Oregon, WI and additional offices.
– especially
Published weekly on Thursday by the Unified Newspaper Group,
A Division of Woodward Communications, Inc.
if it involves
POSTMASTER: Send Address Corrections to
shoveling lots
The Oregon Observer, PO Box 930427, Verona, WI 53593.
of money into
freeway megaOffice Location: 125 N. Main Street, Oregon, WI 53575
projects … and
Phone: 608-835-6677 • FAX: 608-835-0130
steering lots of
Noeldner
e-mail: oregonobserver@wcinet.com
pork to their
ConnectOregonWI.com
political base.
With gas tax revenues falling
This newspaper is printed on recycled paper.
and federal transportation funding programs facing another
General Manager
News
shutdown, WisDOT and its
David J. Enstad
Jim Ferolie
roadbuilding allies seem more
david.enstad@wcinet.com
ungeditor@wcinet.com
determined than ever to squeeze
Advertising
Sports
taxpayers for the same old busiRob Kitson
Jeremy Jones
ness-as-usual – hence their recent
oregonsales@wcinet.com
ungsportseditor@wcinet.com
“Transportation Moves Wisconsin” campaign.
Classifieds
Website
You can read about the camKathy Woods
Scott Girard
paign at dot.wisconsin.gov/about/
ungclassified@wcinet.com
ungreporter@wcinet.com
tmw/townhall.htm, but the gist is
Circulation
Reporters
the department held nine meetCarolyn Schultz
Samantha Christian, Bill Livick,
ings around the state, drawing
ungcirculation@wcinet.com
Anthony Iozzo, Mark Ignatowski,
about 600 people to look at pretty
Scott De Laruelle
pictures of their highway expansion plans.
Unified Newspaper Group, a division of
What WisDOT really needs
Woodward Communications,Inc.
to do is educate a grossly misinA dynamic, employee-owned media company
formed public.
Good People. Real Solutions. Shared Results.
Contrary to popular myth, our
Printed by Woodward Printing Services — Platteville
fuel taxes and other user fees
don’t begin to cover the costs of
maintaining our existing inventoNATIONAL NEWSPAPER
ry of highways, roads and streets
– especially at the local level.
ASSOCIATION
That means citizens who drive
SUBSCRIPTION RATES
little – or don’t drive at all –
are forced to heavily subsidize
One Year in Dane Co. & Rock Co. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $37
freight haulers and motorists who
$
One Year Elsewhere . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45
drive a lot.
And funding shortfalls will
Oregon Observer
only worsen. Reductions in
Stoughton Courier Hub • Verona Press

driving, booming demand for
urban living, a rapidly aging
rural/upstate population and
higher fuel efficiency all foretell
a profoundly different future. The
very mission of WisDOT merits
rethinking from the ground up.
But turning this Titanic will
not be easy. Consider where
we’ve been.
Starting with the Interstate
highway program 60-odd years
ago, the federal government has
poured hundreds of billions into
the construction of new highways.
With Uncle Sam providing
most of the funding, states and
local governments saw these new
highways as essentially “free.”
Why worry about maintenance
costs 25 or 50 years down the
road?
Construction contractors loved
it. So did auto manufacturers and
oil companies. Soon, land speculators, real estate developers,
homebuilders and franchisees of
every stripe learned how to leverage these “free” new highways
(plus dirt-cheap rural land nearby) into housing tracts, country
estates and shopping centers.
And thus did our nation build
the most extravagant network of
public thoroughfares in history
– most of it designed to make
life as convenient as possible for
persons (corporate and corporeal)
who wish to frequently move
large amounts of private property over long distances at high
speeds.
The results were entirely
predictable: Offer highway
infrastructure far below costs
and demand from motorists and
freight haulers skyrocketed.
Meanwhile freight rail, passenger
rail, intercity bus and municipal
transit services – none of which
enjoyed the lavish subsidies
for motorists and truckers – all
crashed.
Having ignored maintenance

costs from Day 1, our Departments of Transportation compounded matters by failing to
connect costs with demands as
demands soared. Wisconsin drivers who congest roadways at
peak hours still don’t pay a cent
more than those who drive at
midnight.
And 18-wheelers have never
been charged nearly enough for
all the pavement they pound into
dust.
The bills are coming due with a
vengeance. Wisconsin must consider whether it’s ready to steer
by looking ahead – or to continue
to gaze into the rear-view mirror.
Before rushing to find more
money, we need to ask a fundamental question: What is the
point of “mobility” anyway?
Obviously roadbuilders, automobile manufacturers and all
the other stakeholders in “Happy
Motoring” depend on massive
public and private spending right
now to make profits and pay
workers. But dumping billions
into “make-work” highway projects isn’t something Wisconsin
taxpayers can afford anymore.
Mobility might be the point for
joyriders and sightseers, but for
most citizens it is a means to an
end: access.
We need access to jobs, goods
and services, education, civic and
religious engagement, health care
and so on. And the more that we
can access these things by walking, rolling wheelchairs, pushing
baby strollers, riding bicycles,
climbing stairs, using elevators
and sharing transit, the less budget-breaking highway infrastructure we’ll need.
So rather than the DOT, how
about a Department of Access
instead?
Hans Noeldner is a Village of
Oregon resident and a member
of Sierra Club Wisconsin’s Clean
Transportation Committee.

ConnectOregonWI.com

July 17, 2014

Fun can be
a mess

Dane County

Financial
outlook
improves

Saturday 11am Snowmoble Grass Drags

Richland Center, WI - Fairgrounds
12 and under Free • $25 3 Day Passes
$5 Admission Thursday • $15 Admission Friday and Saturday
Kids Pedal Pull * Semi Truck Show * Lucas Oil Classes
Best Pulling Trucks & Tractors * Mini Rods * Parade

www.hybridredneck.com / 608-604-5068
Semi Truck Show 608-574-2115

adno=361588-01

At left, Michael Schliem,
10, looks on as the slime
stretches down from one
hand to the other.
Below, Reid Laufman, 13,
spreads “blood” on his face
and arms to play zombie
while Valentina Rizzo, 7, of
Woodbury, Minn., reacts.
The mixture included water,
chocolate syrup, corn starch
and red food coloring.

Special Sale Pricing

Friday, July 25 • 1-6 p.m.
Saturday & Sunday, July 26 & 27 • 10 a.m.-5 p.m.

Photos by Scott Girard

HUNDREDS OF VARIETIES

George & Doris Bacon

4600 Rome Corners Rd., Brooklyn, WI 53521

(608) 334-4594

www.breezewayiris.com

adno=361777-01

MINIATURE TO TALL BEARDED

An Anniversary & Retirement Celebration
will be held on Saturday, July 19th,
at the Oregon Senior Center from 12-4 p.m.
219 Park Street, Oregon

Town of Dunn

Upon further review

Complaint prompts Bielema’s house re-assessment
Scott De Laruelle
Unified Newspaper Group

Former UW football
coach Bret Bielema may
have moved on long ago
for the supposedly greener
pastures of Arkansas, but
his unsold house in the
Town of Dunn is still making local headlines.
Prompted by a neighbor’s complaint about a
low assessment earlier this
year, the town’s board of
review re-set the house’s
value last Tuesday, a move
that will raise the taxes for
the coach who left Madison amongst some controversy in December 2012.
Town of Dunn clerk
Cathy Hasslinger said
the initial assessment of

$809,000 did not include
more than 2,000 square
feet of finished space on
the lower level. Town
assessor Dean Peters recommended the assessment
be adjusted to $1,338,000,
and the board of review
voted unanimously to take
his advice.
“The house was completed before January 1,
2014 and a full assessment should have been
made, but the assessor had
the home listed as not yet
complete,” Hasslinger said.
“He recommended correcting the error by increasing
the value.”
The Bielemas, who never
lived in the house, did not
attend the meeting and did
not send a representative,

Submit photos from Dane County Fair
The Courier Hub is looking for submitted photographs from the Dane County Fair
of area youths’ participation. If you have a
camera, bring it along and snap a few photos.
We’re looking for mostly individuals with
their animals or projects, whether youth are
showing them, getting them ready or turning
them in.
We will run these photos in our annual
Dane County Fair section in the July 31 edition.
Posed and non-posed photos are OK,
however, we like “action shots” whenever

possible. Group photos are also good, too.
Please include a brief description of what’s
happening in the photo, the first and last
name of the youth in the photo, and what
organization they are from.
Please submit photos by July 25 via email
to: communityreporter@wcinet.com.
Please note that larger photo file sizes
(more than 1000K) for the photos are better
for print quality.
If you have any questions, please don’t
hesitate to ask Samantha Christian at 8459559 ext. 249.

and aside from a member
of the media, no other residents attended. Hasslinger
said the Bielemas have the
right to appeal the decision, but said town officials do not expect it.
According to a recent
Channel 3000.com report,
Bielema is asking nearly $2.2 million for the
6,600-square-foot home,
located on Waubesa Avenue, overlooking the lake.

Cletus & Charlene (Haas) McCartney
were married May 9th, 1964 at Bethel
Lutheran Church-Madison.
They have 3 children
Donald (Sherry), Donna Hall
and Denise (Greg) Fink
7 grandchildren &
4 great grandchildren!
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DANE COUNTY FAIR
Extreme July 16-20, 2014
MAKEOVER

FAIR EDITION

Alliant Energy Center

• Thrilling Midway
• Tasty Food
als
• Hundreds of Anim
• Cool Shopping

Daily entertainment, main stage concerts & parking are included with general admission.

DANECOUNTYFAIR.COM

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Bond ratings might not
sound too exciting, but Dane
County’s top administrator said some recent changes
have provided welcome good
news on the county’s financial health.
According to a press
release Monday from Dane
County, both of the county’s bond-rating agencies
– Moody’s Investments and
Fitch Ratings – praised its
restored reserve fund, with
Moody’s removing the “negative outlook” label put on the
county’s bond rating in 2011,
upgrading it to “stable.”
Dane County Executive
Joe Parisi said the move is a
“significant financial milestone” and recognizes the
work done to rebuild the
county’s fiscal foundation.
“It is good to receive positive feedback for sound fiscal management,” he said.
“But more importantly, this is
good news for our taxpayers
because capital projects will
cost less due to a better borrowing rate.”
Fitch Ratings also revised
the county’s fiscal outlook
to stable, adding, “financial
management is strong and has
improved with more conservative budgeting and recent
implementation of multi-year
forecasting … the county has
restored structural balance
and demonstrated an ability
to maintain adequate financial flexibility despite a 2010
state law that limits growth in
property tax revenue.”
Moody’s awarded the
county with an Aa1 rating,
citing a “stable and strong
local economy, the General
Fund reserve and limited
fixed obligations.”
According to county officials, Dane County’s general
reserve fund has gone from
a negative balance during
the recession to its current
$20.9 million. Parisi said as
the 2015 budget process soon
begins in earnest, there are
reasons for “cautious optimism” about the county’s
financial situation.
“Making tough decisions
together in recent years now
means important work like
cleaning up our lakes and
rebuilding our roads can be
done at a lower cost in Dane
County,” he said.

5

Thursday July 24 6:30pm
Friday July 25 6:30pm
Saturday July 26 6:30pm

Kids got a chance to get a
little messy Friday afternoon
at the Oregon Public Library
with “Gross Stuff” at the
monthly Fuss With Stuff
event. The kids played with
slime, “blood” and “bird
poop,” all made with household ingredients.

Bond rating moved
from ‘negative’ to
‘stable’

Oregon Observer

6

Oregon Observer

July 17, 2014

ConnectOregonWI.com

Coming up

Churches

Got World Cup fever?

John Duggleby’s
Want to play some soc- Kitchen Band

cer? Come out to Fields
6 and 13 to play soccer
Wednesday evenings from
6:30-8:30 p.m. throughout the summer. No skill
is required. You just need
shin guards and appropriate shoes. There will be a
women’s and co-ed team.

Pump House
participation
People can become part
of the history of the new
Oregon Pump House Welcome Center. A new paved
walkway is being designed
that leads up to the front
door on the new Welcome
Center.
Two sizes are available
for purchase – an 8-inch by
8-inch size that can have up
to four lines of engraved
text for $150 (12 characters
per line), and an 8-inch by
16-inch size that can have
up to four lines of engraved
text for $275 (20 characters
per line).
For more information,
call Randy Glysch at (608)
291-0648 or visit oregonwatertower.com.

National Night Out
Join us in celebrating
Oregon’s 19th National
Night Out from 5-8 p.m. on
Tuesday, August 5, on the
100 block of Spring St.
There will be different
booths for area organizations/businesses, emergency vehicles available for
viewing along with personnel, games, free food and
demonstrations. If you or
your organization is interested in having a booth,
contact officer Cindy Neubert at 835-3111 or cneubert@vil.oregon.wi.us.

John Duggleby has
brought music and drumming many times to the
Oregon Senior Center,
and his “Beat Generation”
kitchen band raids the pantry for pots, pans, homemade shakers and other
“found” instruments to
cook a free-wheeling stew
of familiar songs.
As zookeeper for this
musical menagerie, he
simultaneously plays
tricked-out kazoos and
washboards and brings
along a genuine washtub Oregon Kids Triathlon
bass for someone to join the
The Oregon Community
reverie. The event is schedule for 10:45 a.m., Friday, Swim Club’s 9th Annual
Oregon Kids Triathlon
July 25, at the center.
will be held on Saturday,
Aug. 9. There will be a
Pantry pickup
Oregon-Brooklyn Food pool swim, in-village bike
Pantry has pickup coming course and an on-trail run
up Thursday, July 31. Resi- course for six age groups
dents in the Oregon School ranging from 5-17 years
District are welcome to old. There will be participacome to the pantry from 3-7 tion awards, T-shirts availp.m. at 1092 Union Road. able on race day for $12,
For more information, visit goody bags and age-group
awards. This is an opporobfp.org.
tunity for young athletes to
participate in an enjoyable

and athletic life-experience.
The objective is to encourage self-confidence, good
health, and community spirit through participation.
This year’s event will
be limited to the first 500
registrants. Online registrations on active.com will be
accepted until Aug. 1 at 8
p.m. or until participation
is at full capacity. People
with questions can email
the club at oregonkidstri@
yahoo.com

Sounds of Summer
Concerts
Free concerts will be performed on Tuesdays at 7
p.m. at Waterman Triangle
Park on Aug. 12 and 26.
Food will be for sale starting at 6 p.m.
On Aug. 12, "Universal Sound" will perform,
and Chicago-style hot dogs
from Lil’ Buddy’s will be
for sale. On Aug.t 19, "The
Dang Its" will perform,
and pizza from Pizza Pit
will be for sale. On Aug.
26, "Bahama Bob’s Island
Music" will perform, and
barbecue sandwiches from
JL Richards will be for sale.

Community calendar
Thursday, July 17

• 11:30, Chamber membership meeting ($7 salad
lunch, please RSVP),
senior center
• 2-4 p.m. Lego Creations
Expo, library, orelib@
oregonlibrary.org
• 4:45-5:30 p.m., Manga
Club (ages 13-18), library
• 6:30-8 p.m., Adult Book
Club: “Before I Fall” by
Lauren Oliver, library

Friday, July 18

• 10 a.m., mixed ages
storytime (ages birth to
6), library
• 1 p.m., “The Secret Life
of Walter Mitty,” senior
center

Saturday, July 19

• 6:30-7:30 p.m. card
party, senior center

Monday, July 21

• 1 p.m. and 2:30 p.m.,
Science Lab, “Catapaults”
(ages K-6), library, 8353656
• 6 p.m., Village Board
Meeting, Village Hall
board room

Tuesday, July 22

• 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.,
Historical Society is open,
159 W. Lincoln St.
• 10 a.m., mixed ages
storytime (ages birth to
6), library

Wednesday, July 23

• 10 a.m., mixed ages
storytime (ages birth to
6), library
• 1-3 p.m. Bad Art/Poetry,
library

Thursday, July 24

• 1 p.m., “What You Need

to Know About Lyme
Disease,” Stoughton
Hospital, 873-2356
• 6:30-7:15 p.m., Pop-up
Puppet Theater, library

Friday, July 25

• 9 a.m., “Add Flavor, Not
Salt, To Your Foods” by
UW Extension Nutrition
Education, senior center
• 10 a.m., mixed ages
storytime (ages birth to
6), library
• 10:45-11:45 a.m., John
Duggelby’s Kitchen Band,
senior center

Tuesday, July 29

• 10 a.m.-4 p.m.,
Historical Society is open,
159 W. Lincoln St.
• 10 a.m., mixed ages
storytime (ages birth to
6), library

Wednesday, July 30

• 10 a.m., mixed ages
storytime (ages birth to
6), library
• 4-6 p.m., Protect Your
PC computer class taught
by Milly McCartney ($15),
senior center computer
lab, 835-5801

Thursday, July 31

• 2-3 p.m., Mad Scientist,
Prairie View Elementary
big gym, 835-3656
• 3-7 p.m., Oregon/
Brooklyn Food Pantry
pickup, Hefty Warehouse
1092 Union Rd., obfp.org

Friday, August 1

• 10 a.m., mixed ages
storytime (ages birth to
6), library
• 1-3 p.m., legal help by
appointment with Beth
Cox, senior center

Community cable listings

Senior center

Village of Oregon Cable Access TV program times same for both channels.
A new program begins daily at 1 p.m. and repeats at 4, 7 and 10 p.m. and at 1,
4, 7 and 10 a.m. 900 Market St., Oregon. Phone: 291-0148;
email: oregoncableaccess@charter.net, or visit www.OCAmedia.com.

Monday, July 21
Monday, July 21
Three Cheese Lasagna,
9:00 CLUB
California Mix, Fruit Cup,
9:00 Wii Bowling
Bread Stick, Sherbet
9:00 Rubber Stamping
9:00 Caregivers Support
Tuesday, July 22
1:00 Get Fit
*Roast Pork w/Gravy,
1:30 Bridge
Mashed Potatoes, Corn,
4:00 Weight Loss Support
Strawberry Shortcake, W.W.
6:00 Pickleball at OMS
Bread
Tuesday, July 22
VO-Veggie Lasagna
8:30 Zumba Gold
9:00 Pool Players
Wednesday, July 23
9:00 Arthritis Movement
Chicken Cacciatore, Egg
9:30 Bingo
Noodles, Sugar Snap Peas,
9:45 Tai Chi
Diced Peach, Multi Grain
12:30 Sheepshead
Bread, Cookie
12:30 Stoughton Shopping
VO-Soy Meat Sauce
Wednesday, July 23
AM—Foot Care
Thursday, July 24
9:00 CLUB
*BBQ Shredded Beef on
1:00 Get Fit
W.W. Bun, Potato Salad,
1:00 Euchre
Carrot Coins, Fresh Fruit
2:00 Knit/Crochet Group
Mix, Ice Cream Cup
Thursday, July 24
VO-Soy Sloppy Joe
8:30 Zumba Gold
SO: California Cobb
9:00 Pool Players
9:00 Arthritis Movement
Friday, July 25
12:30 Shopping at Bill’s
Chicken Macaroni Salad,
1:00 Cribbage
German Cucumbers, W.W. Friday, July 25
Bread, Fresh Apple, Lemon
9:00 CLUB
Dessert
9:00 Pilates
VO-Cottage Cheese w/
9:00 UW Extension Nutrition
Garnish
Program: “Add Flavor to your
Food”
9:30 Blood Pressure
10:00 Wii Bowling
10:45 John Duggleby’s
Kitchen Band

ORE 984

WOW 983

Thursday, July 17
Thursday, July 17
Movie: “Ma & Pa Kettle”
Oregon School
(1949)
Meeting (of July 14)

Board

Friday, July 18
Friday, July 18
Oregon Garden Tour (of
2010 Kids Triathlon Hilites
June 21)
Saturday, July 19
Saturday, July 19
2009 Kids Triathlon Hilites
“Super Tuesday” Band @
Oregon Summer Fest (of June Sunday, July 20
28)
Movie: “Wizard of Oz”
(1939)
Sunday, July 20
Worship
Service: Monday, July 21
Community of Life Church
2008 Kids Triathlon Hilites
Monday, July 21
Tuesday, July 22
6 pm--LIVE--Oregon Village
2007 Kids Triathlon Hilites
Board Meeting
Wednesday, July 23
Tuesday, July 22
“A Leap Above Dance” &
“Bill Bossingham” Music @ “Open Mic” @ OHS (of Apr.
Oregon Senior Center (of July 16)
15)
Thursday, July 24
Wednesday, July 23
“Acappella” @ OHS (of Apr.
Syttende Mai Parade, 16)
Stoughton (of May 18)
Thursday, July 24
Oregon Village
Meeting (of July 21)

Board

ALL SAINTS LUTHERAN CHURCH
2951 Chapel Valley Rd., Fitchburg
(608) 276-7729
Pastor Rich Johnson
SUNDAY
8:30 a.m. classic service
10:45 a.m. new song service

SATURDAY - 5 p.m. Worship
SUNDAY - 8:15, 9:30 and 10:45
a.m. Worship West Campus: Corner
of Hwy. PD and Nine Mound Road,
Verona
SUNDAY - 9 & 10:15 a.m., 6 p.m.
Worship (608) 271-6633

BROOKLYN LUTHERAN CHURCH
101 Second Street, Brooklyn
(608) 455-3852
Pastor Rebecca Ninke
SUNDAY
9 a.m. Holy Communion
10 a.m. Fellowship

HILLCREST BIBLE CHURCH
752 E. Netherwood, Oregon
Eric Vander Ploeg, Lead Pastor
(608) 835-7972
www.hbclife.com
SUNDAY
9:30 a.m. worship service at Oregon
High School PAC

COMMUNITY OF LIFE LUTHERAN
CHURCH
PO Box 233, Oregon
(608) 286-3121
office@communityoflife.us
Pastor Eric Wenger
SUNDAY
10 a.m. Worship at 1111 S. Perry
Parkway, Oregon

HOLY MOTHER OF CONSOLATION
CATHOLIC CHURCH
651 N. Main Street, Oregon
Pastor: Fr. Gary Wankerl
(608) 835-5763
holymotherchurch.weconnect.com
SATURDAY: 5 p.m. Worship
SUNDAY: 8 and 10:15 a.m. Worship

COMMUNITY UNITED METHODIST
CHURCH
201 Church Street, Brooklyn
(608) 455-3344
Pastor Dave Pluss
SUNDAY
9:30 a.m. Worship
FAITH EVANGELICAL LUTHERAN
CHURCH
143 Washington Street, Oregon
(608) 835-3554
Pastor Karl Hermanson
SUNDAY - 9 a.m. Worship
Holy Communion 2nd & last
Sundays
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
408 N. Bergamont Blvd. (north of CC)
Oregon, WI  
608-835-3082 - fpcoregonwi.org
Pastor Bob Vetter
SUNDAY
10 a.m. Blended Worship
11 a.m. Coffee Bar/Fellowship
11:15 a.m.  All-ages activity
FITCHBURG MEMORIAL UCC
5705 Lacy Road, Fitchburg
(608) 273-1008
www.memorialucc.org
Pastor: Phil Haslanger
Associate Pastor Twink JanMcMahon
SUNDAY
8:15 and 10 a.m. Worship
GOOD SHEPHERD LUTHERAN
CHURCH ELCA
Central Campus: Raymond Road and
Whitney Way

PEOPLE’S UNITED METHODIST
CHURCH
103 North Alpine Parkway, Oregon
Pastors Jason and Johanna Mahnke
(608) 835-3755
www.peoplesumc.org
Communion is the 1st & 3rd
weekend
SATURDAY - 5 p.m. Worship
SUNDAY - 9 a.m. worship and
Sunday school; 10:30 a.m. worship;
5 p.m. The Gathering Sunday night
service with simple supper to follow
ST. JOHN’S LUTHERAN CHURCH
625 E. Netherwood, Oregon
Pastor Paul Markquart and Pastor
Emily Tveite
(608) 835-3154
5 p.m. Saturday evening Worship
8 a.m. Traditional Sunday Worship
9:15 a.m. Sunday School & Coffee
Fellowship
10:30 a.m. New Community Worship
(9:30 a.m. Summer)
VINEYARD COMMUNITY CHURCH
Oregon Community Bank & Trust,
105 S. Alpine Parkway, Oregon - Bob
Groth, Pastor - (608) 513-3435
welcometovineyard.com
SUNDAY - 10 a.m. Worship
ZWINGLI UNITED CHURCH OF
CHRIST - Paoli
At the Intersection of Hwy. 69 & PB
Rev. Sara Thiessen
(608) 845-5641
SUNDAY 9:30 a.m. Family Worship

Support groups
• 7 p.m., Alcoholics
Anonymous meeting
at First Presbyterian
Church, every Monday
and Friday
• 7 p.m., Alcoholics
Anonymous closed
meeting, People’s United
Methodist Church, every
Tuesday
• 6:30-7:30 p.m.,
Diabetes Support Group
meeting, Evansville
Senior Center, 320 Fair

St. Call 882-0407 for
information. Second
Tuesday of each month
• 6:30-8 p.m., Parents
Supporting Parents,
LakeView Church,
Stoughton. Third
Tuesday of every month
• Relationship & Divorce
Support Group. State
Bank of Cross Plains.
Every other Monday
night at 6:30 p.m.

Compassion fatigue
Compassion fatigue is a term that is often applied to people who
work in the helping professions, such as doctors, nurses, teachers,
and social workers, and refers to the gradual decrease of compassion which these people sometimes feel in response to others’
suffering. It may be that after seeing so much suffering we become
desensitized to it. Indeed, there is some evidence that everyone
may be prone to compassion fatigue through the media’s portrayal
of suffering people. Hearing everyday about Syrian refugees or the
homeless in America may make us less likely to respond compassionately than if we were hearing about these unfortunate souls
less often. People who are experiencing high levels of stress and
who have inadequate support networks are more likely to experience compassion fatigue, perhaps because they feel that no one is
helping them with their problems and they feel like they have nothing left in their “bucket” to share. Since compassion is one of the
essential callings of the faithful, we should do our best to prevent
compassion fatigue by managing our own levels of stress and by
ensuring that we have a good support network in place. And, we
should remember that God is always there to back us up.
- Christopher Simon via Metro News Service
I cannot carry all these people by myself; the burden is too heavy
for me.
1 Corinthians 12:13

Call 835-6677 to advertise on the
Oregon Observer Church Page

ConnectOregonWI.com

July 17, 2014

Oregon Observer

7

Fair: 4-H member competes
in eight shooting events
Continued from page 1
event of the day – indoor
archery.
She held a serious and
quiet demeanor while aiming with her bow, but
as soon as an arrow was
released, she was all smiles
– whether or not she hit the
target.
“My aim was so bad
when I first started,” she
joked, noting that through
the years, she’s updated
her bow to include a sight,
release and stabilizer.
“Now it’s just breathing
control and focusing and
having fun. Mostly having
fun though. If you don’t
smile, you’re not going
anywhere. I try to have my
friends with me so I actually smile.”
Seated behind her in
the cramped room were
her closest friends, Caitlin
Beyler and Cole Xander.
When the arrows had finished smacking the targets
and the whistle was blown
after each of the 12 rounds,
she turned to them for support and a few laughs to
help remind her to enjoy the
sport.
In fact, it was watching Beyler participate in
archery and air rifle in 2008
that led Majors-Culp to get
involved with 4-H in the
first place. An only child,
she considers Beyler and
Xander as the closest she’ll
ever get to siblings.
“They’re the ones I mainly hang out with, they’re
just a blast,” she said.
After the archery event,
she leaned over the scorekeeper’s shoulder to sneak
a peek at her results.
“That’s the best I’ve ever
done!” she beamed, quickly
scribbling the score 251
with 11 X’s on the back of
her target.

New popularity
Archery participation
has seen a definite increase
in recent years, said fair
spokesperson Janet Keller.
The popularity of the bowwielding character from the
book and movie series “The
Hunger Games” may be

one contributing factor, but
Majors-Culp said that’s not
the reason she started.
“I think it’s kind of cool
they (have) a movie with
a girl doing archery, but a
lot of people think (we) do
archery because Katniss is
doing archery,” she said.
“We do it because it’s fun
and it’s our thing. We were
doing it before (‘The Hunger Games’).”
Her favorite events are
shooting trap and muzzleloading.
“All my instructors are
great, so if I had to choose
one I couldn’t,” she said.
While she admitted she
wasn’t on her game during
the previous trap shooting
event, she said the score
matters but it’s not the biggest deal “as long as I have
fun.” She certainly had fun
in another muzzleloader
event two weeks prior to
the pre-fair competition.
Majors-Culp and Xander
competed in River Falls on
June 14 for a qualifier to
the National 4-H Shooting
Sports Invitational, which
will be held in Nebraska
next June. They should find
out the results by Christmas, but only four people
will be chosen to move on
from Wisconsin.
The incoming Oregon
High School freshman will
be making a second trip to
Pierce County at the end of
August. She was recently
notified that her essay and
application to participate
in a youth bear hunt with
someone with the Wisconsin DNR was accepted.
“There’s not a lot of girls
that hunt, and I wanted
to get into bigger game,”
Majors-Culp said, adding
that she got her first deer
last year gun hunting.
She is used to being busy,
having competed in swimming and lacrosse in middle
school and has been practicing nearly year-round for
shooting events. MajorsCulp is not finished with
4-H events, however, as she
plans to show dairy cattle
for the first year and chickens for the second year at
the fair this week.

You’re the point of
everything we do.
At Meriter, we’ve always focused on what’s best for our patients.
That’s why we’ve joined forces with UnityPoint Health, one of the
nation’s leaders in reshaping health care. This makes us stronger
than ever, so we can better coordinate care between your clinic,
hospital, insurance company and home. We’ll work together
around a single purpose. You.

Faith Majors-Culp, center, talks with her friends Cole Xander, left,
and Caitlin Beyler, right, after the Dane County Fair shooting sports
competition held in June at the Stoughton Conservation Club.
Faith MajorsCulp and
Cole Xander
compete in a
muzzleloader
event in June
that was
a qualifier
event for the
National 4-H
Shooting
Sports
Invitational.
Photo submitted

The point of everything we do is you.

meriter.com
UN350003

Photo by Samantha Christian

ConnectOregonWI.com
8 July 17, 2014 Oregon Observer
Trees: Arborist network helps veteran clean up yard from recent tornado damage
Continued from page 1

“It’s just people
helping people. This
Branching out
is exactly why we
The former Madison
Milk Producers lab techni- designed the group.”
Jeff Olson
Arbor Systems

Photos by Samantha Christian

John Gefke, left, watches Frank Clark of Baraboo Woodworks measure the diameter of a white oak tree that fell on his father’s property,
shown in the background, from the recent tornado.

wood and chip brush on
Saturday, including workers from Shade Lovers
Tree Service, Goodland
Tree Works, Inc., the Dane
County Parks Department,
Wisconsin Urban Wood,
Madison Carpenters Local
314, Baraboo Woodworks,
Arbor Systems and Urban
Tree Alliance.
John Gefke said the
group helped tremendously.
“For the insurance companies not to step up and
help homeowners when
it’s such a costly expense
... You know it probably
would have run close to
$10,000 when everything
was said and done, and
there’s no way my dad on
a fixed income can afford
that,” he said. “And it
wasn’t a luxury. He had to
have it done. So to have a
group like Jeff’s is just fantastic.”
“It’s just people helping
people,” said Olson. “This
is exactly why we designed
the group.”

Sustainable wood
To top off an already
great story, the organizations all seemed to supJeff Olson took a break from helping with the cleanup efforts to take port the sustainable idea
of keeping the salvageable
a picture with Stan Gefke by a pile of logs.
wood local.
“Normally wood goes to
the chipper, but we want to
change that,” said Twink
Jan-McMahon of Wisconsin Urban Wood. “It’s
about connecting all the

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A dozen volunteers pitched in to help clean up trees at the Gefke property Saturday. Above, Peter
Rabenstine of Goodland Tree Works hangs in a big oak tree to direct the pulling efforts by urban forester Randy Nelson, center, while Ross Pettey of Shade Lovers, back, and Jeff Olson of Arbor Systems,
right, look on.

fantastic people who work
with trees with the people who care about trees.
(These are) skilled and
amazing people.”
She said the most sustainable thing that can happen with wood is to take it
to sawyers who can sell it,
mill it and “get it into the
hands of a woodworker to
make furniture, flooring
or art” for the homeowner
where the tree came from
in the first place. To do
that, Jan-McMahon said
the general public needs to
be educated about what is
really in trees.

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lifetime of self-respect and healthy living

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Fall program starts September 4th
Registration opens Monday, July 28th at 8 a.m

Girls on the Run (GOTR) of Dane County is a wonderful
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skills and self-confidence through an interactive curriculum
and physical activity. The 10-week, twice weekly fall session
culminates with the girls participating in a community service
project and the Girls on the Run 5K held Saturday, November 8th.
The fall program will be Tuesdays & Thursdays from
3:45-5:15 p.m. at Netherwood Knoll Elementary.
Coaches still needed!
To register, visit www.girlsontherundaneco.org.
Scholarship assistance is available.

Wisconsin Urban Wood
is committed to “preserving
urban wood’s unique characteristics, bringing life
to dead trees by creating
products of lasting value,”
according to its website.
“(We want) people to
buy (wood) as a local
resource instead of at a big
box store,” she said.
Fred Clark of Baraboo
Woodworks said one white
oak measured in at 30 inches in diameter and probably
stood about 80 feet tall. He
plans to keep the wood in
the area to send to mill.
The mission of Baraboo
Woodworks, according to
its website, is “to restore
the connection between
people and land by producing beautiful, artisanal
wood from well-managed
trees and forests right here

where we live.”
Connections were certainly made Saturday. And
although one day was not
enough time for all the
remaining branches and
limbs to be picked up by
the group, their efforts
went a long way to help a
grateful veteran.
John Gefke expects
the rest of the cleanup
to take a solid couple of
days between clearing the
debris, cleaning up little
branches and trying to relandscape.
“But the bulk of it – the
stuff we really couldn’t do
without help – is done,” he
said. “I just really appreciate that there are groups
like Jeff’s that are going
out and helping people that
really can’t afford this type
of help.”

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Oregon.
“We were ready to have
(Jeff) come over and do the
work,” John Gefke said.
“He explained how much
work there was going to
be and I really thought it
was reasonable, (because)
I know how much arborists charge. So I told him,
‘Yeah let’s get on the
schedule – come on over,
we have to do something,’”
said John.
Since Stan is a veteran on
a limited income, though,
Olson considered the
options and turned the job
down. Instead of making a
profit he decided to make a
difference.
“I slept on it and thought,
‘Why don’t we do it for
free?’” he said.
John Gefke was
“shocked” when he
received the call the next
day from Olson, who had
also reached out to Evan
Slocum, executive director
of Urban Tree Alliance, to
“put the arborist networking group to the test.”
Several professionals
from the area gave freely
of their time and pitched
in to help saw trees, haul

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cian has lived alone since
his wife, Joan, passed away
in 2010, but he still drives
his car and keeps busy. But
sawing down trees isn’t on
his to-do list anymore.
So Gefke’s son John and
his family came over right
away to help the morning
after the storm.
“His driveway and
garage doors were
blocked,” John Gefke said.
“So my wife, two daughters (and I) spent half a day
just clearing things so he
could get his car out and
down his driveway. It was
kind of a safety issue.”
The Gefkes soon realized
they would need the help of
professionals to manage the
rest of the tree damage on
the property, as the insurance company would only
help with the cost to fix the
damage to the house, not
with removing the trees and
cleaning up the brush.
“There’s only so much I
can do,” John Gefke said.
“(This is) a bit beyond my
expertise. Especially with
the one (big oak) tree in
the backyard. You needed
somebody to climb it. I
don’t have any safety gear
and (could have) damaged
the house trying to bring
that down.”
He approached certi fied arborist Jeff Olson,
the owner and operator of Arbor Systems, a

Jeremy Jones, sports editor

845-9559 x226 • ungsportseditor@wcinet.com

Anthony Iozzo, assistant sports editor
845-9559 x237 • sportsreporter@wcinet.com
Fax: 845-9550

Sports

Thursday, July 17, 2014

9

The Oregon Observer
For more sports coverage, visit:
ConnectOregonWI.com

Boys tennis

Senior Legion

Panthers go
3-2 with two
doubleheader
splits
Anthony Iozzo
Assistant sports editor

The Oregon Senior Legion
squad split a pair of doubleheaders and knocked off Jefferson to finish 3-2 last week
and move to 8-8 overall.

Milton doubleheader
The Panthers traveled to
Milton for a doubleheader on
July 8 and won game two 4-3
to secure a split after falling
4-0 in game one.
Zach Klementz (2-for-3,
double) and Logan Hurda
(2-for-3, double) led the
offense.
Steven Davis picked up
the win on the mound. He
allowed one earned run on
two hits in four innings. Mitch
Weber recorded the save,
allowing a hit in one inning.
Weber also had one strikeout.

Oregon 12, Jefferson 3

File photo by Jeremy Jones

Oregon High School boys tennis coach Ben Conklin (right) and varsity assistant Terry Geurkink lift the WIAA Division 1 Lake Geneva sectional championship plaque this
spring. Conklin was named the 2014 Wisconsin High School Tennis Coaches Association Coach of the Year after the Panthers had their best season in school history,
sharing the Badger South Conference title and advancing to the state team semifinals.

Coaching to top honors
Conklin named WTCA
Coach of the Year

Coaches Association Coach of the
Year earlier this month in a vote of his
peers.
Conklin said he only found out of
Jeremy Jones
the decision about a week ago on the
Sports editor
tennis courts, coaching 5- and 6-year
olds, “My colleague had just checked
Oregon boys tennis coach Ben his phone messages and said to everyConklin was named the 2014 Divi- one, ‘Guess what?’”
sion 1 Wisconsin High School Tennis
One of 11 finalists, Conklin knew

he was in the running, but said he
thought it was a long-shot.
“Of course I was a part of a total
team effort – assistant coaches, players, and parents – everyone played a
part,” he said
Sectional winning coaches are
automatically entered, but nominations are open to all coaches whether
or not they won their section. The

nominations need not be limited to
wins and losses. A coach who has
made vital contributions to their team,
school or community can also be
excellent candidates for recognition.
The 2014 season saw Conklin and
the Panthers achieve several firsts,
including defeating Badger South

Turn to Conklin/Page 10

Oregon hosted Jefferson on
July 9 and won 12-3.
Patrick Sommers (2-for-4,
double), Dominic Maurice
(2-for-4), Klementz (2-for-3,
double) and Hurda (2-for-5)
led the offense.
Adam Heath picked up the
win. He allowed three earned
runs on five hits in seven
innings.

Madison East (DH)
The Panthers hosted Madison East in a doubleheader on
Monday and won 6-3 in game
two to split after a 4-3 loss in
game one.
Parker DeBroux (double),
Jake Odegaard (2-for-3) and
Klementz (2-for-3, home run
and two RBIs) led the offense
in game one.
DeBroux (2-for-2) added
a double, two RBIs and three
runs scored in game two.
Davis picked up the win
on the mound in game two,
while Jared Jones took the
loss in game one.

Home Talent League

Orioles still control
playoff destiny
Anthony Iozzo
Assistant sports editor

Two big innings in a row led
to Sunday’s 11-1 loss to Verona, but the Oregon Home Talent
team (6-8) is still in the playoff
hunt.
With the top two teams in the
North and South Divisions automatically moving on, that leaves
the next best four in the Western
Section to make the playoffs.
Verona (14-0), Argyle (11-3),
Mount Horeb-Pine Bluff (9-5),
Wiota (9-5) and Dodgeville (8-6)
have all clinched a playoff spots.

That leaves Blanchardville (6-8),
Hollandale (6-8) and Oregon as
the other three teams if the season ended today.
Monroe (5-9) and Ridgeway
(5-9) are on the outskirts with
two games to go, but the Orioles hold their own destiny. If it
defeats Monroe at 1 p.m. Sunday
and then takes down Ridgeway at
1 p.m. Sunday, July 27, Oregon
will be in the playoffs.
“We know what we have to
do,” player/manager Eric Engler
said. “All we have to do is focus

Turn to Orioles/Page 10

Photo by Anthony Iozzo

Right fielder Abe Maurice slides home safe in the top of the fourth inning Sunday, July 13, on an RBI single by first baseman
Eric Engler against Verona at Stampfl Field. The run made it 1-0 at the time, but the Orioles ended up falling 11-1 in seven
innings.

10

July 17, 2014

Oregon Observer

ConnectOregonWI.com

Orioles: Two regular season games remain

Sport shorts
Oregon Youth Football registration
Flag leagues for incoming 2014-2015 kindergartners
through fourth grade are accepting registration until Aug.
1.
For more information or to register, visit the Oregon
Youth Football Website at oregonyouthfootball.com.

Continued from page 9
on Monroe next week … Regardless
of what happened today, we just have
to put today behind us.”

Verona 11, Oregon 1

Oregon High School
sophomore Taylor
McCorkle and OHS graduate Morgan McCorkle finished 12th and tied for 13th
respectively Monday and
Tuesday in the Wisconsin
Junior PGA Sherri Steinhauer Invitational at Blackhawk Country Club.

Taylor McCorkle finished with a 173 (90-83),
while Morgan McCorkle
finished with a 174 (8787). Oregon junior Jenny
Johnson also participated
and tied for 22nd with a 180
(94-86).
Junior Carmen Cruz finished tied for 48th.

Madison International Speedway

Travis Sauter and Kody
Hubred lead on the track
John Wells
Special to the Observer

Travis Sauter won the 100
lap Super Late Model Triple
Crown Challenge race while
Kody Hubred topped the field
in the Dave’s White Rock
Sportsman.

Triple Crown Challenge
Sauter retook the lead on
lap 28 and never looked back
on his way to victory lane and
a $4,000 payout  in the Ho
Chunk Gaming Super Late
Model Triple Crown Challenge last Friday at Madison
International Speedway.
Sauter outbattled Michael
Bilderback and Bobby Wilberg for the early lead. Jeremy
Miller worked his way past
Sauter for the lead on lap 7
with Chris Wimmer charging
his way up to third.
Sauter retook the lead on lap
28 when he worked his way
to the inside of Miller coming out of turn four. Wimmer
did the same and moved up
to second place, while Miller
held on for third followed by
Feiler, and Wilberg. On lap 32
Feiler took the third spot from
Miller and started dialing in
the top two.
When the green flag waved
Sauter got a big advantage
when Wimmer was off the
pace and quickly opened up
a five-car length advantage

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that by lap 79 was 10 lengths.
Wimmer and Skylar Holzhausen would cut into the lead,
but Sauter never looked back
and cruised to the victory.
Feiler has a 216-203 advantage over Wimmer in the
overall points race for the Triple Crown Challenge. Casey
Johnson is third with 189
points. 
Chris Wimmer won the
Dash with Casey Johnson getting the heat win while Bobby
Kendall set fast time at 17.297
(104.064 mph).

Hubred Holds Off Rece in
Sportsman Feature
Hubred held off Will Rece
to win the 20-lap feature
for the Dave’s White Rock
Sportsman.
Mike Taylor and Jason
Dunn brought the nine-car
Sportsman field to the green
flag.
Hubred and Rece wasted
no time distancing themselves
from the field with Ryan Goldade the quickest in their
rear view mirrors.
With two laps to go,
Rece was in a position to
pass Hubred on the outside
coming out of turn two but
couldn’t get it done, and
Hubred hung on for his
fourth win of the season. 
Rece finished second
followed by Goldade, Matt
Lundberg and Dunn.
Racing continues on Friday, July 18 with Super
Late Models, Sportsman,
Legends and Bandits all in
action. 
It will also be Kids’
Night with the annual
10,000 coin/token drop on
the track. Qualifying is set
for 6 p.m. with racing at
7:30 p.m.
More information is
at madisoninternational
speedway.com.

Photos by Anthony Iozzo

Above, first baseman Eric Engler flips
to first on a grounder in the first inning
Sunday at Verona. Oregon committed no
errors; (at right) second baseman Will
Reinicke makes a play in the bottom of
the fifth to end in the inning and a Verona
threat. Reinicke also ended a threat in the
third by catching a soft liner and getting a
4-3 putout on a tough grounder.

Western Section
Team W-L
North
Verona 14-0
Mount Horeb-Pine Bluff
9-5
Dodgeville
8-6
Oregon
6-8
Hollandale
6-8
Ridgeway
5-9
South
Argyle
Wiota
Blanchardville
Monroe
Shullsburg/Benton
Platteville

But Oregon second baseman Will
Reinicke made a catch on a soft liner and then was able to get the final
out of the inning a tough grounder to
keep the game scoreless.

Conklin: OHS coach enters 16th year with Panthers
Continued from page 9
rival Madison Edgewood head-to-head
in a dual meet, tying for top honors at
the Badger Conference meet, making
the state rankings, qualifying a schoolrecord four players for individual state
and reaching the WIAA Division 1 state
team tournament with a 42-39 victory
over Madison West.
“Coach Conklin absolutely deserves
the award, and not just for the unprecedented success our team had this
spring,” varsity assistant coach Terry
Geurkink said. “He has had a 15-year
commitment to Oregon boys tennis (as
head coach), administers a no-cut program (thus athletes of all levels have
the opportunity to train and compete as
team members), does an excellent job

of communicating with players, parents,
assistant coaches, and he deals with both
success and failure in an even-keeled,
humble manner. 
“It has been my good fortune to work
with Ben the past three years.”
Sporting the smallest enrollment in
Division 1, Conklin and the Panthers
went on to reach the WIAA team state
semifinals.
“With the team accomplishing winning conference, making it to the state
tournament, and a ton of other program
firsts, it says a lot about our coaches and
our players,” Oregon athletic director
Mike Carr said. “I am so happy for him,
his family and our program.”
Of this past season Conklin summed
it up in one word, historic.
“Personally it makes me really feel
a part of something ... like I belong,”

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11-3
9-5
6-8
5-9
4-10
1-13

Then in the top of the fourth,
Engler hit an RBI single to score
right fielder Abe Maurice – who singled to start the inning.
“That first four innings is how we
can play baseball, and that is encouraging,” Engler said.
Riffle took the loss. He pitched
6 2/3 innings and allowed nine runs
on 14 hits and two walks. He struck
out one. Spencer picked up the win
for Verona. He pitched seven innings
and allowed a run on three hits. He
struck out six and walked none.
“When you lose by 10 and everyone is upset, that is a good thing,”
Engler said. “Everyone is still battling.”

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Conklin said. “To be voted best in the
state – it doesn’t matter what it is – it
feels pretty good.
Oregon’s Doug Debroux was the
last Panther to win Coach of the Year
honors, being honored as the Wisconsin Cross Country Coaches Association (WCCCA) Division I State Coach
of the Year in 1988.
Harold Swanson of Racine Prairie
was named the D2 coach of the year.
They will be honored on Nov. 7 at the
coaches’ clinic at Pleasant Valley.
Despite graduating nearly half of its
varsity starters this spring, there is still
plenty of reason to be excited.
“There’s a lot of excitement from
the younger players this summer – they
want to get back to state,” Conklin said.
“It’ll be a steep climb, but we’ve done it
before ... once.”

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McCorkle sisters finish in top
15 at Sherri Steinhauer invite

The Orioles started well with pitcher Ben Riffle shutting out the Cavaliers for five innings, but then the
sixth came.
Derek Burgenske singled to start
the inning, and Luke Yapp walked
two batters later. Danny Koss followed with an infield single to load
the bases.
That is when first baseman Cole
Kroncke put Verona up for good with
a 2-run single. Koss later scored on
a wild pitch, and Flora picked up an
RBI on a groundout. Shortstop Justin Scanlon hit an RBI triple to score
Kroncke to finish the inning.
After Verona’s Zach Spencer
pitched a 1-2-3 seventh, the Cavaliers’ offense once again strung hits
together.
Derek Burgenske and Spencer each
singled, and both later scored on a
two-out 2-run single by Kroncke.
Mitch Flora followed with an RBI
single, and Logan Laski came in to
pitch.
After a walk to Brandt, Scanlon
ended the game with a walk-off 3-run
home run to left for a 10-run rule.
“You are not going to find a better
hitting team than those guys, and Ben
was around the plate making pitches
like he needs to,” Engler said. “Part
of the mental toughness that we don’t
have as much is that when we get
down, it starts to crumble a little bit.
It just comes with time. We have a lot
of young guys, and it is going to happen. It is a learning experience.”
Part of that mental approach also
involves playing a little smarter at
times. There were a few times in the
sixth and seventh when a ball came
in from the outfield to home plate
instead of the cut-off man, allowing a
runner to get to second base.
“That is the mental aspect of the
game that a lot of people overlook,”
Engler said. “Everybody knows what
they need to do, but in the heat of the
moment, those lapses happen sometimes.”
Oregon grabbed a 1-0 lead early,
but before that, it was the pitching
and defense that set up the lead.
Verona threatened in the bottom of
the third to score after Flora walked
and second baseman Klayton Brandt
singled to put runners on the corners.

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Girls golf

ConnectOregonWI.com

July 17, 2014

Oregon Observer

11

Pump house

Photos submitted

Randy Glysch and other volunteers have raised more than $22,000 in their quest to restore the village’s pump house.

Fundraising reaches halfway mark
Organizer: landscaping
completed, building work is next
Unified Newspaper Group

A month ago, the Village Board approved turning the historic pump house
in downtown Oregon into a
welcome center. Now the
project organizer says he’s
passed the halfway point in
his fundraising goal.
Oregon resident Randy
Glysch told the Observer
this week that the Friends
of the Oregon Water Tower
fund now totals $22,280.
He began soliciting donations to restore the 1899
pump house and landscape
the grounds last June.
Along with raising money for the project, Glysch,
a scientist working for
the state and also a master
gardener, has managed to
secure donations of materials and labor.
He said Moyer’s Landscape Services completed
the edging on the property
July 1.
“I think the site looks
fantastic,” Glysch said in
an email to the Observer.
“I heard someone talking
about it last night at the
band concert (in Triangle
Park, across the street from
the pump house). Now on
to the building, inside and
out.”
The fundraising effort
got a big boost when Gorman and Company donated
$5,000 toward the project.
And Pure Integrity
Homes of Re/Max recently donated $1,500. Tony
Antoniewicz, a partner in
Pure Integrity Homes, said
his team – which includes
his brother, Troy, and fellow Realtor Joe Voell –
planned to match up to
$1,500 in funds raised
from hot air balloon rides

How to
Donate
Make Donation to:
Preserve the Water
Tower Fund
C/O Village of
Oregon/Preserve the
Water Tower Fund
117 Spring Street
Oregon, WI 53575

If you go
What: Open house for
historic Pump House renovations
When: 1-3 pm. Aug. 10
Where: 117 Spring St.
Info: Call Randy Glysch
at 291-0648 or visit
oregonwatertower.com

at Oregon Summer Fest,
which his company sponsored, but the balloon never
got off the ground because
of windy conditions, so
they were not able to do it.
“So the team just decided
that since we were originally going to match up to
$1,500 in donations that
were raised from the balloon rides but couldn’t,
we would just provide that
donation of $1,500,” he
said.
Antoniewicz said his
team chose to support the
pump house restoration
because “it’s going to be a
great place for people visiting town or those who live
in town just to go and get
some information about the
village.”
“It’s obviously a historical moment in the village,
so it’s important to us and

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Moyer’s Landscape Services completed edging on the Pump House property July 1, and several area businesses donated a total of more
than 70 plants for the landscaping. The new bench was donated by the family of a former Oregon couple who died.

it’s great to see it come
back for the community,”
he said.
The pump house and the
water tower it was meant
to serve are both on the
National and State Register of Historic Places. The
pump house had been used
as a storage site for the

village since 1981.
Glysch said now that the
landscaping is completed,
he and other project volunteers will turn their attention to tuck-pointing the
outside walls of the pump
house, cleaning its exterior brick, repainting trim,
installing outdoor lighting,

replacing concrete slabs
around the building and
gutters and installing walkway pavers. The engraved
pavers will be sold for fundraising.
Glysch is planning an
Open House with free beverages at the site from 1-3
p.m. on Sunday, Aug. 10.

That day, the pump house
will be open for tours.
“Folks can take a stroll
around the new landscaping, and sign-up for a walkway brick,” Glysch said.
For more information on the project, visit
oregonwatertower.com.

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12

July 17, 2014

Oregon Observer

ConnectOregonWI.com

Oregon History
May 2014

Those receiving seconds
in the category were Kay
• One of the most
Ringhand and Rich Olson
destructive cyclones (i.e.,
for a cornet-trombone duet
tornadoes) passed through and the vocal trio of Kay
the Oregon area at about
Ringhand, Florence Kellor,
10 a.m. Monday, May 11.
and Betty Knox.
Numerous barns, tobacco
• The Annual Madison
sheds, and silos were
Suburban League Music
blown down.
Festival was held in
There was a loss of life
Oregon. The event hosted
on the Bartlett farm west
13 area high school bands,
of the Village, when Beralong with several chorusnhard Fredrickson and his es and glee clubs. Making
three year old son, Lyman, the arrangements for the
were caught in the destruc- event were Oregon band
tion of the barn. Barnhard
director, Richard Churchill
escaped with just an injury and the chorus and assoto his hip but his son,
ciate director of music,
Lyman, was killed.
Joseph Stratman. The
Other buildings
Oregon Band Mother’s,
destroyed in the area
headed by president, Peg
included a large barn and
Kellogg, made arrangetwo sheds on the Dreher/
ments to feed an anticipatMatson farm and a large
ed 1,200 participants.
barn, windmill and shed on
• The Village purchased
the Charles Friday farm.
a new fog machine to fight
Ed Fisher lost all his farm
mosquitoes. Children were
buildings; only his house
warned not to follow the
remained standing.
truck too closely in order
On the south end of
to avoid breathing in heavy
Village Charles Devine’s
concentrations of the
barn was completely
fumes. The fogging would
turned upside down and
be done after about 8:00
left standing on its ridge
p.m. so as not to interfere
boards leaning against his
with outdoor activities.
house.
• The Oregon Woman’s
Sofus Nelson reported
Club held their Annual
that along his mail route
Dinner and installed offithere were 22 tobacco
cers for the coming year.
sheds, two barns and four
The new officers were
silos down. Mail carrier,
Mrs. Marie Nelson, presiH. V. Chapple, was caught dent; Mrs. Maurice Olson,
in the storm and had his
first vice-president; Mrs.
wagon turned completely
Syl Farris, second viceover.
president; Mrs. Jay Winter,
Nearly every area farmer secretary; and Mrs. Norsustained losses. In the
man Champion, treasurer.
Village scores of trees
• The Chamber of Comwere torn up and chimneys merce kicked off a contest
blown down. The front
to find an appropriate
of J. P. Brophy’s harness
slogan for the Oregon
shop was blown in. (for
community that could
more details and photos
be incorporated into an
about this storm, see the
emblem as well. First prize
OAHS website.
would be $25.00, second
• A referendum propoprize $15.00 and third
sition for organizing a
prize $10.00. The board of
union free high school was directors would judge the
defeated. In the Village,
entries.
215 votes were cast; 97
• Oregon Sports Shop
men voted for the propoopened for business.
sition and 35 against; 71
The owners were Ralph
women voted for and 12
“Rufus” Thornton and Jim
against. From the outlying Packard. The shop was
areas there were 226 votes located on Main Street in
cast of which 60 were for
the McManus Building
the proposition and 166
(a building at the present
against.
day site of Pivotal Point
• The Wintermute Bros. Acupuncture Center).
and Hall’s Circus came
They handled all types of
to Oregon. Some of the
equipment from guns and
attractions advertised were fishing rods to baseball
Jargo, the largest elephant and softball equipment and
on earth and Wallace the
golf balls.
largest, longest, and heavi• The Lane Tank Co. of
est lion in captivity. Also
Menomonee Falls puts a
featured was a taking horse fresh coat of paint on the
and musical ponies playing historic water tower.
familiar tunes on Sweet
• The Civil Improvement
Toned Swiss Bells.
Committee of the Chamber of Commerce gives
50 years ago (1964)
the War Memorial a facelifting prior to the annual
• Of the OHS music
Memorial Day ceremonies.
students competing at the
Some of the Chamber
state solo and ensemble
members working on the
contest in Oshkosh, Kathproject were Earl Wheeler,
ryn Ringhand received
Ron Erfurth, Bob Wisfirst in “Class A” for her
chhoff, Don Bates, and Jim
cornet solo and Nancy
Jallings and Carolyn Olson Haight along with the help
of many volunteer firemen.
received a first in “Class
• Holy Mother of ConA” for their clarinet duet.
solation 8th. grade graduates were Debra Gross,
EMERALD INVESTMENTS
Kathleen Johnson, Barbara
MINI SToRAgE
Kemp, Tom Shea, Lester
5'x10' $27 Month
Gammeter, Dan Webb,
10'x10' $38 Month
John Dahlke, Mary Jane
10'x15' $48 Month
Johnson, Kathleen Kinney,
10'x20' $58 Month
Mary Tauchen, Robert
10'x25' $65 Month
Staley, Joseph Palmer,
Gregory Wethal, Michael
At Cleary Building Corp.
190 S. Paoli St., Verona WI
O’Neill, Thomas Baxter,
(608) 845-9700
and Frederick Clark. Fr.

Photo submitted

From left, OHS math teacher Kathy Mentink with Trig Star winners
Natalie Knox, Rachel Hakes, Chi-Ching Ada Lam and professional
surveyor Joe Gruber.

OHS grads have
surveying success
Three recent Oregon
High School graduates
earned “Trig Star” awards
recently, taking part in a
national program at OHS
put on by the National Society of Professional Surveyors.
Joe Gruber, a professional surveyor and sponsor
who lives in Oregon, joins
other surveyors in visiting
area high schools to talk to
math students about how
surveyors use trigonometry
in their daily work.
This year’s Trig Star winners were Natalie Knox

(first place), Rachel Hakes
(second place) and ChiChing Ada Lam (third
place). Winners received
prizes, including a plaque
for first place along with a
check for $100, a $50 check
for second place, and a $25
check for third place.
Around two-dozen participants received a certificate
of participation.
Funding was provided by
local professional organizations, the Wisconsin Society of Land Surveyors and
the Madison Area Surveyors Council.

Photo submitted

Scavenger hunt quiz winner
Young people are invited to visit the Oregon Area Historical Society
museum and participate in the summer scavenger hunt quiz.
Museum hours are 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Tuesdays and Saturdays.
There is a drawing each month for a prize. Pictured above, Devyn
Wallisch is the winner for June and received a gift certificate from
Maria’s Pizza.

DNR Air Pollution Permit Application Reviews: Goose
Landing LLC, Alma Center; Green Bay Packaging Inc., Green
Bay; ANGI Energy Systems, LLC, Janesville;
MEETING: Lower Wisconsin State Riverway Board meeting,
July 10, 5pm;

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GOV. SCOTT WALKER AND THE STATE OF WISCONSIN
want you to be aware of the following public notices
published the week of JULY 10, 2014:

GENERAL NOTICES: Replaces the order related to prohibiting
the practices of deer baiting and feeding in certain counties;
Variance request, Lower Wisconsin State Riverway Board;
Search public notices from all state communities online at:

WisconsinPublicNotices.org is a public service made possible
by the members of the Wisconsin Newspaper Association.

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100 years ago (1914)

Charles Monroe was the
parish priest and Sister M.
Lueida, the principal of the
school.

• A class of two hundred graduate from OHS.
Bradley Simplot was
valedictorian and Jennifer
Uphoff , salutatorian. At
25 years ago (1989)
the graduation ceremonies
School Superindentdent,
• Members of the Town
Linda Barrows, presented
of Dunn Cemetery Task
a plaque to Audrey Appel
Force received land stewardship awards at the annu- in honor of her husband,
Henry Appel, who had
al Arbor Day Celebration
for their efforts in restoring served as high school printhe Dunn Burying Ground cipal for the past 27 years,
and researching the history but recently resigned due
of the Town. Those on the to health problems.
• Jeanette Essie and Amy
task force were Jo Reynolds, chairperson, Lorraine Martinson, pupils of Mrs.
Pike’s Advanced Art Class
Hawkinson, Dorothy Berkan, Margaret Lalor, Jack- at OHS displayed their art
at Community National
ie Jeardeau, Pam Crapp,
Lottie Halverson and Mar- Bank.
ian Berman.
• The theme for the OHS 10 years ago (2004)
Junior Prom was “Togeth• The Village of Oregon
er Forever” and the theme and the City of Fitchburg
attempted to reach a new
song, I’ll Be There For
You”. The king and queen phase in their negotiations
to establish a joint business
were Ron Wendt and
park.
Kathy Crossen.
• The Oregon School
• The OHS Orchestra’s
Concerto Concert featured District held a retirement
celebration for their 2004
four soloists. Performing
retirees. Those retiring
with orchestral accompaniment were violinist,
were Jeanne Batha, Ann
Scott Eisfeldt, performing Benedict, Carol Connelly,
Bruch’s “Violin Concert
Carolyn Holland, Marcia
in G. Minor”; violinist,
McKenna, Jack Mitchell,
Tammie Behr, performing Mary Ann Reid, Helen
Mozart’s “G Major Violin Schoebel, Nancy Sheldon,
Concerto”; trumpet player, Lanell Wagner, Dorothy
Dean Trexel, performing
Wendt, Joan Zuhse, June
Hummel’s “Trumpet Con- Schuett, and Nancy Miller.
• The OHS boy’s basecerto” and pianist, Laura
ball team went undefeated
Nitsche, performing the
in conference play (8-0)
first movement of Johann
capturing the Badger South
Sebastian Bach’s “Italian
Conference Title. They had
Concerto”.
an overall season record of
• The Oregon Odyssey
16-2.
of the Mind team won
• Dane County dedicated
second place in their division of 20 teams at the
the Lyman F. Anderson
State Competition. They
Agricultural and Conservaalso received the coveted
tion Center (formerly the
Renantra Fusca Award
Fen Oak Resource Center)
for exceptional creativity
in Lyman’s memory, recin unexpected situations.
ognizing his many years of
The team members were
service to the County. The
DeeDee Paster, Andrew
oak savannah to the south
Lederer, Eli Paster, Ryan
of the building was also
Werth, Anna Thayer, and
renamed in his honor.
Zak Paster.
• The Theme for the
• The Brooklyn Schools OHS Prom was “New
Odyssey of The Mind team York Nights”. Ryan Stace
placed 6th. in their division and Claire McGahan were
out of 13 teams in at the
the King and Queen for the
state competition and, like event.
the Oregon team, won the
• A Leap Above Dance
Ranantra Rusca Creativity Co. had several winners at
Award. Members of their
the state-wide dance comteam were Angie Burmeis- petition. Bonnie Fischer
ter, Kara Schulz, Kevin
and Whitney Krause won a
Gasner, Bryan Mihlbauer, gold trophy for their duet.
Patrick Newman, Jerry
Also winning a gold trophy
for their duet were Kim
Robert, and Micah Wyss.
The team was coached by
Fischer and Aleah SchroDave Gasner.
eder. Sarah Imhoff and
• Grand Opening CerJessica Klahn received a
emonies for the new com- silver award for their duet.
Soloist, Lindsey Jensen,
munity swimming pool
won a silver trophy. Aleah
were held. Jerry Luebke,
Schroder won a gold trofund raising chairman,
phy as a soloist as well as
Erin Farrar, Miss Oregon,
and school board member, being the recipient of the
Ken McGlauchlen had the Standout Dance Award.
• The Village Board
honor of cutting the ribbon, opening the facility.
passed an ordinance which
Heather Durkin, Sarah
prohibited bicycles, inDettwiler and Joe Berline skates, skateboarding
or “other play vehicles”
gey, winners in a drawing
among the Oregon School on any public or private
District students, were the property where signs were
posted.
first ones in the new pool.
• OHS students repre• The OHS boys’ track
team won their third
senting the local DECA
straight Badger ConferChapter attended the interence Title. Contributing
national competition in
to their successful season
Nashville, Tennessee. The
were Aaron Hans, Tom
team of Pat Whaley and
Richardson, Bob Richard- Mike Moran, competing
son, Dave Williams, Derek in the subject of Financial
Schaefer, Jake Oelke, Brad Services Management,
won National Awards of
Brayshaw, Andy Lynch
Excellence.
and Kevin Mittlesteadt.
– Compiled by Oregon
Their head coach was Tom
Area Historical Society
Mueller.

ConnectOregonWI.com

Oregon Observer

July 17, 2014

Oregon School District

13

Oregon history

Board aims for better
relations, retention
Staff will consider
compensation,
improving
environment
Debra Seubert
Unified Newspaper Group

Though the 2013-14 Oregon School District budget
has been approved and in
place for several weeks,
school board members
expressed concern Monday
night about recent teacher
resignations and the need
to retain top district staff in
the future.
The discussion centered around improving the
employment environment
for all teachers, looking
into not just the supplementary compensation options
that have been discussed in
recent months but also finding out what teachers want.
Board members said they
want to improve the situation for teachers and that
they are seeking input.
Board president Dan
Krause said there are things
“that are not monetary” that
teachers may be interested
in.”
The board proposed that
the human assets committee meet and confer with
staff and bring back some
ideas. They recommended
that school district business

manager Andy Weiland
work with his administrative team to examine
potential options, including
providing additional supplemental pay and teacher
compensation.
A handful of technology and agriculture teachers in the district received
supplemental pay for the
2013-14 season as part of
the 2013-14 school year
collective bargaining agreement between the school
district and Oregon Education Association finalized last month. In some
cases, the amount was up
to $10,000, as an incentive
because they hold positions
that are difficult to recruit
and retain.
However, the three newest board members all campaigned heavily on improving relations between the
district and teachers.

Lunch prices
Taking the advice of the
U.S. Department of Agriculture, and citing the higher cost of fruits and vegetables, the board approved
a 5-cent increase on school
lunches, effective for the
upcoming school year.
Weiland said the district
had not raised lunch prices
in the past two years.  
The next board meeting is
set for 6:30 p.m., Monday
Aug. 25.

School: Possible referendum
Continued from page 1
wanted to hear more refined
plans about the needs of the
schools.
Since that time, district
officials have made a point
to include the public in
the process, most recently
holding teacher, staff and
community focus group
sessions in the fall. The
district’s values, goals and
priorities were discussed,
as well as possible capital
projects.
In the past year, the board
has approved a report listing up to $60 million in
potential facility needs,
which will provide a framework for any future referendum, according to district
officials.

Earlier this year, district
superintendent Dr. Brian
Busler called the referendum planning process
“comprehensive,” and that
board members are gathering information from
community survey results,
teacher and staff meetings
at all schools with Bray
Architects and the focus
group sessions.
“This deliberate approach
has provided Oregon teachers and staff and community members with multiple
opportunities to share their
thoughts, ideas and questions,” he said. “We have
learned a great deal from
these engagement sessions
… and this has improved
and strengthened the potential referendum projects and
their design.”

Photo courtesy Oregon Area Historical Society

Where’s the fire?
How about this one of the Oregon Fire Department, 1950s?  Al Gasner is the one running, coming from his grocery store.  Dorothy
Gasner loaned us some Oregon photos from the 1950s, which we have now scanned.  We would like to remind everyone to consider
loaning or giving Oregon-related photos to the OAHS.

Legals
STATE OF WISCONSIN,
CIRCUIT COURT,
DANE COUNTY, NOTICE TO
CREDITORS (INFORMAL
ADMINISTRATION) IN THE
MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF
James W. Taylor

Case No. 14PR424
PLEASE TAKE NOTICE:
1. An application for Informal Administration was filed.
2. The decedent, with date of birth
January 30, 1920 and date of death March
31, 2014, was domiciled in Dane County,
State of Wisconsin, with a mailing address of 1746 Hook Island Road, Oregon,
WI 53575.
3. All interested persons waived notice.
4. The deadline for filing a claim
against the decedent’s estate is October

3, 2014.
5. A claim may be filed at the Dane
County Courthouse, Madison, Wisconsin, Room 1000.
Lisa Chandler
Probate Registrar
June 27, 2014
Theodore N. Johnson, Esq.
Godfrey, Leibsle, Blackbourn & Howarth,
S.C.
354 Seymour Court
Elkhorn, WI 53121
262-723-3220
Bar Number: 1001160
Published: July 10, 17 and 24, 2014
WNAXLP
***

Town of Oregon
Park Committee Agenda
Monday, July 21, 2014
6:30 pm
Oregon Town Hall
1138 Union Road
Oregon, Wisconsin

1. Call meeting to order.
2. Reading and approval of minutes
from the last meeting.
3. Public Comments and Appearances.
4. Discussion and possible Action
re: Eagle Scout Project.
5. Discussion and possible Action
re: recommendations/decisions from the
Town Board.
6. Review of potential work projects.
7. Set next meeting date.
8. Adjournment.
Note: Agendas are subject to amend-

Get Connected
Find updates and links right away.
Search for us on Facebook as “Oregon Observer” and then LIKE us.

adno=361589-01

Published: July 17, 2014
WNAXLP

Published: July 17, 2014
WNAXLP

ment after publication. Check the official
posting locations (Town Hall, Town of
Oregon Recycling Center and Oregon
Village Hall) including the Town website
at www.town.oregon.wi.us or join the
Town’s e-mail list to receive agendas at
townoforegon@mailbag.com. It is possible that members of and possibly a quorum of members of other governmental
bodies of the town may be in attendance
at any of the meetings to gather information; however, no action will be taken by
any governmental body at said meeting
other than the governmental body specifically referred to in the meeting notice.
Requests from persons with disabilities
who need assistance to participate in
this meeting or hearing should be made
to the Clerk’s office at 835-3200 with 48
hours notice.
Steve Root, Chairperson
Posted: July 15, 2014
Published: July 17, 2014
WNAXLP

July 17, 2014

Oregon Observer

143 Notices
SUPPORT OUR Service members, veterans and their families in their time
of need. For more information visit the
Fisher House website at www.fisherhouse.org (wcan)
WCAN (Wisconsin Community Ad Network) and/or the member publications
review ads to the best of their ability.
Unfortunately, many unscrupulous people
are ready to take your money! PLEASE BE
CAREFUL ANSWERING ANY AD THAT
SOUNDS TOO GOOD TO BE TRUE!
For more information, or to file a complaint regarding an ad, please contact The
Department of Trade, Agriculture & Consumer Protection 1-800-422-7128 (wcan)

150 Places To Go
29TH ANNUAL AUTO Parts Swap Meet
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car show, swap meet and car corral.
Adm $7. No pets. Hours: Sat & Sun
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342 Boats & Accessories
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355 Recreational Vehicles
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402 Help Wanted, General
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check/drug test. Apply online @ www.
petersoncleaning.com

1998 FORD MUSTANG Bright blue,
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PAR Concrete, Inc.
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DRIVERS: REGIONAL/OTR. Excellent
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We recommend septic
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FOUR WINDS MANOR IS currently
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GROWING CONCRETE company looking for EXPERIENCED Flat work finisher,
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JOB TRAINER Position . Work opportunities in Rural Communities Inc. is looking to expand their team. If you are looking for variety and flexibility, enjoy working with people and being out and about,
this may be just the job for you. W.O.R.C.
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surrounding Dane County communities.
We provide some transportation, minimal
personal cares may be required, and do
a fair amount driving each day. Monday
thru Friday no evenings or weekends.
Looking for 32-36 hours per week with
some PTO benefits. Starting wage is
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vehicle required. Please send resume
and letter of interest to: W.O.R.C. Inc.
Attn: Melanie Dinges, 1955 W. Broadway
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MIDWEST ROCK TOPS, a local
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two full time positions open.
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but willing to train the right
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THE DANE County FSA office is accepting applications for a Program Technician
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contact Haley Krohlow via phone at 608224-3767 or by email at haley.krohlow@
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be received by 11:59 PM Eastern time on
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TINA'S HOME CLEANING
Hiring personnel for residential
cleaning position. Days only. Become
a part of our growing Team!
Call 608-835-0339
tinashomecleaning@gmail.com
TRUCK DRIVER/LABORER Madison
area paving company accepting applications for CDL, drivers and laborers. Seasonal full time through October. For more
information call 608-842-1676

449 Driver, Shipping
& Warehousing
OTR DRIVERS WANTED
Above Average Mileage Pay Including
Performance and Safety Bonusus!
Health/Dental/Vision/HSA/Matching
401K/Vacation and Holiday Pay
Avg 2500-3500 miles/week
100% No Touch- 12 mo. CDL/A
Exp Preferred 888-545-9351 ext 13
www.doublejtransprot.com (wcan)

452 General
OFFICE CLEANING in Stoughton
M-F. 4 hours/night. Visit our website:
www.capitalcityclean.com Or call our
office: 831-8850.

453 Volunteer Wanted
HELP THE Catholic Multicultural Center
to serve the community! Volunteers are
needed for basic daily tasks to help make
sure the Center is a welcoming, clean,
respectful place for community members
to seek assistance. Tasks include making
coffee, general cleaning in the building,
and stocking incoming donations on food
pantry shelves.
Enjoy a morning, afternoon or full day
working up a sweat helping the Girl
Scouts of Wisconsin - Badgerland
Council Property Team revitalize the
landscape around Council Headquarters
in August. We need help dragging limbs
and brush to the curb, weeding, pruning,
raking and other tasks. Water and
s'mores will be provided.
United Way 2-1-1 is seeking new
volunteers to staff our telephone lines,
answering questions about resources
available in the service area. Training
is provided. If you are looking for
an opportunity to learn more about
community resources and would like
to assist people in finding ways to
get and give help, United Way 2-1-1
may be the place for you! Call the
volunteer Center at 608-246-4380 or
visit www.volunteeryourtime.org for
more information or to learn about other
volunteer opportunities.

548 Home Improvement
A&B ENTERPRISES
Light Construction/Remodeling
No job too small
608-835-7791
ALL THINGS BASEMENTY! Basement
Systems Inc. Call us for all your basement needs! Waterproofing? Finishing?
Structural Repairs? Humidity and Mold
Control? Free Estimates! Call 888-9298307 (wcan)
ASPHALT SEAL COATING
Crack filling, striping.
No Job Too Small.
Call O&H: 608-845-3348 or
608-832-4818
DOUG'S HANDYMAN SERVICE
GUTTER CLEANING
"Honey Do List"
No job too small
608-845-8110
HALLINAN-PAINTING
WALLPAPERING
**Great-Summer-Rates**
35 + Years Professional
Interior/Exterior
Free-Estimates
References/Insured
Arthur Hallinan
608-455-3377
TOMAS PAINTING
Professional, Interior,
Exterior, Repairs.
Free Estimates. Insured.
608-873-6160

554 Landscaping, Lawn,
Tree & Garden Work
LAWN MOWING Residential and
commercial. 608-873-7038 OR
608-669-0025
ROTOTILLING, SKIDLOADER, Small
Dumptruck for Brooklyn, Oregon, Evansville and surrounding areas. 608-5138572, 608-206-1548
SNOWMARE ENTERPRISES
Property Maintenance
Lawn Mowing
Bush Trimming
Powerwash Houses
Spring/Summer Clean-Up
Gutter Cleaning
608-219-1214

560 Professional Services
MY COMPUTER WORKS - Computer
Problems? Viruses, Spyware, Email,
Printer Issues, Bad Internet Connections - FIX IT NOW! Professional, US
based technicians. $25 off service. Call
for immediate help. 888-885-7944 (wcan)

586 TV, VCR & Electronics
Repair
DIRECTV 2 Year Savings Event. Over
140 channels only $29.99 a month. Only
Directv gives you 2 years of savings and
a FREE Genie upgrade! Call 800-3202429 (wcan)
DISH TV RETAILER. Starting at $19.99/
mo for 12 mos. High Speed Internet
starting at $14.95/month (where
available) Save! Ask about same day
installation! Call now 800-374-3940 (WCAN)
REDUCE YOUR Cable Bill! Get wholehome Satellite system installed at NO
COST and programming starting at
$19.99/mo. FREE HD/DVR Upgrade to
new callers, so call now. 888-544-0273
(wcan)

601 Household
ALUMINUM LADDERS Various types,
sizes. Large wooden desk, antique
dining set w/buffet,
3-pc wicker storage table set.
Horse saddles and tac.
608-862-5388

602 Antiques & Collectibles
ANTIQUE SHOW July 24-26, 10am5pm. Gibraltar High School. Hwy 42 Fish
Creek in door Cty. 35 booths. 715-3555144 (wcan)
COLUMBUS ANTIQUE MALL
& CHRISTOPHER COLUMBUS
MUSEUM "Wisconsin's Largest
Antique Mall" Enter everyday
8am-4pm. 78,000 sq. ft.
200 Dealers in 400 Booths. Customer
Appreciation Week 20% discount
on all items $10 and over Aug 4-10.
Third floor furniture, locked cases.
Location:
239 Whitney St., Columbus,
WI 53925 920-623-1992 www.
columbusantiquemall.com

606 Articles For Sale
DECKER PACK Saddle $125. Ring-ofBells, $50ea. 2 saddles, $100ea.
507-259-7445
SEWING CABINET opens to 7', rollout extension w/drawers, drop leaf work
surface, excellent condition. $600. 608833-2656

646 Fireplaces,
Furnaces/Wood, Fuel
SEASONED SPLIT OAK, Hardwood.
Volume discount. Will deliver. 608609-1181

648 Food & Drink
ENJOY 100% guaranteed, delivered to
the door Omaha Steaks! SAVE 74%
PLUS 4 FREE burgers. The Family Value
Combo. Only $39.99. Order today. 800931-1898 Use code 49377PXR or www.
OmahaSteaks.com/father72 (wcan)
SHARI'S BERRIES Order delicious
strawberries for any occasion. Save 20%
on qualifying orders over $29! Fresh
dipped berries starting at $19.99. Visit
www.berries.com/happy or call
800-975-3296 (wcan)

652 Garage Sales
FITCHBURG FISH Hatchery and
Vinyard Rd neighborhood.
July 17-19. 8am-4pm. Moving sales!
Mahogany bedroom set, sofas, more
furniture, kids-adult clothing, baby items,
tools, snow blower, hobnail glass, golf
clubs, household.
OREGON 1105 Winged Foot Dr.
July 17, 8am-5pm, July 18,
8am-3pm. Moving Sale! Bikes, area
rugs, designer clothing and purses kidsadults, household
STOUGHTON 3205 Old Stage Rd. July
17-18, 8am-5pm. Moving sale!
1947 M-Farmall, some furniture, lots of
miscellaneous.
VERONA 201 E Harriet Friday-Saturday, 9am-5pm. TV, games, books, Avon
collectibles, household and decorative
items.
VERONA 612 Enterprise Dr. Sat., 7/19,
8am-5pm. Multi-family. Saddles, kidsadult clothing, toys, misc.

666 Medical & Health Supplies
MEDICAL GUARDIAN Top-rated medical alarm and 24/7 monitoring. For a
limited time, get free equipment, no activation fees, no commitment, a 2nd waterproof alert button for free and more. Only
$29.95 per month. 800-281-6138
SAFE STEP Walk-in tub Alert for
Seniors. Bathrooms falls can be fatal.
Approved by Arthritis Foundation.
Therapeutic Jets. Less than 4 inch stepin. Wide door. Anti-slip floors. American
made. Installation included. Call 800940-3411 for $750 off. (wcan)

668 Musical Instruments
5 PC Drum Set, complete w/hardware,
dbl. brace stand, Sabian B8 cymbals,
14", 16", 18" and Hi-Hats. throne and
accessories. Very good condition. $450.
608-862-5388

Stoughton, WI offIce
adno=357992-01

Who wants to
see a picture?
Visit
ungphotos.smugmug.com/oregonobserver
to share, download and order
prints of your favorite photos
from local community and
sports events.
All orders will be mailed
directly to you!

Do You Like to Meet People?
Are You Up For A Challenge?
Can You Adapt To Change?
Are You Self-Motivated?
Do You Possess Computer Skills?
If you’ve answered yes, we are very interested in talking to you. We are seeking
candidates for a flex full-time opening in our Stoughton front office. Responsibilities
for this position include but are not limited to selling and processing classified ads,
selling special projects by phone, processing circulation data, receptionist duties
and proof reading.
We are an employee-owned company offering a competitive benefits package
including 401K, ESOP, vacation, and more.
If this flex full-time position interests you and you have the equivalent of a high
school diploma and at least two years of office/computer experience plus a valid
driver’s license, send your resume today.

Apply online only at:
www.wcinet.com/careers
Woodward Communications, Inc. is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer. WCI maintains a tobacco-free campus. All qualified persons are encouraged to apply.

adno=356254-01

14

ConnectOregonWI.com

July 17, 2014

GUITAR: FENDER American made
Standard Stratocaster guitar. Tobacco
burst finish, mint condition. Includes
tremelo bar, straplocks, and custom fitted Fender hard-shell case. Asking $950
OBO. Call 608-575-5984

STOUGHTON 2-BR Duplex/Condo.
All new carpet, vinyl, paint. Garage,
appliances, A/C, washer/dryer hook ups.
Full basement for storage, yard work
provided. Just move in and enjoy! No
pets, no smoking. $890. plus utilities.
920-723-6535

676 Plants & Flowers
PROFLOWERS ENJOY 50%off 100
blooms of Peruvian Lilies with free glass
vase- your price $19.99 plus s/h. Plus
save 20% off your order over $29! Visit
www.proflowers.com/ActNow or call 800615-9042 (wcan)

688 Sporting Goods
& Recreational
FISH CANADA Kingfisher Resort.
Cottage-Boat-Motor-Gas/ $75. per
person/day. Call for specials. 800-4528824 www.kingfisherlodge.com
(wcan)
WE BUY WE BUY Boats/RV/Pontoons/
ATV's & Motorcycles! "Cash Paid" now.
American Marine & Motorsports Super
Center, Shawano 866-955-2628 www.
americanmarina.com (wcan)

696 Wanted To Buy
TOP PRICES Any Scrap Metal
Cars/Batteries/Farm Equipment
Free appliance pick up
Property clean out. Honest
Fully insured. U call/We haul.
608-444-5496

STOUGHTON 4 Bedroom duplex in great
neighborhood near Kegonsa school. All
appliances, real stone gas fireplace.
$1200 per month +utilities. No smoking/
pets. Available now. 608-448-9926
STOUGHTON 514 S Academy Upper of
2 flat. 2 Bedroom. Hardwoods, Air, W/D
in apt., deck off 1 bedroom. Garage,
large backyard, Dog/Cats O.K. $820
includes heat and electric. Available now.
Call Jim 608-444-6084.
STOUGHTON/KENILWORTH- Quiet
2-bedroom, walk-out patio, water. Private Owner. No Pets. $725/mo. Available
Now. Handicap Accesible 608-212-0829
STOUGHTON-LARGE 2-BDRM unit
in quiet, owner managed 10 unit. All
appliances, C/A, gas heat. Close to
shopping, off street parking, large yard.
Laundry. Water included, elec/gas extra.
Approx. 1000 sq ft. Available Aug 1.
$675. month.
Call 608-772-0234
VERONA ONE Bedroom Available now.
Heat Included, $525 month. Dave 608575-0614

720 Apartments

WE BUY Junk Cars and Trucks.
We sell used parts.
Monday thru Friday 8am-5:30pm.
Newville Auto Salvage, 279 Hwy 59
Edgerton, 608-884-3114

OREGON-2 BDRM, 1 bath. Available
for spring/summer. Great central location. On-site or in-unit laundry, patio,
dishwasher and A/C. $720-$730/month.
Call 255-7100 or www.stevebrownapts.
com/oregon

705 Rentals
GREENWOOD APARTMENTS Apartments for Seniors 55+, currently has 1
& 2 Bedroom Units available starting at
$725 per month, includes heat, water,
and sewer. 608-835-6717 Located at 139
Wolf St., Oregon, WI 53575
OREGON- 1 bedroom apartment,
garage, washer/dryer $630/month. Call
608/455-7100

ROSEWOOD APARTMENTS for Seniors
55+, has 1 & 2 bedroom units available
starting at $695 per month. Includes
heat, water and sewer. Professionally
managed. 608-877-9388 Located at 300
Silverado Drive, Stoughton, WI 53589
CLASSIFIED AD DEADLINE IS Noon
Friday for the Oregon Observer unless
changed because of holiday work
schedules.

STOUGHTON 100 West Street
1 bedroom, appliances, water, heat,
A/C, ceiling fan, on-site laundry,
well kept and maintained. On-site
manager, next to park. $629/month
608-238-3815
STOUGHTON- 115 Hillside lower 3
bedroom, $680 plus utilities
608-455-7100.

483 Commerce Drive

adno=358854-01

Attention College Students
and 2014 HS Grads!
Summer Work,
$17 base-appt, FT/PT
customer sales/service,
no exp nec, conditions apply,
all ages 17+, call now for
interview 608-662-2092
or apply online at

Currently hiring
housekeepers.

750 Storage Spaces For Rent

NORTH PARK STORAGE
10x10 through 10x40, plus
14x40 with 14' door for
RV & Boats.
Come & go as you please.
608-873-5088
RASCHEIN PROPERTY
STORAGE
6x10 thru 10x25
Market Street/Burr Oak Street
in Oregon
Call 608-206-2347

ALL SEASONS SELF STORAGE
10X10 10X15 10X20 10X30
Security Lights-24/7 access
BRAND NEW
OREGON/BROOKLYN
Credit Cards Accepted
CALL (608)444-2900

UNION ROAD STORAGE
10x10 - 10x15
10x20 - 12x30
24 / 7 Access
Security Lights & Cameras
Credit Cards Accepted
608-835-0082
1128 Union Road
Oregon, WI
Located on the corner of
Union Road & Lincoln Road

C.N.R. STORAGE
Located behind
Stoughton Garden Center
Convenient Dry Secure
Lighted with access 24/7
Bank Cards Accepted
Off North Hwy 51 on
Oak Opening Dr. behind
Stoughton Garden Center
Call: 608-509-8904

760 Mobile Homes
OREGON MOBILE Home.
High efficiency appliances, A/C, new
steel front door/storm. $10,000
608-835-8552

DEER POINT STORAGE
Convenient location behind
Stoughton Lumber.
Clean-Dry Units
24 HOUR LIGHTED ACCESS
5x10 thru 12x25
608-335-3337

PUCKAWAY SHORES PARK
Central Wisconsin, lot rent $132.
14X70 fully furnished, A/C, all
appliances, private wooded lot, pier.
$19,900. 920-295-0185

FRENCHTOWN
SELF-STORAGE
Only 6 miles South of
Verona on Hwy PB.
Variety of sizes available now.
10x10=$50/month
10x15=$55/month
10x20=$70/month
10x25=$80/month
12x30=$105/month
Call 608-424-6530 or
1-888-878-4244

830 Resort Property For Sale
VACATION HOMES HUNTING
PROPERTIES. Get more fun for your
dollar here in Southwest Wisconsin.
Happy to explore the hills and valleys to
find your special place.
Gerard Abing, Broker.
Platteville Realty 608-732-3000.

SCHOOL BUS DRIVERS
& PARATRANSIT
DRIVERS
Part-time. Excellent Wages
20+ hours/wk. CDL bonus program
Paid training/testing. Signing bonus.
5501 Femrite Dr. Madison
Call Paul at 608-310-4870 or email
paulm@badgerbus.com
EOE

to request an
application:

8210 Highview Drive - Madison

608.243.8800

adno=359823-01

allsaintsneighborhood.org

FULL TIME DRIVERS

FULL TIME DRIVERS NEEDED FOR REGIONAL WORK.
Tractor-trailer drivers needed for the Walgreen’s Private Fleet Operation
based in Windsor, WI. Drivers make hand deliveries to Walgreen’s stores
within a regional area (WI, IL, IA, MN, ND, SD). Workweek is Tues ~ Sat.

* $21.90/hour (Overtime after 8 hours)
or $0.4650/mile

adno=361064-01

*Must be over 24 years old
*Have a min 18 mos. tractor trailer exp. or
6 mos. T/T experience with a certificate
* Full Benefits Package that includes:
from an accredited truck driving school.
Disability Ins., Dental, Life Ins., Health Ins.
*Meet all DOT requirements.
with Prescription Card
*To
be willing & able to unload freight
* 401K Pension Program with Co. Contribution
* Paid Holidays & Vacation
* Home everyday except for occasional layover
For more information or to apply contact:

Please email resume to
t.billig@callcpc.com or call 800-914-3755

adno=361833-01

Positions Available Immediately

Call Celerity Staffing Solutions at
(608) 238-3410 for more information

adno=361804-01

SENIOR CENTER
PROGRAM MANAGER

$1000 SIGN ON BONUS
$1000 RETENTION BONUS
$750 GUARANTEE WEEKLY

The best drivers drive CPC

OREGON BERGAMONT
Gated. By owner. Make offer!
1 blk from waterpark/clubhouse
608-212-2283

970 Horses
WALMERS TACK SHOP
16379 W. Milbrandt Road
Evansville, WI
608-882-5725

975 Livestock
REGISTERED ANGUS Yearling and
Mature Bulls. All bulls are fertility tested
and have current EPD information. Bulls
are gentle and are from high quality
genetics.
815-266-6260

980 Machinery & Tools
MF8570 ROTARY Combine 6 RN &
Platform, 500bu grain cart, PTO or all
hydraulic drive. 608-214-3196
CLASSIFIED AD DEADLINE IS Noon
Friday for The Great Dane and Noon
Monday for the Oregon Observer unless
changed because of holiday work schedules. Call now to place your ad, 873-6671
or 835-6677.

990 Farm: Service &
Merchandise
RENT SKIDLOADERS
MINI-EXCAVATORS
TELE-HANDLER
and these attachments. Concrete
breaker, posthole auger, landscape rake,
concrete bucket, pallet forks, trencher,
rock hound, broom, teleboom, stump
grinder.
By the day, week, or month.
Carter & Gruenewald Co.
4417 Hwy 92
Brooklyn, WI, 608-455-2411

905 Auction Sale Dates
AUCTION 400+ acres in Green Lake Co.
Selling in multiple parcels. August 2nd,
9am. Auction held at N6302 Sina Rd,
Princeton, WI 223+/-acres, 3 separate
homes, 5 ponds & wooded hunting land.
Go to wyoderauction. com for video or
call 920-787-5549/920-295-2644 (wcan)

SELL IT
NOW…
in the
Classifieds!
835-6677 or

connectoregonwi.com

COUPON

95
17
Oil Change & 20-Point Check
$

Up to six quarts with filter,
diesels excluded. Expires 9-31-14.

Service Technician

Assembly - Middleton & Mazomanie, $11/Hr, 1st shift
Stainless Steel Polishing - Middleton, $15.75/Hr, 2nd
shift
Packaging - Middleton, $12-12.60/Hr, 2nd shift
Shipping/Receiving - Middleton, $12-13/hr, 1st shift

to download
an application:

870 Residential Lots

Questions?
Call 888-873-7310

479 Commerce Drive

Now hiring for full and part-time PM and night shifts at
our beautiful senior living residence on Madison’s
west side. Shift and weekend differentials, paid training
and an array of benefits available.

THEY SAY people don’t read those little
ads, but YOU read this one, didn’t you?
Call now to place your ad, 873-6671 or
835-6677.

1411 Hwy. 51 North,
Stoughton, WI

4808 Ivywood Trl.
Mcfarland, WI 53558
608-256-5189

Resident Caregivers/CNAs

IDEAL UW-LACROSSE Student
housing. 4 blocks from campus.
4-bedroom, 2-bath. Rent brings in
$11,000+ per year while your young
scholar lives in the master suite for
free. Appliances, W/D included. Great
residential neighborhood. A steal at
$137,500. Call or email:
Bill Karls: 608-444-6526 or
Bkable@aol.com.

www.danecountyauto.com

Requirements are: Must
have clean driving record. Knowledge of
plumbing helpful. Background check. Pass a
physical. Join a great group of people! Must be able
to work some nights and weekends. To apply stop
by our Mcfarland location or send resumé to:

www.SummerWorkNow.com

845 Houses For Sale

We Are Here For All Your Vehicle Needs!

$9 an hour plus quarterly
bonus and benefits.
Please apply online at
www.ncgcareers.com
or stop by the hotels to
talk to a manager for
assistance in applying.
adno=361169-01

THEY SAY people don’t read those little
ads, but YOU read this one, didn’t you?
Call now to place your ad, 873-6671 or
835-6677.

STOUGHTON 2-BEDROOM
Spacious Townhouse style apartment.
Great location. Private Entrance,
Laundry, Garage, Balcony, Storage.
$725/month. No Pets. 608-225-1061

adno=360990-01

STOUGHTON 2 Bedroom Duplex in quiet
neighborhood near Fox Prairie School.
$795/month +Utilities. Water/Sewer
included. Available July 15-Aug 1 608843-7098

adno=358773-01

AMP: LINE 6 Spider IV 75 watt guitar
amp. Tons of built in effects, tuner, and
recording options. Like new, rarely used,
less than 2 years old. Asking $250 OBO.
call 608-575-5984

15

Oregon Observer

The City of Verona is seeking an energetic and
people-oriented individual to join the team
at the Verona Senior Center. The Program
Manager develops and implements a wellrounded schedule of programs and activities to
serve seniors in the community. This position
also recruits and trains volunteers, prepares a
monthly newsletter, and coordinates a volunteer
ride program. A degree in human services,
recreation therapy, or related field or equivalent
experience, plus experience working with older
adults, knowledge of activity planning, and
excellent customer service skills are desired.
Salary $36,400 to $41,600 DOQ plus excellent
benefit package. For complete position
description and to apply go to www.ci.verona.
wi.us by July 31, 2014 EOE.

adno=361716-01

NOW HIRING CONSTRUCTION
CREW PERSONNEL

VALID DRIVER’S LICENSE REQUIRED
MUST BE 18 YEARS OF AGE OR OLDER
CONSTRUCTION EXPERIENCE PREFERRED
FULL-TIME WORK and FULL BENEFITS
TOP WAGES for the RIGHT INDIVIDUALS

APPLY TODAY!!
www.workforclearybuildingcorp.com

Cleary Building Corp.
190 Paoli St.
Verona, WI 53593
608-845-9700
Mon.-Fri. 8 am-5 pm

adno=361448-01

DESIGN ENGINEER

We are currently seeking an experienced
Design Engineer who has worked with
pumps. Experience with Creo and Windchill preferred. This individual will research,
design, evaluate, install, operate and maintain mechanical products, equipment, systems and processes to meet requirements,
applying knowledge of engineering principles. Additional responsibilities include
specifying system components or direct
modification of products to ensure conformance to specs. Send resume and cover
letter to hr@baker-mfg.com.

adno=361452-01

July 17, 2014

Oregon Observer

ConnectOregonWI.com

You’ve gotta
have Faith
You couldn’t miss the colorful float
from Faith Lutheran Church at the
recent Summer Fest parade, nor the
three confetti-cannon salute to the
Oregon Chamber of Commerce at
the end.
The church took first place in the
parade’s float contest.
The float, built in around one week
on the Klahn family farm outside
of Oregon, was a team effort from
youth from the congregation, and
featured American flags and the
seals of five armed forces: Army,
Navy, Air Force, Marines and Coast
Guard.
Submitted photo

LINES+10GB
44LINES+10GB
4 LINES+10GB
Unlimited
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& Text
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EvansvilleEvansville
Evansville
613E.E.Main
Main
St.,
608-882-0680
613
608-882-0680
613St.,
E. Main
St., 608-882-0680
CALLFOR
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STORE
CALL
STORE
FORHOURS.
STORE HOURS.

Oregon
OregonOregon
1015
North
Main
St.,Main
608-835-2980
1015
North
Main
St., 608-835-2980
1015
North
St., 608-835-2980
Stoughton
Stoughton
Stoughton
2384
Jackson
St., 608-877-9548
2384
Jackson
St., 608-877-9548
2384
Jackson
St., 608-877-9548

78967

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to know:
New
Retail
Installment
Contracts
andand
Shared
Connect
Plan required.
Creditororapproval
required.forfor
Regulatory
Cost
Recovery
Feebased
applies
$1.57/line/month);
this
not
tax
gvmt.
required
charge.
Add.
fees,
taxes
and termseach.
applyRetail
andeach.
vary Retail
by svc.Installment
and eqmt. Offers
valid
at participating
may
be fulfilled
through
direct
fulfillment
and
cannot
combined.
uscellular.com
details.
Price
PlanPlan
based
on $100/mo.
10GB
SharedShared
Connect
Planis plus
linesor4with
$10 Device
Charges
Installment
Contract
in-storein-store
at participating
locations
may
be fulfilled
through
direct
fulfillment
cannot
bebecombined.
See store
store
uscellular.com
details.$140
$140
Price
on(currently
$100/mo.
10GB
Connect
Plana4 plus
linesdiscounted
with discounted
$10Connection
Device
Connection
Charges
Contract
in-store
at
participating
locations
only,
may
be
fulfilled
through
direct
fulfillment
and
cannot
be
combined.
See
store
or
uscellular.com
for
details.
$140
Price
Plan
based
on
$100/mo.
10GB
Shared
Connect
Plan
plus
4
lines
with
discounted
$10
Device
Connection
Charges
each.
Retail
Installment
Contract
required
to
receive
discounts,
otherwise
regular
Device
Connection
Charges
apply.
Other
discounts
available
for
additional
Shared
Connect
Plans.
Price
comparison
based
on
AT&T
Mobile
Share
Plan
and
Verizon
More
Everything
Plan
for
10GB
as
of
May
7,
2014.
Contract
Payoff
Promo:
Offer
valid
on
up
to
6
required to receive discounts, otherwise regular Device Connection Charges apply. Other discounts available additional Shared Connect Plans. Price comparison based on AT&T Mobile Share Plan and Verizon More Everything Plan for 10GB as of May 7, 2014. Contract Payoff Promo: Offer valid on up to 6
to lines
receive
otherwise
Device
Connection
Charges
apply.number
Other discounts
available
additional
Shared
Connector Plans.
Price
comparison
based
on AT&T
Mobile
andConnect
Verizon
More
Planbillforidentifying
10GB
as ofearly-termination
May 7,fee2014.
Payoff
Promo:
on up60to 6
consumer
orbusiness
25 business
lines
per account,
based
on credit
approval.
Mustport
port
current
number
and
new
Smartphone
tablet
through
a Retail
Installment
Contract
on aShare
Shared
Connect
Plan. Submit
final billfinal
identifying
early-termination
(ETF)Contract
charged
bycharged
carrier
within
60validwithin
consumer
lines orlines
25required
perdiscounts,
account,
based
onregular
credit
approval.
Must
inincurrent
toto U.S. Cellular
Cellular
andforpurchase
purchase
new
Smartphone
or
tablet
through
a Retail
Installment
Contract
on a Plan
Shared
Plan. Everything
Submit
fee (ETF)
byOffer
carrier
or 25 business lines per account,
based
credit
approval.
Must portPayoff
in current
number
to U.S.POCellular
and purchase
new
Smartphone
orCustomer
tablet through
a reimbursed
Retail Installment
Contract
on a Shared
Connect
Plan.
Submit Reimbursement
final bill identifying
early-termination
fee (ETF)
charged
by carrier®within 60
® Debit
®®Contract
of activation
to lines
www.uscellular.com/contractpayoff
or via
mailtoontoU.S.
U.S.Cellular
Cellular
Contract
Program
5591-61;
Box
752257;
El ElPaso,
TX TX
88575-2257.
will be
for thefor
ETFthereflected
on finalon
billfinal
up tobill
$350/line.
in form
ofina U.S.
Cellular
MasterCard
days ofdays
activation
dateconsumer
todate
www.uscellular.com/contractpayoff
or via
mail
Payoff
5591-61;
PO
Box
752257;
Paso,
88575-2257.
Customer
will
be
reimbursed
ETF
reflected
up
to
$350/line.
Reimbursement
form
of
a
U.S.
Cellular
MasterCard
Debit
® Debit
of activation
date to www.uscellular.com/contractpayoff
or viaInternational
mail to U.S.Incorporated.
Cellular® Contractcard
PO Box
Elused
Paso,
88575-2257.
Customer
willaccepts
beMasterCard
reimbursed
for theCards
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reflected
onU.S.final
bill
uponly.
tovalid
$350/line.
formdate
ashown
U.S.ofCellular
MasterCard
Card issued
by days
MetaBank™
Member
pursuant
to license
MasterCard
does
not
cash
andand752257;
cancan
be be
used
at any
merchant
location
that accepts
Debit
only.
Card
through
expiration
date inshown
onof front
card.
Allow
Card issued
by MetaBank™
Member
FDICFDIC
pursuant
to license
fromfrom
MasterCard
International Incorporated.
This Payoff
doesProgram
nothave
have5591-61;
cashaccess
access
atTXany
merchant
location
that
MasterCard
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Cards the
within
the
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Card
validReimbursement
through expiration
on front
of card. Allow
Card
issued
by
MetaBank™
Member
FDIC
pursuant
to
license
from
MasterCard
International
Incorporated.
This
card
does
not
have
cash
access
and
can
be
used
at
any
merchant
location
that
accepts
MasterCard
Debit
Cards
within
the
U.S.
only.
Card
valid
through
expiration
date
shown
on
front
of
card.
for processing.
be eligible,
customer
register
Account.Retail
RetailInstallment
Installment Contracts:
Contracts: Retail
monthly
payments
according
to thetoPayment
Schedule
in the in
Contract
required.required.
If you areIf inyoudefault
terminate
your Contract,
may require
you require
to
12-14 12-14
weeksweeks
for processing.
To beToeligible,
customer
mustmust
register
forforMyMyAccount.
Retail Installment
InstallmentContracts
Contracts(Contract)
(Contract)andand
monthly
payments
according
the Payment
Schedule
the Contract
are inordefault
or terminate
yourweContract,
we may
youAllow
to
12-14
weeksunpaid
for
processing.
To beas eligible,
mustcosts,
register
for My Account.
Contracts:
Retailyour
Installment
Contracts
(Contract)
and4Gmonthly
payments
toSeetheuscellular.com/4G
Payment
Scheduleforincomplete
theforContract
required.
If you
are service
in4Gdefault
or terminate
your
Contract,
we may
you to
immediately
the entire
Amount
Financed
as well
as our
collection
costs,attorneys’
attorneys’
feesand
andRetail
courtInstallment
totoenforcing
under
the
Contract.
LTE
not available
inaccording
all inareas.
coverage
details.
4Gdetails.
LTE
through
Kingthrough
Street King
Wireless,
immediately
pay thepayentire
unpaid
Amount
Financed
well
as customer
our
collection
fees
court
costs related
related
enforcing
yourobligations
obligations
under
the
Contract.
4G LTE
not available
all areas.
See
uscellular.com/4G
complete
coverage
LTEprovided
service
provided
Streetrequire
Wireless,
immediately
pay
the
entire
unpaid
Amount
Financed
as
well
as
our
collection
costs,
attorneys’
fees
and
court
costs
related
to
enforcing
your
obligations
under
the
Contract.
4G
LTE
not
available
in
all
areas.
See
uscellular.com/4G
for
complete
coverage
details.
4G
LTE
service
provided
through
King
Street
Wireless,
a partner
U.S. Cellular.
is a trademark
of ETSI.
Kansas
Customers:In Inareas
areasininwhich
whichU.S.
U.S.Cellular
Cellular receives
receives support
Fund,
all reasonable
requests
for service
must must
be met.beUnresolved
questions
concerning
services services
availabilityavailability
can be directed
the Kansas
Corporation
a partner
of U.S.ofCellular.
LTE isLTEa trademark
of ETSI.
Kansas
Customers:
support from
fromthe
theFederal
FederalUniversal
UniversalService
Service
Fund,
all reasonable
requests
for service
met. Unresolved
questions
concerning
can betodirected
to the
Kansas Corporation
partner
of U.S.
Cellular.
LTE isProtection
a trademark
Kansas Customers:
In areasoffer.
in which
U.S. Cellular
receives
support
from
the Federal
Universal
Service
Fund,
allAdditional
reasonable
requests
service
must
be met.forUnresolved
questions
services availability can be directed to the Kansas Corporation
Commission
of Public
Affairs
and Consumer
Protection
atETSI.
1-800-662-0027.
Limited-time
offer.
Trademarks
and
names
arearethethe
property
of oftheirtheir
respective
owners.
Additional
termsterms
apply.
See for
store
orstore
uscellular.com
details.©2014
U.S.concerning
CellularPromo_140Plan_Integration_Print_DI_9_75x11
Commission
Office Office
ofaPublic
Affairs
and
Consumer
at of1-800-662-0027.
Limited-time
Trademarks
and trade
trade
names
property
respective
owners.
apply.
See
or uscellular.com
for details.©2014
U.S. CellularPromo_140Plan_Integration_Print_DI_9_75x11
Commission Office of Public Affairs and Consumer Protection at 1-800-662-0027. Limited-time offer. Trademarks and trade names are the property of their respective owners. Additional terms apply. See store or uscellular.com for details.©2014 U.S. CellularPromo_140Plan_Integration_Print_DI_9_75x11
UN355907
78967

16

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