You are on page 1of 20

SOUTH CAROLINAS PREMIER WEEKLY

INDEX | LIVING HERE | DEATHS |


TO SUBSCRIBE
TO THE
GREER CITIZEN,
CALL US
TODAY AT
8772076
SUMMER FUN
Park Hop closing
ceremonies come to
Greer City Park
B6
Michael Eugene Lamb,
56
NOTABLE |
PLANNING AHEAD
Partnership for
Tomorrow sets
fundraising goal
A3
INSIDE |
CLASSIFIEDS B5
COMMUNITY CALENDAR/NEWS A2
CRIME A9
ENTERTAINMENT B9
MILESTONES B7
OBITUARIES A6
OPINION A4
OUR SCHOOLS B8
SPORTS B14
WEATHER A6

Partying with a
purpose
A jewelry and fashion show will be
held at Memorial United Methodist, lo-
cated at 201 N. Main St. in Greer, on July
17 from 6:30 - 8 p.m.
The show will beneft Greer Relief.
Please RSVP to Karen Thomas at
drthomasgc@aol.com if interested in
attending.
LETS HOOP: Greer coach organizes basketball camp B4
WEDNESDAY, JULY 16, 2014 GREER, SOUTH CAROLINA VOL. 101 NO. 29 75 CENTS
Brings 35
years of
experience
BY PHIL BUCHHEIT
STAFF WRITER
On July 1, Carl Long,
a 35-year veteran of law
enforcement, became
Duncans police chief. He
brings 26 years of experi-
ence as a South Carolina
highway patrolman and
nine years of experience
as a captain of the Duncan
Police Department.
Since he was 16, Long
knew he wanted to work in
law enforcement. Grow-
ing up in Greenville, his
father owned a drug store
on Laurens Road that had
a diner on the side of it.
Long saw officers with the
Greenville Police Depart-
ment and deputies with
the Greenville County
Sheriffs Office came in
regularly.
So I was just always
around officers a lot as I
was growing up and I al-
ways knew since the age
of 16 that it was some-
thing I wanted to do, he
explained.
After graduating from
Bob Jones University in
1978, Long worked at a
factory before getting his
first job in law enforce-
ment as an officer with the
Greer Police Department.
I started on third shift
at 11 at night on Friday
the 13th in 1978, Long
said with a laugh.
Long stayed with Greer
for four and a half months
before taking a job with
highway patrol. A 26-
year-long career with the
highway patrol followed,
in the course of which,
Long would be promoted
to corporal, sergeant and
lieutenant.
I started with the high-
way patrol in Chester
County and I was in Ches-
ter County eight and a half
years. Then, I came to
SEE LONG | A6
Near
Riverside
BY BILLY CANNADA
EDITOR
Police are still investigat-
ing a fiery single-vehicle
crash that left two teens
dead and one injured last
Wednesday morning on
Hammett Bridge Road near
Riverside Middle School in
Greer.
Emergency personnel
were called to the scene at
around 6:15 a.m. on July
9.
Upon arrival, the vehicle
was in flames, Lt. Jimmy
Holcombe with the Greer
Police Department said.
Two were transported [to
the hospital] and one died
en route. One was taken to
the burn center. One of the
occupants died on scene.
Officials identified the
two deceased as 16-year-
old Andrew Chase Jack-
son, who was the driver,
and 17-year-old Aaron
Jeffrey Al-Rawi Jones, who
was entrapped in the front
passenger seat after the
collision. The coroners
office said Jones died of
blunt force trauma.
Greer police say speed
was a factor in the sever-
ity in the crash, estimating
the vehicle was traveling
87 mph in a 35 mph zone.
Holcombe said the Jack-
son did not have a drivers
license or a permit. It was
not known whether the
three were wearing seat-
belts.
We dont know why he
lost control, Holcombe
said. We still have a pend-
ing [toxicology test] on the
driver.
According to the cor-
oners office, witnesses
helped the driver and the
backseat passenger (17-
year-old Tydre Salters-
Young) out of the car.
Salters-Young was trans-
ported to the Augusta
Burn Center, where he re-
mains presently.
A fundraiser was estab-
lished for Salters-Young in
hopes of providing finan-
cial help to the family. The
website for those wishing
to donate is gofundme.
com/tydre. Proceeds will
cover travel expenses and
future medical bills.
A vigil for friends and
family was held on Friday
night and memorials have
been established at the
scene of the crash.
billy@greercitizen.com | 877-2076
Abner
Creek
Crossing
passed
BY AMANDA IRWIN
STAFF WRITER
Despite residents voicing
concerns at Planning Com-
mission and Greer Coun-
cil meetings held in June,
Greer Council passed the
rezoning request for Ab-
ner Creek Crossing apart-
ment homes, located on
Abner Creek Road, during
the second and final read-
ing on July 8.
The rezoning request is
for design review district.
This type of zoning allows
the city more control over
the development and al-
lowances of the property
than the propertys for-
mer zoning. The zoning
permits as many as 200
single-story homes to be
SEE COUNCIL | A6
Deadly collision claims
lives of two area teens
Carl Long takes reins in Duncan
BY AMANDA IRWIN
STAFF WRITER
Greer City Park was
crowded Friday night for
the Greer Idol competition
and performances by Jim
Quick and Coastline as a
part of the Tunes in the
Park series. Voting results
from Fridays Greer Idol
rounds were not available
at press time.
Ten teen singers took
the stage to perform their
best renditions of songs
from the 70s and 80s. Ja-
cob Roach was the first
to perform. He played
electric guitar while sing-
ing Eric Claptons Barrel
Bottom Blues. Zelena Hull
followed Roachs perfor-
mance with Holding Out
for a Hero. Roni Teems
sang Ive Got the Music in
Me, and Keddy Mendoza
sang Dont Stop Believ-
ing.
Mendoza has big shoes
to fill, following in the
footstep of her brother,
Kiefer Mendoza, whose
singing and acoustic gui-
tar skills made him a fan
SEE IDOL | A6
Performers take
center stage at
Tunes in the Park



MANDY FERGUSON | THE GREER CITIZEN
Memorials are placed at the site of a crash that killed two
teens in Greer last week.


PRESTON BURCH | THE GREER CITIZEN
The sounds of Tunes in the Park was enough to get Greer
residents out of their seats last Friday night.
PHIL BUCHHEIT | THE GREER CITIZEN
Carl Long was recently named Duncans new police chief. He brings 35 years of experience to the job, after spending
more than two decades with the South Carolina Highway Patrol.
We dont know why
he lost control.
Lt. Jimmy Holcombe
Greer Police Department
We have really good equipment here, but
ultimately, you are only as good as the
people who work for you and we have real
good people here.
Carl Long
Duncan Police Chief
A new chief in town
Calendar deadline is
noon on Tuesdays. All list-
ings are subject to editing
and/or omission due to
space constraints. Please
submit information about
area events, meetings, etc.
to Amanda Irwin at 877-
2076, email to airwin@
greercitizen.com or mail
to The Greer Citizen P.O.
Box 70 Greer, SC 29652.
TODAY, JULY 16
GRACE PLACE in Greer will
have its mini-mall open from
10 a.m. - noon. Grace Place
is located at 407 Ridgewood
Drive. I.D. required.
THURSDAY, JULY 17
THE TAYLORS LIONS Club
at 6 p.m. at the Clubhouse,
500 East Main St., Taylors. Call
Allen Culver at 350-6939.
THE TAYLORS LIONS Club
at noon at the Taylors First
Baptist Church Ministry Cen-
ter (old Post Of ce) on Main
Street, Taylors. The meeting
will last approximately one
hour. Call Jerry Hatley at
268-0567.
SATURDAY, JULY 19
COMMUNITY FOOD BANK
10 -11:30 a.m. at Calvary
Christian Fellowship, 2455
Locust Hill Road, Taylors.
Limited supplies available on
a frst come, frst serve basis.
UPSTATE FIBROMYALGIA
SUPPORT Group at the
Hampton Inn on Fishermans
Drive (behind Earthfare) by
Pelham & 85 at 11 a.m. Call
Rita Forbes at 968-0430 or
Lisa Gambrell-Burns at 268-
5907.
KINGDOM ASSEMBLY
OUTREACH Center will be
handing out free groceries to
qualifed applicants from 10
a.m. - noon at 3315 Brushy
Creek Road, Greer. Call 848-
2728 or visit www.kingdo-
maoc.com.
MONDAY, JULY 21
THE NEVER ALONE GROUP
OF NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS
at 7 p.m. at the Greer Recre-
ational Center.
GRACE PLACE IN Greer will
have its mini-mall open from
10 a.m. - noon. Grace Place
is located at 407 Ridgewood
Drive. I.D. required.
TUESDAY, JULY 22
GRACE PLACE in Greer will
have its clothing closet open
from 6-8 p.m. Grace Place is
located at 407 Ridgewood
Drive. I.D. required.
GIG GLUTEN INTOLER
ANCE GROUP) of Greenville
meets at the Taylors Library,
316 W. Main St. The group
meets from 7- 8:30 p.m.
GAP CREEK SINGERS will
rehearse from 7:30-9 p.m.
at The Church of the Good
Shepherd, 200 Jason St.,
Greer. For further informa-
tion or to schedule a perfor-
mance contact Wesley Welsh,
President, at 877-5955.
BARBERSHOP HARMONY
CHAPTER at 7 p.m. at Memo-
rial United Methodist Church,
201 N. Main St., Greer. Call
877-1352.
THE ROTARY CLUB of
Greater Greer at 7:15 a.m.
at Southern Thymes. Call
334-6177.
THE NEVER ALONE GROUP
OF NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS
at 7 p.m. at the Greer Recre-
ational Center.
WEDNESDAY, JULY 23
GRACE PLACE in Greer will
have its mini-mall open from
10 a.m. - noon. Grace Place
is located at 407 Ridgewood
Drive. I.D. required.
THURSDAY, JULY 24
KIWANIS CLUB AT 6:30 p.m.
at Laurendas Family Restau-
rant. Call Charmaine Helfrich
at 349-1707.
THE SOAR BINGO CLUB from
10 a.m. - noon at Victor Gym.
The cost is 50 cents per card.
FRIDAY, JULY 25
GRACE PLACE IN Greer will
have its monthly dinner
at 6:30 p.m. Grace Place is
located at 407 Ridgewood
Drive. I.D. required.
SATURDAY, JULY 26
COMMUNITY FOOD BANK
10 -11:30 a.m. at Calvary
Christian Fellowship, 2455
Locust Hill Road, Taylors.
Limited supplies available on
a frst come, frst serve basis.


A2 THE GREER CITIZEN COMMUNITY WEDNESDAY, JULY 16, 2014
PARTY WITH A PURPOSE
BENEFITING GREER RELIEF
On July 17, Party with a
Purpose to benefit Greer
Relief will be held at the
Memorial United Method-
ist Church, located at 201
N. Main St., Greer, from
6:30 8 p.m. Refreshments
will be served at 6:30 p.m.
and a fashion show will
begin at 7 p.m.
For more information or
to RSVP contact Dr. Karen
Thomas at drthomasgc@
aol.com.
HUB CITY FARMERS
MOBILE MARKET OPEN
Through August 19 the
Hub City Farmers Mo-
bile Market will be at the
Pinewood Resource Center
Parking Lot in Spartanburg
from 12:30 - 2 p.m. to of-
fer fresh and local produce
and eggs.
THRIFT STORE
TAKING DONATIONS
The Community Chest
Thrift Store, located at
52 Groce Road, Lyman, is
open Thursday and Fri-
day 10 a.m. 6 p.m., and
Saturday 10 a.m. 2 p.m.,
hours may extend if vol-
unteers are available and a
need arises.
Donations of gently used
ladies clothing, accessories
and home dcor items are
being accepted and can be
dropped off at the MTCC,
located at 84 Groce Road,
Lyman, or to setup larger
donations or to volunteer
contact Lyn Turner at 439-
7760.
MEALS ON WHEELS
VOLUNTEER ORIENTATION
Orientation for Meals
On Wheels volunteer driv-
ers will be every Thurs-
day of the year from 9:30
11 a.m. at 15 Oregon St.,
Greenville.
For more information
contact volunteer@mow-
gvl.org or 233-6565, or
visit mealsonwheelsgreen-
ville.org.
ROAD TO RECOVERY
DRIVERS NEEDED
The American Cancer So-
ciety needs volunteer driv-
ers to transport patients
to local treatment centers.
Anyone interested in vol-
unteering as a driver must
have a good driving re-
cord, valid drivers license,
automobile insurance and
a vehicle in good working
condition. The American
Cancer Society provides
free training for this pro-
gram.
For more information on
becoming a Road to Recov-
ery volunteer, contact the
local office at 627-8289.
CPW MATCHES GREER
RELIEF DONATIONS
CPW will dollar for dol-
lar match all donations
designated with CPW. The
donations go out for emer-
gency financial utility as-
sistance.
Contact Greer Relief at
848-5355 for more infor-
mation.
PELHAM POWER
BREAKFAST JULY 23
On July 23 the Pelham
Power Breakfast will be
at Pelham Falls Deli, 8590
Pelham Road, Greenville,
from 8 9 a.m.
For More information,
contact the Greater Greer
Chamber of Chamber at
877-3131.
PANTRY NEEDS CANNED
GOODS, VOLUNTEERS
Gods Pantry needs the
following nonperishable
food donations: canned
vegetables, canned meats,
peanut butter and volun-
teers.
Items can be dropped off
at 100 Enoree Road, Greer,
on Thursdays from 10 a.m.
noon; 2481 Racing Road,
Greer, on Thursdays 1 4
p.m.; or 700 E. Main St.,
Duncan, on Wednesdays 9
11 a.m.
For questions or to vol-
unteer call 963-4441.
GCM SEEKS VOLUNTEERS
FOR SENIOR DINING
GCM needs volunteers to
assist with the Senior Din-
ing from 9 11:39 a.m.,
Monday Friday. To vol-
unteer or for more infor-
mation, call Patsy Quarles
at 877-1937.
SHARONS CLOSET
REQUESTS CLOTHING
Sharons Closet needs
spring and summer cloth-
ing donations, especially
for girls in sizes newborn
to 6T and new underwear
in all sizes. New or gently
used clothing accepted
Monday through Friday 8
a.m. 4 p.m. at 783 S. Line
St Ext., Greer.
GREER RELIEF CALLS ON
VOLUNTEER GARDENERS
As part of a collabora-
tion with the community,
Greer Relief has several
plots and needs as many
volunteer gardeners as
possible to help grow veg-
etables and flowers. Plant-
ing for a fall garden cur-
rently.
Contact Greer Relief at
848-5355 for more infor-
mation.
GCM NEEDS LARGE PRINT
BIBLES, CANNED ITEMS
The Food Pantry needs
boxed gelatin, canned
peas, canned fruit, canned
peas, and potatoes.
GCM also needs large
print Bibles to distribute
to senior adults in the Se-
nior Dining and Meals on
Wheels programs.
Donate at the ministry,
738 S. Line St. Ext., Greer,
between 8 a.m. 4 p.m.
Monday through Friday.
Visit gcminc.org or call
879-2254 for more infor-
mation.
SPARTANBURG REGIONAL
OFFERING SIBLING CLASS
The interactive class
will introduce brothers
and sisters to changes to
expect when siblings are
born.
The class is July 17 from
4 - 5 p.m., and alternative
dates are available.
Registration is open on-
line at spartanburgregion-
al.com.
GCM SEEKS DRIVERS
FOR SUMMER MONTHS
Greer Community Min-
istries needs drivers for
Meals On Wheels during
the summer months. Sev-
eral routes are available
and each takes about an
hour, with pickup between
10 and 11 a.m.
To volunteer or for more
information, call Wendy
Campbell at 879-2254.
A Meals On Wheels
driver must be a qualified
driver with a valid drivers
license and have a heart
for serving others. MOW
has 19 delivery routes in
the greater Greer area.
Meals are delivered Mon-
day through Friday.
INFANT CARE SESSION AT
SPARTANBURG REGIONAL
On July 29 from 6 - 7
p.m., an infant care ses-
sion will introduce the
basics of baby care and
nurturing to moms and
support people.
Registration is available
online at spartanburgre-
gional.com, and 28 open-
ings are available.
GREER RELIEF NEEDS
DELIVERY VOLUNTEERS
Weekly Costco donates
bread and pastries to Greer
Relief. Greer Relief needs
volunteers who are willing
ot pick up donations and
deliver them to Greer Re-
lief for distribution.
Contact Greer Relief at
848-5355 for more infor-
mation.
NUTRITIONAL NAVIGATION:
A GROCERY STORE TOUR
On August 8, from
10 a.m. - noon, dietitian
Kerri Lindberg, R.D., L.D.,
with Spartanburg Reional
Healthcare System, will of-
fer an interactive tour of
your local grocery store.
Waiting list enrollment
available, and registration
is available online at spar-
tanburgregional.com.
CONCERT IN COURTYARD
AT MANNING PLACE
On July 30 a Concert in
the Courtyard will be held
at Manning Place, located
at 10 Companion Court,
Greer, from 6 - 7:30 p.m.
The GRUMPY OLD JAZZ
MEN will perform and
light refreshments will be
served.
COMMUNITY
CALENDAR
COMMUNITY
NEWS
PRESTON BURCH | THE GREER CITIZEN
A tasty treat
Iris Harvey and her son, Barrett, are enjoy a tasty dessert at Dillards Ice Cream. The shop
is located at 504 S. Buncombe Road in Greer.
Local residents will
soon have a chance to
show the world their en-
thusiasm as the global
spotlight comes to Green-
ville during the 2014 UCI
Para-Cycling Road World
Championships running
Aug. 27Sept. 1.
More than 450 of the
worlds best athletes rep-
resenting over 45 coun-
tries will be in Greenville
to compete in time trials
and road races.
As part of the world
championships event,
Greenville Health System
is sponsoring Show Us
Your Spirit, a community
cheer competition award-
ing Upstate area commu-
nity groups demonstrat-
ing the most spirit.
Medals with cash prizes
will be awarded to three
registered teams with the
largest group demonstrat-
ing the most spirit dur-
ing the event. The awards
include $1,000 for first
place gold, $750 for sec-
ond place silver and $250
for third place bronze.
Many of the families
of the competing athletes
are unable to attend be-
cause of travel costs, said
Stan Healy, senior admin-
istrator for GHS Roger
C. Peace Rehabilitation
Hospital and president
of Notus Sports, the local
organizing committee for
the 2014 UCI Para-cycling
Road World Champion-
ships. The cheer compe-
tition is an ideal way for
Greenville to demonstrate
support and enthusiasm
for these world-class ath-
letes.
To register, email info@
greenvillesc2014.com to
receive a registration form
and guidelines. For more
information about the
2014 Para-cycling Road
World Championships, vis-
it greenvillesc2014.com.
WEDNESDAY, JULY 16, 2014 NEWS THE GREER CITIZEN A3
Internal Medicine Eastside
and Westside Now Open
Eastside
864-560-9056
Suzanne Kovacs, M.D.
Thomas Robinson, M.D.
Paul Weaver, M.D.
Westside
864-560-9435
Victoria Arlauskas, M.D.
Jack Cole, M.D.
Jim Evans, M.D.
MedicalGroupoftheCarolinas.com
UNDER
NEW
MANAGEMENT
Back to
MEAT & THREE
$7.
49
SENIORS PAY $6.99
Cafe and Catering
Open: Tuesday - Sunday 7:00 a.m. - 2:30 p.m.
219 Trade Street, Greer
Event Catering Available
Call Lauren for more information
864-801-9511
www.SouthernThymesCafeCatering.com
Southern Thymes
BY BILLY CANNADA
EDITOR
The Partnership for
Tomorrow launched its
fourth phase this week
setting a goal to raise $1
million over the next five
years.
The funds will invest
in economic development,
community development,
quality of life and mar-
keting projects affecting
the Greer community, ac-
cording to Partnership for
Tomorrow officials.
The Partnership for To-
morrow is unique because
we have all the organiza-
tions of Greer sitting down
at the table together plan-
ning and trying to imple-
ment those plans for the
betterment of the Greater
Greer area, said Larry
Wilson, chairman of the
board for the Partnership
for Tomorrow. Thats re-
ally our purpose.
Twenty-eight Greer
area companies have al-
ready pledged more than
$300,000 toward the $1
million goal.
The organization was
created in Greer 15 years
ago as a partnership
among the City of Greer,
Greer Commission of Pub-
lic Works, Greer Chamber
of Commerce, Greer De-
velopment Corporation
and more than 100 private
sector businesses to help
to grow the Greer commu-
nity by strategically and
collectively planning and
investing.
We try to be an incuba-
tor of thoughts and ideas
for our community, Wil-
son said. Starting back in
the late 90s, we did a mas-
ter plan then to help carry
us forward for the next 15
years, and here we are 15
years later and weve pret-
ty closely followed that
master plan.
Over the last 15 years,
officials say Partnership
for Tomorrow has raised
and invested more than
$4.5 million, mostly from
the private sector, for
projects benefiting the
Greer community.
The organization is now
working in conjunction
with the City of Greer on
a 2030 Community Mas-
ter Plan to help to identify
Greers path for growth
and development over the
next 15 years.
From what some of the
consultants have present-
ed at the meetings that
have taken place so far,
the planned future growth
for Greer over the next 15
years is almost doubling
our size, Wilson said. Its
substantial growth. What
were trying to do plan for
the growth and develop-
ment that would be good
for Greer and not just to
let it happen by chance.
We dont want to wake
up one day and say, wow,
how did that happen.
Wilson said community
involvement is crucial to
the Partnership for To-
morrows campaign.
All the things were
trying to do are really
for the betterment of the
community and solely for
the good of the commu-
nity so, obviously, we have
been listening and have
been talking to potential
investors about what they
would like to see Greer be
and the things they would
like us to support, he
said. Thats how we de-
velop our program.
The City of Greer has
already hosted commu-
nity planning sessions for
those wishing to submit
input for the master plan
and will continue with
more sessions in the com-
ing months.
We have already had
some community focus
groups in developing our
master plan, he said.
We have an online survey
that we would hope a vast
majority of our citizens
would complete to tell us
what they hope Greer will
look like in the future. We
feel that it is critical that
we have input from all of
our citizens. We need to
know how they feel and
what they want to see us
do.
For more information
on the Partnership for To-
morrow, call 416-0125.
309 Northview Drive
848-1935
PRESTON BURCH | THE GREER CITIZEN
Business Yard of the Month
The Azalea Garden Club awarded Business Yard of the Month to Talloni, a shoe salon
located at 113 E. Poinsett St. in Greer. Pictured is Kristi Mabry, owner of Talloni, with furry
friend Nelson, the store mascot.
Showing
the most
spirit

Partnership sets goal
to fundraise $1 million
MANDY FERGUSON | THE GREER CITIZEN
Partnership for Tomorrow Chairman Larry Wilson spoke to
supporters Tuesday about fundraising goals and the im-
portance of growth planning.

BY AMANDA IRWIN
STAFF WRITER
Duncans new Police
Chief Carl Long received
a standing applause from
a packed room after being
sworn at the Duncan Town
Council meeting on Mon-
day night. Long, who has
served on in Duncan since
2005, was promoted from
caption to police chief fol-
lowing former Police Chief
Ryan Cothrans resigna-
tion to take a position with
District 5 schools.
Following suit with
Wellford and Spartanburg
County, Duncan council
passed the first reading
of an ordinance to place
a referendum on the bal-
lot in November allowing
residents to vote on au-
thorizing alcoholic sales
on Sundays by nonprofit
organizations and busi-
ness establishments.
If passed on the second
and final reading during
the next Duncan Town
Council meeting, resi-
dents can expect a 5-mil
tax increase for Spartan-
burg County Recreations
services for incorporated
areas of Duncan. Council
passed the proposed or-
dinance on first reading at
Monday nights meeting,
despite previous hesita-
tions posed by councilper-
son Shirley Clopton.
During a previous coun-
cil meeting, Clopton ques-
tioned exactly what ser-
vices the Duncan would
receive if it rejoined the
Recreation District. Recre-
ation District representa-
tives presented proposals
for linear parks to revi-
talize Duncan, which the
Recreation District would
assist with. However, they
also said the town likely
wouldnt see any park de-
velopment as a result of
the tax increase until 2015,
a year and a half after the
tax is implemented.
Duncan Council unani-
mously approved reap-
pointing Boyd B. Nick
Nicholson, Jr., managing
director of Haynsworth
Sinkler Boyd P.A., as Dun-
cans town attorney.
Because the second and
final reading to change
Duncans town council
meetings to the second
Tuesday each month was
approved on final reading,
the next regularly sched-
uled meeting is August 12
at 6 p.m. at Duncan Town
Hall, located at 153 E. Main
St., Duncan.
airwin@greercitizen.com | 877-2076
Residents may have tax
increase due to Rec. Dist.


I
know a bride that just threw the
most lavish wedding, one of two: her
husband is English and within days of
their respective, I do, they were on the
plane to Oxford where he, Chris, contin-
ues work on his Ph.D. and so that they
can celebrate with his family and friends
as well.
The dress was elegant, the flowers,
breathtaking, the food and wine, over-
flowing...just a dream of a day.
And before you nervous fathers start
totting up the potential numbers for
your own daughters, let me just add
this: Bailey planned and executed the
entire wedding, herself, while, of course,
giving full credit to dear friends and
family that were all caught up in the exu-
berance of a truly DIY wedding.
It also says something about Bailey,
I think, that so many people couldnt
wait to roll up their sleeves and pitch
in. I only know Bailey as she is a fellow
equestrian from down the road at her
folks farm, and I was thoroughly caught
up in her adventure.
Having promised to emcee a benefit on
the day of Baileys wedding, I couldnt
attend, so the least Paul and I could do
was offer roses for the bridal bouquet.
Far ahead of us, Bailey planned to
pick her bouquet from the field: Queen
Annes Lace mixed with blue Hydran-
geas, and she and her mother, weeks
earlier, had grown all the other flowers,
in pots, however rose petals for the
flower girls to toss as well as scatter
around the base of the 8 layer cake,
which Bailey baked (a Victorian Sponge
with layers of Costco organic preserves)
were graciously accepted.
College friends from Maryland, for the
price of tanks of gas for the trip and a
place to bunk down, served as the wed-
ding photographers and other equally
cherished souls offered food, stemware
and even a lovely home in Flat Rock, for
the actual ceremony. Our vet, Bibi, along
with her son and his girlfriend, and three
other close chums, all accomplished
musicians, played for the ceremony
and the dance floor, afterwards, was a
bargain-base-
ment rented,
wooden,
clogging
floor, with
a 20 year
old roll of
linoleum,
found in the
farms barn,
fitting per-
fectly over,
ends tucked
beneath, as
was done
to the LED
lights draped
over the tent,
softened
with layers
of muslin.
Did I men-
tion the dress and shoes came from
Goodwill? For a whopping fifty bucks?
And Bailey, a budding jewelry designer,
made the wedding rings, herself, as well
as sewed the pillow on which they would
rest as they were carried up the aisle.
How refreshing, in a day of even small
weddings costing thousands, nay, tens
of thousands of dollars, creating finan-
cial strain at the beginning of a marriage
(or a worried mom and dad, eyeing their
own retirement), to see such a creative
spirit and such a joyous and content
couple. No wonder Chris fell in love with
Bailey.
No wonder we all did.
EDITORIAL |
OPINION
A4 THE GREER CITIZEN WEDNESDAY, JULY 16, 2014



All advertisements are accepted and published
by the Publisher upon the representation that
the advertiser/agency is authorized to publish
the entire contents and subject matter thereof.
It is understood that the advertiser/agency will
indemnify and save the Publisher harmless from
or against any loss or expense arising out of
publication of such advertisements, including,
without limitation, those resulting from claims
of libel, violation of rights of privacy, plagiarism
and copyrights infringement. All material in
this publication may not be used in full or in
part without the expressed written consent of
management.
Established 1918
The Greer Citizen
The Greer Citizen
is published every Wednesday by
The Greer Citizen, Inc.
317 Trade St., Greer, S.C. 29651
Telephone 877-2076
Periodicals Postage Paid at Greer, S.C.
Publication No. 229500
POSTMASTER - Send address changes to
The Greer Citizen, P.O. Box 70
Greer, S.C. 29652
Preston Burch Photographer
Phil Buchheit Photographer
William Buchheit Staf Reporter
Katie Jones Staf Reporter
Amanda Irwin Staf Reporter
Mail subscription rate
Greenville and Spartanburg Counties..................................... $33/year
Elsewhere in South Carolina................................................... $43/year
Elsewhere in Continental U.S. ................................................ $53/year
By Carrier and On Newsstand
75 Cents Per Copy
Steve Blackwell | Publisher
Billy Cannada | Editor


The Greer Citizen

Shaun Moss Advertising
Suzanne Traenkle Advertising
Julie Holcombe Graphic Artist
Mandy Ferguson Photographer
T
he Greer Citizen accepts Let-
ters to the Editor. Letters
should be 125 words or less
and include a name and a phone
number for verification.
The Greer Citizen reserves the
right to edit any content.
Letters to the Editor can be
mailed to 317 Trade St., Greer
29651.
Submission guidelines
LETTERS TO THE EDITOR |
IM JUST
SAYING
PAM STONE
THE UPPER ROOM |
CURIOUSLY
AMANDA
AMANDA IRWIN
Staf reporter
A joyous and content couple
Beware of the facts of
Common Core Standards
Live it!
Read Ezekiel 33:30-33
D
o not merely listen to the
word, and so deceive your-
selves. Do what it says.
- James 1:22 (NIV)
In the midst of busy lives,
even when we make daily
Bible reading a priority we
sometimes find ourselves
merely scanning the pages and
not reading the scripture in
ways that can help us apply
its truths. When we read the
Bible as if hearing that story
or event for the first time, we
can discover something new
in its pages. And it can be an
inexhaustible source of truth
and encouragement.
The prophet Ezekiel spoke
to the people of his day about
applying the word of God to
their lives. They loved to listen
to the word but did not do
well in practicing what they
heard. So God spoke to Ezekiel,
saying, To them you are like a
singer of love songs, one who
has a beautiful voice and plays
well on an instrument; they
hear what you say, but they will
not do it (33:32 NRSV). Jesus
expanded on this theme: Ev-
eryone who hears these words
of mine and puts them into
practice is like a wise man who
built his house on the rock
(Matt. 7:24, NIV).
Scripture takes on tremen-
dous power when we apply
it every day. It addresses our
problems, displaying Gods
concern for us and Gods
wisdom to help solve these
problems. Putting the word of
God into practice can improve
our relationships and give us
direction for our lives. Instead
of resolving only to read the
Bible, we can resolve to live it!
Thought for the day: What is
Gods word showing me today?
Prayer: Dear God, as we read
your word, help us discern
your message for our hearts
and lives each day. Amen.
Roots
S
mall towns hold a unique-
ness thats only seen by
those who take the time to
slow down, look around and
listen. There are stories to be
told, and in Greer this is cer-
tainly no exception.
At the paper, each of us has
our regular small-town-charac-
ters with whom we socialize,
write stories about or, in some
cases, fondly remember. Our
regulars are likely familiar
faces to anyone who frequents
downtown Greer.
A while ago, while doing a
story on a local business, the
owner shared his story regard-
ing a picture discretely hanging
on his wall of a man known
as Socks. Socks, who passed
away years ago, was a Greer
native and, every day, he went
around completing odd jobs
for anyone he could to earn a
little bit of money. Like clock-
work every Friday, he would go
into the owners clothing store
and buy a pair of socks that he
would use to store his hard-
earned change in hence his
nickname.
Recently, a Greer man by the
name of Dewey stopped by the
paper to show us a wooden
replica he handcrafted of a lo-
cal church that was torn down
years ago. It was among many
hes constructed and shared
with us. The detail, pride and
effort he puts into his creations
is apparent to anyone who sees
them from framed windows
to cedar shingles and lighting
concealed beneath the removal
roof. His replicas arent for
profit but rather for hobby.
Through his hobby though, in
his own way, he preserves parts
of Greer that many of us never
knew.
And of course, theres Stomp-
ing Grounds very own Cliff
a veteran who is known by
all and even has his very own
picture of a picture with South
Carolina Senator Tim Scott.
Hes a Greer celebrity in his
own right.
These recognizable, unique
and extraordinary characters
are the embodiment of why
Greer and small towns like
it is so exceptional. In the
same way historic buildings
reflect the past, these rare,
but familiar types of individu-
als preserve what Greer was,
reminding us how far it has
come and during a time when
progression is imminent.
Progress is beautiful and
inevitable, but as our branches
stretch farther, we cannot
forget the roots that ground us
and rightfully remind us of our
humble beginnings.
Common Core is the most controversial topic
in American K-12 education today and for
good reason. The federalized education stan-
dards are quickly forcing schools across the na-
tion to alter their curriculums and alter the way
they monitor student success. Curiously, how-
ever, many South Carolina officials have been
quick to accept some of the most easily refut-
able assertions put forward by Common Cores
supporters. Indeed, some of the routinely ac-
cepted facts about Common core are actually
myths.
No.1: The federal government has nothing to
do with Common Core.
Thats a myth. The federal government
pushed states to adopt Common Core in three
ways. First, in order to apply for Race to the Top
grants (from the 2009 stimulus bill), states
had to adopt common standardsand there
was only one system of common standards to
choose from: Common Core. Second, the fed-
eral government stipulated that in order to get
No Child Left Behind (NCLB) waivers, states had
to adopt these same common standards. Third,
the stimulus bill provided $362 million to fund
two consortia to develop tests aligned to these
standardsSmarter Balanced and PARCC.
No. 2: Common Core was a conservative
idea that was hijacked by the Obama adminis-
tration.
Thats another myth. Its true enough that the
idea of a nationwide set of common standards
was initiated during the Reagan administration;
and its true, too, that Common Core itself was
at first pushed (and still is being pushed) by
some Republicans. That doesnt make it a con-
servative idea. Theres nothing conservative
the federal government bribing states to hand
over their prerogatives in education to unac-
countable bureaucrats in Washington and to
functionally anonymous boards and consortia.
Common Core wasnt hijacked by the Obama
administration. Its creators openly asked for
the federal governments help, knowing full
well that Washington doesnt hand out money
without exerting control.
No. 3: Common Core has nothing to do with
curriculum; its only about standards.
Yet another mythand an especially mislead-
ing one. Standards determine curriculum. If you
change standards, you have to change the cur-
riculum in order to meet the standards. Since
teachers will be held accountable according to
how well their students performed on Common
Core-aligned standardized tests, theyll have
to gear their lesson plans to the Common Core
standards. Common Cores ties with curricu-
lum are mentioned throughout South Carolinas
Race to the Top grant proposals, NCLB Waiver
proposal, and the review of Common Core pub-
lished by the State Board of Education and the
(state) Education Oversight Committee.
No. 4: Common Core was developed and ad-
opted in a transparent manner.
Thats false. The Common Core standards
themselves were developed behind closed
doors. As for its adoption in South Carolina,
parents were left out of the adoption process
in violation of state law.
No. 5: Common Core will better prepare stu-
dents for college and career.
This last is the biggest and most destruc-
tive myth of all. Standards themselves cant
promote student achievement. There is no sig-
nificant relationship between an increase in the
rigor of standards and student achievement
as Harvard and Brookings Institute studies have
made clear. Teachers and parents can promote
achievement, but federal dictates like No Child
Left Behind and Common Core actually remove
power and freedom from teachers and parents
by creating a one-size-fits-all system that they
are powerless to change.
These, then, are some myths about Common
Core. Here is a fact: If we want higher student
achievementand if were tired of dumping
ever-increasing amounts of money into a sys-
tem that hasnt produced itwed better get
out of Common Core while we can.
This guest editorial was submitted by Dillon Jones, a policy analyst with the South
Carolina Policy Council.
LANGHORNE HOWARD | PHOTO SUBMITTED
BY AMANDA IRWIN
STAFF WRITER
Originally founded 26
years ago in Greenwood,
Migs Pizza Castle has now
made its way to Taylors.
In early June the family-
owned restaurant opened
its seventh location at
5010 Old Spartanburg
Road, where it offers sal-
ads, subs, pizzas, calzones
and seafood for dine-in,
carry-out and catering.
We thought Taylors
would be a good com-
munity to do business
with, so this is the reason
you know, said Thomas
Migdalas, co-founder of
the original restaurant.
Im an old-school, if you
take care of people the
business will be here...
The Migdalas broth-
ers, Thomas and Kostas,
opened the restaurants
first location and later let
the namesake expand to
Laurens, Saluda, Abbeville,
Ninety Six, Newberry and
now Taylors, each man-
aged under different own-
ers. Although separately
owned, each restaurant is
established with the train-
ing, supervision, service
and quality standards of
the Migdalas original lo-
cation.
Im going to be here
to make sure things go
like Greenwood its the
same concept, the same
recipes and the training.
Thats what Im here for,
Thomas said.
The only thing I want
to do when I sell a place
is to control the quality of
the food, he said. If they
do that theyre doing their
job, if not I take the name
off, thats the deal.
Although the restaurant
industry is notoriously
difficult to succeed in,
through his lengthy ca-
reer, Thomas has come to
believe that Migs empha-
sis on quality sets the res-
taurant apart from others.
Thats all Ive been do-
ing all my life. Since I
know myself, I was in the
restaurant business..., he
said.
Thomas said when he
moved south people told
him his style of food
would not do well, but he
decided, Im going to do
what I do best.
I did everything I knew,
and somehow people, they
liked it and it worked, he
said. Because I believe if
you have a quality prod-
uct people will come. I
dont believe in only hav-
ing good recipes like a
lot of people say they have
good recipes you have
to buy premium ingredi-
ents for these recipes to
come through. Thats why
I said, Stop the gimmicks,
stop the specials, spend
that money on the prod-
uct and stop spending it
on the promotions and we
will be better off.
Thomas said the menu
has items for people of all
ages and nothing on the
menu is mediocre. Every
item could be a favorite,
and any item believed to
be mediocre is taken off.
Lets say they try the
pizza, and for the next six
months they think they
found the good thing on
the menu and they keep
getting that. Then they
get a sub sandwich, and
they go whoa I didnt
know that, Thomas said.
When they try something
they stick with it because
a lot of restaurants, they
have something good on
the menu and everything
else is averageI believe,
if you dont do it good, get
it off the menu. I dont be-
lieve variety will bring the
business, so if you dont
do it right dont have it.
Although the Migdalas
brothers dont own the
Taylors location, the res-
taurant still operates as a
family-run business with
owner J. Rees Jones and
his two sons working at
the restaurant. The Jones
family were regulars at the
Greenwood Migs location,
and now the same chil-
dren who grew up eating
Migs are part of the new
Taylors establishment.
I met them (the Jones
family) in my place, and
(they) loved the food,
Thomas said.
Theres nothing on the
menu bad, but it just de-
pends on what you like.
You like seafood? Weve
got flounder plate, tila-
pia plate, devil crab, fried
shrimp. If you like sand-
wiches weve got every
sandwich on the board. If
you like pizzas, calzones,
wings, salads I could
keep going.
Jones said in his experi-
ence the hot subs are the
most popular items on the
menu.
Jones said he wants
people to know theyre a
new business, but theyre
involved in the community
and community oriented.
Through July 18, kids
menu meals are under $5
and include drink, and
chips or fries. A portion
of the grand opening pro-
ceeds will be donated to
the Disabled American
Veterans organization.
The Taylors location is
open Monday Thursday
and Saturday 10:45 a.m.
9:30 p.m., and Friday
10:45 a.m. 10 p.m. For
more information, visit
facebook.com/migspizza-
oftaylors or call 268-3001.
BUSINESS
The Greer Citizen
WEDNESDAY, JULY 16, 2014 THE GREER CITIZEN A5
1921 Hwy. 101 South
(Exit 60 off Interstate 85)
Greer, SC 29651
864-968-1133
CIGARS
S.C.s Largest Humidor
Dont leave
an estate
with life
insurance
Q: My mom is 71 and
debt-free. Shes invest-
ing $600 a month in a
universal life insurance
policy worth $250,000 be-
cause she wants to leave
something behind when
she dies. What could she
invest this money in,
other than the life insur-
ance policy, in order to
leave an estate?
DR: This is a good ques-
tion.
You dont use life insur-
ance to leave an estate.
Its a bad idea. You leave
an estate by saving and
investing.
The only people who
will tell you to use a life
insurance policy to leave
an estate are life insur-
ance salesmen.
Unless shes ill, I
wouldnt keep the policy.
Instead, Id do some
long-term investing. It
wont take long to get to
$250,000 with $7,200 a
year.
Its the kind of thing
that sounds like itll take
forever, but youve got
to remember youve got
growth and interest in the
equation.
I wouldnt put money
into a life insurance
policy at age 71, unless
theres someone being
left behind who really
needs the money and it
doesnt sound like there
is in this case.
It would probably
take about 13 years for
the money to turn into
$250,000. Assuming shes
healthy, Id rather do that
and bet on her living. That
way, she can leave an
estate and avoid the ex-
pense and rip-off part of
the universal life policy.
No treating
student loans
like a mortgage
Q: I have a very large
amount of student loan
debt. Where would that go
in your Baby Steps plan?
DR: Baby Step 2 is
where you pay off all debt
except for your house.
The fact that its a large
amount of student loan
debt doesnt change
anything.
Hopefully, with your
very large amount of stu-
dent loan debt, you also
have a very large income.
Believe it or not, there are
some really sad situations
out there where people
have gone $200,000 into
debt for a four-year de-
gree in a field where they
make $50,000 a year.
That kind of thinking
and behavior is ridicu-
lous, but its out there.
Whatever you do, Jade,
dont treat this student
loan debt as if it were a
mortgage.
In other words, dont let
it hang around for years
and years and years.
Youve got to get fo-
cused and intense about
paying off this mess and
getting on with your life.
Remember, your income
is your largest wealth-
building tool.
You cant save and plan
for the future when all
your money is flying out
the door to pay back debt!
DAVE
SAYS
DAVE
RAMSEY


CBLGreer.com
229 Trade Street | Greer, SC | 877-2054
Visit our new Online Mortgage Center where you can check
interest rates and conveniently apply online for a mortgage.
There is NO Application Fee PLUS:
We originate and underwrite all our home loans so every
application is considered case-by case.
We dont require PMI (Private Mortgage Insurance) which
results in lower monthly payments and may mean you can
afford a shorter term mortgage.
We service your loan, so you always deal with people you know.
Apply Online for
Your Mortgage at
Keeping it Simple:
CBLGreer.com
Your Local Mortgage Lender Since 1907
Greer State Bank recently
hired Larry Compton as
vice president and mort-
gage loan officer.
Compton brings more
than 30 years in lending
and mortgage lending ex-
perience and will serve at
the Taylors branch.
He will be responsible for
developing relationships
with customers, realtors,
builders and other sources
for the origination of resi-
dential mortgages loans.
In addition to loan gen-
eration, Larry has managed
mortgage operations and
has extensive experience in
conventional, FHA, VA, and
USDA residential mortgage
lending, said Tim Strom,
mortgage director for the
bank. He is a great addi-
tion to our GSB Mortgage
team.
Compton began his lend-
ing career in 1973 and
has focused on Mortgage
Lending since 1992. As a
lifelong resident of South
Carolina, he previously
served as a board member
for the S.C. Department
of Consumer Affairs and
was involved in the com-
position of the mortgage
regulations for the State of
South Carolina.
Compton also served as
a board member and presi-
dent of the South Carolina
Mortgage Brokers Associa-
tion. He and his wife reside
in Moore and have two sons
and two granddaughters.
Migs Pizza opens in Taylors
GSB hires
Compton
Larry Compton
MANDY FERGUSON | THE GREER CITIZEN
Pictured from left is J. Rees Jones, owner of Migs Pizza Castle in Taylors, with his son,
Brady Jones, both of whom work at the newly opened family-owned business.
I did everything I
knew, and somehow
people, they liked
it and it
worked.
Thomas
Migdalas
Co-founder,
Migs Pizza Castle



Dollar General will cel-
ebrate the opening of its
new location at 2810 S
Highway 14 in Greer this
Saturday, July 19 at 8 a.m.
with free prizes and spe-
cial deals.
Additionally, the first
50 adult shoppers at the
store will receive a $10
Dollar General gift card
and the first 200 shoppers
will receive a Dollar Gen-
eral tote bag, among other
giveaways.
Dollar General is com-
mitted to delivering a
pleasant shopping experi-
ence that includes a con-
venient location, a wide
assortment of merchan-
dise and great prices on
quality products, said
Dan Nieser, Dollar Gener-
als senior vice president
of real estate and store
development. We hope
our Greer customers will
enjoy shopping at Dollar
Generals new location.
Nieser said Dollar Gen-
eral stores offer con-
venience and value to
customers by providing
a focused selection of na-
tional name brands and
private brands of food,
housewares, seasonal
items, cleaning supplies,
basic apparel and health/
beauty products.
Traditional Dollar Gen-
eral stores employ approx-
imately six to 10 people,
depending on the need.
Those interested in join-
ing the Dollar General
team may visit the Career
section at www.dollargen-
eral.com
Dollar General
celebrates opening
FROM PAGE ONE
favorite and resulting in
winning the 2013 Greer
Idol competition.
Ashley Goss gave a per-
formance of Pat Benatars
Heartbreaker, Taylor
Lee performed Journeys
Lights, and Sha Jack-
son sang Fleetwood Macs
Rhiannon. The teen por-
tion of the competition
concluded with Isabel
Greene performing Your
Love, Sophia Noyes sing-
ing Love is a Battlefield,
and Devan White singing
Sweet Home Alabama.
Continuing on in the
Greer Idol Teen competi-
tion are Roach, Teems,
Mendoza, Goss, Lee,
Greene, Noyes and White.
Setting the tone for the
adult Greer Idol portion
of the night, Brian Gar-
ners took the stage with
an acoustic guitar to per-
form You Give Love a Bad
Name, and John Garrison
followed his performance
of Billys Joels Moving
Out. Steven Young, a
clear fan favorite, gave an
interactive performance of
Never Been to Spain, dur-
ing which he hopped off
the stage and high-fived
crowd members. Josh
Jordans performance of
Pride and Joy followed.
Lauren Painter sang Black
Velvet, James Landreth
sang Aerosmiths Dream
On, and Elizabeth Haney
gave the last performance
of the night when she sang
Open Arms.
Continuing on in the
Greer Idol competition are
Garner, Young, Jordan,
Painter and Landreth.
Weather permitting, the
next regularly scheduled
Tunes on Trade is Friday
beginning with Greer Idol
Teen at 6 p.m., Greer Idol
at 8 p.m., and The Carolina
Coast Band will perform
between the two competi-
tions in Greer City Park.
airwin@greercitizen.com | 877-2076
Mike Lamb
Michael Eugene Lamb,
56, of 5 Gallivan St., Greer,
passed away Tuesday, July
8, 2014. A native of Hen-
dersonville, N.C., he was
the husband of Mindy Har-
vey Lamb and the son of
Hazel Whitmire and Jim
McCall of Piedmont and
the late Alfred Lamb. He
retired from Michelin and
was a member of Oneal
Church of God.
Survivors also include
a son, Brannon Lamb of
Greer; a daughter, Jade
Sanders of Hartwell, Ga.;
four brothers, Tim , Jimmy,
and Leo McCall, and Allen
Lamb; three sisters, Polly
Lindsey, and Doris and
Lisa Lamb; and a grand-
son, Tucker Sanders.
A memorial service was
held at 7 p.m. on Monday
and the family received
friends from 6 - 7 p.m.
prior to the service.
Memorials can be made
to Home With A Heart, 220
James Mattison Road, Lib-
erty, S.C. 29657.
Online condolences can
be made at striblingfuner-
alhome.net.
A Arrangement Florist
877-5711
The Upstates Premier Florist
1205 W. POINSETT STREET GREER OPEN MON.-FRI. 8:30-6 SAT. 9-3
www.aarrangementfowers.com
Greers Freshest Flowers Master Designer Shop
VOTED BEST IN THE UPSTATE
OBITUARIES
The Greer Citizen
A6 THE GREER CITIZEN WEDNESDAY, JULY 16, 2014
OBITUARIES
Can be emailed to billy@
greercitizen.com or dropped
of at 317 Trade St. Deadline:
noon Tuesday. Cost: $40; with
photo $55.
Rain Returns for the Weekend
We will see sunshine, warm temperatures and
afternoon thunderstorms returning for the
weekend. We will see rain and thunderstorms
on Saturday and Sunday with highs in the
upper 70s and low 80s. After a week with dry,
cool weather, temperatures take a dip as more
clouds and higher rain chances return this
weekend. Have a great weekend!
Moonlight Movies
Where: Greer City Park
Date: Thursday, July 17th
6-10 p.m.

Temps: Mostly sunny and
warm. Low 80s at start.
91
70
1.10
23.73
-1.52
6:27 AM
8:42 PM
July 19 July 26 Aug. 3 Aug. 10
74/63 RN 78/62 ISO
71/59 ISO 76/58 ISO
86/74 ISO 84/75 ISO
86/77 ISO 85/76 ISO
80/68 ISO 81/68 ISO
84/68 ISO 82/67 ISO
89/72 ISO 86/71 ISO
78/66 ISO 83/66 ISO
74/63 Rain
78/62 Iso. showers
75/64 Rain
79/63 Iso. showers
79/66 Rain
83/68 Iso. showers
80/68 Rain
84/70 Iso. showers
86
63
87
65
84
65
79
66
83
68
86
68
88
70
Wednesday Thursday Friday
Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday
Weekend Outlook
FROM PAGE ONE
Spartanburg County and
was promoted to corporal
in 1990, said Long.
The highway patrol
formed The ACE team
(Aggressive Criminal En-
forcement) in 1991, a spe-
cialized squad that works
specifically to curtail traf-
ficking and transportation
of illegal drugs on South
Carolina roadways. Long
became a part of the ACE
team when it was formed
and stayed on that unit,
earning titles of sergeant
and lieutenant before re-
tiring from the highway
patrol in 2005 as the sec-
ond in command. During
his two decades with the
highway patrol, Long lost
four friends in the line of
duty, three of whom were
shot to death during traf-
fic stops, and one which
was struck on the side of
the interstate while assist-
ing a disabled motorist.
In May of 1983, Corporal
John Clinton, who had
trained Long, was shot to
death in Chester County
while trying to make an
arrest.
He had trained me and
was my supervisor. When
that happened my wife
was pregnant with our
first child and I was 27-
years-old. It was extreme-
ly tough, Long said.
Long also worked with
Corporal Mark Coats and
Trooper First Class Eric
Nicholson. Coats was shot
to death on I-95 during a
routine traffic stop and
Nicholson was shot to
death on I-85 while trying
to apprehend a suspected
bank robber.
Longs decision to retire
from The highway patrol
stemmed from a job offer
as a captain with the Dun-
can Police Department. He
also had a desire to escape
the tedious drives to Co-
lumbia that he was mak-
ing on a daily basis.
Coming in as a captain,
Long worked right along-
side former Police Chief
Cothran for nine and half
years, making Longs tran-
sition from captain to
chief a lot easier.
He is a great guy and
I really enjoyed working
with him, said Long, re-
ferring to Cothran.
As chief, Long now finds
himself immersed in pa-
perwork and faces the
task of getting everything
budgeted. He is also on
call everyday around the
clock, but according to
him, this has been the case
since 1991.
With 10 full time offi-
cers, six officers working
in schools, six reserve offi-
cers, one full time victims
advocate and one police
clerk, the Duncan police
departments work force
totals 24.
Long feels fortunate to
have a qualified police
force which also has a lot
of experience.
One of my main goals
as Chief is to maintain
good morale in this police
department. These offi-
cers have to deal with so
much and its extremely
important to keep morale
up.
We have really good
equipment here, but ul-
timately, you are only as
good as the people who
work for you and we have
real good people here,
states Long.
As chief, Long also wants
his department to focus
on the importance of be-
ing proactive and profes-
sional.
Its a lot easier to pre-
vent crime than investi-
gate crimeWe want to
have a good presence in
our apartment complexes
and in our community in
general. We want people
to know that we are here
for them and if they have
problems they can come
to us. This department
has made a lot of changes
over the last nine years
and we have gotten bet-
ter and better and become
more professional. A lot
of people look at small
town police departments
differently than bigger cit-
ies like Greenville but our
goal is to always be pro-
fessional, said Long.
With drugs becoming an
increasing problem, Long
believes the drug causing
most of the crime in the
Duncan area is metham-
phetamine.
One of our biggest chal-
lenges right now is the
influx of meth in our com-
munities. Though a lot of
people arent cooking it
here, a lot of the robberies
and car breakings are meth
related. It seems like the
meth epidemic that is oc-
curring right now is worst
than the crack epidemic
ever was, he said.
Longs 14 years of expe-
rience on the ACE team,
along with his desire to
keep his department pro-
active, provide the Duncan
Police Department with an
opportunity to stay one
step ahead of drug-related
crime and keep the Dun-
can community safe.
Everyday, Im excited to
go to work, says Long.
FROM PAGE ONE
built on the property and
the proposed plan has the
developments entrance
on Abner Creek Road,
which was part of the pri-
marily traffic-related con-
cerns expressed by nearby
residents. However, traf-
fic concerns cant be ad-
dressed through rezoning
but rather through traffic
studies managed by South
Carolina Department of
Transportation.
Again, the only thing
I wanted to make known
or have on record is, our
vote here is simply for the
rezoning. A lot of citizens
had a lot of concerns for
this area, said councilper-
son Kimberly Bookert.
Concerns residents ex-
pressed could not be ad-
dressed through changing
or denying the rezoning
request, which is what the
request presented to coun-
cil was in reference to.
This may be an oppor-
tunity for us to reach out
to our residents in our
area and help them bet-
ter understand process
and procedure as we go
through these types of
events to help them better
understand how it is we do
things and why it is we do
things because the nation
of education in that regard
is critical to, not only the
process for us, but to oth-
ers as they try to under-
stand the issues that will
be before them, said
Greer Mayor Rick Danner.
Council addressed sev-
eral other zoning request-
ed, in which they unani-
mously approved the final
reading and rezoning for
properties located at Fox-
field Way and Chandler
Road to a R-5 residential
patio home district. That
action received no oppo-
sition. In addition, nearly
18 acres of property lo-
cated at 421, 431 and 445
South Suber Road received
approval on first reading
for annexation and zon-
ing classification of R-10
single family residential.
Developer Mark II Proper-
ties plan to combine and
develop the property and
construct 77 $250,000 de-
tached homes. The prop-
erties will be addressed at
the July 21 Planning Com-
mission meeting.
On the second reading,
council made their final
vote to repeal the tex-
ting-while-driving ban or-
dinance pushed forward
by councilperson Judy Al-
bert. The citys decision to
repeal the ordinance came
in light of the statewide
texting-while-driving ban
Gov. Nikki Haley signed
into law earlier this sum-
mer.
Council also unanimous-
ly voted to amend the
citys code of ordinance
by repealing and replac-
ing all of chapter 35 of the
flood damage prevention
with new floodplain maps
for the city and Greenville
County. The amendment
was required in order to
remain in compliance with
the National Flood Insur-
ance Program and it will
be effective on August 8.
Nominations for the
Board of Zoning Appeals
and Planning Commission
were made as well. Nomi-
nated by councilman Jay
Arrowood, Allison Ringer
was unanimously appoint-
ed for the Board of Zoning
Appeals replacing Loan
Nelson, who resigned, to
serve for District 1. Both
nominated by Danner,
Mickey Montgomery was
appointed to the Planning
Commission to replace
Clay Jones, who resigned,
for District 4, and Kevin
Tumblin was appointed to
the Planning Commission
to replace Chris Harrison,
who resigned.
The next regularly sched-
uled Greer City Council
meeting is July 22 at 6:30
p.m. at Greer City Hall.
airwin@greercitizen.com | 877-2076

Clemson Universitys
engineering-and-science
majors will have more op-
portunities to apply class-
room knowledge to the
real world as part of a new
effort that launches this
month.
Randy Collins has been
named executive director
of academic initiatives, a
newly created position in
the College of Engineering
and Science. He was previ-
ously the colleges associ-
ate dean of undergraduate
and international studies.
Collins said that he
plans to expand engage-
ment opportunities for
students, including the
portfolio of projects that
put students in communi-
ties to learn how engineer-
ing and science apply out-
side of the classroom.
The activities will help
better prepare students
for their careers, while
benefiting the communi-
ties where they work, he
said.
Projects will include in-
ternational programs, in-
cluding study abroad, that
will be aimed at building
on the successes of those
already in place. Clemson
students, for example,
have constructed a water
system for a Haitian village
and delivered specialized
blankets to Tanzania for
babies born prematurely.
We want to provide
opportunities that are
uniquely Clemson, Col-
lins said. We want stu-
dents to be engaged in
experiences that are richer
than simply taking a col-
lection of classes and get-
ting a degree.
A search will begin in fall
for a permanent associate
dean of undergraduate
and international studies.
Anand Gramopadhye,
the colleges dean, said
that Collins new initiatives
will focus on the 21st cen-
turys grand challenges,
including health, energy,
transportation and envi-
ronmental sustainability.
Clemson is a land-grant
university in an area with
a large number of multina-
tional corporations, which
uniquely positions us to
take the lead in solving the
worlds complex issues,
he said
Its a responsibility that
we take seriously. Were
working with a broad
range of public and pri-
vate partners to change
the world for the better.
John Ballato, Clemsons
vice president for eco-
nomic development, said
Collins new role will help
create a well-qualified
workforce that supports
companies across the state
and attracts new industry.
When students gradu-
ate and begin their careers,
they need to be able to hit
the ground running, Balla-
to said. The projects that
Dr. Collins oversees will
help ensure students are
ready to meet the worlds
complex challenges from
day one.
Collins will also lead on-
line education for the col-
lege.
He has been at Clemson
since 1989. He served as
an American Council on
Education Fellow in 2012-
13.
LONG: Lost friends in the line of duty
AMANDA IRWIN | THE GREER CITIZEN
Carl Long, Duncans new police chief, took his oath
the Duncan Town Council meeting Monday.
COUNCIL: Repeals texting ordinance



IDOL: Next performance is this Friday


Collins named director
at Clemson University
NORTHWOOD BAPTIST
LADIES NIGHT IS JULY 29
Northwood Baptist
Church will host a ladies
night on Tuesday, July 29
at 7 p.m. featuring special
guest Carol Kent.
Kent is an award-win-
ning author, whose life
changed forever when her
only son, a graduate of the
U.S. Navel Academy and
a Lieutenant in the Navy,
shot and killed his wifes
ex-husband. She will speak
on hope in the midst of
challenging circumstanc-
es.
Tickets are available July
14-27. The cost is $7. Call
877-5417 for more infor-
mation.
WORSHIP THE SON UNDER
THE SUN AT AGAPE HOUSE
Agape House welcomes
the public and friends and
family to partake in
Worship the Son Under
the Sun, an outdoor wor-
ship service being held on
July 27 at 9:45 a.m. The
church is located at 900
Gap Creek Road, Greer.
JUNGLE SAFARI VBS
AT UNITED CHRISTIAN
United Christian Church,
located at 105 Daniel Ave.,
Greer, will host Jungle
Safari, a Vacation Bible
School for ages 5 and up
from July 21-25 from 6-
8:30 p.m. nightly.
For more information,
call 895-3966 or 561-
8195.
MORGAN TO SPEAK
AT UPSTATE TREE OF LIFE
Rev. Lloyd Morgan will be
speaking at Upstate Tree
of Life Church, located at
203 E. Bearden St., Greer,
on July 20 at 6 p.m.
For more information,
call 848-1295. The pastor
at the church is Rev. Jim
Henderson Sr.
DEVENGER ROAD CHURCH
HOSTING VBS
Vacation Bible School at
Devenger Road Presbyte-
rian Church will run from
July 20 -24 starting each
night at 5:45 p.m. Dinner
will be provided for free
nightly.
The program is for ages
3 to rising seventh grad-
ers. To register, visit De-
vengerroad.org.
ABNER CREEK
HOSTING SIMULCAST
Abner Creek Baptist
Church will be hosting:
THE WORD: CLOSER TO
HOME with Beth Moore.
The Living Proof Live Si-
mulcast will take place
Saturday, Sept. 13 from
9:30 a.m.-4:15 p.m.
Tickets are $25 per per-
son (including lunch) and
are available online at ab-
nercreekbaptist.com.
The simulcast will be
broadcast at 2461 Abner
Creek Rd. in Greer.
APALACHEGOLDEN
HEARTS CALENDAR
On July 19, the senior
adult group will be treated
to lunch in Gatlinburg,
Tenn. at Log Cabin Pan-
cake House. On this day
trip they will spend some
time in Gatlinburg and go
to Ober-Gatlinburg.
The seniors plan to eat
out at Chick-Fil-A in Greer
at 6 p.m. on July 31.
Senior Adult Vacation
Bible School is on the
calendar for August 4-8
(Monday through Friday,
6 p.m.) at Apalache Bap-
tist Church. There will
be a different Bible Study
Leader for each of the five
nights: Monday Rev. Ed-
die Cooper (ABC Pastor),
Tuesday- Rev. Jerry Bry-
ant, Wednesday - Rev. Jim
Carpenter, Thursday Dr.
Trenton Connley, and Fri-
day Rev. Butch Howard
(all members of ABC). Din-
ner will be served to the
group each night after the
bible study sessions in the
CLC. Senior VBS is an an-
nual event held each year
at ABC where the group
enjoys a week of bible
study, food, fun and fel-
lowship.
A one day trip is sched-
uled August 18 for the
Golden Hearts (place
and time to be announced
later).
The seniors will meet at
Petes Restaurant in Greer
on August 28 at 6 p.m. for
the evening meal.
EBENEZER WELCOME
OFFERING FREE FOOD
The Bread of Life Food
Pantry at Ebenezer Wel-
come Baptist Church, 4005
Highway 414, Landrum, is
open on Thursdays from
2-4 p.m. The pantry is
open to families in need
of assistance. Photo ID is
required.
For more information,
call 895-1461.
SINGLES BIBLE STUDY
AT PELHAM ROAD BAPTIST
Pelham Road Baptist
Church, 1108 Pelham
Road, Greer, hosts a Sin-
gles Bible Study each Sun-
day from 6-8:30 p.m.
GRIEFSHARE OFFERED
AT FAIRVIEW BAPTIST
Fairview Baptist Church,
1300 Locust Hill Road,
Greer, will host Grief-
Share, a support group led
by Carol Allen, on the sec-
ond Sunday of each month
from 4:45 - 6:30 p.m.
For more information,
contact Carol Allen at 292-
6008.
SEND US YOUR
CHURCH NEWS
Churches wishing to
list upcoming events and
programs in Church News
should send information
to Billy@greercitizen.
com or call 877-2076.
Deadlines for submission
are Monday at noon.
Bob Jones University is
inviting the Greer commu-
nity to view a static dis-
play of law enforcement
and military vehicles in
front of Bob Jones Acade-
my on campus Friday, July
18 from 9 -11 a.m.
Law enforcement agen-
cies participating in the
event include the South
Carolina Highway Patrol,
the Greenville County
Sheriffs Department and
numerous municipal po-
lice departments including
Fountain Inn, Greenville,
Greer, Mauldin, Simpson-
ville and Travelers Rest.
Dr. Mike Wilkie, a crimi-
nal justice professor at
BJU, organized the event
in conjunction with the
Universitys summer crim-
inal justice camp.
The event is free and
open to the public. Park-
ing will be available be-
hind the R.A. Johnson
Residence Hall.
To access this park-
ing lot, enter the campus
from the Wade Hampton
entrance.
RELIGION
The Greer Citizen
WEDNESDAY, JULY 16, 2014 THE GREER CITIZEN A7
PELVIC/TRANSVAGINAL MESH?
Did you undergo transvaginal placement of
mesh for pelvic organ prolapse or stress urinary
incontinence between 2005 and the present?
If the mesh caused complications,
you may be entitled to compensation.
Call Charles H.Johnson Law
and speak with female staff members
1-800-535-5727
Reshaping the past
Longtime craftsman and World War II veteran Dewey
Williams recently completed a miniature version of the old
Methodist Episcopal Church, which stood at a location on
North Main Street and Church Street in Greer from 1888 -
1912. He has also recreate businesses such as the Sanitary
Caf, Greer Alignment Garage, Miller Cook Hardware
and McCarters Barber Shop. He is searching for a photo
of Greer Mill School for a similar project. Anyone with a
photo can contact him at 293-1151.
Photos by Mandy Ferguson
CHURCH
NEWS

Chuck Nicholas was re-
cently awarded the Fifth
Diamond Award by the
National Speech & Debate
Association during their
annual tournament in
Overland Park, Kansas.
Nicholas, a resident of
Mauldin, serves as the
speech and debate coach
for Bob Jones Academy in
Greenville. He has coached
at BJA for more than 25
years and earned more
than 13,000 coaching
points. With this designa-
tion, Nicholas is the high-
est ranked active coach
in South Carolina by the
National Speech & Debate
Association.
A diamond award recog-
nizes a professional career
that combines excellence
and longevity. The Nation-
al Speech & Debate Asso-
ciation provides diamond
awards based on coach
points received.
Coaches receive one-
tenth the points earned
by their students and one-
tenth of the points earned
as a student member of
the Association. After a
minimum of five years as
a National Speech & De-
bate Association member,
a coach who attains 1,500
points is awarded a first
diamond. The member re-
ceives a second diamond
for 3,000 points and a
third for 6,000 points. Five
years must pass between
each diamond award.
The National Speech &
Debate Association is the
largest interscholastic
speech and debate orga-
nization serving middle
school, high school and
collegiate students in the
United States.
Nicholas recognized with
national coaching award
Chuck Nicholas
Greer Police to participate
in display at Bob Jones

301 McCall St. Greer
848-5500
Highway 14 Greer, SC
879-7311
Management & Employees
ASHMORE
BROTHERS
Commercial Residential
Asphalt Paving Site Preparation
SINCE 1930
BENSON
Collision Repair Center
Ofce Hours:
7:30-6:00 Mon.-Fri.
848-5330
400 W. Wade Hampton Blvd.
Greer
Free Estimates
120 Years Combined Experience
Rental Car Competitive Rates
State of the Art Equipment & Facilities
www.bensongreer.com
989-0099
1409 W. Wade Hampton Blvd.
10% DISCOUNT WITH CHURCH BULLETINS ON SUNDAYS
NEW HOMES
ADDITIONS
PAINTING
ROOFING
FLOOR
COVERINGS
CUSTOM
CABINETRY &
COUNTER TOPS
DECKS
PRIVACY
FENCING
864-578-4100
Free Estimates - 35 Years Experience
New Birth Greenville 3315 Brushy Creek Road Greer
And they were calling to one another: Holy, holy, holy is the LORD Almighty;
the whole earth is full of his glory. - Isaiah 6:3
BAPTIST
Abner Creek Baptist Church
2461 Abner Creek Rd., Greer 877-6604
Airport Baptist Church
776 S. Batesville Rd., Greer 848-7850
Apalache Baptist
1915 Gap Creek Rd., Greer 877-6012
Bible Baptist Church
6645 Mountain View Rd., Taylors 895-7003
Blue Ridge Baptist Church
3950 Pennington Rd., Greer 895-5787
BridgePointe
600 Bridge Rd., Taylors 244-2774
Burnsview Baptist Church
9690 Reidville Rd., Greer 879-4006
Calvary Baptist
101 Calvary St., Greer 877-9759
Calvary Baptist
108 Forest St., Greer 968-0092
Calvary Hill Baptist
100 Edward Rd., Lyman
Calvary Road Baptist Church
108 Bright Rd., Greer 593-2643
Camp Creek Baptist Church
1100 Camp Creek Rd., Taylors
Cedar Grove Baptist Church
109 Elmer St., Greer 877-6216
Community Baptist Church
642 S. Suber Rd., Greer 848-3500
Double Springs Baptist Church
3800 Locust Hill Rd., Taylors 895-1314
Ebenezer-Welcome Baptist Church
4005 Highway 414, Landrum 895-1461
El Bethel Baptist Church
313 Jones Ave., Greer 877-4021
Emmanuel Baptist Church
423 S. Buncombe Rd., Greer 877-2121
Enoree Fork Baptist Church
100 Enoree Dr., Greer 268-4385
Fairview Baptist Church
1300 Locust Hill Rd., Greer 877-1881
First Baptist Church
202 W. Poinsett St., Greer 877-4253
Freedom Fellowship Greer High 877-3604
Friendship Baptist Church
1600 Holly Springs Rd., Lyman 877-4746
Good News Baptist Church
1592 S. Highway 14, Greer 879-2289
Grace Baptist Church
760 W. Gap Creek Rd., Greer 879-3519
Grace Place
407 Ridgewood Dr., Greer 877-7724
Greer Freewill Baptist Church
110 Pine Ridge Dr., Greer 968-0310
Heritage Chapel Baptist Church
218 Alexander Rd., Greer 989-0170
Highland Baptist Church
3270 Hwy. 414, Taylors 895-5270
Hillcrest Baptist Church
111 Biblebrook Dr., Greer 877-4206
Hispanic Baptist Iglesia Bautista Hispana
199 Hubert St., Greer 877-3899
Holly Springs Baptist Church
250 Hannon Rd., Inman 877-6765
Locust Hill Baptist Church
5534 Locust Hill Rd., Travelers Rest 895-1771
Maple Creek Baptist Church
609 S. Main St., Greer 877-1791
Milford Baptist Church
1282 Milford Church Rd., Greer 895-5533
Mount Lebanon Baptist Church
572 Mt. Lebanon Church Rd., Greer 895-2334
New Hope Baptist Church
561 Gilliam Rd., Greer 879-7080
New Jerusalem Baptist Church
413 E. Poinsett St., Greer 968-9203
New Life Baptist Church
90 Becco Rd., Greer 895-3224
Northwood Baptist Church
888 Ansel School Rd., Greer 877-5417
ONeal Baptist Church
3420 N. Highway 101, Greer 895-0930
Pelham First Baptist Church
2720 S. Old Highway 14, Greer 879-4032
Peoples Baptist Church
310 Victor Avenue Ext., Greer 848-0449
Piney Grove Missionary Baptist Church
201 Jordan Rd., Lyman 879-2646
Pleasant Grove Baptist Church
1002 S. Buncombe Rd., Greer 877-6436
Pleasant Hill Baptist Church
4899 Jordan Rd., Greer 895-3546
Providence Baptist Church
2020 Gibbs Shoals Rd., Greer 877-3483
Rebirth Missionary Baptist Church
2375 Racing Road, Greer 877-0449
Riverside Baptist Church
1249 S. Suber Rd., Greer 879-4400
Second Baptist Church
570 Memorial Drive Ext., Greer 877-7061
Southside Baptist Church
410 S. Main St., Greer 877-2672
St. Johns Baptist Church
2 Groveland Rd., Taylors 879-2904
Suber Road Baptist Church
445 S. Suber Rd., Greer 801-0181
Taylors First Baptist Church
200 W. Main St., Taylors 244-3535
United Family Ministries
13465 E. Wade Hampton Blvd., Greer 877-3235
Victor Baptist
121 New Woodruff Rd., Greer 877-9686
Washington Baptist Church
3500 N. Highway 14, Greer 895-1510
Welcome Home Baptist Church
1779 Pleasant Hill Rd., Greer 901-7674
CATHOLIC
Blessed Trinity Catholic Church
901 River Rd., Greer 879-4225
CHURCH OF CHRIST
Riverside Church of Christ
2103 Old Spartanburg Rd., Greer 322-6847
CHURCH OF GOD
Church of God - Greer
500 Trade St., Greer 877-0374
Church of God of Prophecy
2416 N. Highway 14, Greer 877-8329
Eastside Worship Center
601 Taylors Rd., Taylors 268-0523
ONeal Church of God
3794 Berry Mill Rd., Greer 895-4273
Pelham Church of God of Prophecy
139 Abner Creek Rd., Greer 801-0528
Praise Cathedral Church of God
3390 Brushy Creek Rd., Greer 879-4878
EPISCOPAL
Good Shepherd Episcopal
200 Cannon St., Greer 877-2330
LUTHERAN
Abiding Peace Ev. Lutheran Church
401 Batesville Rd., Simpsonville 288-4867
Apostolic Lutheran Church
453 N. Rutherford Rd., Greer 848-4568
Immanuel Lutheran Church & School LCMS
2820 Woodruff Rd., Simpsonville 297-5815
Redeemer Lutheran Church, ELCA
300 Oneal Rd., Greer 877-5876
METHODIST
Bethel United Methodist Church
105 E. Arlington Ave., Greer 879-2066
Covenant United Methodist Church
1310 Old Spartanburg Rd., Greer 244-3162
Ebenezer United Methodist Church
174 Ebenezer Road, Greer 987-9644
Faith United Methodist Church
1301 S. Main St. (S. Hwy. 14), Greer 877-0308
Fews Chapel United Methodist Church
4000 N. Highway 101, Greer 895-2522
Grace United Methodist Church
627 Taylor Rd., Greer 877-7015
Lee Road United Methodist Church
1377 East Lee Rd., Taylors 244-6427
Liberty Hill United Methodist Church
301 Liberty Hill Rd., Greer 968-8150
Liberty United Methodist Church
4276 Highway 414, Landrum 292-0142
Memorial United Methodist Church
201 N. Main St., Greer 877-0956
Mountain View UMC
6525 Mountain View Rd., Taylors 895-8532
Sharon United Methodist Church
1421 Reidville Sharon Rd., Greer 879-7926
St. Mark United Methodist Church
911 St. Mark Rd., Taylors 848-7141
St. Paul United Methodist Church
3856 N. Highway 101, Greer 895-5570
Victor United Methodist Church
1 Wilson Ave., Greer 877-5520
Woods Chapel United Methodist Church
2388 Brown Wood Rd., Greer 879-4475
Zoar United Methodist Church
1005 Highway 357, Greer 877-0758
PRESBYTERIAN
Blue Ridge Presbyterian Church
2094 Highway 101 North, Greer 483-2140
Devenger Road Presbyterian Church
1200 Devenger Rd., Greer 268-7652
Fellowship Presbyterian Church
1105 Old Spartanburg Rd., Greer 877-3267
First Presbyterian Church
100 School St., Greer 877-3612
Fulton Presbyterian Church
821 Abner Creek Rd., Greer 879-3190
OTHER DENOMINATIONS
Agape House
900 Gap Creek Rd., Greer 329-7491
Anglican Church of St. George the Martyr
427 Batesville Rd., Simpsonville 281-0015
Bartons Memorial Pentacostal Holiness
Highway 101 North, Greer
Bethesda Temple
125 Broadus St., Greer 877-8523
Beulah Christian Fellowship Church
1017 Mauldin Rd., Greenville 283-0639
Calvary Bible Fellowship
Holiday Inn, Duncan 266-4269
Calvary Chapel of Greer
104 New Woodruff Rd. Greer 877-8090
Christ Fellowship
343 Hampton Rd., Greer 879-8446
Christian Heritage Church
900 N. Main St., Greer 877-2288
Christian Life Center 2 Country Plaza 322-1325
Christian Outreach 106 West Rd. 848-0308
El-Bethel Holiness 103 E. Church St. 968-9474
Faith Family Church
3339 Wade Hampton Blvd., Taylors 244-0207
Faith Temple
5080 Sandy Flat Rd., Taylors 895-2524
Glad Tidings Assembly of God
Highway 290, Greer 879-3291
Greer Mill Church 52 Bobo St., Greer 877-2442
Harmony Fellowship Church
468 S. Suber Rd., Greer 877-8287
Harvest Christian Church
2150 Highway 417, Woodruff 486-8877
International Cathedral of Prayer
100 Davis Avenue Greer 655-0009
Lifesong Church
12481 Greenville Highway, Lyman 439-2602
Living Way Community Church
3239 N. Highway 101, Greer 895-0544
Mountain Bridge Community Church
1400B Wade Hampton Blvd., Greer 350-1051
New Beginnings Outreach
104 New Woodruff Rd., Greer 968-2424
New Birth Greenville
3315 Brushy Creek Rd., Greer 848-2728
New Covenant Fellowship
2425 Racing Rd., Greer 848-4521
New Hope Freedom
109 W. Wade Hampton Blvd. Greer 205-8816
New Life in Christ 210 Arlington Rd. 346-9053
Point of Life Church
Wade Hampton Blvd. Duncan 426-4933
Springwell Church
4369 Wade Hampton Blvd., Taylors 268-2299
Trinity Fellowship Church
3610 Brushy Creek Rd., Greer 877-0419
1700 N. Pleasantburg Dr, Greenville 244-6011
United Anglican Fellowship
1001 W. Poinsett St., Greer 629-3350
United Christian Church
105 Daniel Ave., Greer 895-3966
United House of Prayer
213 Oak St., Greer 848-0727
Upstate Friends Meeting (Quaker)
39 Hillcrest St., Lyman 877-9392
Upstate Tree of Life
203 East Bearden St., Greer 848-1295
Victorian Hills Community Church
209 Victor Ave. Ext., Greer 877-3981
Vine Worship Center
4373 Wade Hampton Blvd., Taylors 244-8175
A8 THE GREER CITIZEN PAGE LABEL WEDNESDAY, JULY 16, 2014
Its a Matter
Consignment Store
3245 B Wade Hampton Blvd.
Taylors, SC 29687
864-244-1652
of Style
Greer Gas,
Inc.
864-578-5886
arolina
L
awn
T
ractor &
4389 Wade
Hampton Blvd.
Taylors
864-292-1842
C
arolina
L
awn
T
ractor &
DILL CREEK COMMONS
1379 W. Wade Hampton, Greer
864-848-5222
For information
about advertising
on this page,
call 864-877-2076.
For information
about advertising
on this page,
call 864-877-2076.
Worship With Us
Hospice Care at Home
You dont have to do this alone
Ask for us by name!
864.457.9122 www.hocf.org
COMMERCIAL RENTALS RESIDENTIAL
www.mcculloughproperties.com
McCullough
Properties
864-879-2117
Forest Hills Funeral Home
6995 Highway 101, Woodruff
(864)576-9444
(864)288-8700
(864) 476-9898
www.foresthillsfuneralhome.net
Greer Storage
LLC
Let us handle
your storage needs!
FREE
MOVE IN TRUCK
14372 E. Wade Hampton Blvd.
Greer, SC 29651
864-879-2117
Greer
Q
UALITY
F
OODS
508 North Main St. 877-4043
7 am - 10 pm Mon.-Sat.
For information
about advertising
on this page,
call 864-877-2076.
For information
about advertising
on this page,
call 864-877-2076.
A 28-year-old Simpson-
ville man has been charged
with child neglect after an
incident at Goodwill on
Woodruff Road Monday.
According to the Green-
ville County Sheriffs Of-
fice, deputies were called
to Goodwill early Monday
afternoon in reference to
a suspicious person. Upon
arrival, several witnesses
informed deputies a sub-
ject (Brian Jonathan Reid)
pulled into the parking lot
and got out of his car be-
fore opening all of his car
doors as if he was looking
for something.
Reid then entered the
store in a confused manner
and, after being inside for
several minutes, went back
to his vehicle and began
opening all of the doors
while yelling that he could
not find his child. Reid
then drove his car to the
back of the Goodwill and
began pulling items out of
his vehicle. An employee
heard a child crying inside
the vehicle and confronted
Reid about the child. Reid
then handed the 8-month-
old baby, who was hot and
covered in dried vomit, to
the employee before ask-
ing several employees for
boxes so he could unload
his car.
Reid was arrested on an
active family court bench
warrant and also charged
with child neglect. The
baby was checked out by
EMS before being turned
over to its mother, who
deputies were able to con-
tact. The Greenville County
Department of Social Ser-
vices checked the childs
mother before giving her
custody of the baby.
(Note: All information
contained in the following
blotter was taken directly
from the official incident
reports filed by the Greer
Police Department or The
Spartanburg County Sher-
iffs Office or The Green-
ville County Sheriffs Of-
fice. All suspects are to be
considered innocent until
proven guilty in the court
of law.)
POSSESSION
Shelly Ann Lindsey, 35,
of 3762 Berry Mill Road,
Greer, has been charged
with possession of a con-
trolled substance, unlaw-
ful carrying of a pistol and
public intoxication.
According to incident
reports, officers were dis-
patched to Target on Wade
Hampton Boulevard in ref-
erence to a possible suspi-
cious vehicle being driven
by a possibly intoxicated
driver.
The first officer to ar-
rive on scene located the
subject (Lindsey) standing
outside of her improperly
parked vehicle and digging
through a trash can. Other
officers arrived on the
scene and observed Lind-
sey to be showing signs of
being impaired.
Lindsey advised the of-
ficers she had consumed
a prescription dosage of
Valium.
A series of field sobri-
ety tests were given to
Lindsey, which she failed.
She was placed under ar-
rest and a search of her
person yielded three pills
of Diazapam. A search of
the vehicle yielded a small
semi-automatic pistol.
Lindsey was transported
to Pelham Medical Cen-
ter due to complaints of
chest pain, then she was
transported to the Greer
City Jail and the Greenville
County Detention Center.
DUS
Charles Victor Morgan II,
51, of 200 S. Beverly Lane
H103, Greer, has been
charged with driving un-
der suspension (third) and
two warrants for failure to
appear.
According to incident
reports, an officer was on
routine patrol when he ob-
served a known suspend-
ed driver (Morgan) driving
a green Ford Escort.
The officer initiated a
traffic stop on Morgan
and placed him under ar-
rest for his third driving
under suspension, along
with two active warrants
out of Greenville County
for failure to appear.
He was transported to
the Greer City Jail and
eventually turned over to
Greenville County.
DUI
Jose Rafael Caballero, 47,
of 4 Latigo Court, Greer,
has been charged with DUI
and faulty equipment.
According to incident
reports, an officer was
on routine patrol on West
Poinsett Street when he
observed a black Dodge
Dakota traveling with no
headlights.
The officer initiated a
traffic stop on the vehicle
and its driver Caballero.
Upon approaching the ve-
hicle, the officer detected
a strong odor of alcohol
coming from Caballeros
person.
Caballero was asked to
step out of the vehicle and
walk to the officers patrol
car at which point the of-
ficer observed him to be
stumbling and uneasy on
his feet.
A series of field sobri-
ety tests were offered to
Caballero that he refused.
He was placed under ar-
rest and transported to
the Greer City Jail where
he refused a breathalyzer
and became verbally ag-
gressive with an officer.
He was later transported
to the Greenville County
Detention Center.
CDV
Marquez Davon Glenn,
25, of 4 Old Chick Springs
Road, Taylors, has been
charged with criminal do-
mestic violence (second),
attempting escape, resist-
ing arrest and disorderly
conduct.
According to incident
reports, an officer was
dispatched to the area
of South Suber Road and
Chick Springs Road in ref-
erence to some type of do-
mestic situation in which
a male and female were in
the roadway and the male
was trying to get the fe-
male into a vehicle.
Upon the officers ar-
rival, he observed a female
trying to get a child out of
a vehicle and a male sub-
ject (Glenn), who was very
upset and had an aggres-
sive disposition. Due to
his aggressive demeanor
and yelling profanity, of-
ficers placed Glenn into
investigative detention.
The officers then went
to speak with the victim
to determine what had
happened at which point
Glenn opened the door of
the patrol car fled and on
foot. One officer was able
to catch up to Glenn and
several officers attempted
to pin him to the ground
but he continued to resist.
Officers were able to
secure him and place him
back in the patrol car. Of-
ficers then spoke with the
victim who stated she and
Glenn were on their way
to dinner when he became
verbally abusive toward
her.
She said she then at-
tempted to turn the ve-
hicle around and return
home, at which point,
Glenn jumped at her as
if he was going to hit her.
The victim then stopped
and exited the vehicle, but
Glenn began pulling on her
arms attempting to get her
back in the vehicle.
Glenn was arrested and
transported to the Greer
City Jail.
MULTIPLE CHARGES
Michael Van Vickers
Jr., 43, of 214 Pelham St.,
Greer, has been charged
with criminal domestic
violence of a high and ag-
gravated nature, assault
and battery high and ag-
gravated, two counts of
possession of a firearm
during a violent crime and
two counts of pointing and
presenting a firearm.
According to incident
reports, an officer was
dispatched to the above
address in reference to a
subject who pointed a gun
at the occupants inside
the residence.
Upon the officers arriv-
al, two female victims out-
side the residence met the
officer. One of the victims
told the officer her ex-hus-
band Vickers had pointed
a handgun at both her and
her daughter after a ver-
bal argument. She stated
Vickers ordered them (the
two victims) to get out of
his house while pointing a
gun at them.
The officer was able to
reach Vickers via phone
and talk him out of the
house.
When Vickers came out
of the residence he was
immediately taken into
custody and the gun was
recovered from inside the
house. Vickers was trans-
ported to the Greer City
Jail.
SHOPLIFTING
Derek Cole Greene, 17,
of 101 Amber Crest Court,
Greer, has been charged
with shoplifting.
According to incident re-
ports, an officer respond-
ed to Walgreens on West
Wade Hampton Boulevard
in reference to a possible
shoplifting in progress.
Upon arrival, the officer
met with the complainant
who stated the subject
(later identified as Greene)
concealed some Mucinex
on his person and then left
the store without paying.
The officer canvassed
the area and located
Greene, who matched the
description provided by
the complainant. Greene
eventually confessed to the
shoplifting and the items
he stole were located a
short distance from where
he was apprehended.
He was arrested and
transported to the Greer
City Jail.
DUI
Nurtrail Jermaine Dugar,
38, of 200 S. Beverly Lane
E103, Greer, has been
charged with DUI.
According to incident
reports, an officer was on
routine patrol when he ob-
served a red Cadillac trav-
eling east on Wade Hamp-
ton Boulevard strike a fog
line and then continuously
swerve.
The officer initiated a
traffic stop on the vehicle
and its driver (Dugar).
Upon stopping, Dugar at-
tempted to get out of the
vehicle, but the officer
ordered him to remain in
the car. Upon approaching
Dugar, the officer detected
a strong odor of alcohol
coming from his person.
A series of field sobriety
tests were performed on
Dugar, which he either
failed or refused.
He was placed under ar-
rest and transported to
the Greer City Jail where
he refused a breathalyzer.
MULTIPLE CHARGES
David Robert Redding
Jr., 36, of 3 Tee Time
Court, Greenville, has
been charged with driving
under suspension (fifth),
faulty equipment, habit-
ual offender, possession
of drug paraphernalia,
unlawful possession of a
prescription drug and two
failure to appear war-
rants.
Ashley Danielle Sud-
deth, 21, of 164 Woodcliff
Drive, Wellford, has been
charged with possession
of methamphetamine with
the intent to distribute
and possession of drug
paraphernalia.
According to incident
reports, an officer was on
routine patrol at the inter-
section of S.C. Highway
29 and South Main Street
when he observed a gray
Honda Accord with an in-
operable brake light.
The officer initiated a
traffic stop on the vehicle
and as it began to pull
over the officer could see
the passenger of the ve-
hicle moving around as
if she was trying to hide
something.
The officer approached
the vehicle and its driver,
(Redding), who was unable
to produce a drivers li-
cense. The officer ordered
Redding to step out of the
vehicle and acquired his
name. The officer learned
Reddings license was sus-
pended and this would be
his fifth driving under sus-
pension and he had two
active failure to appear
out of Greenville County.
Redding was placed un-
der arrest. Officers then
conducted a search of
the vehicle that yielded a
plastic bag containing 1.3
grams of methamphet-
amine, a digital scale, $40
and two cards.
All of these items were
located near the passen-
ger seat where Suddeth
was sitting. Also located in
the backseat of the vehicle
was a backpack belonging
to Redding that contained
a glass pipe and four pills
of Trazodone.
An unopened mail pack-
age from the U.S. Drug
Enforcement Agency ad-
dressed to another name
was also located in the
trunk of the vehicle.
Both Redding and Sud-
deth were transported to
the Greer City Jail.
SHOPLIFTING
Catherine Lee Gale Em-
rich, 25, of 125 Beech
Springs Road, Greer, has
been charged with shop-
lifting enhancement, tres-
passing after notice and
resisting arrest.
According to incident re-
ports, an officer respond-
ed to the Walmart on East
Wade Hampton Boulevard
in reference to a shoplift-
ing in progress.
Upon arrival, the officer
met with the complainant
who stated she observed
the subject (Emrich), who
had shoplifted from the
store before, go to the
health and beauty aisle
and place items in her
backpack.
A second officer arrived
on scene and took Emrich
to the Loss Prevention Of-
fice of the store where she
emptied 22 items (totaling
a value of $304.74) out of
her backpack while telling
the officer she intended
on paying for the items.
The officer learned Emrich
had been placed on tres-
pass notice from the store
in March of this year and
advised her she was under
arrest.
The officer ordered her
to place her hands behind
her back, but she refused.
After several refusals, the
officer grabbed Emrichs
right wrist in an attempt
to handcuff her but she
pulled away. She contin-
ued to resist and a second
officer was needed to suc-
cessfully cuff Emrich.
She was transported to
the Greer City Jail where
it was learned she had two
prior shoplifting convic-
tions.
MULTIPLE CHARGES
Marty Wayne Blackwell,
41, of 120 Crystal Lane,
Greer, has been charged
with DUI, driving under
suspension (second), pos-
session of drug parapher-
nalia, no turn signal and
interfering with police.
According to incident
reports, an officer was on
routine patrol when he ob-
served a gray GMC truck
turn off South Line Street
without using a turn sig-
nal. The officer then ob-
served the vehicle begin
driving away at a high rate
of speed.
The officer caught up to
the vehicle and initiated a
traffic stop on it and its
driver (Blackwell).
The vehicle pulled into
a residential driveway and
stopped. Upon stopping,
Blackwell got out of his
vehicle and began walk-
ing toward this residence
before turning and asking
the officer what he could
do for him. The officer
asked Blackwell why he
didnt use turn signals, at
which point Blackwell told
the officer he hadnt been
driving the vehicle despite
the officer watching him
get out of the drivers seat
of the truck that had no
other occupants.
Blackwell began to walk
away from the officer, at
which point the officer
told him to stop and that
he was under arrest.
The officer was able to
grab Blackwell by his wrist
and stop him from resist-
ing by using a wristlock.
The officer placed him
under arrest for interfer-
ing with a police officer.
A search of the vehicle
yielded a glass pipe and
an orange pen tube with
a white powdery residue.
The officer learned Black-
wells license was sus-
pended.
Blackwell was transport-
ed to the Greer City Jail,
where he was offered a se-
ries of field sobriety tests
that he refused. Blackwell
also refused a breatha-
lyzer.
MULTIPLE CHARGES
Glenn Allen Twiford, 37,
of 3999 N. Highway 101,
Greer, has been charged
with driving under sus-
pension, faulty equipment,
simple possession of mar-
ijuana and possession of
drug paraphernalia.
According to incident
reports, an officer was
on routine patrol on West
Wade Hampton Boulevard
when he observed a blue
Mazda drive past him with
a faulty taillight. The offi-
cer initiated a traffic stop
on the vehicle and its driv-
er (Twiford).
The officer learned Twi-
fords license had been
suspended and he was
placed under arrest.
Upon being arrested,
Twiford surrendered a
small pouch containing
a green leafy substance
believed to be marijuana
along with a smoking
pipe.
He was transported to
the Greer City Jail.
SIMPLE POSSESSION
Joshua Dewayne Wil-
liams, 25, of 2263 Fews
Chapel Road, Greer, has
been charged with simple
possession of marijuana
and possession of drug
paraphernalia.
According to incident
reports, an officer was
working patrol when he
observed a white Honda
being driven on Memo-
rial Drive without a license
plate.
The officer initiated a
traffic stop on the vehicle
and its driver (Williams).
Upon approaching the
vehicle, the officer ob-
served Williams pupils to
be dilated and his speech
slowed. When asked if he
had any drugs in his pos-
session, Williams eventu-
ally retrieved a small bag
containing one gram of
marijuana from the cen-
ter console of the vehicle.
Williams also advised the
officer of some additional
marijuana in the rear floor-
board. The total amount
of marijuana located and
seized was 26 grams.
Williams was arrested
POLICE AND FIRE
The Greer Citizen
WEDNESDAY, JULY 16, 2014 THE GREER CITIZEN A9
Burning Feet?
Electric Shocks?
Pain & Numbness?
Pins & Needles?
Creepy Crawlies?
You might have
PERIPHERAL NEUROPATHY
This condition affects 20 million Americans. It begins in the feet and
lower legs and can advance to the hands. Treatment of oral medi-
cations and injections often dont work.
Weve utilized a NEW TREATMENT that may take away most, if not
all, of your pain. Its safe and highly effective for most people, even
diabetics. Its covered by many insurance plans.
Call 864-847-6020 now to schedule
a FREE conference with one of our doctors.
Pain Relief at
Complete Healing & Wellness Center
24 E. Main St., Williamston, SC CompleteHealing.net
FDA Cleared | Safe and Effective
Dr. Robert Walker, MD Internal Medicine,
Greg Furness, PA-C, Kevin Burnham, PA-C,
Marylouise and Jack Wise, DC
PLACE YOUR AD IN
107 S.C. NEWSPAPERS
and reach more than 2.5 million readers
using our small space display ad network
South Carolina
Newspaper Network
Donna Yount 888.727.7377
scnewspapernetwork.com
Statewide or regional buys available
1921 Hwy. 101 South, Greer, SC 29651
(Exit 60 off Interstate 85)
864-968-1133
CHECKS
CASHED
PAY BILLS HERE
Simpsonville man charged with child neglect
Brian Jonathan Reid
CRIME REPORT |


A10 THE GREER CITIZEN NEWS WEDNESDAY, JULY 16, 2014
d
a
n
s
k
o

s
e
m
i
-
a
n
n
u
a
l

c
l
e
a
r
a
n
c
e

Wellford, SC * 439-3557
Locuted Hwy. 29....1 mile south of -85 ut Lxit 66
MON-SAT 9-6 * CLOSLD SN www.thompsonsshoes.com
Famous Name Brand Shoes
FALL 2012
Thompson's
Thompson's
Starting at
$
59
95
SELECTED STYLES
Sanders
Heating & Air Conditioning
(Formerly Service Experts)
Indoor air quality experts since 1951
864- 288- 7671
621 Keith Drive
Greenville, SC 29607
www.SandersHeatCool.com
6
1
Y
e
a
r
s
S
e
r
v
in
g
Y
o
u
r

C
o
m
m
u
n
it
y
$25 SERVICE CALL
with repairs
when you mention you saw us in
The Greer Citizen
Call Cindy or Dawn for appointment.
Friends of the Greenville
Zoo wants to know what
people think the name
of the expected baby gi-
raffe at the Greenville Zoo
should be.
Any person who gives
a minimum $10 dona-
tion to the Friends of the
Greenville Zoo through
its newly redesigned web-
site, friendsgreenvillezoo.
org, or by mail, 102 East
Park Ave., Greenville, can
submit a male and female
name for the baby giraffe,
which is due later this
summer at the Greenville
Zoo.
All names will be re-
viewed by the Friends of
the Greenville Zoo board
and a final three will be
given to the Greenville
Zoo staff, who will decide
on the official name, said
Amanda Osborne, execu-
tive director of the Friends
of the Greenville Zoo.
Online submissions will
be accepted until 48 hours
after the baby giraffes
birth, which can be seen
live on the Friends web-
site via the Giraffe Cam.
Regular mail submis-
sions must be postmarked
by the baby giraffes birth
date.
A portion of the dona-
tions will be used to sup-
port the giraffe exhibit
at the Greenville Zoo. We
would love to provide new
shade structures for the
exhibit, Osborne said.
The new giraffe will be
the second baby of Walter
and Autumn.
Their first born, Kiko,
garnered national atten-
tion for the Greenville
Zoo.
The Greenville Zoo saw
such an outpouring of
interest that the Friends
and Zoo leadership felt it
would be a fun idea to al-
low people the chance to
participate in the naming
of this addition to the Zoo
family, Osborne said.
The Friends of the Green-
ville Zoo is a non-profit or-
ganization that serves as
an independent communi-
ty outreach group, whose
stated purpose is to pro-
vide financial, resource,
and advocacy support for
the needs of the zoo.
Name the baby giraffe
at the Greenville Zoo
Paris Mountain State
Park will hold programs
on dragonflies and animal
vision on Saturday, July
26.
The Friends of Paris
Mountain State Park will
host a program at 10
a.m. called The Amazing
World of Dragonflies and
Damselflies.
Dr. Wade Worthen from
Furman University will
conduct a walk around
Lake Placid and to Moun-
tain Creek, observing and
learning about these col-
orful and important crea-
tures. The meeting place
will be at the park center.
No registration is required
and there is no fee for the
program beyond park ad-
mission.
Interpretive Ranger
Cathy Taylor will present
a program at 1 p.m. called
Wild Eyes. Those partici-
pating can investigate how
the world looks to animals
at the park, from dragon-
fly to deer eyes--bees to
bird eyes. The event will
take place in the park lab
and on a walk around Lake
Placid.
The program costs $7
per person, payable at
the fee booth instead of
admission. It will begin at
the Park Center. Registra-
tion is required. There is
a limit of 25 participants.
To register, email ctay-
lor@scprt.com, or call
the office at 244-5565.
The programs are part
of the parks Fourth Satur-
day series of events.
For more information, or
to register for the 1 p.m.
program, call 244-5565
during office hours from
11 a.m. 5 p.m., or email
ctaylor@scprt.com.
The parks Web site is
SouthCarolinaParks.
com. The Friends of Paris
Mountain web site is pm-
spf.org.
Paris Mountain State
Park is located at 2401
State Park Road, Green-
ville, six miles north of
downtown Greenville.
Dragonflies the focus of
Paris Mountain programs
PHOTO | SUBMITTED
The Friends of Paris Mountain State Park will host the The Amazing World of Dragonfies
and Damselfies program at 10 a.m. on July 26.
PHOTO | SUBMITTED
The parks free Wild Eyes program demonstrates how the
world looks from a variety of animal species perspectives.
A portion of the
donations will be
used to support the
giraffe exhibit at the
Greenville Zoo.
Amanda Osbourne
Executive Director, Friends of the
Greenville Zoo
SPORTS
The Greer Citizen
WEDNESDAY, JULY 16, 2014
B
BLAME
CANNADA
BILLY
CANNADA
Coming
home
L
eBron James is coming
hometo a bunch of
lousy, fair-weather
fans who would turn their
back on him again given
the chance.
The hottest sports story
of the summer reached
its climax last week as the
NBAs biggest name an-
nounced he would return
to the city where he began
his career.
In a classy essay he
wrote for Sports Illus-
trated, James said (Im
paraphrasing) all the bad
blood between he and the
Cavaliers organization is
water under the bridge.
But it shouldnt be.
What Clevelanders did to
LeBron upon his depar-
ture for Miami broke all
acceptable boundaries
and should not be so eas-
ily swept under the rug.
No. 23 Jerseys were
burned, resounding
boos could be heard all
across the state of Ohio
for years to come and a
letter from Cavs owner
Dan Gilbert essentially
disowned and mocked
LeBron on the teams web-
site for four years.
According to Gilberts
letter, LeBrons heart-
less and callous decision
to leave Cleveland was a
cowardly betrayal to the
organization.
He said other stupid
things in the letter, not
the least of which was I
personally guarantee that
the Cleveland Cavaliers
will win an NBA champi-
onship before the self-
titled former King wins
one.
Of course, that was
ridiculous. LeBron hasnt
seen anything but the
NBA Finals since his
move to Miami, winning
two rings and racking up
several MVP awards.
Cleveland, on the other
hand, has been consis-
tently in the running for
the No. 1 draft pick each
season as one of the
leagues worst teams.
Despite all that was
said and done to LeBron
since he left his home in
Ohio, basketballs great-
est player opted to go
back. He has reportedly
been mending fences with
Cavs management and
the same fans that were
burning his jersey four
years ago are now in line
for another one.
Fans get away with too
much. They cross the line
and dont have to pay
the price for the hurtful
things they say and do.
In the case of LeBron,
fans, they completely
alienated their own na-
tive son. James grew up
there, went to high school
there, played the first half
of his NBA career there
and enjoyed living there
during the offseason. He
deserved some heat for
leaving, but Cavs fans
crossed a line.
There are just certain
things you cant go back
to, and I honestly have no
clue what made LeBron
want to. Whatever the rea-
son behind it, Cleveland
got one of the biggest
Christmas presents of all
time last week. The King
decided not to hold a
grudge.
With a young nucleus
of No. 1 draft picks, its
hard not to think the
Cavs could be looking at
a worst-to-first scenario
very soon.
I will admit, the LeBron
storyline just took a dra-
matic step forward. If he
is able to go to Cleveland
and win multiple champi-
onships, youre going to
have a hard time leaving
him out of the all-time
greats discussions.
Last week, LeBron
proved you can go home,
no matter how ugly things
were.
With a fresh two-year
contract on the table, lets
hope Cleveland fans can
mind their Ps and Qs
this time.

Protect
home turf
in 7-on-7
BY BILLY CANNADA
SPORTS EDITOR
The Rebels were not go-
ing to be denied on their
home field last weekend,
winning the Palmetto State
Showdown 7-on-7 tourna-
ment handily.
Byrnes went 13-1 in the
two-day stretch, losing its
only game to Woodruff in
pool play. The tournament
featured teams from as far
away as New Jersey.
Head coach Brian Lane,
who recently left his
coaching role at Woodruff
to take over at Byrnes, said
his former squad got off
to a hot start.
It was a good game, he
said. It came down to the
last second and they beat
us by one point, but ulti-
mately we went in there
trying to win a champion-
ship. You try to win every
one of them, but youll pick
up a loss here or there.
They were beating us
17-0. We finally got it go-
ing, but we lost 42-41.
They caught a last second
bomb on us.
The loss would not mat-
ter, as the Rebels advanced
to defeat Davidson Day of
North Carolina 27-12 in
the championship.
Its a lot of games and a
lot of guys stepped up, he
said. Lyrics Klugh on the
defensive side of the ball
always plays well. Theres
just so many you could
SEE BYRNES | B4
BY BILLY CANNADA
SPORTS EDITOR
A difficult season came
to a frustrating end for
the Greer American Legion
Post 115 senior team last
week.
Greer dropped three
straight to defending state
champions Chapin-New-
berry, making an early
playoff exit.
They were just a better
team than we were, head
coach Paul Kontowsky
said. Our guys did the
best they could. We were
just out-classed by Chap-
in-Newberry. Theyre a re-
ally good team.
Post 115 dropped game
one by a score of 12-2.
We went down there
for game one and we were
kind of shorthanded,
Kontowsky said. It hurt
us. The boys did the best
they could. Ethan Bray,
Tyler Crowe and Alex Wil-
liams had good days at
the plate. All three games
those guys got on base,
but we just couldnt move
them over and score.
Jordan Sizemore got
all he could handle from
Chapin-Newberry early
on.
Jordan (Sizemore) start-
ed the first game for us,
he said. He got us into the
playoffs pitching that 10
inning game the week be-
fore. His arm was kind of
dead. He still pitched OK,
but he didnt have a lot of
gas left in him.
Bray started game two
for Greer.
He did a great job,
Kontowsky said. He
pitched awesome. The
team got behind him and
played good defense. They
did better at the plate, but
we gave them a few runs.
They made some great de-
fensive plays too.
Despite a solid offensive
showing, Post 115 fell 8-
6 at home. Game three
would not be as close, re-
sulting in a 13-1 defeat.
Kontowsky said he did
not see as much commit-
ment from his team this
season.
The lack of commitment
by a couple of players real-
ly hurt the whole season,
he said. We had to move
a lot of kids around and
we had a lot of kids out
of position. Tyler Crowe is
our starting shortstop, but
he had to play centerfield
or left field all year just
to fill in spots. When you
dont have people in their
normal spots, its hard to
win.
Already looking ahead,
Kontowsky has begun
scouting his potential ros-
ter for next summer.
Weve already started
recruiting for next year,
he said. Weve got an idea
of who were going to pull
up from the junior team.
We know who we dont
want to invite back from
the senior team. We just
want to try to get some
chemistry.
The senior legion team
will keep busy during the
offseason, participating in
fall baseball games.
Well do a legion fall
league, he said. Well
run it with Belton. We try
to keep most of our kids
playing through that. Well
have two teams from Greer
in it and well try to get our
junior team involved. A lot
of the kids from Byrnes
play on our fall league and
thats going to be another
key to get them more
involved.
billy@greercitizen.com | 877-2076
At US
Presidents
Cup
BY BILLY CANNADA
SPORTS EDITOR
Champions were
crowned last Thursday at
the 2014 US Youth Soccer
National Presidents Cup at
the MESA Soccer Complex
in Greer.
The four-day event fea-
tured 40 US Youth Soc-
cer boys and girls teams
in the under-13 through
under-17 age groups that
earned their way to the
cup through success in
their respective regional
matches.
Region IV teams took
home seven titles with
winners from southern
California, Utah, Washing-
ton, Nevada and Alaska.
Region II was represented
by two champion teams
from Illinois and southern
Ohio, and Region III had
one champion team from
south Texas.
The champions were:
Eagles White (under-13
girls), Barcelona Texas
Carrasco (under-13 boys),
West Coast FC United
White (under-14 girls),
Team Evanston Premier
(under-14 boys), Crush
Blue (under-15 girls), Ta-
coma United 98 Chelsea
(under-15 boys), Classics
Eagles Black 97/98 (un-
der-16 girls), CISC Velocity
98 ( under-16 boys), Cook
Inlet SC Velocity (under-17
girls) and LV Neon 97 (un-
der-17 boys).
In addition to playing
for a national title, various
head coaches believe the
National Presidents Cup
helps develop their play-
ers abilities by providing
them the opportunity to
play against teams from
different regions.
I feel like the US Youth
Soccer Presidents Cup just
gives a great opportunity
for the girls to have good
competition, said Cara
Fisher, head coach of the
champion under-16 girls
team Classics Eagles Black
(OH-S). Theres nothing
like being at the National
Presidents Cup. Its excit-
ing to be at this level and
get to play teams from
other states and other re-
gions.
Other coaches said the
process to get to the cup
has been a long one.
We didnt expect that we
would be here, said Mike
Zile, head coach of Under-
16 Boys team Mid Rivers
Soccer Club - Tigers (MO).
Its an honor to be here.
Its been a process. At the
beginning of the year we
decided we would try the
Presidents Cup, and its
worked out and we now
get to represent Region II
here in South Carolina.
Preliminary games in the
cup ran through Saturday,
July 12. Consolation and
championship matches
took place on Sunday, July
13.
billy@greercitizen.com | 877-2076
Teams claim championships
MANDY FERGUSON | THE GREER CITIZEN
The Classics Eagles (pictured in white) took home the championship in the under-16 division, defeating the Lady Nomad
last Sunday afternoon at the MESA Soccer Complex in Greer.
MANDY FERGUSON | THE GREER CITIZEN
Barcelona Texas Carrasco defeated the HG Eagles in the
under-13 championship match.

PRESTON BURCH | THE GREER CITIZEN
Byrnes went 13-1, keeping the Palmetto State Showdown
title in Duncan last weekend.
Rebels finish
tourney on top


Greer senior legion ousted
after postseason struggles
PRESTON BURCH | THE GREER CITIZEN
Chapin-Newberry swept the Greer senior legion team in a
best of fve series last week.
Its exciting to be
at this level and get
to play teams from
other States and
other Regions.
Cara Fisher
Coach



B2 THE GREER CITIZEN SPORTS WEDNESDAY, JULY 16, 2014
BY BILLY CANNADA
SPORTS EDITOR
Summer has proven
fruitful for the Yellow
Jacket football team.
As workouts continue
and full practice moves
a few days closer, Greer
football coach Will Young
said he has seen strides
from his team during 7-
on-7 tournament play.
For what we do, I think
theyve done pretty well,
Young said. One thing I
think all our coaches are
pleased with is how our
kids continue to compete
and work hard. We feel
pretty good about where
we are as far as our kids
competing.
A couple of players have
shown what they can do,
Young said.
Dorian Lindsey has ob-
viously played pretty well
for us. He is supposed
to, he said. I would say
Xavier Wright would be
the biggest surprise for us.
Hes going to be a senior,
and he has really grown
up and matured and has
played really well. His at-
titude is really good to so
were pretty pleased with
him.
The Yellow Jackets have
traveled to various 7-on-7
sites this summer, seeing
competition at schools
such as Chapin and Spar-
tanburg.
Looking at our kids,
trying to compare them
to everybody else, I think
theyre in pretty good
shape, Young said.
Theyre able to play at a
high level for a long period
of time. Thats obviously
going to be a plus when
you put the pads on and it
gets hot out there.
Greer will head to Wren
this Thursday and Friday
to take on several Ander-
son-area teams.
Well start pool play
Thursday afternoon, and
then well have a tour-
nament based on seeds
starting Friday afternoon,
he said. I havent re-
ally looked at it yet, but
I think BHP will be there,
Wren will be there, I think
Powdersville will be there.
Those guys have been do-
ing really good in these 7-
on-7s.
The Yellow Jackets will
then put together a full
slate of workouts to finish
out July.
Next week well continue
with our (morning and af-
ternoon) sessions on Mon-
day through Thursday,
he said. Well do some
testing stuff next week
with strength and speed
to find out where they are
and how far theyve come.
Everybody will report on
August 1 at 9 a.m. for the
first practice.
BY BILLY CANNADA
SPORTS EDITOR
After a strong start to
the postseason, the Greer
American Legion Post 115
junior team was sent pack-
ing earlier than expected.
Greer defeated Rock
Hill 4-2 in game one of
the playoffs, but dropped
the next two, breaking a
winning streak that has
spanned the last several
weeks.
We got off to a great
start the first night, head
coach Nate Ramsey said.
Ryan Teems gave us five
and a third and Tyler Kru-
glevich came in and got
the save. I thought we had
all the momentum going
up there.
Rock Hill gained all mo-
mentum back in game
two.
Game two kind of got
away from us, he said.
We made a few mistakes
early, and they kind of
found their swing. They
got all the momentum
back.
Ramsey said missed op-
portunities cost Post 115
the three-game series.
It came down to a game
three and it was full of op-
portunities, he said. We
were right there all night. I
think we loaded the bases
three times and hit into
three or four double plays.
We got the opportunities.
We just werent able to
cash in. Thats baseball.
Despite a slow start to
the season, Ramsey said
he could not be happier
with where his team ended
up.
From where we start-
ed to where we ended, it
couldnt have been better,
Ramsey said. They came
together as a unit and they
learned how to play the
game the right way. They
definitely grew and, espe-
cially when youre playing
summer baseball, thats
what you want. You just
want them to grow.
The experience will help
the players grow, he said.
Hopefully they will
be able to take some of
this stuff back to their
high school with them,
he said. We had a young
team. Hopefully they will
just continue to grow in
the game and do what they
now know theyre capable
of doing.
With what he believes
is a gifted group of young
talent, Ramsey said the po-
tential is definitely there
moving forward.
Their potential is
through the roof, he said.
I think we had four mid-
dle school guys that are
just now going into high
school. Theyre going to
be unbelievable. Our older
guys havent even been in
leadership roles until this
summer, so I think every-
body was able to learn
something about them-
selves.
In baseball, potential
is what you make out of
it, but its there, he said.
Theyre really a great
group.
Ramsey said the team
saw tough competition all
season due to the quality
of baseball in the Upstate.
Any time you get in
the Upstate, theres great
baseball, Ramsey said.
Theres good coaches
at these high schools.
From facilities to fields
to teams, the Upstate has
all kinds of great baseball
places. Guys at least have
an opportunity to bet-
ter themselves and better
their careers.
Ramsey will be tasked
with filling holes vacated
by players moving up to
the senior roster next
year.
Well probably move
four or five up to the senior
team, but all of our young
guys are going to be back,
he said. Theres going to
be a couple of changes.
We didnt like the way it
ended necessarily. We let
some stuff go with travel
ball and vacation that real-
ly ended up hurting us in
the end. We think we have
a committed core, and
thats something we have
to stress in the offseason.
Even though its summer
baseball, there still has to
be commitment.
billy@greercitizen.com | 877-2076
BY BILLY CANNADA
SPORTS EDITOR
For the first time in a
couple of seasons, the
Byrnes football team is
breaking in a new quarter-
back during summer ses-
sions.
Micah Young will take
the helm for the Rebels
this fall, picking up where
two-time Gatorade Player
of the Year Shuler Bentley
left off.
Its progression every-
day, he said. Ive been
working with the receivers
and this is a great team
overall anyway, so were
looking to get better as a
team, and I want to help
be a role model for the
team.
Shulers brother, Jake,
was expected to compete
for the starting job this
summer, but his recent
departure left the door
wide open for Young, who
is used to seeing time at
other spots on the field.
I think hes handled it
well, head coach Brian
Lane said. Its one of
those things where, youve
got to have a quarterback.
Hes played receiver, and
hes a heck of a good re-
ceiver and a heck of a good
athlete. We just wanted to
make sure he was com-
fortable with the checks
and the things youve got
to do to play quarterback.
I had a talk with him and
we came out of the meet-
ing knowing he was our
quarterback and that we
were going to ride the
wave with him.
Lane said Young is al-
ready turning into a leader
on the offense.
Hes been providing re-
ally good leadership, he
said. Micah is coming in
changing positions and,
although he might not be
so sure at the quarterback
position, hes a really good
athlete and has shown
himself to be a great lead-
er for this football team.
Im just glad he was
able to take on that role as
the leader and help solidi-
fy the team, Lane said.
For Young, getting stron-
ger at the position has
meant some early morn-
ings.
Were getting after it ev-
eryday, Young said. We
get in here at 7:30 in the
morning and work hard.
Everybody is working to-
gether as a team and is
just trying to get better.
Lane, along with Youngs
receiving core, say the
quarterbacks mobility
will give Byrnes a weapon
it has not had in the past.
God blessed me with
great feet, so Ive got to
use it to the best of my
ability and just make
plays, Young said. Weve
got great playmakers on
this team.
The Rebels have contin-
ued to make their goals
known this offseason.
Were going for the
state title, Young said.
billy@greercitizen.com | 877-2076
BY BILLY CANNADA
SPORTS EDITOR
Aspiring Greer athletes
put their basketball skills
to the test this week, par-
ticipating in the Warriors
Basketball Camp, hosted
by the Riverside basket-
ball program.
The camp, for boys from
third grade to eighth grade,
began on July 14 and will
run through Thursday.
This is the second year
weve run the Warriors
Basketball Camp, Riv-
erside boys basketball
coach Greg Miller said.
Its really a community
outreach program for our
players. They run most of
the camp and us coaches
just supervise it. We do
it just to get the commu-
nity involved, and we use
it as a fundraiser for the
basketball program. Were
just trying to get kids ex-
cited about Riverside bas-
ketball.
The camp features in-
struction and drills, fo-
cusing on ball handling,
rebounding, shooting and
more.
We try to run the whole
gauntlet, Miller said. We
teach them a lot of differ-
ent skills as far as shoot-
ing, scoring, dribbling,
passing and defense. We
try to work on skills for
the first couple of hours,
and the last two hours we
do more game play. We
just try to make it as fun
as possible.
Senior Riverside guard
Alan Caldwell said the
camp is a fun way to get
kids involved.
Its good to help out
other people and give
back, Caldwell said.
These guys are a lot of
fun to work with. Well run
shooting drills, dribbling
drills, and well also play
knockout and games like
that. We just have fun and
keep them entertained.
Miller said getting this
experience is important
for his players.
To me, this is invalu-
able for our players, he
said. They start learn-
ing more about the game
by teaching, but they also
learn that theyre a role
model in this community
and thats something they
need to know. These kids
will end up looking up to
them one day.
Caldwell said partici-
pants learn a lot during
the short clinic.
We did this last year and
we had a lot of fun teach-
ing the kids new things
and helping them devel-
op, Caldwell. I think they
really learn a lot.
The Warriors have been
at it all summer, working
out and playing games in
preparation for next sea-
son.
The offseason has been
phenomenal, Miller said.
The summer has been
well above what we ex-
pected. I think we ended
up winning 22 summer
games. They dont mean a
whole lot, but at this time
last year we only won one.
Its just been great.
Billy@greercitizen.com | 877-2076
Post 115 falls to Rock Hill in game three
Warriors youth
camp tips off
Jackets prepare for Wren
MANDY FERGUSON | THE GREER CITIZEN
The Greer football team will travel to Wren for a 7-on-7
tournament this Thursday and Friday.
PRESTON BURCH | THE GREER CITIZEN
After securing an early win, The Greer American Legion Post 115 junior squad was tagged out of the playofs in a best
of three series with Rock Hill last week, falling at home last Wednesday.
PRESTON BURCH | THE GREER CITIZEN
Collin Traynham puts up a shot during basketball camp
at Riverside High.
Young adjusting to QB job
PRESTON BURCH | THE GREER CITIZEN
Rebel quarterback Micah Young is learning to steer
the ofense, assuming leadership duties this summer.

WEDNESDAY, JULY 16, 2014 SPORTS THE GREER CITIZEN B3


For Brad Keselowski, its
beginning to look an awful
lot like 2012 when every-
thing went right on the
way to a NASCAR Sprint
Cup Series title.
Keselowski led 138 of
the last 232 laps to win
last Sundays Camping
World RV Sales 301 for
his third Sprint Cup vic-
tory of the season. He held
off Kyle Busch on the final
restart and pulled away to
win by three-quarters of a
second in a green-white-
checker finish.
Im not thinking of any-
thing else right now (other)
than how thankful I am to
have a team and a car that
is clicking well, said Kes-
elowski from Victory Lane.
Its every drivers dream.
I think, in a lot of
ways, were stronger than
(2012). I dont think weve
had this much speed be-
fore. I feel like Im in a re-
ally strong rhythm right
now. I think some of last
years struggles put me in
a spot to work harder and
become a better race car
driver. I think were com-
bining all those things and
were seeing the fruits of
that labor with more to
come.
Keselowski, 30, captured
his first Sprint Cup cham-
pionship in 2012 on the
strength of five victories
and 23 top-10 finishes in
36 starts. After failing to
qualify for the Chase last
season, hes produced 10
top-10 performances in 19
races this season.
We were fast last year
at this time but we werent
executing, said Kesel-
owski, who also won Sat-
urdays Sta-Green 200 Na-
tionwide Series race and
had dominated the speed
charts during Saturdays
Sprint Cup practice ses-
sions. This year were
executing and we have a
lot of momentum. It really
feels like we have hit our
stride.
At the same time, we
have a lot of potential
still left in our team. Ev-
erybody is going to turn
it up a notch when the
Chase comes and we know
that. Youve got to have
a good horse and we had
that today. (But) we know
we have to have another
gear to grab to be able to
run for a championship.
I think were close but I
want to keep pushing.
Presuming they attempt
to qualify for the next sev-
en races, Keselowski and
Dale Earnhardt Jr. (10th)
became the first two driv-
ers to clinch spots in the
Chase thanks to their
showings on Sunday.
Im proud of our team
for that, Earnhardt said.
Hopefully we can improve
before we come back here
(for the second race of
the Chase). That was the
hardest Ive ever worked
for a 10th-place finish. We
(were) off all weekend a
real frustrating weekend
to be honest.
Keselowski seemed to
be in cruise control, lead-
ing Denny Hamlin by 2.91
seconds with four laps
remaining. But Justin All-
gaier spun and struck
the wall, bringing out the
races seventh caution flag
and necessitating the fifth
green-white-checker finish
of the 2014 season and
juggling the field.
As soon as the yellow
flag came out, Hamlin
headed to the pits for a
splash of gas and settled
for eighth place. Jeff Gor-
don, who had been run-
ning third, ran his Hen-
drick Chevrolet out of
gas and was relegated to
26th place. Kevin Harvick
started second alongside
Keselowski but ran out of
fuel on the restart.
We had what I thought
was the second-best car,
Hamlin said. I had to save
fuel and couldnt push
it. I would have liked to
have seen if we could have
raced with the (No.) 2, but
he obviously had a very
dominant car.
The fuel situation left
Busch and Clint Bowyer as
the only drivers with a real
shot at Keselowski in the
final two laps.
In the end, neither had
anything for Keselowski.
I dont think anybody
did, said Busch, whose Joe
Gibbs Toyota was strong
enough to sit on the pole
and lead 62 laps.
We made a gusty call at
the end to stay out and see
if we could make it on fuel.
We barely made it ran out
right at the start-finish. All
in all, a decent day to be
coming home second.
Bowyer, who led 36 laps
after leading a total of 12
in the previous 12 Cup
events, faded to sixth be-
hind rookie Kyle Larson,
Matt Kenseth and Ryan
Newman.
Keselowskis power was
evident when crew chief
Paul Wolfe opted to give
up the lead and take four
tires when the races sec-
ond caution came on Lap
113. It took Keselowski 13
laps to drive from 10th
place to third and 10 more
laps for him to get to the
rear bumper of the leader,
Kenseth. Throughout the
race, Wolfe opted for fresh
tires over track position.
I really was not sure how
that was going to work out
and unfold, Wolfe said.
Seeing that, I felt pretty
good about the strength of
our car and what Brad was
able to do moving through
traffic.
Team owner Roger Pen-
ske also liked what he was
seeing.
Paul made great calls
today, he said. Watch-
ing Brad and I got to see
it from up on top I can
tell you there was nobody
that could beat him. It was
just great execution from
everybody.
Keselowski became the
13th different winner in
the last 13 Cup races at
New Hampshire, tying a
record set at Texas Motor
Speedway. Busch has now
finished second at New
Hampshire in three con-
secutive races.
In Iowa
Speedway
truck series
No ones ever questioned
the talent Erik Jones pos-
sesses.
His luck?
Thats another matter
entirely.
But Friday at Iowa
Speedway, both skill and
good fortune finally co-
existed for the 18-year-old
Kyle Busch Motorsports
driver, who powered to
his second career NASCAR
Camping World Truck Se-
ries triumph in the Ameri-
can Ethanol 200.
Glad we could get out
and command the race and
bring it home, said Jones,
who led 130 laps and held
off a spirited charge from
Brad Keselowski Racings
Ryan Blaney, who settled
for second.
He brought it home in
one piece, too.
Jones, who runs a 12-race
schedule, was wrecked
while leading late in the
June 14 race at Gateway
Motorsports Park outside
of St. Louis.
He was running in the
top five when another
truck sent him spinning on
a late restart in the March
29 race at Martinsville.
You really want to try
to make your mark every
time you get in (the truck),
Jones said. Its a tough in-
dustry and when you get in
and you get turned around
or something like that, its
just really a bummer and
it kind of takes that week
and you have to throw it
away. When you only get
so many opportunities, it
makes it really hard as a
young guy.
Not that hes complain-
ing.
His turn at the wheel of
the No. 51 Toyota put the
truck into victory lane for
the sixth time this season
and the first time when
owner Kyle Busch wasnt
driving.
It was definitely fun,
Jones said. I had a lot
of fun two young guys
battling hard there for the
win. Pretty hungry.
Its the second time
Blaneys snared a runner-
up finish at Iowa Speed-
way this season.
He ran second to Sam
Hornish Jr. in Mays Get
to Know Newton 250 NAS-
CAR Nationwide Series
race.
Were getting closer
and closer to getting to
victory lane, said Blaney,
who owns one win at Iowa,
which came in 2012. Its
just a matter of time.
That description ap-
peared apropos to Fridays
race at times, as well.
Blaney, who excelled in
long runs, could reel in
Jones, but couldnt stick a
pass.
His best chance came
with 16 laps remaining,
but a side-by-side duel
that went three-wide with
the lapped truck of Jus-
tin Lofton didnt provide
enough daylight.
I knew that was my best
opportunity to try to get
by him, said Blaney, who
notched his fifth top-five
finish of the season. We
got really close. It almost
sucked me around. Luck-
ily we didnt wreck right
there. It was tight racing,
but a good race and hope-
fully good for the fans.
Matt Crafton earned
third, with Joey Coulter
and German Quiroga Jr.
completing the top five.
Crafton said lapped traf-
fic often proved to be per-
ilous, so he was pleased
with his podium finish.
My lord, some of these
guys would go from the
bottom to the top and
back to the bottom, said
Crafton, who assumed
the series points lead by
two over Blaney while for-
mer leader Johnny Sauter
limped in with an 18th-
place finish. It was ab-
solutely insane, lapping
some of them. I know they
had their hands full, with-
out a doubt.
Thats not a problem
for Jones, who battled his
teammate Darrell Wallace
Jr. for the lead early in the
race before an ill-timed
pit stop helped drop Wal-
lace the pole sitter to
13th.
He knows what he
needs in a truck and he
knows how to race, said
Eric Phillips, Jones crew
chief. He raced side by
side with a lot of lapped
cars to work through and
he and Blaney raced hard
all night. They didnt beat
on each other or take each
other out. They just raced
hard and thats the sign of
a true winner, or champi-
on, in years to come.
Note: The No. 51 car was
ruled to be too low dur-
ing post-race inspection.
Any possible penalties will
be determined early next
week by NASCAR officials.
Taking a deep breath at
the winners podium, Brad
Keselowski took a second
to savor his dominant last
Saturday at New Hamp-
shire Motor Speedway.
Keselowski captured the
pole, then led 152 of 200
laps to win the NASCAR
Nationwide Series Sta-
Green 200. In addition, he
posted the fastest times in
both NASCAR Sprint Cup
Series practice sessions in
preparation for last Sun-
days Camping World RV
Sales 301.
One helluva Saturday,
said Keselowski, who re-
corded a perfect driver
rating for the sixth time
in his Nationwide career
and has finished no worse
than third in any of his six
Nationwide Series starts
this season. Sometimes
on these really busy days
you get so caught up in
the action that you really
cant appreciate all thats
transpired.
We have so much to
be proud of there and,
obviously, were looking
forward to tomorrow and
the opportunity we have.
Our Cup car was fast this
morning. Our Nationwide
car in qualifying had a lot
of adversity but we fought
through that and got the
pole. In the Nationwide
race the car was really
fast.
In addition, Keselowskis
Penske-prepared Hertz
Mustang became the first
Nationwide Series car to
win from the pole position
in 17 races this season. He
also won the March 8 race
at Las Vegas and now has
29 victories in 211 Nation-
wide races.
Kyle Busch, the pole-
sitter for Sundays Sprint
Cup race, was Keselows-
kis primary competition
and finished second ahead
of Matt Kenseth, Kyle Lar-
son and rookie Chris Bue-
scher.
It was a bit of a dog-
fight one of the most
challenging races Ive ever
ran, knowing that you
have Kyle Busch behind
you and hes just a tiny bit
faster, said Keselowski,
whose only mistake was
accidentally dropping the
American flag during his
victory lap.
You have to fight
through a line of cars and
it seemed like there was
always something coming
at us.
Busch pulled to within a
car length of Keselowskis
rear bumper with 29 laps
to go, but got loose on Lap
173, slid up the track and
dropped nearly a second
off the pace with 25 laps
left. Taking advantage of
lap traffic in the final 20
laps, Keselowskis eventu-
al winning margin was 1.8
seconds.
It was actually very
hard-fought there at the
end, Keselowski said. He
(Busch) was really good
at making adjustments. I
didnt think I was going to
be able to hold him off.
Busch led the first 34
laps but never led again
in falling just short of his
fifth win in nine Nation-
wide Series starts at New
Hampshire.
We got what we could
out of our Monster Energy
Camry, Busch said. We
had the best run there at
the end but just not quite
enough. We had to fight
hard to get by a few guys,
got to second but didnt
have quite enough to chase
(Keselowski) down.
If it was clean and green
all the way to the end I
dont know if I could have
got to him. I was hoping
for a couple opportunities
there in traffic.
Keselowski asserted his
car as the one to beat,
leading 66 of the first 100
laps. By Lap 66, only Busch
(2.88) and Kenseth (9.25)
were within 10 seconds of
Keselowskis yellow No. 22
Mustang.
True to its name, the
Sta-Green 200 stayed cau-
tion-free for 76 laps prior
to a yellow flag for debris
on Lap 93 that tightened
the field.
Busch struggled after
the restart while Larson
seized the opportunity
and tucked in second be-
hind Keselowski.
And he wasnt second
for long.
When Brian Scott got into
the back of third-place El-
liott Sadler, it touched off
a spin that involved seven
cars, enabling Larson to
seize the lead.
Larson led the race twice
for 11 laps. But when
things settled down af-
ter the races fourth cau-
tion, Keselowski regained
the top spot and went on
to dominate the final 56
laps.
Keselowski cruises to NASCAR Sprint Cup win
PHOTO | COURTESY OF NASCAR.COM/ GETTY IMAGES
Brad Keselowski, driver of the No. 2 Redds Ford, celebrates in victory lane after winning
at New Hampshire Motor Speedway last Sunday.
We made a gusty
call at the end to
stay out and see if
we could make it on
fuel.
Kyle Busch
NASCAR driver
Fortune lifts Erik Jones to victory
PHOTO | COURTESY OF NASCAR.COM/ GETTY IMAGES
Darrell Wallace Jr., driver of the No. 54 ToyotaCare Toyota, and Erik Jones, driver of the No. 51 ToyotaCare Toyota, lead
the feld at Iowa Speedway last Friday.
Keselowski
dominates at
New Hampshire
It was tight racing, but a good race and
hopefully good for the fans.
Ryan Blaney
Driver
B4 THE GREER CITIZEN SPORTS WEDNESDAY, JULY 16, 2014
FROM B1
name that did a great job.
Tavin Richardson had a
good tournament. Braylin
Collins and Najee Bowens
had a good tournament.
You can just go down the
list of guys who played
well.
While 7-on-7 serves as
solid practice for his team,
Lane said his guys are get-
ting anxious for practice
to start.
Doing all these 7-on-7s
in the summer and going
against yourself, these kids
are ready to get the pads
on so they can start bang-
ing around some, Lane
said. Right now, its just
a lot of two-hand touch.
Theyre getting a little ant-
sy, but it comes with the
territory. You just want
to be sure theyre safe in
the summer and avoid in-
juries and get out there in
the fall and prepare for a
state championship run.
Byrnes will see its share
of the limelight early on
this season. The Rebels
will travel to Northwestern
on Aug. 22 for a match-up
televised on ESPN at 6 p.m.
Byrnes game with De La
Salle in Concord, Califor-
nia will also be shown on
the network.
Its exciting, Lane said.
You have to keep things
in perspective. You still
play the football game and
while youre playing, youre
not thinking, Oh, this is
on ESPN. Youre worried
about other things. Ive
coached in ESPN games
before and other televi-
sion games and your not
worried about all that. Its
exciting, but you dont let
it take over what you do
and how you prepare.
Lane said the team plans
to continue to make a
name for the school, as
well as South Carolina
football as a whole.
Thats something we
plan on doing year in and
year out at Byrnes, he
said. We want to make
the state of South Carolina
proud by hopefully play-
ing the best teams in the
country and showing that
South Carolina football is
good football. Thats what
were doing year in and
year out and thats why
ESPN keeps coming back
to us.
Lucky
in
Mudville
BY MARK VASTO
FOR THE GREER CITIZEN
O
n the Fourth of July,
Major League Baseball
and its fans com-
memorated the 75th an-
niversary of Lou Gehrigs
farewell to baseball
speech. Though written
off the cuff by Gehrig, a
player whose humility
was as legendary as his
mighty swing, the im-
mortal speech is generally
regarded as one of the
great speeches in Ameri-
can history.
Delivered over the
public address system of
the cavernous old Yankee
Stadium then already
considered a cathedral to
the game the speech
famously echoes Gehrigs
sentiments, as if to add
a ghostly emphasis
foreshadowing his own
imminent death.
Today (today) ... I con-
sider myself (I consider
myself) ... the luckiest
man ... (the luckiest man)
... on the face of the Earth
(on the face of the Earth).
Gehrigs speech, de-
livered at the end of his
playing career, two years
before his death due to
a still-incurable disease,
reminds us of a higher
purpose and a state of
grace.
But while Americans are
adept at soaring turns of
phrase, it never takes long
before someone drags the
discourse down into the
gutter.
Instead of reading
tributes about Gehrig, the
buzz on the Internet sur-
rounds a $10 million law-
suit filed the day previous
by a fan caught napping
in his box seats on cam-
era during a Yankees-Red
Sox game.
The complaint reads
that he was made fun of
by announcers, causing
him great mental distress,
and the subsequent post-
ing of the video online
invited more slurs regard-
ing his physical appear-
ance.
Apparently he feels his
good name was dispar-
aged, and he needs to
seek redress.
He has to keep up his
reputation at work, after
all.
Whether or not the
annoyingly distracting
and absurd $10 million
case has any merit, it oc-
curs to me that Gehrigs
replacement at first base,
a ballplayer named Babe
Dahlgren, never made
more than $50,000 in his
entire career.
A closer look reveals
that after he replaced
Gehrig, he was traded
eight times over the next
12 years. Certainly, he
had larger-than-life shoes
to fill for the Yankees,
shoes that only became
larger after Gehrigs
death.
But Dahlgrens case is
notable in that he was the
first baseball player ever
tested for drugs.
Dahlgren had sought
more money during his
career, and baseball exec-
utives like Branch Rickey
and Joe McCarthy unfairly
maligned him, saying he
was not only a mediocre
talent, but a marijuana
smoker, as well. That
story is better told in his
grandson Matts book,
Rumor Has It, in which
he sheds light on the un-
founded, unproven claims
that his grandfather spent
a life agonizing over.
Who knows what curi-
ous cases tomorrow will
bring?
As for me, watching the
game with my family on
the Fourth of July, stoking
up all of these stories
just because we decided
to watch a bunch of guys
throw a ball around, Im
reminded that things
arent so bad ... or, at
least, they could be worse.
Who says theres no
joy in Mudville? Gehrigs
American story reminds
us all just how lucky we
really are after all.
Neely hosts
Shooting
for Heaven
Greer High basketball
coach Jeff Neely will be
putting on a basketball
camp this week and next
week, featuring instruc-
tion for children in kin-
dergarten through eighth
grade.
Neely has been conduct-
ing the camp for more
than two decades and it
takes place at Greer First
Baptist Church.
The camp runs July 14-
17 and July 21-24 (from
9-11:30 a.m.) for various
ages.
Spots are still available
for next weeks events.
Ive been doing this for
21 years now, Neely said.
The church has been gra-
cious enough to help me
and partner with me. It
started out with my chil-
dren helping me and Ive
been able to use some of
my players to help me. Its
been a good thing for us
as a family to do together.
We just try to focus on
the spiritual side of things
and the fundamentals of
basketball. We just have
a good time and I think
most of the kids that come
through really enjoy it.
The clinic will focus on
fundamentals.
With the young kids, we
work a lot with them on
just catching and passing,
he said. Well get kids that
are afraid to even catch
a basketball. I think a lot
parents think Im going to
turn them into a basketball
player in a week, and Im
just trying to teach them
not to be afraid to catch. It
really just depends on the
individual.
Neely said the camp is
mostly about having fun.
Well have a lot of fun
games with them and well
try to incorporate a lot
of basketball into it, he
said. We talk a lot about
sportsmanship and get-
ting along with others. We
try to show them how to
play without fussing at
each other and just having
good attitudes.
The head coach said he
has gotten assistance from
some of his players from
the high school through
the years.
I always try to use my
players, Neely said. I
try to handpick the ones
I think would be good at
that. Im often surprised
that the ones that actually
are good with kids are the
ones I didnt know would
be good with kids. It helps
me and I think it helps
them to be able to do stuff
like that. Ive used a vari-
ety of students over the
years.
BY BILLY CANNADA
SPORTS EDITOR
Washington Baptist
Church will play host to a
sports camp each Wednes-
day night throughout the
remainder of July.
The camp is July 16, 23
and 30 from 7-8:30 nightly
for ages 6-14 at 3500 N.
Highway 14 in Greer.
No registration is re-
quired and the events are
free and open to the pub-
lic.
In our youth group, we
have so many good stu-
dent athletes, both at the
high school and collegiate
level said Travis Henson,
who currently serves as
youth minister for the
church. We just thought
about doing a sports camp
on these last few Wednes-
day nights in July just to
bring people in from the
community who might
be looking to play some
ball.
Henson, who is also the
head baseball coach at
Blue Ridge, said the camp
is a way to provide skill
training and encourage-
ment.
Well teach them some
basic skills. Its also an
evangelistic effort, but
we do it through sports
themes, he said. Weve
got some student athletes
that are going to step up
and give testimonies at
each event. This week,
with the baseball and bas-
ketball emphasis, well
have Ross Mathis, who is
a graduate of Blue Ridge
signed to play basketball
at Lincoln Memorial and
Alex Williams, who is a
graduate of Blue Ridge
signed to play for SMC.
Wednesday nights camp
will highlight baseball and
basketball. On July 23, the
camp will feature football
and volleyball and on July
30, participants will play
soccer and ultimate ball.
Its an opportunity to
give back, Henson said.
Thats pretty much my
aim in lifeto share Christ
anytime I get the oppor-
tunity. When youre able
to do these two things,
sharing Christ and play-
ing sports, thats about as
much fun as I can have.
Ryan Norton a center
with the Clemson Uni-
versity football team will
speak next Wednesdays
camp.
This is just something
a lot of people can enjoy
at no cost, he said. Its a
really great opportunity.
Were just looking to help
the children with skills in
their different sports, but
were also looking to give
them some encourage-
ment and motivation.
Henson said the church
has been blessed with a
group of talented athletes
who can provide quality
instruction.
Within our youth group
this year, we graduated 18
seniors and we had several
sign scholarships to play
athletics at a collegiate
level, he said. We just
have all these people that
are so gifted and its great
they are able to do some-
thing like this.
For more information,
call 895-1510.
billy@greercitizen.com | 877-2076
A SPORTING VIEW |
RAVENS YOUTH FOOTBALL
REGISTRATION OPEN
Registration is now un-
derway for the fall season
of Carolina Ravens youth
tackle football (ages 6-12)
and cheerleading (ages 5-
13). To register online, visit
ravensfootballsc.com.
For more information,
call 423-4550.
REGISTRATION OPEN
FOR GOODWILL MUD RUN
Registration has opened
for the fall edition of the
Goodwill Mud Run, which
will take place on Satur-
day, Sept. 13 at SC-TAC
(formerly the old Donald-
son Center).
For more information on
the fall Goodwill Mud Run,
visit the official event web-
site at goodwillmudrun.
org.
BIG LEAGUE WORLD SERIES
KICKING OFF IN EASLEY
The Big League World Se-
ries will take place on July
23-30 at the J.B. Red Ow-
ens Recreation Complex in
Easley, featuring top base-
ball players from the area
and around the world.
The tournament will kick
off with Fan Fest on July
22 with a night of activi-
ties and a special concert
by rising country music
group Chasin Crazy.
While Fan Fest is free and
open to the public, tourna-
ment daily and champi-
onship game passes are
available at $5 for adults
and $3 for students. Week-
long passes are available
for $30 for an adult and
$15 for students. Children
under 5-years-old are free.
For more information, visit
bigleagueworldseries.com.
MANDY FERGUSON |THE GREER CITIZEN
Spots are still open for Greer basketball coach Jef Neelys basketball camp Shooting for
Heaven. It is held Greer First Baptist Church for kindergarten through eighth graders.
Spots still open for final
week of basketball camp
PRESTON BURCH |THE GREER CITIZEN
Bradyn Durrah takes a shot during Mondays basketball
camp at Greer First Baptist.
BY BILLY CANNADA
SPORTS EDITOR
The Swim Association
Invitational League (SAIL)
teams were competing for
top honors last weekend
at divisionals and several
area swimmers racked up
points.
Gower won the Red Di-
vision with 1,848 team
points. Sugar Creek won
the Founders Cup in the
Red Division, acquiring
9,420 quality points.
Woody Creek racked up
1,377 points in the Purple
Division, claiming the
championship. Devenger
earned 1,418.5 points,
winning the Metcalf Tro-
phy in the White Division.
Spaulding Farm won the
Blue Division with 1,349.5
points, while Foxcroft won
the Green Division with
1,292 points.
Sparrow Point/Adams
Run won the gold division
with 1,283 total points.
Billy@greercitizen.com | 877-2076
Washington
Baptist Church
puts on clinic
Area teams earn SAIL titles
PRESTON BURCH | THE GREER CITIZEN
Sugar Creek won the Founders Cup, earning 9,420 quality points in the Red Division
at SAIL divisionals last weekend.


BYRNES: Will be featured
on ESPN in season opener






SPORTS
ROUNDUP
We talk a lot about
sportsmanship and
getting along with
others. We try to
show them how to
play without fussing
at each other and
just having good
attitudes.
Jef Neely
Coach
NOTICES
NOTICE All real estate ad-
vertised in this newspaper is
Subject to the Federal Fair
Housing Act of 1968 which
makes it illegal to advertise
any preference, limitation or
discrimination based on race,
color, religion, sex, handicap,
familial status, national origin
or an intention to make such
preference, limitation or dis-
crimination. This newspaper
will not knowingly accept any
advertising for real estate
which is in violation of the law.
Our readers hereby informed
that all dwelling advertised
in this newspaper are avail-
able on an equal opportunity
basis.
7-2,9,16,23,30-TFN
AUCTIONS
AUCTION EVERY THURS-
DAY, 11am in old ABC Build-
ing 317 S. Buncombe. Visit
auctionzip.com
7-2,9,16,23,30-TFN
Auction House & Lot at 501
Salterton St., Summerville,
SC Friday, July 25, 3 PM
1,283 +/- Sq. Ft., 3 BR, 2 BA
Damon Shortt Auction Group
877-669-4005 SCAL2346 da-
monshorttproperties.com
AUCTION: Ofce Build-
ing Hollywood SC CBD X
162/165. 3492 sf. Single/
Multi-Tenant Flex Space. July
31 Will Sell > $89K! Harper-
AuctionAndRealty.com Mike
Harper SCAL 3728. 843-729-
4996
ADVERTISE YOUR AUC-
TION in 107 S.C. newspa-
pers for only $375. Your 25-
word classied ad will reach
more than 2.6 million readers.
Call Donna Yount at the S.C.
Newspaper Network, 1-888-
727-7377.
VACATION RENTALS
ADVERTISE YOUR VACA-
TION PROPERTY FOR
RENT OR SALE to more than
2.6 million South Carolina
newspaper readers. Your 25-
word classied ad will appear
in 107 S.C. newspapers for
only $375. Call Donna Yount
at the South Carolina News-
paper Network, 1-888-727-
7377.
HOMES AND LAND FOR
SALE
HOUSE FOR SALE. 2 Bed-
room, 1 1/2 bath, new carpet,
linoleum, windows. Freshly
painted. Central heat/air.
Possible owner nancing.
$55,000. 864-915-1016.
7-16,23
DOCKABLE LAKEFRONT
TRACT 3.5 Acres: Willing to
sell for $39,900 on a 71,000
ac lake bordering SC and GA
877-717-5263 my extension
955.
APARTMENTS FOR RENT
SUMMERTREE APTS.:
MOVE INTO SUMMERTREE
TODAY & RECEIVE OUR
MOVE-IN SPECIAL! Sum-
mertree offers spacious 1 &
2 bedroom apartment homes
with a great location, just
minutes from Spartanburg.
Units designed for persons
with disabilities and/or rental
assistance subject to avail-
ability. Call Sandra at (864)
439-3474 to nd out more.
Credit and background check
required. Section 8 vouchers
welcomed. Equal Housing
Opportunity. Profession-
ally managed by Partnership
Property Management, an
equal opportunity provider
and employer. Apply Today!
7-16,23,30
MOBILE HOME RENT
3 BEDROOM 2 BATH, mobile
home, north of Greer. Large
lot, $500 per month. Deposit
and references required. Call
380-1451.
7-2,9,16,23,30-TFN
HELP WANTED
HELP WANTED: NEED
someone to cut grass, paint,
etc. Call 879-2015.
7-2,9,16,23,30-TFN
LANDSCAPE COMPANY
HIRING Laborers Must be
able to work full days doing
heavy labor. Some overtime
may be required. Must be
able to pass a background
check, drug test and e-Verify.
Excellent pay. Positions avail-
able immediately. Call 864-
607-8224.
7-9,16,23
Want A Career As A HVAC
Technician? Accelerated
Hands On Training & Certi-
cations Offered. National Av-
erage 18-22 Hourly! Lifetime
Job Placement Assistance.
VA Benets Eligible! 1-877-
994-9904
COLONIAL LIFE is seeking
B2B sales reps. Commissions
average $56K+/yr. Training
& leads. Sales experience
required, LA&H license pre-
ferred. Call Elisabeth at 803-
391-5536.
HELP WANTED DRIVERS
Drivers, CDL-A: LOCAL!! FT
in Greenville Area. 1+ Yrs Exp
- Current Medical. Good Work
History. For Fastest Results
Apply at: www.drive4inno-
vative.com or leave msg: 1-
888-473-3559
7-9,16
Drivers: Regional & OTR.
$1,000 plus per week + Ben-
et Pkg. 100% No Touch
Freight. Weekly/Bi-Weekly
HomeTime. CDL-A 1yr. OTR
exp. 855-842-8498
7-9,16
Experienced OTR Flatbed
Drivers earn 50 up to 55 cpm
loaded. $1000 sign on to
Qualied drivers. Home most
weekends. Call: 843-266-
3731 / www.bulldoghiway.
com EOE
GUARANTEED PAY! CLASS-
A -CDL FLATBED DRIVERS
NEEDED! Local, regional,
OTR. Great pay package/
benets/401k match. 1yr exp.
required. Call JGR 864-488-
9030 Ext. 319, Greenville and
Gaffney SC locations. www.
jgr-inc.com
Superior Transportation New
Careers for OTR Drivers
Class A CDL 2yrs Exp Flat-
bed. Get paid for your Experi-
ence! Weekly Salary & Extra
pay for weekends! Call 800-
736-9486 Ext266
WANT TO DRIVE A TRUCK
- No experience? Earn while
you learn. Company spon-
sored CDL Training. Full ben-
ets. Earn $41,500+ 1st year.
1-888-714-3759.
ADVERTISE YOUR DRIVER
JOBS in 107 S.C. newspa-
pers for only $375. Your 25-
word classied ad will reach
more than 2.6 million readers.
Call Donna Yount at the S.C.
Newspaper Network, 1-888-
727-7377.
FOR SALE
FOR SALE - TWO BURIAL
PLOTS located in Greenville
Memorial Gardens in Garden
of Devotion, Spaces 1 and 2.
Asking $1500.00 for both or
$750.00 or one, plus $100.00
for transfer of ownership.
EMAIL -xrjlx@hotmail.com
DirectTV. 2 Year Savings
Event! Over 140 channels
only $29.99 a month. Only
DirecTV gives you 2 YEARS
of savings and a FREE Ge-
nie upgrade! Call 1-800-908-
5974
DISH TV Retailer - Starting at
$19.99/month (for 12 mos.)
& High Speed Internet start-
ing at $14.95/month (where
available.) SAVE! Ask About
SAME DAY Installation! CALL
Now! 1-800-635-0278
REDUCE YOUR CABLE
BILL!* Get a whole-home
Satellite system installed at
NO COST and programming
starting at $19.99/mo. FREE
HD/DVR Upgrade to new call-
ers, SO CALL NOW 1-866-
981-7319
SERVICES
REECE ROOFING
THIRD GENERATION. For
all your roong needs, call
864-431-9198 or 864-401-
3693. 40 years experience.
10% off thru July.
6-188,20
TOMMYS GRASS CUTTING.
Free Estimates.
451-0431 or 268-0660.
\
DIVORCE WITH OR WITH-
OUT children $125.00. In-
cludes name change and
property settlement agree-
ment. SAVE hundreds. Fast
and easy. Call 1-888-733-
7165, 24/7
All Things Basementy! Base-
ment Systems Inc. Call us for
all of your basement needs!
Waterproong, Finishing,
Structural Repairs, Humid-
ity and Mold Control. FREE
ESTIMATES! Call 1-800-307-
8128
MISCELLANEOUS
AIRLINE CAREERS begin
here - Get trained as FAA
certied Aviation Technician.
Housing and Financial aid for
qualied students. Job place-
ment assistance. Call Avia-
tion Institute of Maintenance
866-367-2513
YARD SALE
YARD SALE. 103 S. BUN-
COMBE ROAD, Greer. Sat-
urday, 8:00 a.m. until. Miscel-
laneous items!
7-16
YARD SALE SATURDAY,
July 19th, 8:00 a.m. until 1:00
p.m. 310 New Woodruff Rd,
Greer.
7-16
HUGE YARD SALE Saturday,
July 19th, 1100 Gap Creek
Road at M&Js Restaurant.
7-16
YARD SALE SATURDAY, July
19th, 7:00 a.m. until. 69 Ford
Pickup, Appliances, Clothes,
Tools, Equipment, Speakers.
685 Main St. Wellford.
7-16
WEDNESDAY, JULY 16, 2014 CLASSIFIEDS THE GREER CITIZEN B5
EMERYS
TREE
SERVICE
Fertilization
Thinning
Removals
Stump Grinding
Fully Insured
Free Estimates
895-1852
HELP WANTED
327 Suber Road
1 & 2 Bedroom
879-2015
NOW LEASING!
JORDAN
MINI-WAREHOUSES
FOR RENT
Jordan Rental Agency
329 Suber Rd.
Greer, SC 29651
879-2015
3
-
8
-
t
f
n
c
Last weeks answers
Apply at McState.com
Paid Vacations Discount Insurance Available Flexible Hours
Hwy. 14 and Hammett Br. Rd.
IS NOW HIRING
ALL SHIFTS
ALL POSITIONS
Also looking for Part Time Janitorial/Maintenance
Position 6 am to 2 pm Fridays and Sundays
McDonalds
McDonalds
SCFL 3471, Terry Howe, BIC
AUCTIONS
ONLINE ONLY at terryhowe.com
terryhowe.com
864.268.4399
Terms, photos, video &more at:
Home & Lots
111 Valley Dr, Greer, SC
3 Bedroom, 1.5 Bath Brick Home
Full Unfnished Basement
Just of of Hwy 29
Also Selling Adjacent Lot
Leesburg Peak, Greer, SC
9 Residential Subdivision Lots
Mount Vernon Estates
Close to Hwy 29
40+ Additional Properties in SC
Homes, Land, Lots & Commercial,
including 8 More Lots in Greenville,
Greer, Spartanburg & Taylors
Bid Now at terryhowe.com!
CeL Lralned as lAA cerued Avlauon 1echnlclan.
Pouslng and llnanclal ald for qualled sLudenLs.
!ob placemenL asslsLance.
Call Avlauon lnsuLuLe of MalnLenance

AIRLINE
CAkLLkS
8LGIN HERE
DIRECT TV TECHNICIANS
MasTec Advanced Technologies is hiring!!!
DirecTV Technicians needed in Greenville
& surrounding areas.
PAID TRAINING STARTS SOON
Apply now online
www.jobsatmastec.com JOB ID 1502
Or call Jami Price 954-218-7894
Your Job Specics
JN Source Code : ATL 140714 A19 _________________________
Publication Date(s): 7/14, 7/21, 7/28 _______________________
This Ad has been designed for the exclusive
use of the customer advertising in the
publication listed. Use of this ad outside of
the listed publication is prohibited.
Publication: Greer Citizen/SC______________________________
Market: Atlanta ________________________________________
Ad Size : 4.9 x 4 in ______________________________________
Recruitment Consultant: George Burdick ____________________ Ph: 770-955-4458 ______________________________________
CLASSIFIEDS
CALL 864-877-2076
RATES
20 words or less: $13.50 frst insertion
Discount for additional insertions
DEADLINE
5pm Monday
for insertion Wednesday
TERMS
Cash in advance. We accept Visa, MasterCard,
American Express, and Discover Card

PUBLIC NOTICE
AUCTIONS
VACATION RENTALS
HOMES AND
LAND FOR SALE
APARTMENTS
FOR RENT
MOBILE HOMES
FOR RENT
HELP WANTED
DRIVERS/
HELP WANTED
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
CALL FOR SERVICES
MISCELLANEOUS
YARD
SALES
Break Down Coordinator. Full Time!
7a-4p. Medical, Dental, Vision. 401k. Paid
Vacation/Holidays. General Knowledge of
Tractor Trailer/Diesel maintenance, Strong
computer/ communication skills, able to
multi-task, positive attitude required.
Apply: gptruck.com (non-driver app)
Richard / Lesa: 864-879-4140
Visited
Fatz at
peach shed
BY KATIE JONES
STAFF WRITER
Jim and Carolyn Gilliam
were looking for some-
where to eat on the way
home from Spartanburg
when they stopped at a
converted peach shed.
Now, 25 years later, its
still their restaurant.
Good food. Friendly
people. Nice atmosphere.
Attention to the needs
of the customer, Jim
Gilliam said. Those are
four things I can appreci-
ate about Fatz. One other
thing its not as noisy as
other places. We like that,
as you get older.
Fatz Caf is celebrat-
ing its 25th year, with
throw-back menu items to
the peach shed days, like
peach sangria and a sum-
mer salad with peaches.
Neither one of the cou-
ple has a favorite dish or
remembers what that first
meal was. Now they come
to the Greer location about
once a week.
Im sure it was good,
Jim Gilliam said. Thats
one thing you remember,
if it isnt.
Jim Gilliam, a retired
Methodist pastor, said
the price must have been
reasonable for them to eat
there.
If you knew me better,
you would know I would
pay attention to that. In
those days, on a pastors
salary, raising a large fam-
ily you had to manage
your pennies, he said.
My first salary was $4,200
a year.
The Gilliams have seen
Fatz change, along with
the rest of the Upstate.
It has grownGreer
has grown tremendously
since then, Carolyn Gil-
liam said.
There wasnt a lot along
here. There werent many
businesses on (Highway)
29 until you got here at
Taylors and Greer, Jim
Gilliam said. In between
all this now nothing.
That used to be the race
track for teenagers.
They couple also likes to
eat at City Range in Green-
ville and Olive Garden.
The couple has been
married for 58 years and
have five children.
When the children are in
town, they bring them to
Fatz.
kjones@greercitizen.com | 877-2076
Im sure
[the food]
was
good.
Thats one thing
you remember, if it
isnt.
Jim Gilliam
LIVING HERE
The Greer Citizen
B6 THE GREER CITIZEN WEDNESDAY, JULY 16, 2014
800 families
downloaded
passports
BY KATIE JONES
STAFF WRITER
As summer winds down,
so does the second Park
Hop.
Park Hop is an initiative
between LiveWell Green-
ville, the Greenville Drive,
the six cities in the county
and Greenville County
Recreation, among oth-
ers. The scavenger hunt
is designed to get families
active and help them dis-
cover new parks.
We want it to grow and
expand but we want to re-
main true that Park Hop
was founded to get people
active and get people active
as a family, said Melissa
Fair, communications and
event coordinator for Park
Hop. There are hundreds
of gems in Greenville, but
realizing that, you make it
a lifestyle when you make
physical activity fun and
something to do as a fami-
ly. When those changes are
instilled in kids at an early
age, thats really when you
see them develop.
Fair said about 800
families have downloaded
Park Hop passports, which
have this years parks on
them with scavenger hunt
clues.
She has high hopes for
Park Hops future it may
become year-round event.
It may become a staple,
like downtown Green-
villes Mice on Main. It may
expand to appeal to the 12
and older crowd
Next year, one thing
were exploring is do we
create more than one
scavenger hunt, one with
more challenging answers,
geared toward the 12 and
up age...We would love
to do permanent instal-
lations to where its not
just during the summer,
Fair said. We have this
idea that Park Hop would
almost become a database
of scavenger hunts to pull
from. Whenever you want
something to do, maybe
you havent done the one
from 2013, but youve
done the one from 2015.
Families can go back dur-
ing spring break, when
the kids are out of school
and they have a little down
time. Wed love to see, sim-
ilar to the idea of Mice on
Main, that its a Greenville
staple.
This year, the mobile
app expanded to include
a function that allowed
clues for parks to be un-
locked only when the user
is in the park.
Children and teens are
so technology-driven,
Fair said. They love play-
ing with their cell phones
and their tablets. Finding
a way to expand to where
were getting interest from
other children and teens,
so we wanted that mobile
interactive device.
The Aug. 13 closing cer-
emony will be at Greer City
Park this year. The picnic
drop-in party is invita-
tion-only. Fair is planning
on having music and food
vendors for the event.
Reedy RipIt will hopeful-
ly make an appearance.
Its such a beautiful
park, with such a great
green space, Fair said.
We want it to be a relaxed,
family, casual atmosphere
and do a picnic in the park
to celebrate the end of the
summer and going back to
school.
Prizes are awarded at
the closing ceremony, like
shelter rentals, Drive tick-
ets, admission to the Chil-
drens Museum of the Up-
state, and camping gear.
A bicycle and throwing
out the first pitch at the
Drive game are the grand
prizes.
There are more than 100
parks and recreation facili-
ties in Greenville County.
Park Hop passports
are due August 4. More
information is available
at livewellgreenville.org/
parkhop.
kjones@greercitizen.com | 877-2076
Summer Park
Hop winds down
MANDY FERGUSON | THE GREER CITIZEN
Kids Planet, a popular play spot in Greer, was featured in this years Park Hop. The
summer event is a scavenger hunt designed to get families active.
COUPLE REFLECTS ON GREER
MANDY FERGUSON | THE GREER CITIZEN
Jim and Carolyn Gilliam say they frequent Greers Fatz Caf, recalling 25 years of good service with the restaurant. Jim
said he enjoys the good food and friendly people.

DEAR PAWS CORNER:
Were planning to drive
across the country and
want to bring along our
dogs, Trudy and Jake.
Weve never done a trip
like this before, though,
and I hear that there are
not many pet-friendly ho-
tels or campsites. Is that
true? -- Carl C., Trenton,
N.J.
DEAR CARL: Actually,
the number of pet-friend-
ly accommodations in the
United States is increas-
ing, with even some
high-end hotels offering
pet perks such as rooms
customized with sleeping
areas, and food and water
dishes.
Many campgrounds al-
low dogs, as long as they
are leashed and do not
disturb other campers.
A number of books and
websites are available that
list pet-friendly places.
Check out BringFido.com
to search for places to
stay during your trip.
For a cross-country
drive, plan your route
based on those pet-
friendly accommodations.
How long do you plan to
drive each day? Will you
be stopping to sightsee?
Are there times when you
have to be dog-free (such
as going out for a nice
dinner), and need to keep
them in a safe place like a
day kennel?
Youll also need to keep
the dogs safe while in
the vehicle, so look into
purchasing either dog
restraints (sort of a seat
belt for dogs of different
sizes) or sturdy carri-
ers, or both. Remember
to never let the dogs sit
alone in the car, even with
the windows down -- its
incredibly dangerous.
If you have time before
the big drive, try taking
the dogs on a long one-
day drive or an overnight
trip, so both you and they
get used to the idea of
traveling some distance.
With some careful plan-
ning, you can bring your
dogs along and have a
very enjoyable, safe trip.
Send your questions
or comments to ask@
pawscorner.com.
I
ve said it before and
will say it again: chil-
dren dont need to be
coddled as much as they
are. Its a shame. Given
the tiniest amount of
freedom, they do amazing
things.
Children die every sum-
mer after being forgotten
in cars. Make no mistake,
this is a terrible tragedy.
When things like this hap-
pen, the response is quick
and hysterical. Never
leave a child unsupervised
anywhere. Until hes 18,
then hes totally on his
own.
Dont you remember the
eve of your 18th birthday,
how you magically under-
went a transformation,
put away your childish
things and whatnot?
Of course you dont
people grow and mature
slowly. Some more slowly
than others.
Even in the winter, when
theres no chance of over-
heating, there are people
who say never to leave
kids in the car.
Someone might steal
them, you say. Theres
roughly a one-in-a-zillion
chance of this happening.
Driving is what makes
cars dangerous. And why
would someone steal a
random kid anyway?
That happened once
in Arizona and the baby
Nicholas Cage stole was in
his own home.
A 9-year-old isnt the
same as a 9-month-old
and all 9-year-olds are
different. The 9-year-old
version of myself was
different than the 9-year-
old version of my brother.
Different people (children
are just small people, I
hear) are different.
Recently, a South
Carolina mother was ar-
rested after her 9-year-old
daughter went to the park
while the mother worked.
Why is the first reaction
to call the police? The kid
was presumably having
fun at the park. Ask the
kid if shes OK. Ask if her
mom knows where she is
or if she needs anything.
I doubt the kid is better
off in the system than at
the park.
Its also been in the
news recently that our
state has a foster family
shortage and DSS is over-
whelmed.
Lets change gears for a
second.
When an elderly man in
Tennessee became stuck
in his car the locks mal-
functioned a 3-year-old
came to his rescue. Since
the 3-year-old had to go
find help, its safe to as-
sume he was momentarily
unsupervised and look
what happened.
This will make me
sound crazy, but theres
a Michael Scott line from
The Office, which Ive
always thought made a
wonderful parenting phi-
losophy: I dont get why
parents are always com-
plaining about how tough
it is to raise kids. You
joke around with them,
you give them pizza, you
give them candy, you
let them live their lives.
Theyre adults, for Gods
sake.
Its extreme, obviously.
Children need more than
jokes and pizza, but
theyre not made of glass.
Some freedom is good,
healthy. Kids need unsu-
pervised time. Free play.
They need to make up
games, scrape their knees.
They need to do stupid
stuff, potentially danger-
ous stuff so they learn.
I dont put coins in my
mouth since I choked on
one as a young (dumb)
kid.
Children can be capable,
competent human beings,
but only if theyre given
the chance. And besides,
whatever you do your
kids will just try to the
opposite. Thats just sci-
ence.
I know, I know I
should go ahead and have
kids while I have all the
answers. I think Ill stick
with dogs for the time
being. They already do the
opposite of what I say.
MILESTONES
The Greer Citizen
WEDDING |
WEDNESDAY, JULY 16, 2014 THE GREER CITIZEN B7
KEEPING UP
WITH JONES
KATIE
JONES
PET OF THE WEEK |
DASHER
Animal ID: 23120156
Breed: Chihuahua,
Short Coat / Mix
Age: 9 months 14
days
Gender: Male
Color: White / Tan
Neutered: Yes
Size: Small
To adopt: Call (864)
467-3950.
Located at: Greenville
Animal Care Services
328 Furman Hall Road, Greenville, South Carolina, 29609
Email: petpr@greenvillecounty.org
PAWS
CORNER
SAM MAZZOTTA
King Features
Mr. and Mrs. Ron Felts,
of 3560 Jug Factory Road,
Greer, announce the en-
gagement of their daugh-
ter, Christina Joy Felts, of
Greer, to Joshua Turner,
son of Mr. and Mrs. Gary
Turner.
Miss Felts , a 2007 grad-
uate of Mercy and Truth
Academy and Pensacola
Christian College, is em-
ployed with Lowes Home
Improvement in Boiling
Springs.
Mr. Turner is a graduate
of Mt. Christian Academy
in Cowpens. He is em-
ployed by Asplundh.
They will be mar-
ried March 28, 2015, at
Hopewell Baptist Church
in Landrum.
Emily Scott Brannon, of
Greer, became the bride of
Ethan Dean, of Armuchee,
Georgia, on July 12, 2014,
at Abner Creek Baptist
Church in Greer. The Rev.
Scott Ogle officiated at the
2 p.m. ceremony, which
was followed by a recep-
tion held at Greer City
Hall.
The former Miss Bran-
non is the daughter of Mr.
and Mrs. Bryan Dacus, of
Greer, and granddaughter
of Mr. and Mrs. Ronald
Styles, of Greer, and Ms.
Barbara Brannon, of Greer.
A 2014 graduate of North
Greenville University with
a bachelors degree in el-
ementary education, she
is employed by the Green-
ville County School Dis-
trict.
Mr. Dean is the son
of Mr. and Mrs. Gregory
Dean, of Armuchee, Geor-
gia, and grandson of the
Honorable F. Larry Salm-
on, of Armuchee, Georgia.
A 2013 graduate of North
Greenville University with
a bachelors degree in in-
terdisciplinary studies,
he is employed by Abner
Creek Baptist Church.
Given in marriage by her
father, the bride chose an
alabaster gown of sheer
Venice lace accented with
a Sweetheart neckline.
A textured lace trumpet
skirt, fashioned by a cha-
pel-length train, fell from
a pleated regal satin cum-
merbund. Completing the
ensemble was her veil
which fell to waist length.
She carried a vintage-
themed bouquet com-
posed of creamy white
hydrangea , babys breath
and creamy roses col-
lared by baby eucalyptus
and sheathed with a tai-
lored corset ribbon wrap
adorned with pearls ac-
cented at the handle.
Her maid of honor, Sar-
ah Gunter, stood with Ms.
Elora Dittmar, Ms. Kaycee
Hannon, Mrs. Whitney
Mathis, Mrs. Savannah Ste-
vens, Ms. Hanna Sweatt
and Ms. Mary Vickery, as
her bridesmaids. Sarah Mc-
Cullough, daughter of Mr.
and Mrs. Tim McCullough,
joined the bridal atten-
dants as the flower girl.
The grooms best man
was Mr. Gregory Mathis.
Mr. Cole Brannon, Mr. Na-
than Brannon, Mr. Jackson
Dean, Mr. Michael Fox,
Mr. John Dewey Hall and
Mr. Jed Stevens served as
groomsmen.
Mr. Chris Litton, Mr.
Dylan Baxter and Mr. Park-
er Robinson ushered.
The couple will make
their first home in Lyman
following a wedding trip
to Disney World.
Mrs. Ethan Dean
Brannon Dean
ENGAGEMENTS |
Mr. Joshua Turner and Miss Christina Joy Felts
Felts - Turner
$
$
$
$
O
ne Itemat Regular Price
Coupon Coupon
COUPON FOR IN-STORE OR ONLINE USE!
Cash Value 1/10.
Coupon
Code:
Offer good for one item at regular price only.
One coupon per customer per day. Must present coupon at time of purchase.
Offer is not valid with any other coupon, discount or previous purchase.
Excludes CRICUT products, Tim Holtz Vagabond Machine, Silhouette CAMEO Machine,
candy, helium tanks, gift cards, custom orders, special orders, labor, rentals or class fees.
A single cut of fabric or trim by the yard equals one item.
Online fabric & trim discount is limited to 10 yards, single cut.
TAYLORS
Wade Hampton Blvd & Fairview Road
Kids need freedom



Taking pets
on the road
A number of books
and websites are
available that list
pet-friendly places.

SOCIETY DEADLINE
WEDNESDAY, 5 P.M.
No anniversary under 25 years Birthdays 12 and under only
Local area connection required for publication
Charge for birthdays
with one column photo
$15.00
Charge for items with 2 column photo
(anniversaries, engagements & weddings)
$25.00 (black and white)
$100 for color
* All other items not mentioned can be published at local advertising rates
RHS DEBATE TEAM GETS
NATIONAL RECOGNITION
Riverside High Speech
and Debate students
earned national honors at
the National Speech and
Debate Association Na-
tional Tournament. Riv-
erside High was named
a School of Excellence in
Speech, and individual
students received the foll-
lowing honors.
Senior Chantel Brown
was an Octafinalist in Dra-
matic Interpretation.
Senior Nida Ansari was
12th in the nation in U.S.
Extemporaneous Speaking
and was a four-time quali-
fier.
Senior Lorenzo Barberis
Canonico was 16th in Con-
gressional Debate in the
Senate and was a four-
time qualifier.
Kerry Yan was 18th in
Congressional Debate in
the House.
Kerry Yan was elected
Best Presiding Officer dur-
ing the Final Session of
Congressional Debate in
the House.
Sophomore Carol Lee
finished sixth in the Ex-
pository Speaking Final
Round.
Junior Stephanie Hong
and Sophomore Carol Lee
were octafinalists in Duo
Interpretation.
Sophomore Matt Har-
rington was a Semifinalist
in Expository Speaking.
LOCAL STUDENTS NAMED TO
USC UPSTATE DEANS LIST
Several local students
have been named to the
USC Upstate deans list.
To be eligible for the
deans list, freshmen stu-
dents must earn a 3.25 or
higher and be enrolled in
at least 12 course hours
and upperclassmen must
earn a 3.5 or higher and
be enrolled in at least 12
course hours.
Greer
Juanita Arcos
Katrina Baker
Peter Bluemmel
Frances Bowles
Morgan Brown
Hilary Buchanan
Donna Burgess
Russell Burkett
Linda Carrasco
Cristhian Carvajal
Philip Chute
Matthew Clark
Natalie Davis
Brittany Dickerson
Ethan Dopp
Kathryn DuCharme
Whittany Evans
Brian Flaherty
Joanne Foli
Cameron Fowler
Emily Gray
Mason Hardy
Lauren Holbrook
Melissa Hurst
Stephanie Ibbotson
Daniel Ivester
Joshua Izaguirre
Laurel Johnson
Rachael Kalchbrenner
Abigail Laiewski
Kristen Lamb
Jamie League
Casey Leonhardt
Scott Linnell
Meghan Little
Michelle Lodise
Palmer Madson
Nicole Magana
Benjamin McSwain
Jennifer Melancon
Rachel Mills
Paul Nechodom
David Nguyen
Madeline Norsworthy
Juan Olalde
Andrea Owen
Brittany Paris
Maria Arias Restrepo
Laura Rodriguez
Christopher Rojas
Christopher Ryon
Anthony Sanfilippo
Danielle Scruggs
Austin Seay
Amanda Serrao
Anthony Serrao
Bailey Shook
Blake Sieg
Elizabeth Tarry
Samantha Wickliffe
Jeffery Upton
Reginald Vaughn
Christine Worley
Richard Zapata
Kimberly Zdanowicz
Taylors
Logan Aho
Kaleb Alexander
Jordan Aliers
Andri Angrino
Andy Angrino
Robin Ballentine
Brittany Biera
Deborah Bishop
Tessa Childs
Hannah Clayton
Phillip Didok
Lisa Espada
Amberly Fowler
Jordan Hiatt
Haley Johnson
Kyle Jones
Kendall Koppen
Emily Leonard
Neena Lowery
Mary Maloney
Erika Montgomery
Imanuelle Noell-Baba
Shaylene Scandale
Shayna Smith
Ashlie Stewart
Anslee Stoddard
Wendy Strout
Ashley Taylor
LaRenda Terry
Ashley Taylor
LaRenda Terry
Melissa Wilson
Douglas Were
Duncan
Brooke Allender
Catherine Blauvelt
Benjamin Campbell
Sarah Campbell
Brittany Christian
Daniel Espina
Lori Frost
Jacqueline Gordon
Diamond Harris
Ashley Jeffcoat
Christopher McElwee
Brittany Fisher Richard
Scott Rollins
Adam Snell
Lyman
Julia Bridges
Hollie Brown
Lised Casella
Heather Dillard
Candice Ezell
Kassia Graves-Monroe
Aimee Lawson
Jesse Leonard
Kisha Marler
Ethan Owens
Erin Patton
Savannah Vaughn
Wellford
Tyler Cole
Sara Horton
Jesse Stidham
GREER STUDENT NAMED
TO MUSC DEANS LIST
Kinsley Johnson of
Greer was named to the
deans list MUSC James B.
Edwards College of Dental
Medicine.
The deans list recogniz-
es those students, who for
any given semester, earn a
GPA of 3.5 or better.
FURMAN PROFESSOR
TO OVERSEE PARTNERSHIP
Furman University and
Greenville Health System
(GHS) announced that Fur-
man biology professor Eli
Hestermann will assume
the responsibilities of over-
seeing the new academic
partnership between the
two organizations.
As executive director
of health education/un-
dergraduate studies and
students, Hestermann will
work with Furman and
GHS officials to develop
programs for undergradu-
ate college students who
are interested in pursuing
health careers.
It was announced last
fall that Furman would
serve as GHS primary
undergraduate partner in
GHS Clinical University, a
new alliance between one
of the Southeasts largest
healthcare systems and
three area academic insti-
tutions. The other part-
ners are the University of
South Carolina (graduate
education) and Clemson
University (research).
Undergraduates at other
area colleges and univer-
sities will also have the
opportunity to become
involved in the initiatives
created through the Fur-
man partnership. That
includes opportunities
for students considering
careers in medicine, phar-
macy, and occupational
therapy, as well as experi-
ences in non-clinical areas
like health administration
and information technol-
ogy.
Hestermann, who joined
the Furman faculty in
2003, is the Henry Keith
and Ellen Hard Townes
Associate Professor of Bi-
ology at the university. In
his new position, he will
serve as executive director
of undergraduate stud-
ies and students at GHS
and executive director of
health education at Fur-
man.
Before coming to Fur-
man, he worked at Har-
vard Medical School and
the Dana Farber Cancer
Institute. He earned a B.S.
degree from Purdue Uni-
versity and a Ph.D. from
the Massachusetts Insti-
tute of Technology and
Woods Hole Oceanograph-
ic Institution.
At Furman, he has
taught cell biology, phar-
macology, and study-away
programs while building
an active research pro-
gram in toxicology and
endocrinology. He has led
initiatives to provide early
research experiences to
Furman students and to
broaden undergraduate
research opportunities at
other colleges in the re-
gion. His efforts to build
research programs and ef-
fectively mentor students
have been recognized by
awards from professional
organizations at the state
and national level.
OUR SCHOOLS
The Greer Citizen
B8 THE GREER CITIZEN WEDNESDAY, JULY 16, 2014
SCHOOL
NEWS
GREENVILLE COUNTY |
PHOTO | SUBMITTED
Scholarship recipients
Each year the Citizens Building and Loan Foundation awards a $5,000 higher education scholarship to outstanding
Blue Ridge High and Greer High seniors. This years recipients are Kelsey Maynard and Clayton Warnke from Blue Ridge,
and Gage Dowling, Kelsey Roloson, Xiomara Torres and Megan Williams from Greer High. The awards were presented
by Citizens Building and Loans President/CEO J. Thomas Johnson and Sr. Vice President Jennifer Jones. Pictured left to
right are Johnson, Torres, Roloson, Maynard, Warnke and Jones. Dowling and Williams are not pictured.
HIGHER EDUCATION |

The South Carolina De-
partment of Education
won a 2014 Social Media
Award of Excellence, pre-
sented by the National As-
sociation of Government
Communicators (NAGC),
for its Hour of Code cam-
paign.
The Hour of Code na-
tional initiative that took
place in December 2013,
which promoted the teach-
ing of computer coding in
South Carolina schools.
Were thrilled to be
honored with yet another
national award for our ex-
panded social media out-
reach, said Dr. Mick Zais,
State Superintendent of
Education. This award of
excellence is a sign of the
importance we place on
reaching out to the public
and providing them with
valuable information, re-
gardless of their preferred
form of social media. I
would like to congratulate
Dino Teppara, our Direc-
tor of Legislative and Pub-
lic Affairs, for his leader-
ship in winning this award
and for creating a national
presence for the South
Carolina Department of
Education on social me-
dia.
The NAGC consists of
top communicators in
local, state, and federal
government. Each year,
NAGC gives out Blue Pen-
cil & Gold Screens awards
to highlight superior com-
munications efforts of
government agencies.
The South Carolina De-
partment of Education was
one of only three agencies
that received this award in
the social media category.
The department is the
only state education agen-
cy in the nation that en-
gages in eight social media
platforms: Facebook, Twit-
ter, LinkedIn, Instagram,
Google+, YouTube, Pinter-
est and a weekly blog.
State department
of education wins
social media award
This award of
excellence is a sign
of the importance
we place on
reaching out to
the public and
providing them
with valuable
information...
Dr. Mick Zais
State Superintendent of Education
STOMPING GROUNDS
HOLDS CELTIC SESSION
Stomping Grounds hosts
Old Time Jam with Bob
Buckingham, every first
and third Tuesday of the
month. Buckingham in-
vites anyone who has a
banjo, guitar, bass, fiddle,
etc. to come and jam from
7-9 p.m. Even if you dont
play, come listen to this
group of musical folks.
For more information,
call Bob at 423-5576.
Stomping Grounds
now has a Celtic Ses-
sion 7-9 p.m. every other
Wednesday. This is an
open session to Irish/
Scottish folk music and
anyone can participate.
Call Alan Dillman for
more information at 828-
329-2640.
GLT PRESENTS
SHAKESPEARE COMEDY
Greenville Little The-
atres Studio 444, its al-
ternative series, presents
The Complete Works of
Shakespeare (Abridged)
by Adam Long, Daniel
Singer, and Jess Winfield.
Performances will take
place at on July 31 - Au-
gust 2 at 8 p.m. and Sun-
day, August 3 at 3 p.m.
The comedy parodies
all 37 of Shakespeares
plays with only three ac-
tors in about 90 minutes.
Its fast, its silly and you
dont need to be a Shake-
spearean scholar to laugh
your codpiece off.
The show will be di-
rected by GLTs Associate
Director, Katie King. It fea-
tures Todd Janssen, Evan
Harris and Sam McCalla.
All tickets are $15 and
are available through
our website or at the
Box Office. Tickets can
also be purchased at the
door. Call the Box Office
at 233-6238 or visit green-
villelittletheatre.org for
more information. Green-
ville Little Theatre Box Of-
fice is located at 444 Col-
lege St. on Heritage Green,
and is open Monday-Friday
from 10 a.m. -5 p.m.
SHREK: THE MUSICAL
AUDITIONS, GCT EVENTS
Auditions for Shrek:
The Musical, done on a
first-come first-serve, will
be 6-9 p.m. July 21 and 23
at the Tryon Recreation
Center, 226 Oakland Ave.
Ages 6 and older can audi-
tion.
Prepare 16 bars of a
musical theatre song and
your own musical accom-
paniment. A CD player will
be provided. Be prepared
to do a cold read and bring
a headshot. Wear clothes
you look nice in and can
also move in, as you will
be learning a short dance
routine. Wear dance shoes.
No bare feet.
If you are going to be out
of town during auditions
you may email a video be-
fore July 21 to artscoun-
cil@cityofgreer.org. Call-
backs will 5-8 p.m. July 24
at Tryon Recreation Cen-
ter. The cast list will be
posted at 5 p.m. July 26 at
greerculturalarts.com.
There will be a mandato-
ry cast/parent meeting, at
6 p.m. July 28 at the Can-
non Centre, 204 Cannon
St. Greer. Rehearsals will
be Mondays, Tuesdays,
Thursdays and Saturdays.
Performance dates are Oct.
17, 18, 24, 25 at 7 p.m. and
Oct. 19 & 26 at 2 p.m.
Musicians are also need-
ed for the production. Con-
tact Alex.eshenbaugh@
gmail.com with your inter-
est and any questions.
Summer camp informa-
tion is also available at
greerculturalarts.com.
SHOUT! MUSICAL EVENT
AT CENTRE STAGE
Shout! The Mod Musi-
cal comes to Centre Stage
July 10-Aug. 2, Thurs.-Sat.
8 p.m. and Sun. 3 p.m.
SHOUT! is the mod mu-
sical magazine that brings
back the beautiful birds
and smashing sounds
that made England swing
in the 60s. From cover to
cover, SHOUT! travels in
time from 1960 to 1970
chronicling the dawning
liberation of women. Just
as Dusty Springfield, Petu-
la Clark, Cilla Black, Shir-
ley Bassey, and Lulu were
independent women with
major careers, English and
American women were re-
defining themselves in the
face of changing attitudes
about gender. SHOUT! re-
flects that change through
the unforgettable music of
the time.
Tickets for Shout! The
Mod Musical are $35, $30
and $25. Student rush
tickets available 30 min-
utes prior to show time for
$20 with school ID (based
on availability), one ticket
per ID.
Shows run Thursday
through Sunday and all
seats are reserved. You
can reach the box office at
233-6733 or visit us online
at centrestage.org.
LOVE, LOSS, AND WHAT I
WORE AT CENTRE STAGE
Proving that a great
show is always in fash-
ion, Love, Loss, and What
I Wore has become an in-
ternational hit. The show
uses clothing and acces-
sories and the memories
they trigger to tell funny
and often poignant stories
that all women can relate
to, creating one of the
most enduring theater-go-
ing experiences domesti-
cally and overseas. The
Nora Ephron and Delia
Ephron script is directed
by Ruth Wood.
Love, Loss, and What I
Wore starts at 7 p.m. July
22 and 29. Tickets are $15.
You can reach the box of-
fice at 233-6733 or visit us
online at centrestage.org.
CONCERTS CONTINUES AT
NEWBERRY OPERA HOUSE
Live entertainment
continues every Friday
evening in the summer,
beginning at 7 p.m., June
27-August 8, at Newberry
Opera House. Bring your
a blanket or lawn chair to
enjoy relaxing music un-
der the setting summer
sun.
For more information
contact the Box Office at
(803) 276-6264 or online
at newberryoperahouse.
com
July 18: Susan Douglass
Taylor
July 25: Jerry Simms and
Kristi Hood - Jazz
Aug. 1: Doug and Bunny
Williams
Aug. 8-9: Newberry Com-
munity Players
Aug. 15: Movie in the
park - City
CORNERS & FALLS
ON DISPLAY
Local artists Rick Row-
land and John Ingle will
exhibit their combined
works Corners & Falls
in the Artists Guild of
Spartanburg Gallery at
Chapman Cultural Center
July 1-28. This is a free
exhibit showcasing a se-
ries of paintings by both
artists depicting local cor-
ners (such as well known
local street corners) and
waterfalls in the Upstate
and western North Caro-
lina.
The exhibit will be open
to the public Monday
through Saturday, 9 a.m.-
.5 p.m.; and on Sundays,
1-5 p.m. A free public re-
ception will be on 5-9 p.m.,
July 17 during the citys
monthly ArtWalk.
For more information,
please call the Guilds Ex-
ecutive Director Caitlin
Boice at 764-9568 or visit
ArtistsGuildOfSpartan-
burg.com.
BJU ANNOUNCES
20142015 SCHEDULE
Bob Jones University
announced the schedule
for the Universitys 2014-
2015 Concert, Living Gal-
lery and Drama Series.
The series will once again
bring to Greenville world-
renowned artists and ex-
citing performances. All
performances are open to
the public.
The 2014-2015 BJU
Concert, Living Gal-
lery and Drama Series
schedule is as follows:
BJU Symphony Orchestra
Oct. 2 8 p.m.
Founders Memorial Am-
phitorium (FMA).
The Universitys Sym-
phony Orchestra, under
the director of Dr. Michael
W. Moore, presents an
evening with guest artist
David Kim, concertmas-
ter of The Philadelphia
Orchestra. The program
will feature Camille Saint-
Sans Violin Concerto No.
3, Jules Massenets Medi-
tation from Thais, and
other works.
The Taming of the
Shrew
Nov. 20-21, 8 p.m.; Nov.
22, 2 p.m.; Rodeheaver Au-
ditorium (RA)
Suitors, suitors every-
where for the charming Bi-
ancaand not a prospec-
tor in sight for her ornery
sister, Kate. But when Pe-
truchio strides into town
in pursuit of a bride, Kate
insists that a twenty-mule
team couldnt drag her
down the aisle. The Clas-
sic Players strike gold in
the rip-roarin production
of one of Shakespeares
best-loved comedies.
Cantus
Jan. 27, 8 p.m.; FMA
Cantus is a professional
vocal chamber ensemble
consisting of nine men
singing in a TTBB (tenor,
tenor, baritone, bass)
voice arrangement. This
group is known for its in-
novative concert program-
ming, often drawing from
numerous genresinclud-
ing classical, folk, spiritu-
als and orchestral-vocal
repertoire.
Living Gallery Rivals
on the Road
April 2-3, 4:30 and 7:30
p.m.; April 4, 2, 4:30 and
7:30 p.m.; RA
Rivals on the Road will
highlight the struggles of
two characters as each in
his own way deals with
who Jesus of Nazareth re-
ally is and how they will
respond to the Messiah.
See great paintings come
alive in life-size re-cre-
ations on the Rodeheaver
stage as choirs, instru-
mentalists and costumed
actors re-create scenes
from our Lords ministry
on earth.
Information and tickets
are available at bju.edu/
tickets. For further infor-
mation, call 770-1372. In-
dividual tickets for all pro-
ductions will be available
for purchase on Sept. 1.
HUB CITY EMPTY
BOWLS SCHEDULE SET
Hub City Empty Bowls
2014 is set to start making
pottery bowls and money
to feed needy Spartanburg
citizens. There will be five
bowl-making days that will
lead up to Soup Day, Sept.
27 at Chapman Cultural
Center.
For the past five years,
Hub City Empty Bowls
has raised tens of thou-
sands of dollars to feed lo-
cal citizens by having the
general public make clay
bowls that were used on
Soup Day. On Soup Day,
the hundreds of colorful
and handmade bowls are
set out on display for the
publics choosing.
For a $15 donation per
bowl, the patron may en-
joy unlimited gourmet
soup donated by local res-
taurants at the community
event that also features
live music, a silent auc-
tion, and the fellowship
of helping others. All of
the money raised goes to
an established charity that
feeds local and needy citi-
zens.
Last year, Empty Bowls
raised a record amount
of more than $20,000 and
netted $18,600 that was
given to TOTAL Ministries
for its food pantry. The
beneficiary of the funds
raised this year will once
again be TOTAL Ministries,
a local non-profit charity
that provides assistance
for basic needs to Spartan-
burg County families who
are facing financial crisis.
This year, all of the pub-
lic bowl-making events will
be held at either Spartan-
burg Art Museum School,
located at Chapman Cul-
tural Center, or West Main
Artists Co-op in Spartan-
burg. At these events, the
public is invited to make
handmade pottery bowls.
No experience is neces-
sary, and all materials,
including instruction by
Carolina Clay Artists, are
free. The bowls are left to
be glazed and fired, and
eventually used on Soup
Day. Organizers hope to
have 1,400 bowls made
this year.
Here is the bowl-making
schedule:
July 19, Spartanburg
Art Museum School, 10
a.m.-12 p.m. and 1-3 p.m.
Aug. 16, Spartanburg
Art Museum School, 10
a.m.-12 p.m. and 1-3 p.m.
Aug. 21, West Main Co-
op, 6-8:30 p.m. (ArtWalk)
This years sponsoring
partners are Carolina Clay
Artists, Chapman Cultural
Center, Spartanburg Art
Museum, West Main Art-
ists Co-op, and Chris Wil-
liams of Clay-King.com.
The Carolina Clay Art-
ists are seeking sponsors
and donations for Hub
City Empty Bowls. Funds
are needed for expenses.
Donations are tax deduct-
ible. Anyone wishing to
contribute should make
checks payable to Spartan-
burg County Foundation
with an indication that
the gift is for the Hub City
Empty Bowls Project Fund;
mail checks to 424 E. Ken-
nedy St., Spartanburg,
29302.
For sponsorship oppor-
tunities or to learn more
about Hub City Empty
Bowls 2014, please con-
tact Nancy Williamson at
621-2768 or NanWilliam-
son@gmail.com.
HUB CITY EMPTY BOWLS
HOSTS BOWLMAKING
Hub City Empty Bowls, a
charity that raises money
to feed local needy citi-
zens, invites the public to
Chapman Cultural Center
July 19, to help feed the
hungry by making clay
bowls.
There will be two op-
portunities this day for all
ages and experience lev-
els to drop by and make
bowls: 10 a.m.-noon and
1-3 p.m. These bowls will
later be painted, glazed,
and fired, and then used
on Soup Day, which will
take place Sept. 27, at
Chapman.
Soup Day is a day of
food, music and char-
ity, where the handmade
bowls are filled with soup
from local restaurants for
a donation of $15. Patrons
keep the bowls, as remind-
ers of their participation
in this charitable event.
This year, the proceeds
will benefit TOTAL Min-
istries, a charity assisting
those in Spartanburg fac-
ing financial hardships.
All bowl-making events
are free. This is the sixth
year that Hub City Empty
Bowls has participated in
this international drive to
feed the hungry. Last year,
1,400 bowls were made
and more than $20,000
was raised locally.
This years sponsors are
Chapman Cultural Center,
West Main Artists Co-Op,
Spartanburg Art Museum,
Spartanburg County Foun-
dation, Action Printing,
Carolina Clay Artists, and
Chris Williams, owner of
Clay-King.com.
For more info, call 621-
2768 or visit HubCityEmp-
tyBowls.com.
ENTERTAINMENT
The Greer Citizen
WEDNESDAY, JULY 16, 2014 THE GREER CITIZEN B9
DVD previews
COUCH THEATER |


THINGS
TO DO
By Sam Struckhof
NEW RELEASES
FOR WEEK OF JULY 28
PICKS OF THE WEEK
The Other Woman
(PG-13) -- Three women
team up for slapstick
revenge when they real-
ize they are being strung
along by the same guy.
Cameron Diaz plays a
super-busy, extra-classy
Manhattan lawyer who
tries to surprise her boy-
friend, but ends up find-
ing out hes married. The
cheated wife (Leslie Mann
of This Is 40, Knocked
Up) confronts and then
befriends Diaz. Together
they discover that Manns
husband (Nikolaj Coster-
Waldau from Game of
Thrones) is cheating on
both of them with a volup-
tuous beach bunny (Kate
Upton).
This might not be the
hilarious and empowering
ladies-get-revenge the pro-
ducers had in mind. While
Diaz and Mann try to bring
balance between warmth
and goofy comedy, the
script and the direction
just dont support them.
Noah (PG-13) -- The Bi-
ble story of Noah and the
Ark gets a different spin
in this somewhat darker
and grungier retelling.
Russell Crowe plays Noah
with gravel-voiced convic-
tion. He receives visions
from the silent creator
who seems to give him
instructions. Noah puts
together the boat, rounds
up the animals and fights
off hordes of enemies --
all with a little help from
giant rock monsters who
used to be angels.
Darren Aronofsky han-
dles the material as rever-
ently as he can. The movie
tries to fill in the gaps
while pleasing both devout
and secular audiences.
There are some genuine
thrills in the film, as well
as some truly impressive
special effects.
Lullaby (R) -- Jonathan
(Garrett Hedlund) left his
family years ago to pursue
a music career out in Cali-
fornia, and now hes come
back to New York City for
his fathers final days.
Dad (Richard Jenkins) has
decided he wants to be
pulled off life support af-
ter a very long battle with
cancer. Now the whole
clan has a lot of feelings
to work out and only 48
hours to do it. Jonathan
finds some peace when
he meets Meredith (Jes-
sica Barden), a terminally
ill teen who teaches him
a few things about living
with death.
Five Dances -- Chip
(Ryan Steele) is talented,
young, broke and all but
alone in New York City.
Hes in a small dance
troupe rehearsing five
classical pieces of chore-
ography, dedicating him-
self to the art while still
receiving phone calls from
his alcoholic mother, beg-
ging or demanding that he
return to Kansas or else
shell follow him to the
city. Chip has a connec-
tion with one of the other
dancers, but he doesnt
know how to react to it.
The driving force of this
film is the expert dancing
-- shot almost entirely in
a small dance studio with
natural lighting and mini-
mal schmaltz.
TV RELEASES
Midsomer Murders, Set
24
Mystery Science The-
ater 3000: XXX
Teen Titans Go: Couch
Crusaders Season 1 -- Part
2
My Little Pony Friend-
ship Is Magic: The Keys of
Friendship
Bubble Guppies: Get
Ready for School
Russell Crowe as Noah
PHOTO | SUBMITTED
Hub City Empty Bowls, a charity that raises money to feed local citizens, invites the public
to Chapman Cultural Center on July 19 to help feed the hungry by making clay bowls.
The event will last from 10 a.m. - noon.
PHOTO | SUBMITTED
Lillys Purple Plastic Purse
runs July 12, 18, 19 and 20.
See scchildrenstheatre.org
for more information.
BY DANA BLOCK
THE BOLD AND
THE BEAUTIFUL
Ridge began putting the
pieces together about his
accident. Justin warned
Bill that their involvement
in Ridges fall might soon
be revealed. Aly turned to
Darla for advice on what
to do about her situation
with Oliver. After gaining
Carter as an ally, Oliver
learned the motivation
behind Mayas recent be-
havior. Bill tried to hide
his fear from Brooke that
Ridge was solving the puz-
zle. Determined to win Aly
back, Oliver made a grand
gesture to prove his feel-
ings for her. In front of
Brooke and Katie, Ridge
pointed an accusatory
finger at Bill. Oliver apolo-
gized to Aly in a way that
she could not help but
forgive him. Wait to See:
Deacon tries to redeem
himself in Brookes eyes.
DAYS OF OUR LIVES
Brady feared that he
might have killed his fa-
ther. EJ made an emotion-
al plea to Sami. Later, Sami
was caught off-guard when
Kate did the unexpected.
Jordans worst nightmare
came true when Clyde
showed his face. Marlena
was horrified by the news
of Johns condition. Will
received an assignment
that might put him at odds
with his loved ones. Sami
overheard a shocking se-
cret. Ben asked Abigail if
she was still in love with
EJ. Jordan and Ben shared
a tense reunion with Clyde.
Eric had a favor to ask of
Nicole. Jennifer spied Dan-
iel and Eve growing closer.
Daniel gave Brady the grim
news about John. Theresa
feared her lies were about
to be exposed. Wait to See:
Paige questions whether
she ever really knew JJ.
GENERAL HOSPITAL
Due to recent events,
Nina wondered if she
should come clean to Silas.
Michael questioned Mor-
gan about his relationship
status with Kiki. Tracy
made a promise to Alice,
but with strings attached.
Elizabeth was taken aback
when she found Nikolas
and Britt together at Spen-
cers day camp. Nina over-
heard some incriminating
evidence that she planned
to use to her advantage.
Anna encouraged Patrick
not to give up on his mar-
riage. Levi hit Maxie with
the news that he might
be forced to leave Port
Charles. Nina put her plan
in motion to break up Sam
and Silas. Nikolas was on
to Spencers shenanigans.
Wait to See: Lucys love life
is falling apart.
THE YOUNG AND
THE RESTLESS
Summer was upset that
no one approved of her
relationship with Aus-
tin. Dylan found out that
he was being called as a
witness in Ians lawsuit
against Nikki. Lily was an-
noyed that Devon was still
so focused on Hilary. Mean-
while, Cane tried to reason
with Hilary to set Neil free.
Dylan worried that Averys
good intentions for Austin
would eventually backfire.
Colin offered to be a part-
ner in Jill and Laurens
boutique. Sharon told Dr.
Mead about how her mem-
ory was coming back bit
by bit. Victor sought out a
specialist for Phyllis. Stitch
asked Chelsea to quit dig-
ging through his past. An
Abbott family dinner was
planned as Traci returned
home to Genoa City. Wait
to See: Nikkis trial ends
up being her worst night-
mare.
DEAR DR. ROACH: I
have had high blood pres-
sure at times, and my
doctor said I have white
coat syndrome. I am on
metoprolol and ramipril.
My blood pressure spikes
at times. Recently I didnt
feel right. My blood pres-
sure was reading 200/120,
more or less, over 12
hours. I went to my doctor,
who gave me something
that would bring it down
and told me to double
up on metoprolol. I took
readings at home, and for
the next three days it was
better but still on the high
side. The average over 12
hours was 145/90.
I went to a specialist and
took along my readings.
He didnt seem alarmed
that I had several spikes
of 190/105. He told me
its normal to have high
blood pressure readings,
everyone has them. I can
understand occasional
spikes, but mine goes up
and stays up for hours. -
- G.
ANSWER: Lets first de-
fine white-coat hyperten-
sion, also called reactive
hypertension. Its a condi-
tion where blood pressure
in the doctors office is
much higher than blood
pressure at home. Consis-
tent regular readings at
home are a better marker
of overall blood pressure.
At first glance, that doesnt
seem to be what you have.
You have high blood pres-
sure consistently, at least
recently.
Even people with whose
blood pressure generally
is well-controlled -- either
naturally or because they
take medication -- will have
some readings that are
higher than others. How-
ever, readings of 195/105
are too high. Even your
relatively better average of
145/90 is too high.
One test that is often
done is called an ambula-
tory blood pressure mea-
surement. A blood pres-
sure monitor is worn for
24 hours and takes your
blood pressure every 15-
20 minutes during the
day and 30-60 minutes
during sleep. Its possible
that your blood pressure
is normally in the good
range but spikes every
time you or your doctor
take it -- I have seen a few
cases of this.
An echocardiogram also
can detect changes in the
heart, most commonly
enlargement of the left
ventricle, which may show
damage from high blood
pressure. I suspect you
may need additional treat-
ment. This is usually med-
ication, but salt restriction
and stress management
can reduce blood pressure
in most people.
High blood pressure
is one of our most com-
mon ailments. The book-
let on it describes what it
does and how its treated.
Readers can order a copy
by writing: Dr. Roach -
- No. 104W, Box 536475,
Orlando, FL 32853-6475.
Enclose a check or money
order (no cash) for $4.75
U.S./$6 Canada with the
recipients printed name
and address. Please allow
four weeks for delivery.
***
DEAR DR. ROACH:
Some time ago, I had a lot
of noise coming from my
stomach, a kind of growl-
ing sound. It went away,
but now it comes on again
once in a while. No pain,
just the noise. -- T.
ANSWER: These noises
go by the official-sound-
ing name of borborygmi
(BOR-boh-RIG-mee), and
are both common and nor-
mal the vast majority of
the time. They reflect the
movement of the stomach
and the intestines. Since
there is no pain, you dont
have to do anything about
them.
***
Dr. Roach regrets that
he is unable to answer in-
dividual letters, but will
incorporate them in the
column whenever pos-
sible. Readers may email
questions to ToYourGood-
Health@med.cornell.edu.
To view and order health
pamphlets, visit www.rb-
mamall.com, or write to
P.O. Box 536475, Orlando,
FL 32853-6475.
(c) 2014 North America Synd., Inc.
OUT ON A LIMB by Gary Kopervas |
AMBER WAVES by Dave T. Phipps |
RFD by Mike Marland |
THE SPATS by Jef Pickering |
SOAP UPDATES


TO YOUR
GOOD HEALTH
KEITH
ROACH, M.D.
B10 THE GREER CITIZEN FUN AND GAMES WEDNESDAY, JULY 16, 2014
Blood pressure rises
at doctors office
Mishael Morgan stars as
Hilary on The Young and
The Restless