You are on page 1of 28

A REPORT ON DEMONSTRATIVE RAIN WATER HARVESTING

STRUCUTRES IN JAWAHARLAL NEHRU TECHNOLOGICAL


UNIVERSITY, HYDERABAD, KUKATPALLY, HYDERABAD

I. INTRODUCTION:

(i) Brief description of the project proposal:


The present project proposal is based on the letter vide No.
F.No.T/5(6)/CGWB/SR/2008 dated 5th June, 2009 received from Director, CGWB,
Hyderabad with the objective of promoting demonstrative rain water harvesting practices
in academic institutions for spreading of message among wider section of people
including academicians and student community. In this context, an investigation was
carried out to take-up rain water harvesting structures in the campus of Jawaharlal Nehru
Technological University (JNTU), Kukatpally, Hyderabad during the current year, 2009-
10.

(ii) Base line information of the project area on the following


Base line information of the project is presented in Table.1 and in the Figures
from 1 to 4.

(a) Location and Areal extent


State: Andhra Pradesh
District: Ranga Reddy
Block/Mandal: Kukatpally
Basin/Subbasin/watershed: Micro watershed level
Latitude and Longitude:78023’22.9’’ to 78023’41.3’’E
17029’23.5’’ to 17029’50.3’’ N
No. of villages/Towns: JNTUH Campus
Area: 89.27 acres.

(b) Population:
The number of quarters in the campus is 250. The total population including
residential, hostel and floating population (at the time of EAMCET, E-CET, PGCET
admissions) is estimated to be 50,000. Surrounding area is densely populated and it is one
of the biggest residential colonies in Asia.

(c) Landuse/land cover (in hectare): Enclosed in Table.1

(d) Agriculture: Not Applicable

(e) Hydrometeorology (i) Type of climate: Semi arid


(ii) Rainfall:
(a) Average annual (for 10 years):
Average normal annual rainfall in Hyderabad is 821mm,
monsoon rainfall is 591.40 mm and non-monsoon rainfall is
230.30mm and month wise normal rainfall as shown in the
Figure 5. Percentage of deviation over normal rainfall .is
shown in Fig.6. Trend line of rainfall for Hyderabad area is
presented in Figure 7. Normal monthly annual rainfall in mm
is given in Table 2
Dr. M.V.S.S. Giridhar, 1 Prof. M. Lakshmi Narasu,
Principal Investigator, Director,
CWR, IST, JNTUH IST, JNTUH
(b) No.of Rainy days: 46 days (approx)
(c) Peak intensity:30 mm/hr on 6th September
2008 at 20.00hours
(d) Flood/drought period:
Drought occurred in the years 1972, 1977,
1980, 1985, 1999 and 2002

(iii) Temperature: 390C in summer and 140C in winter.


Normal monthly hydro-meteorological parameters for
Hyderabad area is listed in Table.3.

(iv)Humidity: 51% average


(v) Potential Evapotranspiration: 6.5mm
(vi)Wind speed: 0.3km/hour

(f) Physiography General Topography: Undulated and steep


Drainage: Well drained
Surface water bodies: Nil
Runoff: Flash runoff
Characteristics of the area:
The topography of the area is highly undulating and slopy. The
slope of the ground in the campus and surrounding areas is from
North West to South East. The area is 594 m (maximum) to
576m (minimum) above msl.

(g) Ground water Hydrogeological frame work:


The campus is underlain by massive and hard grey and
pink granites of Archaean age. The ground water occurs in
weathered granite under unconfined conditions and in
joint fractures and fissures in semi-confined conditions
below the weathered mantle. Generally, weathered granite
is present up to a depth of 15 m followed by hard and pink
granites. Occasional fractures occur down to depth of 100
m bgl.

Short term and long term water level behavior:


One observation well is located near the hydro-
meteorological station as shown in the Figure.1. near the
field farm to monitor fluctuations in the ground water
levels for every 30 minutes using automatic water level
recorder. These water levels are monitored since 2008 and
found to be 25 to 30 m bgl deep in pre-monsoon period
and 16 to 19 m bgl in post-monsoon as shown in Fig. 8.

No. of ground water abstraction structures: Nil


Ground water resource availability: Partial, not
sufficient to meet the demand in the campus
Ground water problems (quality/quantity): Quantity
Existing recharge facilities in the block: Not available

Dr. M.V.S.S. Giridhar, 2 Prof. M. Lakshmi Narasu,


Principal Investigator, Director,
CWR, IST, JNTUH IST, JNTUH
(h) Water demand and supply: The total water requirement to the entire campus is to
the tune of 1687m3/day. To meet the entire water requirement, the Hyderabad Metro
Water Supply and Sewerage Board (HMWS&SB) supplies water to the tune 1000m3/day.
The remaining 687 m3/day water requirement is being met through the ten bore wells in
the campus. However, during the summer period, the bore wells yield and HMWS&SB
supply reduce considerably, and this deficit is met by purchasing water through tanker
supply. In this context, it is proposed to meet the above deficit in demand through
artificial recharge.

II. OBJECTIVES OF THE PROJECT:


1. Large roof area is available in the campus to tap the rain water for augmenting
ground water resources.
2. The campus area is located in the capital city of Hyderabad and most suitable
for demonstrative purpose.
3. Learned and opinion builders of the future, pass though these portals, hence
very useful to educate and bring awareness to the society.
4. Learned persons and researchers to pursue, monitor, evaluate and assess the
impact of the artificial recharge structures in scientific lines independent of
Central Ground Water Board.
5. As Jawaharlal Nehru Technological University Hyderabad is having Centre
for Water Resources Department and running M.Tech and M. Sc courses on
Water resources, the structures will be useful as permanent field
demonstration and experimental research activity for students.
6. To conduct regular training programmes to public and disseminate the
information about the significance of the artificial recharge activities.
7. To harvest, store and use for drinking and domestic purpose, gardening in the
campus.
8. To recharge excess water from storage sumps into the ground through
recharge pits and shafts.
9. To encourage farm rain water harvesting so as to harvest the rainfall falling
other than roof-top area within the campus.
10. To prepare the reports and disseminate to the public and to various
government agencies
11. To monitor and record ground water level fluctuations in the observation wells
on daily basis using automatic water level recorders.
12. To recharge ground water through recharge pits along with recharge shafts,
there by increasing the ground water levels.

Scope of artificial recharge

1. There are several buildings in the campus (administrative building,


departments, institutes, centers, hostels and staff quarters) with large roof area
and there is a lot of scope for roof-top rain water harvesting in the campus.
Also, there is adequate open area (either paved or covered with
grass/vegetation) from which runoff (as a result of rainfall) could be harvested
and used for recharging the aquifers below the ground.

Dr. M.V.S.S. Giridhar, 3 Prof. M. Lakshmi Narasu,


Principal Investigator, Director,
CWR, IST, JNTUH IST, JNTUH
2. The available roof area with in the campus is listed in the Table 4 and other
details are as follows.

Existing built-up area and other particulars related to artificial recharge


Total existing built-up area within the campus : 53,822.24 m2,
Normal yearly rainfall : 810 mm
Maximum water can be harvested in a normal year @80% : 34,876.80 m3
Max rainfall in a day : 70 mm
Maximum water can be harvested on a maximum rainfall day: 3014 m3

Proposed built-up area and other particulars related to artificial recharge


Built-up area : 11339 m2
Normal yearly rainfall : 810 mm
Maximum water can be harvested in a normal year @80% : 7347.67 m3
Max rainfall in a day : 70 mm
Maximum water can be harvested on a maximum rainfall day : 635 m3

III. JUSTIFICATION OF THE ARTIFICIAL RECHARGE PROJECT:

Justification of the artificial recharge proposal for various activities is listed in the
following table.

Amount
S.N Description of in
o. structure Rupees Justification for proposing the structure
There are three distinct watersheds covering JNTU
campus from which surface runoff could be harvested for
recharging the ground water aquifers. Recharge pond
with suitable silt trap, inlet and outlet are proposed to be
constructed. The detailed estimate has been prepared for
this proposal with SSR rates approved by the Andhra
Pradesh state government for the year 2008-09 as given
in Table 5 of Annexure. A. Two recharge shafts are also
planned with in the recharge pond with coir. The
Rainwater
diameter of well is proposed to be 6”. These wells would
1 harvesting 3,70,000
be helpful in recharging aquifers at various depths below
structures
the ground surface. It is also planned to irrigate near by
avenue plants with micro irrigation system with the water
stored in the sump. The rates include transportation and
installation charges for irrigating the avenue plants in the
surrounding of the proposed rain water harvesting sump
for use purpose. The detailed design and drawings are
presented in Annexure –A. Figure 9 shows the drawing
of recharge pit.

2 Improving water 2,11,000 The budget for micro irrigation system comprising of
use efficiency HDPE pipes as main and sub mains, LLDPE inline drip
using micro lines, micro sprinklers, sand filter, disc filter, couplers,
irrigation system connecting nipple, end plugs, and Fertigation tank. Micro
irrigation system helps in reducing the application loss of

Dr. M.V.S.S. Giridhar, 4 Prof. M. Lakshmi Narasu,


Principal Investigator, Director,
CWR, IST, JNTUH IST, JNTUH
water and improve the water use efficiency. Micro
irrigation will help to save water tremendously and plants
will grow faster when compared with conventional
irrigation system. This concept is very useful in urban
scenario and necessitates conducting training
programmes. The detailed estimate suitable for 2.0Acres
is prepared as per the Andhra Pradesh Micro Irrigation
Project (APMIP) approved rates and presented in Table 6
of Annexure. B. Source for micro irrigation is existing
bore well in the institute farm.
3 Six Observation 1,20,000 Presently, one observation well is located near the hydro-
wells in the meteorological station near the field farm to monitor
campus fluctuations in the ground water levels for every 30
minutes using automatic water level recorder. These
water levels are monitored since 2008 and found to be
25m to 30 m deep in pre-monsoon period and 16m to 19
m in post-monsoon.
It is proposed to dig and install Six more observation
wells as shown in Fig 10 along with its area of influence
calculated using Thiessen polygon concept in GIS
environment. It is proposed to monitor daily water level
fluctuations throughout the year, and to notify the
fluctuations for pre and post monsoon. It is also proposed
to compare and identify the impact of rain water
harvesting structures before and after execution. The
details are given in Table 7 of Annexure –C.
Keeping in view the availability of roof area of various
buildings in JNTU campus, roof top rain water
harvesting for collecting and storing rain water from roof
tops of buildings and its use is proposed. From the roof
top, the water is diverted to disc filter unit of higher
capcity. From the filter unit, the pure water is led to leak
proof storage tank. Provision for pumping and pipe line
system for taking the water from the storage tank to
Roof-top overhead tank is also proposed. Thus the budget
rainwater requirement is for installing the pipe line for collecting
harvesting with a the roof top rain water, installation of filter unit,
4 capacity of 6,80,000 construction of 50,000 litres leak proof storage tank and
50,000 litres and pumping system. Initially, this water will be used for
use (at two gardening, flushing and other regular uses. However, this
places) water will be tested as for BIS norms and it may also be
used for drinking purpose if it matches standard norms as
per water quality. This water will be assessed for quality
for complying with BIS norms and its safe for use. The
detailed budget is presented in Table 8 of Annexure D.
This will be useful at the level of individual buildings.
These structures shall be useful to demonstrate to public
as well as students in the campus. The detailed design is
shown in Figure 11.

Dr. M.V.S.S. Giridhar, 5 Prof. M. Lakshmi Narasu,


Principal Investigator, Director,
CWR, IST, JNTUH IST, JNTUH
Keeping the large roof area of different buildings in the
JNTU campus, roof top rain water harvesting for
collecting and storing rain water from roof tops of
buildings is proposed. From the roof top the water is
diverted to filter unit (perforated lid on top, layers of
pebbles, coarse sand and gravel). From the filter unit the
pure water is led to leak proof (water and air) storage
tank. Provision for pumping and pipe line system for
taking the water from the storage tank to overhead tank is
Roof top also proposed. Thus the total budget is required for
rainwater installing the pipe line for collecting the roof top rain
harvesting with a water, installation of filter unit, construction of 2.0 lakh
5 7,92,000
capacity of two liters leak proof storage tank and pumping system etc.
lakh liters and Initially, this water will be used for gardening, flushing
use and other regular uses. However, this water will be tested
as for BIS norms and it may also be used for drinking
purpose if it matches standard norms as per water quality.
This water will be assessed for quality for complying to
BIS norms and its safe use. The detailed budget is
presented in Table 9 of Annexure E. This will be useful
at the level of colonies, colleges, group of houses, gated
communities etc.,. These structures shall be useful to
demonstrate to public under this category. The detailed
design is shown in Figure 12.
Two bore holes with accessories and water collection
Roof top system at three different places for injection of rain water
rainwater from surface to underground formation are proposed. The
collection with a diameter of recharge shaft is proposed to be 200 mm.
capacity of These wells would be helpful in recharging both confined
1,00,000 liters and unconfined aquifers situated at various depths below
6 along with 9,78,000 the ground surface. These recharge shafts are more
recharge shafts beneficial where deep aquifers which are depleted are to
and supported be recharged and also where economy of space is
with side brick important criterion. The detailed design and drawings are
walls (three presented in figure 13 of Annexure - F. The detailed
places) budget for each item has been calculated and listed in
Table 10 of Annexure F presented in table.
DPR preparation 1,56,850 Provision for DPR preparation and awareness raising @
7
charges 5% of project cost
Monitoring and 1,56,850
Provision for monitoring and administrative charges @
8 Administration
5% of project cost
charges
Total 34,50,700

Rupees Thirty Four Lakhs and Fifty Thousand and Seven Hundred Only

Locations of the above proposed structures along with existing buildings are shown in
Figure 14.

Dr. M.V.S.S. Giridhar, 6 Prof. M. Lakshmi Narasu,


Principal Investigator, Director,
CWR, IST, JNTUH IST, JNTUH
IV. AVAILABILITY OF SURPLUS SURFACE WATER

The availability of the surface water is given below.

Source Location Quantity Period of availability


Rainfall JNTU 821 mm 60 days in a year Maximum water can be
harvested in a normal year is 34,876 m3
River/ Canal /
Nil
Reservoir

V. PROPOSED STRUCTURES
The proposed rain water harvesting structures in JNTU campus with
locations as well as the budget requirement are listed in the
following table.

Sl. Location Amount in


No. Description of structure Rupees
1 Rainwater harvesting structures Near main outlet of the campus 3,70,000
Improving water use efficiency
2 In the field farm 2,11,000
using micro irrigation system
3 Six Observation wells in the campus In the campus 1,20,000
Roof top rainwater harvesting with a
1. Near Mechanical Building
4 capacity of 50,000 liters with brick 6,80,000
2. Near Guest House
walls and use (at two places)
Roof top rainwater harvesting with a
5 Near PG Boys (Manjeera)hostel 7,92,000
capacity of two lakh liters and use
Roof top rainwater collection with a
1. Near Civil Engg. Building
capacity of 1,00,000 liters along
6 2. Near UGC-ASC Building 9,78,000
with recharge shafts and supported
3. Near Girls hostel
with side brick walls (three places)
Provision for DPR preparation and awareness raising @ 5% of project
7 1,56,850
cost
8 Provision for monitoring and administrative charges @ 5% of project cost 1,56,850
Total 34,50,700
Rupees Thirty Four Lakhs and Fifty Thousand and Seven Hundred Only

VI. COST ESTIMATES


Cost of each structure is estimated as per the state government schedule of rates
along with bill of quantities for each item and listed in the Annexures A to F

VII. TIME SCHEDULE


One year to complete installation of all artificial rainwater harvesting
structures during the year 2009-2010. Monitoring and preparation of impact
assessment report for 2010-11 and 2011-12 entire activity

Dr. M.V.S.S. Giridhar, 7 Prof. M. Lakshmi Narasu,


Principal Investigator, Director,
CWR, IST, JNTUH IST, JNTUH
VIII. IMPLEMENTING AGENCY FOR CIVIL WORKS
Director,
Institute of Science and Technology (IST),
JNTU Hyderabad, Kukatpally,
(Through Centre for Water Resources)
Under the guidance of Dr. M.V.S.S. Giridhar, Assistant Professor, CWR, IST, JNTUH
With technical support and guidance from Central Ground
Water Board, Bandlaguda (CGWB), Hyderabad.

IX. UNDERTAKING FROM THE AGENCY FOR O & M OF RECHARGE FACILITY

• The rainwater harvesting structures would be constructed as per the standard design
procedures
• Care shall be taken that only filtered and clean water enters into recharge pits
• Attention would be paid towards regular maintenance of rainwater harvesting
structures, cleaning and for protection.
• The quality of the harvested rainwater and its influence on the quality of underground
water would be monitored closely through the piezometers located in the campus.
Influencing area under each piezometer well is calculated using Theissen polygon
method in GIS environment.
• These structures shall be constructed as per the suggestions. Parapet walls shall be
constructed for all the pits, to prevent clay or silt entering into the pits. Rain
water/storm water shall be allowed only after setting the silts in the silt chambers into
filter beds and then to various rainwater harvesting structures proposed.
• Before rainwater enters into the settling chamber, the following suggestions shall be
followed.
o On the way of flow of rain water through drains small settling pits of 0.5 m,
depth shall be constructed and maintained within the drain for every 30 m
length.
o Mesh on the way of rain water to stop the leaves and other floating material
shall be provided.
o The first flash flood water will left and will not allowed to enter the filter beds.
• Bore wells, if abandoned shall be used as recharge wells by constructing rain water
harvesting pits, by making slots to the casing pipe. These will recharge the deeper
aquifers directly.
• Filter beds shall be cleaned by removing the sand and gravel, and fresh sand and
gravel may be replaced once in two years or when ever the situation demands.
• Removal of silt in the silt chambers, storage tanks, recharge pits shall be taken up at
regular intervals for proper maintenance of the recharge structures.
• During the rainy season, after every rain spell in each month the mud cake and waste
material on top of the sand layer shall be removed and cleaned properly for the
effective filtration of rain water.

The rainwater harvesting structures suggested shall be taken up at a time, if funds are
available. The implementation of these structures may certainly address the problem of water
scarcity by augmenting the ground water levels in JNTU premises and serves as a
demonstrative tool to create awareness among the general public.

Dr. M.V.S.S. Giridhar, 8 Prof. M. Lakshmi Narasu,


Principal Investigator, Director,
CWR, IST, JNTUH IST, JNTUH
Table 1. Land use land cover details in the study area

Sl.No Description of the item Area in m2


1 Total buildup area 53822.33
2 Vegetation and parking 30182.92
3 Shed area 8540.22
4 Open area 150604.29
5 Other area 117733.54
6 Total area 360883.30 or
89.19acres

Table 2 Normal monthly annual rainfall in mm

Fe
Months Jan b Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
Normal
Monthly
Rainfall 10. 18. 20. 116. 170. 190. 114. 108. 26.
(mm) 9 8.2 9 9 31.6 3 6 4 1 5 1 5.3
Rainy
Days 0.7 0.4 1 1.7 2.4 7 9.9 11.4 6.8 5.5 1.3 0.3

Table 3. Normal monthly hydro-meteorological parameters in Hyderabad

Mean Mean Wind


Max Min Relative Humidity % Speed PET
Temp Temp (km/hr) (mm)
o o
Month ( C) ( C) 8:30hours 5:30hours
January 28.60 14.60 79.00 39.00 8.10 109.80
February 31.20 16.70 64.00 35.00 8.90 128.50
March 34.80 20.00 54.00 30.00 9.60 181.50
April 36.90 23.70 51.00 31.00 10.90 197.80
May 38.70 26.20 50.00 33.00 12.40 219.90
June 34.10 24.10 71.00 54.00 23.80 196.40
July 29.80 22.30 83.00 69.00 22.10 140.40
August 29.50 22.10 82.00 70.00 18.30 135.50
September 29.70 21.60 82.00 71.00 12.60 119.30
October 30.30 19.80 73.00 58.00 8.90 123.60
November 28.70 16.00 68.00 48.00 8.00 104.10
December 27.80 13.40 71.00 42.00 7.40 98.60
Annual 31.70 20.00 69.00 48.00 12.60 1756.80

Dr. M.V.S.S. Giridhar, 9 Prof. M. Lakshmi Narasu,


Principal Investigator, Director,
CWR, IST, JNTUH IST, JNTUH
Table 4 Details about the name of the building, existing built-up area, maximum
amount of water can be harvested on a normal year and on a maximum rain day.
Max. water
Max. Water can
can be
S. AREA in be harvested
NAME OF THE BUILDING harvested in a
NO m2 on a max rainy
normal year in
day in m3
m3
1 COMPUTER SCIENCE BUILDING(OLD) 584.25 473.24 40.89
2 ANDHRA BANK(G.F) 312.8 253.36 21.89
3 RECTOR/REGISTRAR QAR 315.84 255.83 22.10
4 VC'S LODGE 280.01 226.80 19.60
5 C DAC BUILDING 494.44 400.49 34.61
6 GUEST HOUSE 1233.87* 999.43 86.37
7 MECHANICAL BUILDING 1074.48* 870.32 75.21
8 METALLURGICAL BUILDING 834.52 675.96 58.41
9 ESTATE OFFICE 202.46 163.99 14.17
10 CANTEEN 382.69 309.97 26.78
11 PRINCIPAL'S OFFICE 2179.57 1765.45 152.56
12 EEE BUILDING 2921.31 2366.26 204.49
13 UGC-ASC BUILDING 1860.47* 1506.98 130.23
14 A2 TYPE QUARTERS 632.55 512.36 44.27
15 B2,B3&B4 TYPE QUARTERS 2047.89 1658.79 143.35
16 ECE BUILDING 1144.02 926.65 80.08
17 ADMINISTRATIVE BUILDING(G.F,F.F,&S.F) 1394.34 1129.41 97.60
18 CIVIL ENGG. BUILDING 1674.4* 1356.26 117.20
19 SIT BUILDING 2325.58 1883.71 162.79
20 UNIVERSITY HEALTH CENTRE(G.F.) 502.32 406.87 35.16
21 LIBRARY BUILDING 1677 1358.37 117.39
22 DIRECTOR'S QUARTERS(G.F&F.F) 207.6 168.15 14.53
23 A-TYPE QUARTERS(OLD) 534.38 432.84 37.40
24 B-TYPE QUARTERS(OLD) 441.44 357.56 30.90
25 C-TYPE QUARTERS(OLD) 313.66 254.06 21.95
26 BOYS HOSTEL(OLD) 1518.76 1230.19 106.31
27 GIRLS HOSTEL(OLD) 1328.17 1075.81 92.97
28 SPORTS COMPLEX(G.F) 437.12 354.06 30.59
29 KRISHNA HOSTEL SHED 3743.75 3032.43 262.06
30 MECHANICAL SHEDS 4198.17 3400.51 293.87
31 GENERATOR 82.07 66.47 5.74
32 GEO TECH 252.28 204.34 17.65
33 SHEDS NEAR REG/REC.QTRS 263.95 213.79 18.47
34 PG BOYS HOSTEL 3596.21* 2912.93 251.73
35 A3TYPE QUARTERS 801.5 649.21 56.10
36 B5 TYPE QUARTERS 615.98 498.94 43.11
37 GIRLS HOSTEL(OLD) 1902.26* 1540.83 133.15
38 IIC BUILDING 850 688.50 59.50
39 TBI BUILDING 765.6 620.13 53.59
40 ADMINISTRATIVE BUILDING(T.F) 1394.34 1129.41 97.60
41 IST BUILDING 1354 1096.74 94.78
42 CENTRALIZED COMPUTER CENTER 1446.38 1171.56 101.24
43 EXAMINATION BUILDING 1453.74 1177.52 101.76
44 ANDHRA BANK(F.F) 331.91 268.84 23.23
45 GUEST HOUSE (DINING -F.F&S.F) 330 267.30 23.10
46 UNIVERSITY HEALTH CENTRE(F.F.) 502.32 406.87 35.16
47 SPORTS COMPLEX(F.F,S.F) 874.24 708.13 61.19
48 DIRECTOR'S QUARTERS(S.F) 207.6 168.15 14.53
TOTAL Plinth area 53822.24 43596.01 3767.55
* Structure considered for rainwater harvesting

Dr. M.V.S.S. Giridhar, 10 Prof. M. Lakshmi Narasu,


Principal Investigator, Director,
CWR, IST, JNTUH IST, JNTUH
¯
!(
P roposed P iezo m eter

!( !(
P roposed P iezom eter
P roposed P iezom eter

P roposed P iezom eter


!(
!(
E xisting P iezom eter

!(
P roposed P iezom eter

!(
P roposed P iezom eter
L eg en d
!( P iezom eter
H ighw ay_roads
D rainage
0 60,00012 0,000 240,000 360,0 00 480,000
M eters B oundary

Fig. 1 Existing swale network in the campus

Dr. M.V.S.S. Giridhar, 11 Prof. M. Lakshmi Narasu,


Principal Investigator, Director,
CWR, IST, JNTUH IST, JNTUH
¯
!
Proposed Piezometer

! !
Proposed Piezometer
Proposed Piezometer

Proposed Piezometer
!
!
Existing Piezom eter

!
Proposed Piezometer

!
Proposed Piezometer
Legend
! Piezometer
Highway_roads
Boundary
0 60,000120,000 240,000 360,000 480,000
Meters vegitation

Fig. 2 Vegetation cover in the campus

Dr. M.V.S.S. Giridhar, 12 Prof. M. Lakshmi Narasu,


Principal Investigator, Director,
CWR, IST, JNTUH IST, JNTUH
¯

Legend
Highway_roads
Roads
playground
0 60,000120,000 240,000 360,000 480,000
Meters Boundary

Fig. 3 Roads and Playground in the campus

Dr. M.V.S.S. Giridhar, 13 Prof. M. Lakshmi Narasu,


Principal Investigator, Director,
CWR, IST, JNTUH IST, JNTUH
¯

Legend
Highway_roads
Roads
buildings
0 60,000120,000 240,000 360,000 480,000
Meters Boundary

Fig. 4 Buildings along with Roads in the campus

Dr. M.V.S.S. Giridhar, 14 Prof. M. Lakshmi Narasu,


Principal Investigator, Director,
CWR, IST, JNTUH IST, JNTUH
Fig. 5 Normal rainfall over the study area

800

600
Series5
400

200

-200

-400

-600
70
72
74
76
78
80
82
84
86
88
90
92
94
96
98
00
02
04
19
19
19
19
19
19
19
19
19
19
19
19
19
19
19
20
20
20

Figure 6 Percentage of deviation over normal rainfall

Dr. M.V.S.S. Giridhar, 15 Prof. M. Lakshmi Narasu,


Principal Investigator, Director,
CWR, IST, JNTUH IST, JNTUH
1600 y = -1.7118x + 841.21
1400

1200
Rainfall in mm

1000

800

600

400

200

0
70

86

94
72

74

76

78

80

82

84

88

90

92

96

98

00

02

04
19

19

19

19

19

19

19

19

19

19

19

20

20
19

19

19

19

20
Year

Figure 7 Trend line of rainfall over Hyderabad

35

30

25

20

15

10

0
5-Jul
7-Jun

12-Jul

19-Jul

26-Jul
3-May

28-Jun

6-Sep
14-Jun

21-Jun

9-Aug
2-Aug
17-May

13-Sep

20-Sep
10-May

24-May

31-May

16-Aug

23-Aug

30-Aug

Figure 8 Water level fluctuations for a period of May to September at 30 min interval.

Dr. M.V.S.S. Giridhar, 16 Prof. M. Lakshmi Narasu,


Principal Investigator, Director,
CWR, IST, JNTUH IST, JNTUH
Annexure - A

Detailed estimate for Rainwater Harvesting Structures

The proposed rain water harvesting with two recharge wells are designed with the following
specifications.
Bottom width = 12 m.
The length of pit is assumed to be 1.5 times to width = 18 m
Top length (along the slope) = 18 m
Top width (across the slope) = 12 m
Assume depth of pond = 3 m
Assuming the following
Side slope of pond = 1:1 (three sides)
Side slope of pond (water entry side) = 4:1
Base length of pond at 3 m depth = 20 - (4x3)-(1x3) = 5 m
Base width of pond at 3 m depth = 12 – 2x1x3 = 6 m

Total cost of the proposal is given in the following Table

Table:5 Estimation for the construction of rain water harvesting pit with two recharge shafts

Sl. Amou Total

No Description of the item Quantity Unit nt Amount


Earth work for recharge pit, toe
wall,
1 700 M3 100 70000
silt trap, inlet and outlet in hard
rock area including lead and lift
2 Stone work 200 M3 392 78400
Recharge shaft with casing up
3 to 35 Mt 18000
first 20mts
Recharge shaft with casing up
4 to 70 Mt 60000
first 20mts
5 Filtration media LS
6 Protection works LS 25000
7 Maintenance work LS 25000
Online Drip irrigation for 0.5
8 LS 42500
acre
9 Contingency @ 10 % LS 31890
10 Miscellaneous LS 19210
Total 3,70,000
(Rupees Three lakhs and Seventy Thousand only)

Dr. M.V.S.S. Giridhar, 17 Prof. M. Lakshmi Narasu,


Principal Investigator, Director,
CWR, IST, JNTUH IST, JNTUH
Fig. 9 Top view and cross-section of Recharge pond (Not to scale)

Dr. M.V.S.S. Giridhar, 18 Prof. M. Lakshmi Narasu,


Principal Investigator, Director,
CWR, IST, JNTUH IST, JNTUH
Annexure _B

Table 6. Detailed estimate for micro irrigation system in the filed farm of IST, JNTU

(Area: 2.0 acres for inline drip irrigation)

Sl. Quanti Amoun


Description of the item Unit Total Amount
no ty t
1 Sand filter 40m3 1 no 2 14847 29694.00
2 Disc filter 40 m3 1 no 2 6863 13726.00
3 Fertigation tank 1 no 1 20000 20000.00
4 Inline 16 @ 0.3m 1 mt 7600 11.47 87172.00
5 PVC 40mm 6 kg/cm2 1 mt 228 20.59 4694.52
6 PVC 75mm 4 kg/cm2 1 mt 90 46.59 4193.10
7 PVC 90mm 4 kg/cm2 1 mt 90 65.26 5873.40
8 PVC fittings @ 5% LS 8267.65
9 LLDPE fittings @ 5% LS 8267.65
10 Inst and trans charges @5% LS 8267.65
11 Contingency @ 10 % LS 19015.5
12 Miscellaneous LS 1829.03
Total 2,11,000.00
(Rupees Two lakhs and Eleven Thousand only)

Note: These rates are approved by APMIP, Andhra Pradesh State


Government, Hyderabad

Dr. M.V.S.S. Giridhar, 19 Prof. M. Lakshmi Narasu,


Principal Investigator, Director,
CWR, IST, JNTUH IST, JNTUH
Annexure - C

Table 7 Six observation wells in the campus

Sl. Quanti Amoun Total


no Description of the item Unit ty t Amount
Observation wells along
with protection work at a 20,000.
1 No 6 1,20,000.00
depth of 50 mts on average 00
with casing for first 20mts.
Total 1,20,000.00

¯
!(
P ro p o se d P ie z o m e ter

!( !(
P ro p o s ed P ie z o m e ter
P ro p o s e d P ie z o m e te r

P ro p o se d P ie z o m e ter
!(
!(
E x is tin g P ie z o m e ter

!(
P ro p o s e d P ie z om e te r

L eg en d

!( P iez o m e te r

!( H ig h w a y_ro a d s
B o u n da ry
P ro p o s e d P ie z om e te r T hies se n p o lyg o n
<a ll o th er va lu e s >
In p u t_ F ID

0 4 8 ,0 0906 ,0 0 0 1 9 2 ,0 0 0 2 8 8 ,0 0 0 3 8 4 ,0 0 0
M e te rs

Dr. M.V.S.S. Giridhar, 20 Prof. M. Lakshmi Narasu,


Principal Investigator, Director,
CWR, IST, JNTUH IST, JNTUH
Fig. 10 Proposed piezometer wells along with its influence area
calculated using Thiessen Polygon concept in GIS environment

Dr. M.V.S.S. Giridhar, 21 Prof. M. Lakshmi Narasu,


Principal Investigator, Director,
CWR, IST, JNTUH IST, JNTUH
Annexure – D

Table 8 Detailed estimate for Roof top rainwater harvesting with a capacity of 50,000
liters with brick walls and use at two places in JNTU campus

Total
Quanti Amoun Amoun
Sl. no Description of the item Unit ty t t
Earth work for recharge pit, toe wall,
silt trap, inlet and outlet in hard rock
1 area including lead and lift CUM 120.00 100.00 12000.00
Providing P.C.C.1:4:8 Mix in Foundation
2 Using 40 mm Metal, Sand, Cement etc. CUM 4.50 2400.00 10800.00
Laying of RCC M20 Grade using 20 mm Metal,
Sand,
3 Cement etc for footings CUM 13.00 3913.58 50876.54
4 Reinforcement M.T 2.00 31000.00 62000.00
5 Plastering to inside and outside walls SQ.M 168.00 145.00 24360.00
6 Water Proofing course SQ.M 168.00 44 7392.00
Construction of brick masonry in super structure
7 using Brick, Sand, Cement etc. CUM 20 2752 55040.00
3
8 Disc filter 40m 1 No 1 6863 6863.00
9 Inline 16 @ 0.3m 1 mt 1000 11.47 11470.00
2
10 PVC 40mm 6 kg/cm 1 feet 42 65.50 2751.00
11 PVC 75mm 4 kg/cm2 1 feet 15 152.80 5000.80
12 Protection work LS 20000.00
13 PVC fittings @ 5% LS 13427.66
14 LLDPE fittings @ 5% LS 13427.66
15 Inst and trans charges @ 5% LS 13427.66
16 Contingency @ 10 % LS 30883.63
17 Miscellaneous LS 280.04
Total 3,40,000

Cost of each structure proposed : Rs.3,40,000/-


Number of structure proposed : 02
Total cost of proposal : Rs.6,80,000/-

Dr. M.V.S.S. Giridhar, 22 Prof. M. Lakshmi Narasu,


Principal Investigator, Director,
CWR, IST, JNTUH IST, JNTUH
Over flow pipe
connected to channel
leading to farm pond

Fig. 11 Roof top rainwater harvesting with a capacity of 50,000 liters with brick walls

Dr. M.V.S.S. Giridhar, 23 Prof. M. Lakshmi Narasu,


Principal Investigator, Director,
CWR, IST, JNTUH IST, JNTUH
Annexure-E

Table 9 Detailed estimate for Roof top rainwater harvesting with a capacity of two lakh
liters and use at JNTU campus

Sl.n Quanti Amou Total


o Description of the item Unit ty nt Amount
1 Earth work excavation cum 318 100 31800.00
Providing P.C.C.1:4:8 Mix in
Foundation Disc filter 40 m3
Using 40 mm Metal, Sand,
2 Cement etc. cum 10 2400 24000.00
Laying of RCC M20 using 20
3913.5
mm Metal, Sand, Cement etc for
3 footings cum 53 8 207419.74
4 Reinforcement M.Tonnes 7.5 31000 232500.00
Plastering to inside and outside
5 walls M2 260 145 37700.00
6 Water Proofing course M2 64 300 19200.00
Sand filter with automatic
1 44541 44541.00
7 filtration equipment 40 m3 No
8 Disc filter 40m3 1 No 1 6863 6863.00
9 Inline 16 @ 0.3m 1 mt 1000 11.47 11470.00
10 PVC 40mm 6 kg/cm2 1 mt 120 20.59 2470.80
11 PVC 75mm 4 kg/cm2 1 mt 90 46.59 4193.10
12 PVC 90mm 4 kg/cm2 1 mt 90 65.26 5873.40
13 Protection work LS 50000.00
14 PVC fittings @ 5% LS 33901.55
15 LLDPE fittings @ 5% LS 33901.55
16 Inst and trans charges @ 5% LS 33901.55
17 Contingency @ 10 % LS 77973.56
18 Miscellaneous LS 2290.73
Total 8,60,000.00

(Rupees Seven Lakh Ninty Two Thousand Only)

Dr. M.V.S.S. Giridhar, 24 Prof. M. Lakshmi Narasu,


Principal Investigator, Director,
CWR, IST, JNTUH IST, JNTUH
Over flow pipe
connected to
channel leading
to farm pond

Fig 12 Roof top rainwater harvesting with a capacity of two lakh liters and use

Dr. M.V.S.S. Giridhar, 25 Prof. M. Lakshmi Narasu,


Principal Investigator, Director,
CWR, IST, JNTUH IST, JNTUH
ANNEXURE – F

Table 10 Detailed item wise roof top rainwater collection with a capacity of 1,00,000
liters along with recharge shafts and supported with side brick walls at three places in
JNTU places

Total
Sl. no Description of the item Unit Quantity Amount Amount
1 Earth work excavation CUM 240 51.00 12240.00
Construction of brick
masonry in super structure.
40 2752 110080.00
Using Brick, Sand, Cement
2 etc. CUM
Recharge shafts along with
500 120 60000.00
3 casing Feet
Recharge shafts along with
150 120 18000.00
4 casing Feet
Sand filter with automatic
1 44541 44541.00
5 filtration equipment 40 m3 No
6 PVC 75mm 4 kg/cm2 1 Mt 30 152.81 4584.45
7 Protection work LS 20000.00
8 PVC fittings @ 5% LS 13452.71
9 Contingency @ 10% LS 26905.41
10 Miscellaneous LS 16491.09
Total 3,26,000.00

Cost of each structure proposed : Rs.3,26,000/-


Number of structure proposed : 03
Total cost of proposal : Rs.9,78,000/-

1. Farm rainwater harvesting structures


2. Improving water use efficiency using micro irrigation system
3. Six Observation wells in the campus
4 & 5 Roof top rainwater harvesting with a capacity of 50,000 liters with brick
Dr. M.V.S.S. Giridhar,
walls and re-use 26 Prof. M. Lakshmi Narasu,
Principal Investigator,
6, 7 & 8 Roof top rainwater collection withDirector,
a capacity of 1,00,000 liters along
CWR, IST, JNTUH IST,
with recharge shafts and supported with side JNTUH
brick walls
Over flow pipe
connected to
channel leading
to farm pond

Over flow pipe


connected to channel
leading to farm pond

Fig 13 Roof top rainwater harvesting structure with a capacity of one lakh liters along
with two bore wells

Dr. M.V.S.S. Giridhar, 27 Prof. M. Lakshmi Narasu,


Principal Investigator, Director,
CWR, IST, JNTUH IST, JNTUH
Dr. M.V.S.S. Giridhar, Prof. M. Lakshmi
28 Narasu,
Principal Investigator, Director,
CWR, IST, JNTUH IST, JNTUH