The Miami Mirror – True Reflections 

 

 

  THE PICKLE CHISELER 
A Pong™ restaurant review  December 1, 2009  Miami Beach, Florida  By David Arthur Walters  Fresh on Fifth is a large sandwich shop embracing the southwest corner of Ocean Drive  and  Fifth  Street  on  South  Miami  Beach.  The  Boar’s  Head™  insignia  on  the  umbrellas  on  the  plaza around the outside of the shop forewarned the frugal passerby of expensive sandwiches  inside.  The  display  of  the  insignia,  I  noted,  is  contrary  to  a  City  of  Miami  Beach  ordinance  permitting only the name of the establishment itself to be displayed on outside umbrellas. On  Thanksgiving Day, I was attracted by two specials advertised on Fresh on Fifth’s windows, one  being half a turkey sub with chips and soda for $5.  I was feeling rather frugal on Thanksgiving because my employer drastically cut my pay.  Still, I thought about how much I had to be thankful for as I ate my 5” or 6” turkey sub – it was  mostly bread, but the little bit of meat was good. At least the ambience was better than that of 
~ 1 ~ 

 

The Miami Mirror – True Reflections 
 

the  Subway  franchise  two  blocks  away,  where  several  kinds  of  foot‐long  subs  with  lavish  toppings can be had for $5 each.   I  was  thankful  that  I  had  learned  a  lot  on  my  current  job,  but  my  thankfulness  was  tempered by the realization that the informal motto around the office, “They don’t care about  us,”  might  be  true  despite  my  doubts.  The  water‐cooler  motto  at  my  previous  job  had  been,  “The good ones always leave.” I was thankful that I was not homeless, that my rent was paid,  that South Beach is pretty, that my long‐lost sister had sent me a Happy Thanksgiving Day card,  and  that  the  administrator  for  my  previous  employer  sent  me  a  flattering  e‐text  wishing  me  happiness.  Fresh  on  Fifth  was  practically  deserted  despite  the  crowd  of  tourists  down  for  the  holiday.  In  fact,  I  have  rarely  seen  many  customers  in  the  deli  over  the  last  year  or  so.  I  like  deserted places, and my mostly bread sandwich was not half‐bad. I thought I might bring my  friend Aliz there for lunch, since it was the kind of bread she liked, although a bit dried out.  I changed my mind about Fresh on Fifth two days later, after I tried the hotdog special  advertised on the window – a hotdog, a can of soda, and a wee bag of chips for around $5. I  was asked if I wanted mustard or ketchup. “Mustard, please,” I replied. The man who took my  order  at  the  register  handed  me  the  hotdog,  and  told  me  to  grab  some  chips  and  a  soda.  I  wandered about the place looking for a condiment stand, expecting to find relish or pickles and  maybe onions. There were no such condiments.  Please forgive me my ignorance, but I had grown used to American establishments that  provide little packets of relish, mustard and ketchup, et cetera. In retrospect, I know why I was  asked  if  I  wanted  either  mustard  or  ketchup.  To  my  dismay,  that  turned  out  to  be  all  the  dressing that was available for the special.   “May I have a little relish or pickle on this?” I asked the fellow who took my order, and  handed the hotdog back to him. He smiled wryly, and presented the plate to the surly man then  preparing  the  sandwiches  –  he  was  obviously  in  charge.  He  turned  and  stared  at  me  for  a  moment  with  utter  contempt,  as  if  I  were  a  rich  man  who  had  asked  him  for  the  world,  and  then he abruptly turned his back on me, saying to the server, “Tell him he has to pay fifty cents  for pickle.”  “Screw  him,”  I  said  to  myself,  angered  more  by  the  man’s  attitude  than  a  mere  fifty  cents.  “If  this  is  still  America,  a  little  relish  or  pickle  should  come  with  a  dog,  for  that  is  an  American  tradition  no  matter  what  the  total  price  may  be.  This  guy’s  an  (expletive  deleted)  pickle chiseler!”  I decided to let the matter pass as trivia, and sat down to eat my hotdog. I took one bite  out of the end: the bun was dried out, almost stale, the taste of the meat was disgusting, and  the dog was not hot, just room temperature. I began to seethe with anger, assumed the role of  a Pong™ restaurant critic and made quite a stink then and there. 
~ 2 ~ 

 

The Miami Mirror – True Reflections 
 

I got up and put the unopened can of soda, the unopened bag of chips, and the hotdog  less one bite down on the counter in front of him as he was attending to two customers, and  said: “A man who refuses to put a little relish on a five‐dollar hotdog is a cheap chiseler, so take  this cold and disgusting hotdog and shove it right up your ass.”  The victim of my Pong™ review was astonished. I turned around, advising him to kiss my  ass, and briskly departed, just in case he was reaching for a baseball bat.  Yes, I was bad, really bad, very uncivil, but I am not too ashamed of myself, at least not  in my role as a Pong™ restaurant critic. Of course everyone is a critic of sorts. I believe more  restaurant  critics  and  restaurant  patrons  should  evoke  such  astonished  looks  from  food  chiselers before we are chiseled out of America. It is to that end that I shall permit them to use  my Pong™ trademark free of charge.    Epilogue:  I cursed Fresh on Fifth every time I walked by the joint after the above event, and hoped the  owner  would  lose  his  shirt  because  I  thought  the  surly  man  behind  the  counter  owned  the  place.  Fresh  on  Fifth  eventually  littered  the  outdoor  area  with  cheap  and  unsightly  white  umbrellas with Coca Cola™ logos, so I took photos of them and sent the pictures over to Code  Compliance for enforcement of the ordinance barring such blight. A friend of the owner told me  that  the  surly  man  was  not  the  owner,  that  the  owner  is  the  nice  guy  who  owns  a  popular  restaurant with wholesome food on Alton Road. I used to eat Greek salads there, but I stopped  going by every week because only a half dozen or less tiny Greek olives were counted out for  the salads, and I could do much better for $8 notwithstanding the high price of marinated olives  at the Whole Foods grocery store down the street. Still, I may go by one more time, and review  the place.  Contact: miamimirror@gmail.com 

~ 3 ~ 

 

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful