You are on page 1of 2

  1

Strategic Action for Integrating Educational Technology: 
A Four‐Phase Developmental Model 
 
Assumptions 
 
• The process takes longer than first imagined. 
• Success correlates to the degree there is faculty ownership and commitment from administration 
at every phase. 
• Institutions will recycle through earlier phases as new events arise or personnel change.  
• Anticipating assessment strategies should begin early in order to provide needed insight into 
effectiveness. 
• It is possible for schools to be addressing issues in different phases, but completion of all issues in 
each phase is essential if a school is to successfully sustain its commitment to educational 
technology. 
 
Phase I: Discerning  
 
Under the leadership of the president and dean schools discern with the faculty whether using technology 
as a significant resource for teaching is worthwhile, engage faculty in conversations about pedagogy 
to guide the use of technology, consult with other schools on the uses of technology for education to 
gather ideas about what the best practices seem to be, and clarify what in‐house talent and resources 
are available to support a commitment to using instructional technology for teaching and learning. 
 
Transition Activities  
 
• Establish a leadership team to direct strategic planning process. 
• Develop an institutional environment that encourages risk‐taking. 
 
Phase II: Structuring  
 
Under the collaborative leadership of president, dean, and leadership team, the school 
develops a strategic instructional technology plan (a description of leadership responsibilities, 
relationship to institutional mission, and implications for administration and board, faculty, library, 
alums, congregations, and other key stakeholders); designs training options to equip faculty, 
students, and staff for success in their use of technology; utilizes the expertise of technology 
specialists to assist the leadership team as needed; and purchases hardware and software to support 
the strategic instructional technology plan. 
 
Transition Activities  
 
• Assess impact of technology plan on budget in light of other institutional priorities. 
• Review strategic plan. 
• Assess the level of integration needed of administrative and academic computing systems to 
achieve efficiency, easy access, and internal and external networking. 
 
  2
Phase III: Institutionalizing  
 
Under the leadership of the president, dean, and faculty, the school determines whether the initial 
leadership team should become a permanent part of the structure and, if not, from where within the 
school leadership for educational technology will come; develops and implements an assessment 
plan that involves all stakeholders in reviewing the impact of educational technology in light of 
specific institutional needs, priorities, goals, and culture; provides dedicated time and space for 
faculty to reflect on emerging pedagogical and theological questions related to teaching and learning 
and the role of digital technology; identifies what level of instructional technology expertise is needed 
to support the faculty and its work; and funds the refresh and upgrade cycle required for technology 
and software to meet changing needs and take advantages of new applications. 
 
Transition Activities  
 
• Examine how institutionalizing instructional technology redefines roles, structures, and policies 
in the institution. 
• Cultivate and reward a culture of creativity and experimentation. 
 
Phase IV: Sustaining  
 
Under the leadership of the president, dean, and faculty, the school recruits and rewards faculty and staff 
based on the goals and vision for instructional technology, uses regular assessment data from 
stakeholders inside and outside the institution to review and update the strategic plan as part of 
annual long‐range planning, generates new money for funding innovation and new teaching projects 
identified by the faculty, monitors changes in the field in order to make choices that build on efforts 
of the institution and to improve the effectiveness of planning around educational technology, and 
identifies and implements ways to disseminate insights and practices from the school’s use of 
instructional technology to other theological schools and seminaries and the wider church.