STRAIGHT AND  LEVEL 

Each year The  VINTAGE  AIRPLANE  prints a list-
ing of Type Clubs which have provided us with their
addresses and other pertinent information. This list-
ing is especially useful for those persons restoring an
antique or classic aircraft. The last Type Club listing
was included in the January, 1980 issue of The  VIN-
TAGE  AIRPLANE,  and an update of active Type Clubs
is in order. Confirmation of each active Type Club should
be forwarded to our editor including the name of the
club, address, meeting place and date if applicable,
dues (if any), and a notation if a newsletter is printed.
Basically, Type Clubs are independent groups which
have been formed to provide information and other sup-
port to owners and operators of specific lines of air-
craft. Without a doubt, they are a part of grass roots
aviation which help support the basic purpose of the
EAA Antique/Classic Division; to restore, maintain and
fly the aircraft of our early aviation history. Specifica-
tions, construction details and the availability of parts
are a vital factor in the proper restoration of an antique
or classic aircraft. An outstanding example of the value
of a progressive Type Club is the International Swift
Association. Without the results of their effective ef-
fort , parts for Swift aircraft would be practically non-
existent. Rather than have the manufacturing rights,
dies and jigs leave this country, the Swift Association
purchased all of the necessary manufacturing rights,
parts and related equipment. Without this effort and
forethought, as the years pass, Swift aircraft could
gradually disappear from the scene.
Another excellent example of wisdom and foresight
is the result of the efforts of the Staggerwing Club and
the Staggerwing Museum Foundation. Today, there are
no parts available for Staggerwings from the Beech
Aircraft Corporation. Through the early efforts of W. C.
"Dub" Yarbrough, the Staggerwing Club was formed,
initially to restore, fly and preserve Model G Stagger-
wings. With the involvement of Dub and others the
project expanded into the preservation and restoration
of all Model 17 Staggerwing aircraft. Here are some of
the results: A museum exhibiting various models of
flyable Staggerwings and Travel Air aircraft (Walter
Beech was one of the founders of Travel Air Inc. ), plans
and production drawings of all Model 17 Staggerwings;
displays of parts, engines and cut-a-way sections of
various components; original photographs of various
models as delivered by Beech; and a beautiful display
of color photos of today's restorations.
Most of the availabl e remaining parts for Stagger-
wings are in the possession of either Dub Yarbrough
or the Staggerwing Club. The efforts of Jim Gorman,
Dub Yarbrough and George York have resulted in the
availability of these parts for restorations by Stagger-
wing Club members. This is another example of the fore-
sightedness and effort which helps make it possible for
us to see Staggerwings and Travel Airs flying today.
Fortunately some parts, drawings and other neces-
sary information is still available from some of the
original manufacturers or their authorized representa-
By  Brad  Thomas 
President 
Antique/Classic Division 
tives. This applies basically to classic aircraft manu-
factured during 1946 through 1955, but as time moves
on, considerable thought should be given to following
the planning and actions taken by the Swift and Stag-
gerwing groups.
There is another important factor supporting the
formation and continuation of Type Clubs. The together-
ness and fellowship of a club's membership is a compell-
ing factor in the relationship of fun and activity. Through-
out history individuals with common interests have
grouped together for the purpose of survival , or just
mutual admiration. To bring together people from all
walks of life to display and fly their aircraft of one
type is a significant accomplishment. No one is more
proud of his endeavors than the individual who has just
completed his project, or the one whose craft was restored
months back and is still maintained in factory new
condition.
The  VINTAGE  AIRPLANE  is the publication which
brings you current news, restoration projects, fly-in
reports, historical articles, a calendar of events and
editorial comment. The staff and funds are limited and
the dependency of available information for use in the
magazine lies sol ely with our associate editors and volun-
teer contributors. Our historical articles are excellent
examples of the preservation of aviation history. They
are delightful to read while we visualize the events un-
folding in history. But we also want to record current
happenings, restoration projects, and Type Club ac-
tivities.
We welcome such items of interest, whether they
be stories of annual fly-ins , restoration projects or other
informational news of Type Club activities. Further,
many of our EAA Antique/Classic Chapters have fly-
ins during each calendar year, and these events should
be published in The  VINTAGE  AIRPLANE. Each Chap-
ter or Type Club should have a publicity chairman and!
or a committee to function on behalf of its newsletter,
local public relations and national attention through
The  VINTAGE  AIRPLANE. 
Articles should be accompanied by appropriate photos,
either black and white or color slides. The articles should
be written to basically cover the events of the fly-in.
Don't despair if you have doubts about your writing
ability. Our staff at Headquarters is qualified to or-
ganize and edit the text for publication in The  VIN-
TAGE  AIRPLANE.  Let's hear from you!
PUBLICATION OF THE ANTIQUE/CLASSIC DIVISION, INC.
OF THE EXPERIMENTALAIRCRAFTASSOCIATION, INC.
P.O. BOX 229, HALES CORNERS, WI 53130
COPYRIGHTC> 1981 EAA ANTIQUE/CLASSIC DIVISION,INC.,ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
APRIL 1981 VOLUME 9 NUMBER 4 
OFFICERS
PRESIDENT VICE-PRESIDENT
W.BRAD THOMAS,JR. JACK C.WINTHROP
301 DODSON MILL ROAD ROUTE 1, BOX 111
PILOT MOUNTAIN,NC 27041 ALLEN,TX 75002
919/368-2875 Home 214/727-5649
919/368-2291 Office
SECRETARY TREASURER
M. C."KELLY" VIETS E.E. "BUCK" HILBERT
7745 W. 183RD ST. P.O.BOX 145
STILWELL,KS 66085 UNION, IL 60180
913/681-2303 Home 815/923-4591
913/782-6720 Office
DIRECTORS
Ronald Fritz Morton W. Lester
15401 SpartaAvenue P.O. Box3747
Kent City, MI 49330 Martinsville,VA 24112
616/678-5012  703/632-4839 
Claude L.Gray,Jr.
ArthurR. Morgan
9635 SylviaAvenue
3744 North 51st Blvd.
Northridge, CA 91324
Milwaukee, WI 53216
213/349-1338  414/442-3631 
DaleA. Gustafson
John R. Turgyan
7724 ShadyHill Drive
1530 Kuser Road
Indianapolis, IN 46274
Trenton, NJ 08619
317/293-4430  609/585-2747 
AI Kelch
S. J. Willman
66 W.622 N.MadisonAvenue
Box 2672
Cedarburg,WI 53012 Oshkosh,WI 54901
414/377-5886  414/235-1 265 
Robert E. Kesel GeorgeS. York 
455 OakridgeDrive 181 SlobodaAve. 
Rochester ,NY 14617 Mansfield,OH 44906 
716/342-3170  419/529-4378 
ADVISORS
JohnS.Copeland Stan Gomoll Gene Morris
9Joanne Drive 1042 90th Lane,NE 27 ChandelleDrive
lestborough, MA01581 Minneapolis,MN 55434 Hampshire,IL60140
617/366-7245 6121784-1172  312/683-3199 
PUBLICATION STAFF
Publisher
Editor
Paul H. Poberezny, President
GeneR. Chase
FRONT COVER ... BACK COVER ..,
Doug Williams and Carol Simpson fly-
This ~ e e   h Staggerwing reportedly
ing over California near the end of a built for Frank Hawks, is the first 017
ferry flight from Montana in a friend's model. It was manufactured in 1937
Cessna 120. See storyon page 5. as a D17W, then converted to a D17R
and later to a 0178. Apparently it did
not survive its stint with the Navy
(Bur. No.09776) during WWII.
(PhotofromtheClaudeGrayCollection)
TABLE OF CONTENTS
Straight and Level ... by Brad Thomas. , . , . , . . . . . .. 2
NC  News ... by Gene  Chase......... ...... .. . .. ...  4 
Delivering a 95% Reliable Cessna 120 From
Montana to California .. .
by Douglas  Williams  and Carol  Simpson....... . .  5 
Moving The Hughes Flying Boat . . .
by  George  Hardie,  Jr.  .. ........ ... . .. ... , ....... 10
Did You Say Sears? . , . by Bob  McDaniels  ...... .... 11
Thanks EAA ... by Karl C. Bihary  ........ . .. . ..... 12
Members' Projects .............. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 13
How To Build The Powell "P-H" Racer - Part II ..... 14
Record Setting Aeronca C-2N ...................... 19
Sale Of "Red" Jensen's Estate Ends An Era ......... 20
Letters ............. . .............................. 21
Calendar Of Events. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 22
Page10 Page 19 Page5
Experimental AircraftAssociation
Editorial Policy: Readers are encouraged to submil slories and photographs. Policy opinions e.xpressed in articles are
solely those of the authors. Responsibility for accuracy in reporting rests entirely with the contributor. Material should be
sent to:Gene R.Chase, Editor, The VINTAGE AIRPLANE,P.O. Box 229. Hales Corners,WI 53130.
Associate Editorships are assigned to those writers who submit five or more articles which are published in THE
VINTAGE AIRPLANE during the current year. Associates receive a bound volume of THE VINTAGE AIRPLANE and
a free one-yearmembership in the Division for their effort.
THE VINTAGE AIRPLANE (ISSN 0091-6943) is owned exclusively by EAA Antique/Classic Division, Inc., and is pub-
lished monthly at Hales Corners, Wisconsin 53130. Second Class Postage paid at Hales Corners Post Office, Hales
Corners, Wisconsin 53130, and additional mailing offices. Membership rates for EAA Antique/Classic Division, Inc.,
are $14.00 for current EAA members per 12 month period of which $10.00 is for the publication of THE VINTAGE
AIRPLANE. Membership is open to all who are interested in aviation.
ADVERTISING - Antique/Classic Division does not guarantee or endorse any product offered through our advertising. We
invite constructive criticism' and welcome any report of inferior merchandise obtained through our advertising so that cor-
rective measures can be taken.
VINTAGE AIRPLANE 3
MUSEUM ACQUISITIONS
The  following  items  have  recently  been  donated  to 
the. EAA  Air Museum: 
Library Materials - Donors:  Robert F. Allen, Lindale, 
TX;  Lubowski  Stanislaw,  Polska,  Poland,  Juan  Grespo 
Giralt,  Madrid,  Spain;  John  H.  Krauer,  Detroit,  MI;  Al 
Larson,  Ingleside,  IL;  Herman  Matthes,  Mansfield,  OH; 
Jim Gorman,  Mansfield,  OH.  . 
Ford Tri-Motor Materials - Donor:  Scenic  Airways, 
Las Vegas,  NV. 
Radio Equipment - Donor: Ray Hoffman,  Milwaukee, 
WI. 
World War II Artifacts - Japanese - Donor:  Stan 
Gomoll,  Blaine,  MN. 
Racing Pylons and Aerobatic Displays - Donor: 
National Air and Space  Museum,  Washington,  D.  C. 
OSHKOSH '81
GAS AVAilABILITY - For the third consecutive year 
the  Oshkosh  Convention  and  Tourism  Bureau  will  ask 
the  State  of  Wisconsin  to  assure  the  availability  of  a 
sufficient  q-uantity  of  fuel  to  satisfy  the  needs  of  all 
Oshkosh '81  attendees. 
SPECIAL PROGRAMS - The  Warbirds  special  ex-
        will  be  presented  on  Sunday,  August  2. 
They  WIll  also  begin  each  daily  air  show  during  the 
Convention. The Homebuilt Review will be on Wedhesday, 
5. The Antique/Classic "Parade of Flight Pageant" 
IS  set for Thursday, August 6.  As in the past top  air show 
and  lAC  performers  will  be  featured  in  the  daily  air 
shows. 
HOUSING NEEDS - For  the  latest  information 
concerning  the  housing  situation  at  Oshkosh,  call  the 
"Housing  Hotline"  - 414/235-3007  - Monday  through 
Friday,  8  a.m.  to  4  p.m.  Central Time. 
FUEL TANK GROMMETS
From  the Northeastern  Sport Aviation News 
Publication of Chapter 279,  Duxbury,  MA 
Editor Bob  Whittier 
For  those  who  may  be  looking  for  the  grommet  that 
fills  the gap in the plane's top fairing or cowling over the 
gas  tank,  a  simple  expedient  has  been  found.  For  2\4" 
filler  necks  the  cost  is  only  $1.04  at  your  local  Ford 
agency.  Ask  for  Part  Number  D7TZ-9080-B  Grommet. 
This fits  perfectly  and is easily obtainable. 
MUSEUM NEEDS
The  following  items  are  needed  to  carryon  the  pro-
grams  of the  EAA  Air  Museum  Foundation.  If you  can 
help,  please  contact  EAA  Headquarters,  telephone  414/ 
425-4860.  Donations  to  the  Museum  are  tax deductible. 
*Planer (wood) 
*Wing  fittings  for  Curtiss JN4D 
*Miscellaneous  aviation  mechanic  hand tools 
*Tools  for  V-1650  Merlin  engines 
*Complete  engine or parts,  Merlin  V-1650 
*Semi-tractor,  double  or single  axle 
*Modern  NAV/COM  radios  for  B-25  and  Lockheed  12 
aircraft 
*Hydraulic  Mule 
*Hydraulic  Maintenance  Stands 
*220  to  28  volt  rectifier - 100 amp 
*Lawn  mower  blade  balancer 
*Caterpillar or crawler tractor with  front  end  loader 
*Engine  rebuilding stand  for  automotive engines 
*Sewing machine  with zig-zag  attachment 
*Wright Cyclone  R-1300-1A  engine for  T-28A 
*3  prop  hubs  (30  spline),  Part  #5406-AL  and  6 
Hamilton  Standard  Ground  Adjustable  prop  blades, 
Part  #3792X  - 8'  9"  for  P& W  R-985  Ford  Trimotor 
engines 
*N3N wheels  and brakes 
*P&W R-1830-75,  R-1830-94  and R-2000  engines 
*Tank  Model  63  or  73  engine.  Need  complete  but not 
runable 
*Towing tractor for  medium to  large aircraft 
ENGINE POWER LOSS ACCIDE'NT
PREVENTION
From David H.  Scott's  Washington Report 
In connection with general aviation accidents the FAA 
has a  new  Advisory  Circular AC  20-105A that is entitled 
Engine  Power  Loss  Accident  Prevention.  This  does  not 
contain any startling new information and merely reviews 
good  operating  practices.  But  some  of  the  statistics  are 
interesting.  For  instance  from  1977  through  1979  there 
were  2608  accidents  due  to  engine  failure  with  473 
fatalities  and  1396  injured  persons.  Fuel  supply  failure 
accounted for  47%  of these accidents  and fuel  contamina-
tion accounted for  31%. (The fuel  supply failures  included 
running one  or all tanks out of fuel  . .. Editor) 
4 APRIL 1981
__ _
ByDouglas Williams
and
CarolSimpson
(EAA 123809,AIC3771)
2055 SterlingAvenue
Menlo Park, CA 94025
DELIVERING A 95l
Photos bythe authors  ""
v  RELIABLE CESSNA 120
FROM MONTANA TO CALIFORNIA
Doug Williams and Carol Simpson were, respectively,
the President and Newsletter Editor of the West Coast
Cessna 120/ 140 Club for two years, and continue as
product coordinators. Officers of any national organization
get many interesting offers and have many adventures,
and the following is an example.
Since both Doug and Carol were involved, and since
they normally fly alternating legs of a trip (the right
seat occupant navigates, seats are switched each leg) they
wrote alternating sections of this story.
Carol: Last June Alberta Knox of San Rafael, Cali-
fornia joined the club and asked our help finding a 120
or 140 for sale, as she had her heart set on having one
of her own. The next week we got a letter from Jack
Brown in Whitefish, Montana, wanting to join the club
and saying that as he flew his C-170B more than he
did his 1947 polished, very original C-120, he planned to
sell the 120. Immediately we called Alberta. We also
called EAA members and long-time 1201140 Club
members Tom and Donna Weaver in Kalispell, Montana
to see if by chance they knew Jack's 120. Turned out
their hangar was one row away from Jack's at Glacier
International Airport. Tom went over N3032N from
spinner to rudder and pronounced her a super fine
looking bird, which info we passed on to Alberta.
Since Tom and Donna's 140 had won a "Best Custom"
trophy one year at Oshkosh, his opinion carried consider-
able weight. One thing led to another, and before we
knew it we were meeting Alberta at San Francisco Air-
port. Doug's and my assignment was to fly commercial
to Kalispell, armed with Alberta's cashier's check, inspect
the 120, and, if she looked good and performed well,
give the check to Jack and fly her home to Alberta.
Doug: When Alberta had called us asking about
airplanes for sale, I had jokingly suggested that we would
certainly go get it for her. I had made this proposal in
about the same spirit (and with about the same expecta-
tion of having it accepted) as you do when you tell a
bridegroom at his wedding, "If you need a little help
tonight, heh heh, give me a call." Naturally, I hesitated
several microseconds before accepting when she called
back asking us to go get her an airplane a thousand
miles away. As it turned out, it was quite a reasonable
idea. She was not checked out in 120/ 140s, and her in-
surance would not insure anyone who did not have 10
hours in type; and it would be expensive any way she did
it.
Carol: Donna Weaver met our Hughes Air West
flight at Glacier International at about 11 p.m. Of
course we immediately drove to Jack's hangar to have a
look at 32N in the moonlight. Next morning we met
Jack Brown and went over the 120 ourselves from spinner
to rudder, admiring her tail feathers and control sur-
faces and thinking we would have to warn Alberta to
keep close tabs on 32N whenever Larry Cole (who lusts
after perfect control surfaces) was around.
Jack Brown of Whitefish, MT bids farewell to his beloved Cessna 120.
VINTAGE AIRPLANE 5
Tom and Donna Weaver (EAA 116565) flying their award winning Cessna 140 near their hometown of Kalispell, MT.
Jack gave us the go-ahead to fly the 120 over to
mechanic Bobbie Colby at Ferndale Airport for a pre-
sale inspection. Of course Tom and Donna flew along
with us in their beautifully polished 140. 32N passed
all her tests except for the compression in number 3
cylinder, which had dropped considerably since the annual
6 months before (probably due to not having been flown
enough). Over the phone, Jack and Alberta decided to
split the cost of a top overhaul on numbers 3 and 1
(1 was also soft). Less than 24 hours later and for a price
so low you wouldn't believe it, 32N was ready to fly again.
Never saw anyone work as surely and quickly as Bob
Colby.
Lucky Carol got to fly her for a couple of hours keeping
her hot to start seating the rings while Doug went off
to the bank to transfer Alberta's check to Jack.
When we took Jack's picture standing by N3032N,
he looked like he felt like crying, he loved her so much.
We told him we knew Alberta would give her a good home.
Jack showed us on the chart countless little back-woods
airstrips he had flown into and suggested a good route
for our flight back. We decided then and there to return
in our own 140 one day soon. With Tom and Donna in
their Cessna 180 we took an evening aerial tour of
Glacier National Park, wishing we didn't have to return
just yet. Next morning we set out in the 120 for California.
Our trip home was quite an adventure for the last
200 miles (details in good time). For starters we took a
tip from Tom and flew over to Kalispell City Airport to
root around in junk piles behind hangars to hunt for a
set of late model 140 seat bottoms he had seen there
the year before. They were still there, well weathered.
Eventually we got hold of the owner by phone and offered
him $10 for the pair. The seat bottoms took up the last
bit of spare room in the baggage compartment of the 120
so it's good we didn't look any further for more valuable
"junk".
We lifted off Kalispell City at noon, climbing along
the west shore of Flathead Lake for altitude, which was
easy to come by in the 120. Our planned route was short
on dead reckoning and long on pilotage since the mag
compass indicated anywhere from 20 to 180 degrees off,
depending on its mood at the moment. The OBS on the
VOR receiver varied from 30 to 60 degrees shy of our
actual bearing to the station as determined by visual
reference. So we followed ye olde roads and railroads
west to Coeur d' Alene, Idaho then proceeded up north
for a landing and late lunch at Henley Aerodrome,
home of many a WWI replica and assorted antiques.
There were a couple of dog fights going on in the
pattern (or rather below it) when we entered. What
a super place for a fly-in .. . !
After lunch we pressed on west and southwest, skirting
southeast of Spokane and continuing southwest following
railroads to Vista Airport at Kennewick, Washington
near TriCities on the Snake River. It felt like 110
0
in the shade, but that didn't stop the local parachute
club from jumping - everyone had Para Wings, and they
were getting some nice formations together. As usual, the
120 attracted a fair amount of attention, including a
hello from a guy working on his DC-3. They sold us some
80 and took our picture next to the DC-3; then we were
off again (Doug's leg this time) across the now somewhat
bumpy desert making an end run around restricted area
R-5701 and continuing southwest to pick up what looked
like a miniature or very young Grand Canyon - the
Deschutes River, which empties into Lake Chinook,
north of Redmond, Oregon. Of course it was CAVU,
and we watched as the snow-topped peaks of Mt. Hood,
Three Sisters, and Mt. Jefferson drifted by to the west.
During the fuel stop at Redmond, Oregon (averaging
4.75 gph) and change of pilots, we first realized we might
make Enterprise Airport at Redding, California that
day, site of our semi-annual 120/140 fly-ins. Just a bit
6 APRIL 1981
14,162' Mt. Shasta as viewed from the 120 flying at 8,500 msl .
south of Redmond that substantial looking cloud forma-
tion to the south turned out to be Mt. Shasta, so we
steered a course to the right of that magnificent peak.
8 p.m. found us over Dunsmuir-Mott Airport at the base of
Mt. Shasta. With our altitude of 8500 MSL, it was a down-
hill run from there to Enterprise.
" Wonder if there'll be anybody there ... Boy, won' t
they be surprised. They'll sure wonder who it is ..."
Arriving Enterprise at dusk. a STEEP stand it on the
wing 720 degree turn to look over the club house,
then "Enterprise Traffic, Cessna 3032N overhead to enter
left downwind for 16."
Now we're dropping down final at 120 lAS (it's a 120,
right?) and she's really cookin'; down the runway at 110
and pull it up hard left just before the club house, a
standard "Enterprise One Arrival".
Well now they sure were scratching their heads on
the ground. This beautiful silver 120 surely knew them,
so who could it be? Back on downwind, I announced
landing intentions. Then Doug said he had heard there
was a guy named Cole down there who would polish a
120 for a case of beer.
"Is that you, Doug? I thought your 140 was white."
"It is. This is a 120 and it's polished."
"So you finally got Carol her own plane! Congratula-
tions!"
For a few fun moments we enjoyed the luxury of owning
two planes, even if only imaginarily. Larry Cole, Nita
and Steve and other Enterprise dignitaries inspected
3032N with approving eyes in the fading light. Larry
absolutely had to have a turn around the patch so Doug
gave him right seat and off they went.
Doug: Larry has many hours in 120s and 140s, and
wanted to do the flying; fine with me, but I thought I
had better be in the left seat where the brake pedals
were, just for insurance reasons. I had a lot of confidence
in the little 120 after flying it over 800 miles of desert
and mountains in a single day, but still, a night take-off
in an unfamiliar airplane could get interesting; so we
wordlessly agreed that he would fly it, but I would do
the brakes as necessary, and be pilot in command if we
broke it. The run-up was uneventful , but it was now
dark enough so that the 120s retrofit lighting system
was a definite problem; the spotlight-type illumination
would show a gauge at a time, then vibrate down and
point at the floor until re-positioned. We figured we
didn't need to see much except out the window anyhow,
and Enterprise's Mayo-jar and grocery store bulb runway
lights were pointing the way nicely; so away we went.
About 50 feet up the engine started surging and
missing; it was not developing full power, would not
develop full rpm, and sounded like it was going to quit
any time. Larry had lots of experience with 140s which
had a "left-right-both" fuel selector, but didn't know
if this had one of these or one of the "left-right-off'
type which are also common. He couldn't see it in the
dark, and didn't have time to look anyhow; so he did
the wisest thing, which was to keep flying as best he
could, and shout "Give me fuel!" I knew the selector
was on the fullest tank, but that was obviously not
doing the job, so I switched to the other and pulled
carb heat. Neither action did any good, and the 75 foot
tree tops at the end of the ' runway were approaching
fast . Once before I had been in an airplane that ran like
this one, only it had not left the ground; Carol and I
once got a ride in Howie Keefe's P-51 at Watsonville,
but only taxied around in it, as the engine was cutting
out. He had kept it running on the primer, and I tried
VINTAGE AIRPLANE 7
Alberta Knox greeting her newly acquired C-120 at Sonoma County Airport for the first time.
that now; it gave us the extra surge that was needed
to get us over the trees. Larry said, "Keep doing that"
and I needed no encouragement; every pump of the primer
got us altitude or airspeed, and we needed a lot more
of both.
Now, all the books tell you to crash straight ahead
rather than try for the turn, but it hadn't actually quit
entirely yet, and it sure was dark down there, so when
Larry said "I'm going to try a shallow turn to the left"
all I said was ''I'll call your airspeed" since I didn't want
him to be looking inside and clip a tree top or get dis-
oriented; we were not in a mood to get lost. I didn't
know it at the time, but he knew of some lakes in the
direction of the turn that he could have gone into if it
had stopped running.
"Coming left, about 10 degrees is all the bank I'm
going to use"
"Airspeed 60, (pump, pump) now 65, 60, (pump, pump,
pump) 70, looking good, 70 (light vibrations off airspeed
and shines on floor, re-positioned, eek, 55 pump, pump)
60 .. . "
I look up from the airspeed to see a double line of
yellow grocery store bulbs shining through the bottom
of their mayonnaise jar covers, and the biggest CAT-II
runway I ever saw never looked better.
"It runs pretty good downhill"
"Airspeed looks good for landing"
"Ready on the brakes?"
"That's affirm, anytime"
THUMP "You got it"
As we tied it down we expected to be surrounded by
concerned aviators or spectators, or at least a kid who
noticed we landed downwind; everybody was in the bar
and later they told us they thought we hadn't even left
yet.
"Well, you had enough flying for today?"
"Yes, I think I'm ready to start drinking."
"Boy, does that ever sound good. Why didn't you think
of that earlier?"
"I think if we hurry we can make up for lost time."
The next day we took ofT the cowl and looked things
over, checked the fuel bowl, drained the sumps and
checked all connections, and found absolutely nothing.
It ran fine on the ground, full-power static run-ups were
textbook perfect. We looked at the mixture control cable
end, and noticed that a washer was missing that was
required to keep the cable from being jammed when it
was returned from a "Lean" position to "Full rich" .
A run-up confirmed this could give the symptoms noted
if the mixture was partially leaned. It was still a little
puzzling, and we were not sure we had fixed it; but we
could not get it to duplicate the problem on the ground.
"Well, Doug, what do you think?" Larry asked me.
"I don't know what to think, Cole, but it sure runs
good on the ground."
"Let's go see if we can make it do it again."
"What if it does?"
"At least we can see where we are going."
"Ok, same as last night, you fly, I try to keep it
running?"
"Sounds good."
Another complete run-up and we were ready. It
sounded fine and ran well until 50 feet in the air. and
8 APRIL 1981
then it ran exactly as it had the night before. This time
we were looking at wires as well as trees at the end of
the runway, and we had plenty of witnesses as all of the
airport bums had heard of our adventures the night before.
One of them was an AI, and said he never heard anything
sound as bad and still be flying. It didn't sound very
good from inside either.
This time Larry's intimate knowledge of places to
crash led us down the highway about 50 feet high.
He planned to go down in the median strip or on the lane
going our way if necessary. A parade of airport bums
followed, as they had all climbed in any handy vehicle
and chased us down the road. Again, when we needed
some altitude to get over wires or trees, I gave a few
shots of primer; Larry concentrated on flying, and paid
no attention to anything else. Finally, we had covered
about three miles, but had gained no significant altitude.
It didn't sound like it was going to quit, but it wasn't
running any better, either.
"Larry, let's go to Metro, that big runway looks pretty
good."
"Ok, I'll put it on tower frequency for you."
(The radio was on the passenger side)
"Redding tower, this is an emergency, Cessna 3032N
is coming straight in on 16."
"Roger 32N, you are cleared to land on any runway,
what is the nature of your emergency and how many are
on board?"
(Jeez, fellow, we haven't crashed yet, let's wait until
we do before you start filling out the paperwork.)
"Two on board, and the engine won't develop full
power."
(And all our required documents are in the airplane,
we have current medicals and BFR's, the insurance is
paid up . . . )
"Ok Doug, be ready on the brakes, I'm a little
fast."
"No problem, lots of runway."
SKEETHUMP, THUMP.
"32N, do you need a tow off the runway?"
."No, tower, thanks. It runs fine on the ground."
Without going into a lot of unnecessary detail, the
FBO at Redding took the carburetor apart and found
about a teaspoonful of dirt in the float chamber. After
the cleaning, testing showed that it would run fine on
the right tank, but would quit if flown about 50 mph
(nose-high attitude) on the left tank. We figured we
could get home on the right tank, and had them fuel
it; they accidently filled it with 100 octane, which
Carol (who arrived by auto) would not accept; she made
them drain every drop out, and give us 80 instead.
As long as the tanks were empty, I blew through the fuel
lines to make sure they were clear.
By this time it was getting dark, but 32N seemed
to be running well so Carol and I pointed it south and
started picking our way along the chain of lighted fields,
trying to stay within gliding range of one of them. We
had no further problems, and landed at Palo Alto about
11 p.m. Later, we found the needle and seat in the
carburetor were worn out, and the float level was set
wrong; but fortunately that had made no difference after
the dirt was blown out of the float chamber.
Carol: The next day we flew the 120 and our 140 in
formation to Sonoma County (Santa Rosa) to meet Alberta.
It was love at first sight. Alberta gave her a kiss on the
spinner, then she and her friend Dennis in the 120 and
we in our 140 went flying together in the last bit of
daylight.
Seen At Oshkosh '80
(Photos by Gene Chase)
-.
1941 Waco UPF-7, NC30188, Hank Geissler (EAA 86004, AlC
4179), Rt. 1, Box 177C, Webster, MN 55088.
1940 Spartan 7W, N97DC, Don Cassidy (EAA 62405, AlC 3427),
5500 St. Rd. 44, Martinsville, IN 46151 .
VINTAGE AIRPLANE 9
MOVING THE HUGHES FLYING BOAT
It is the largest airplane ever built. Its wingspan of
320 feet is 125 feet greater than that of a Boeing 747.
The span of its stabilizer is greater than the wingspan of
a B-17. The tip of its fin rises almost as high as a ten-
story building. True to its name, Hercules, the Hughes H-4
Flying Boat was an awesome sight for the hundreds of
spectators who witnessed its move from its hangar to its
temporary berth on Pier E at Long Beach Harbor, near
the liner Queen Mary where it will remain until a
special building for its exhibit is completed by mid-
1981.
The "Spruce Goose", so named because of its all-wood
construction, was conceived in 1942 as a joint venture
of Henry J. Kaiser, the master ship-builder, and Howard
Hughes, the eccentric millionaire aviation pioneer. The
monster flying boat was designed to transport men and
materials over long distances, safely out of reach of
enemy submarines which were exacting a heavy toll
of Allied war-time shipping. The original contract
called for three flying boats, designated HK-1, to be
constructed at a total cost of $18 million. The aircraft
were to be built of non-critical materials, hence the lami-
nated wood (birch) structure.
A special factory was built at Culver City and Hughes
was in charge of design and construction. By the end of
March, 1944 the first aircraft still was not completed
and most of the $18 million had been spent. So the contract
was renegotiated with Hughes agreeing to complete the
one aircraft on a cost basis. In 1945 a site was leased
on Terminal Island in Long Beach Harbor and a concrete
drydock was constructed.
10 APRIL 1981
(Los Angeles Times Photo)
By George Hardie, Jr.
In June, 1946 the components of the giant aircraft
were moved to the completed drydock for assembly. To
appreciate the immensity of this task, consider a few
statistics. Each of the two wing panels measured 160 feet
long, with a root chord of 51 feet 9 inches and a root
thickness of 11 feet 6 inches. Length of the hull is 218
feet 6 inches and its height is approximately 30 feet . The
eight engines, Pratt & Whitney Wasp Major R-4360s rated
at 3000 hp, were mounted more than 25 feet ahead of the
front spar. The flight deck is 25 feet above the main
cargo floor, which is stressed to carry a 60-ton Army tank
or could be fitted with seats and racks for 700 infantry
soldiers. Gross weight was to be approximately 200 tons.
Originally finished in silver, the Hercules was given a
white protective coating while in its hangar.
On November 2,1947, after two fast taxi runs, Hughes
lifted the huge boat into the air for a flight of a mile
at a height of about 50 feet. Satisfied that he had
fulfilled his contract, Hughes returned the aircraft
to its drydock. Later a special hangar building was erected
over it with controlled humidity and 24 hour restricted
guard. There it remained until Wednesday, October 29,
1980 when it was taken from its hangar for the move to
its permanent berth.
Saved from destruction (at one time the plan was to
divide the structure between eight museums, including
the EAA Air Museum,) the flying boat was donated by
the Summa Corporation to the Aero Club of California,
who contracted with the Wrather Corporation to house
and display the historic boat in a special facility next
to the liner Queen Mary.
Did You
Say Sears?
By Bob McDaniels
(EAA 22895, AIC 56)
9 S. 237 Aero Drive
Aero Estates
Naperville, IL 60565
(Photos courtesy of Sears, Roebuck and Co.)
As a boy in 1929 I used to spend a lot of time in our
family recreation center, a small building out back with
a moon over the door. We didn't have enough money to
subscribe to "Liberty" or "The Saturday Evening Post"
so I read the only material available, the Sears, Roebuck
and Company catalog.
Even then I was an aviation buff and I remember many
hours spent dreaming and drooling over the goodies on a
page in one of their catalogs. I will never forget my
despair when someone in our household tore out this
page and applied it to a function which Sears had never
intended.
Now, years later and wearing teeth which cost more
than all the items on the page collectively, I was remi-
niscing one day and decided to call the Sears archives
department. They were kind enough to research their
files and provide me with photos of the front cover of
their Spring and Summer, 1929 issue of their catalog and
the page containing the aeronautical goodies. This was
PI5l8_C 3 79
page 379 which had been unceremoniously torn from my
favorite publication in the family "library".
I can't completely dismiss another thought about those
times. I feel certain that Sears also advertised Heath
Parasol airplane kits. A few months ago I asked my
friend Warren Hotchkiss, now deceased, about this .
Warren formerly worked for Heath and he thought the
kits were advertised in the 1927 catalog.
Once again I bothered the Sears people and after a
few days they returned my call stating they could find
nothing pertaining to Heath ·kits in the 1927 catalog.
I believe we are in error concerning the year. One of
these days I will go to the Chicago Public Library and
research on my own.
One might ask why anyone would want to spend time
on such a project? I feel it's a part of aviation history
and as such, should be preserved. I hope the readers of
The VINTAGE AIRPLANE will enjoy this briefpresenta-
tion.
VINTAGE AIRPLANE 11
Thanks  EAA 
Here I sit and sigh
When I would rather fly
But, as of this date
I silently await
My SPORT AVIATION and
VINTAGE AIRPLANE, too;
What happened to our
Postal Service, so true?
Private Pilots Ground School Course is fine
But flying in print and picture right now is mine.
The winds are cold, the snow is deep
Dreams soar above the clouds
Into bright sunshine
My spirit holds
I do not weep
But shout aloud
Flying is for birds like me
And I too would fly and see
Places far away, not seen before
The wonders of nature and much more.
By Karl C. B ihary
(EAA 149485, AIC 5978)
14211 Wellesley Street
Dearborn, MI 48126
Build a craft
With plans so good
Time spent as time should
Toil and trial
And anguish
Now and then
Try over once again
The finished dream
It stands alone
Now to the skies above
I will fly my dream, my love
And if only for a while
Happiness shows with a smile.
Long years have passed
Since last I flew
Alone, so far above
Earth's noise and trouble too
My love and I, Together once again,
My dream come true, and thanks to you.
12 APRIL 1981
This section of The VINTAGE AIRPLANE is ded-
icated to members and their aircraft projects. We wel-
come photos along with descriptions, and the projects
can be either completed or underway. Send material to
the editor at the address shown on page 3 of this issue.
Dear Sir:
In 1976 I acquired part of a Huntington
Chum airplane. The Antique Airplane As-
sociation kindly sent me a copy of an
advertisement that showed it to be a 1931
model. It was manufactured by the Hunt-
ington Aircraft Corporation, Stratford,
Connecticut. I later found out that only
two of this model were ever built. This one
was demolished when new and someone
started to rebuild it, but never completed
the job.
Sometime around 1943, the Chum, less
wings was fitted with skis and run around
on the ice. It remained in that state until
I got possession of it.
I rebuilt it, including the making of
new wings. This was two years later .
However, during taxi tests I had an
accident with it.
Since then I have rebuilt it again
and successfully flew it for the first time
on October 24, 1980. It hadn't been flown
in 49 years!
The original registration number was
NX741 Y. The Chum now carries number
NX707Y.
Enclosed is a recent picture of the Chum.
Sincerely,
Erwin E. Stockwell
(EAA 12215)
216 Pleasant Street
Orange, MA 01364
P. S. I am 72 years old, the Chum 50
years, so together we are 122 years old.
(Photo by Ted Kaston)
Erwin E. Stockwell and his 1931 Huntington Chum. The powerplant appears to
be a Continental A-40.
The following information about the Huntington Chum
was extracted from the Huntington Aircraft Corporation's
full page ad in the April, 1931 issue of AERO DIGEST:
With 35 h.p. Continental ........ . $1,550
With 45 h.p. Szekely . ............ 1,750
With 80 h.p. Genet. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,950
When you have a friend with you in your car, do you place him in the
rear seat, all alone? The old style tandem cockpit seating arrangement in
airplane design is now passe'. Even the cockpit is discarded in these ultra
modern ships. Huntington engineering has achieved a new type of fuselage
which permits large square cornered doors on both closed and open models,
and side-by-side seating. You do not have to be an acrobat to get into and
out of these craft. Safety factors are greater than required, ·and comfort has
been stressed for both pilot and passenger, even to the point of tilt of seat
cushion, height of window sill, convenient position of window winding crank,
instrument lights, etc. Huntington design and engineering experience date
back to the inception of American aeronautics.
AIRCRAFT CORPORATION
Stratford, Connecticut
VINTAGE AIRPLANE 13
HOW TO  BUILD  THE 
POWELL  "P-H"  RACER 
PART  II 
EDITOR'S NOTE: Part one of this two part series appeared in the March, 1981 issue of The VINTAGE
AIRPLANE. This construction article is from the EAA reprint ofthe 1932 FLYING AND GLIDER MANUAL
(see ad on page 23 of this issue). In the June, 1957 issue of the EAA "EXPERIMENTER" magazine, now
SPORT AVIATION, an article about the Powell Racer by Jack McRae (EAA 93, AIC 6055) of New York
City was published. Along with Jack's excellent three view and construction drawings was the following
historical information about this famous little homebuilt of the past:
"The Powell Racer, which was flown in the 1925 National Air Races, was one of the most successful
lightplanes built at that time. It is one of the few airplanes that has the distinction of having won every
race in which it was entered. Powered with a Bristol Cherub engine, the little ship won the Aero Digest
Trophy, the Dayton Daily News Trophy, the Scientific American Trophy, and $2000 in prize money.
It clearly showed the superiority of the horizontally opposed engine over the converted motorcycle engines
then used in most of the lightplanes.
The Powell Racer was the result of some very skilled design and construction work by Professor C. H.
Powell who was at that time in charge of the Aeronautics Department of the University of Detroit. Professor
Powell had previously been employed in the Aerodynamics Department of the Sopwith Company in England
and the design of the Racer shows the effect of his experience there. It was built along conventional lines
scaled down to a wing span of 15 ft . 9 in. with extreme attention paid to detail design in order to save weight
and decrease drag for high performance. The design and construction was done with the help of his students
and was intended as a practical application of the theory taught in the aeronautical engineering courses."
__-----f-C-'S:.:.Pc:.RU:.:C:.::E'-L=£A.OINC EDGE  ,e9  ''''' .. 
79'"........ 9'" ........... .......e.___•• •..-.'.......... .. .......... e.--.I·........ 9..   .......... 9 .. -
, ! . . . r i"JI 18  GA 
, Ej,BE
zf-j
c:::::::::::.
LOWER WING

I
I ..  lO"'-- -l! __
FULL 5rrfION  . . ; c OJ! 5"'- \ -- t:j
'RONT  LOWER  WING  SPAA  R[AR  '" HOl.ES 
REAR  SPAR  IS  SAM!:  FOR  WING  ATTACH. 
'ITTING 
TH[  ...... INeMES 
o 24
-CONSTRUCTION DETAILS OF WINGS AND AILERONS ."'.
ASSEMBLY 
-OF THE 'P"'H" RACE PLANE- DETAILS OF INTERNA. ORA;::' BRACING
STRUT END .1 TT ING
Figure 4, The wings are of  simple, conventional construction. This drawing gives full dimensions.
14 APRIL 1981
+ ___ HINGE  22  GA  ALUMINUa.4  NOSE 
.. 
r
·."---
· - 79" ·
.' 
;;;; ••   ..
r TORQUE 
TUBE HORN
1$ 
AND 
X!"  CAP--....... 
STRIPS OF
SPRUCE-TOP
BOTTOM 
HINGE=,  TOP  VIEW  OF  AILERON  ,HINGE 
: . ; z:::::=,
$;0 Z:
TUBES)  REAR  VIEW  OF  "C:rORQUr  TUBE  TO  BE 
SUPPORTS  THE  AILERON  I"  X  22 CAGE 
BOLTS  DETAIL  Of 
••
SIDE  END 
METHOD  OF  SUPPORTING 
THE  TORQUE  TUBE 
PLA TES  REQ ' D.  or 10  GA. 
HINGE 
BEARING 
WELDED  TO 
SUPPORT 
I
O·REQ'D.  10  GA.  . I
1_-"" 
SI DE  [NO 
BEARING  SUPPORT 
10  REQ' D.  10  GAGE 
END 
DETAIL  Of  THE  AILERON  HORN 
2" REQ'D.  or IS  GA.  CARBON  STL 
-COMPLETE  DETAILS  OF  THE--
LERON  FOR  THE  ' P-H" 
Figure 6. These detailed drawings
of the aileron construction will
nutke your work " ,sy, Two inches
are cut from the ribs.
Fig. 5
Now for the axle. This should
be a piece of 22 gauge chrome-
molybdenum round steel tubing
1 in. in diameter and at least 54
in. long. This should be placed in
the axle guides and the collars
should be brazed at the points
shown in the drawing. The axle
should not be sawed to length
until after you have the wheels
on and the gear fitted to the fu-
selage, and then enough of the
axle should be left to permit the
placing of a hub cap. This can be
made from a 1 in. inside diameter
washer and a piece of 11/8 in. by
16 gauge steel tubing about %, 
DETAILS  Of  THE  ELEVATOR  HORN 
I-REQUIRED  or I.  GA.  STUL 
TO  BE  WELDED  TO
HINGE  SlRAP 
ELEVATO·"  TORQOE  TuBE
.-R[Q'D  Ie GA 
--COMPLETE  DETAILS  OF  THE  ASSEMBLY  Of  TAIL  GROlJP-
..... fOR  THE  "P-H"  RACEPLANE ..... 
VINTAGE  AIRPLANE  15 
f---'"--j
WELD ........... "

"--rEtTt t:=j

LOWER PEDAL FITTING
DETAIL OF FOOT PEDAL 4 RED ' O 12 GA STEEL
TO BE MOUNTEO ON COCK- DETAIL OF CENTER STRUT
PIT FLOOR 10 SUI T PI LOT
FITTING 12 GA
in. long, with a 3/16 in. bolt put
through the end.
The Wings
The wings are of conventional
design with the same bracing as
you will find in other wings. A
glance at Figs. 4 and 7 will reveal
their simplicity. The spars are
the acme of simplicity, as they
are solid. But be sure and pick
a very good piece of spruce for
each spar, as they are the heart
of the wings. In drilling holes for
the wing fittings, be sure to make
a clean bore, being careful not to
let the drill wobble in the wood,
as this causes a weakness of the
spar at that place and gives a
poor fitting. The leading edge is
put on with glue and nails and
the ribs are secured to the spar
in this way.
In making the ribs, it is well
to stress the fact here that these
are very important parts of the
plane and should be built accord-
ingly. Layout an outline of the
rib on a piece of heavy brown
paper and put it on a board that
is smooth and level. This board
should be at least 38 in. long and
6 in. wide. Lay a cap strip on the
outside of the line all the way
PERCENT 0' CHORD
a:

VI
...
I-
"
Z
o
a:
o
..
o
...
oJ
CD
"
I-
f
f x f SPRUCE CAP STRIPS
PLYWOOD RIB
. 20 GA, ALUMINUM
TRAIL . EDGE
......f xf BOTTO" STRIP
DE TAIL OF TRAILING EDGE

--COMPLE T E DETAILS OF THE AIRFOIL
- FOR THE" P - H" RAC[PLANE-+-
Figure 7. The Racer uses R.A.F. Airfoil, which is shown in deta,il here a,long
with the table of ordinates. Spruce cap strips and 1/16 in. plywood are used in
constructing ribs. 42 ribs are needed.
Fig. 9
"r
:" " "
. >..
[iffi
:. :. ,. -.

CONTROL WIRE
FITTING • __  
l - R[Q'O GAo 14
ATTACHING
, '" 2 11 GI STRUTS TO FUSELAGE
__
+I b:J q;:ff{HOLE


COCKPI T [DGE 5 ARE
LEATHER AND PADDEO
FLEXIBLE CONTROL ____
CABLE rOA RuDDER
IT "LOOR -------
Ii PLY WOOD ___________
X)' - - -:;: A55EMBLED SECTIONAL VIEW"-
TIRES -4-0F THE "P-H" RACEPLANE-
TH E SCALE I.... INCHES
16 APRIL 1981
around the contour of the rib and 
nail in place  accurately. 
Inside  of  this  place  two  more 
cap  strips,  pushing  the  middle 
one  in  place  and  nailing  the  in-
side  strip.  This  middle  one  is  the 
cap  strip  of  your  rib.  Now  you 
are  ready  to  place  the  spar  open-
ings,  which are illustrated on  Fig. 
7,  in  their  correct  locations. 
After  these  are  located  and 
their  correct  size  determined, 
make  a block  of that size  and  put 
it in  the  spar  place.  Now  cut  the 
1/16  in.  plywood  tl)  the  contour 
of  the  rib,  place  it  over  the  cap 
strip,  glue  and  nail with  % in.  by 
20  nails  with  a  flat  head.  Then 
place  the  other  cap  strip  on  the 
opposite  side  and  glue  and  nail  it 
in  place.  After  all  the  ribs  are 
made,  sand  them  up  and  fit  to 
the spars. 
A wing splice in  the spar is  not 
necessary if a piece of spruce can 
be  obtained 'which is long enough, 
but in  the  event  that  you  have  to 
splice  the  top  wing  spar  in  the 
center,  make  it  a  diagonal  splice 
16  in.  in  length,  wrap  with  rib 
cord and glue. 
In  rigging  the wing it is  easiest 
to  measure  out  from  the  butt 
about three feet and make a mark 
on  the  spar.  Then  tighten  and 
loosen  the  wires  until  it  is  the 
same  distance  diagonally  from 
the  wing  butt  to  the  mark  on 
each  spar.  Give  the  wing  a  coat 
of good  varnish before covering. 
The  Ailerons 
The  ailerons  are  of  the  semi-
balanced  type  and  are  operated 
with  a torque  tube from  the  fuse-
lage  bell  cranks.  There  are  four 
hinges  o-n  each  aileron,  and  these 
are  made  from  16  gauge  steel  %
in.  wide.  Details  for  these  hinges, 
as  for  all  other  parts  of the  ailer-
on,  are  clearly  shown  on  Fig.  6. 
This  type  of  hinge  is  the  best  if 
care  is  given  in  construction,  but 
they must be assembled as  the ail-
eron  is  built  if  they  are  to  be  in 
line  and  operate  smoothly. 
The aileron ribs are the regular 
ribs  with  two  inches  cut  out  im-
mediately  behind  the  wing  spar. 
The  aileron  spar  depth  is  then 
gotten  from  the  inside  measure-
ments of  the  cap  strips. The trail-
ing  edge  is  made  from  a  1  in. 
THE SCALE IN INCHES
r" 20  GA_TUllE  TO  THE 
HORN 
'-"-"----RUDDER BELL CRANK
CRANK  TUllE  IIRACE 
CONTROL 
BEARINGS  ARE 
BRACED  SI  DE  REAR 
OF  TORQuE 
AND   
ROL 
ING 
OF ATTACH. STICK
'I'
""  BR-"Z'E 
- -J  END

- _ 
END  TOP 
CONTROL' -1
FRONT END OF"
BEARING
CONTROL STICK
l-REQ'O  16GA.
CRANK DETAIL
I-REQ'O _ 
Fig.  11 
wide  strip  of  aluminum,  bent  in 
a "V" shape and secured by small 
strips  of  brass  nailed  around  the 
aluminum  and  onto  the  rib  cap 
strips.  No  other  instructions  are 
needed  here,  as  the  drawings  are 
given  in  minute  detail. 
The  Control  Stick 
This is  another part of  the ship 
which  can  be  moved  around  to 
suit  the  pilot.  There  is  not  much 
room in which to  play around, but 
the  person  who  is  to  fly  the  ship 
should  see  that the stick  and  foot 
pedals are placed where they will 

__
permit  the  most  comfort.  The 
draftsman  has  illustrated  the  en-
tire  control  system  in  such  mi-
nute detail in  Figs.  9 and  11,  that 
further comment would be super· 
fluous. 
The  tail  skid  may  be  made  of 
either steel  or  wood,  but  for  this 
size  ship  wood  will  probably  be 
the  best,  although  the  drawing 
shows it constructed of steel, This 
is  a  matter  of  personal  choice.  If
you  decide  upon  wood,  use  ash, 
and  follow  the  general  size  and 
shape as  shown  on  Fig.  9. 
VINTAGE AIRPLANE 17
had clean iii Powell racer
LOCATION  AND  METHOD  OF 
ATTACHING  LOWER  WING  SPARS 
""RALLEL W'TH TO  THE  FUSELAGE 
NG[RON  f  SOLT 
).
+DETAILS  OF  LOWER  WING· 
+SPAR  ATTACH  FITTING. 
4-REQ.' o.  12 GA . 
Figure 8. These
drawings give de·
tails of fittings
needed for fitting
Air  Force  Photo  from  Jack  McRae 
the wings
fuselage.
UPPER  STRUT 
FITTING 
  ~ GA  -4-A[Q' D 
NOTE:  STRUT  LUG  IS 
W[LOED TO THl LOW(R
STRUT "TTINe;
DET AILS  OF  THE 
FLYING  WIRE  AND 
STRUT  FITTINGS 
FOR  THE  OUTER 
STRUTS  OF  REAR 
SPARS  UPPER  FITTING 
&  LOWER  WINGS  ,......  4-R[Q'O
Figu're 10. Above are shown detailed
working drawings of  the flying wire
and strut fittings for the outer struts
of the rear spars on both upper and
lower wings of the Powell Racer.
18  APRIL  1981 
to the
Instruments
The only instruments needed
are the oil gauge, tachometer, al-
timeter and switch. Others are of
course desirable, but you can buy
what you want at the convenience
of your purse.
Struts
The center section struts are of
1 in. by 20 gauge streamlined
steel. They may be made adjust-
able if so desired. The front cen-
ter strut is 151/2 in. long and the
rear one is 15 in. When these
have been laid out and spot weld-
ed the diagonal is cut to fit. They
are then fitted to the fuselage
and welded.
The front outer bay strut is
30% in. long and the rear 30%
in. The diagonal is cut to the
proper length before welding.
The flying and landing wires are
of 14. in. streamline cable, al-
though stranded cable may be
used if preferred. Before order-
ing the streamline wire it is the
best policy to set the plane up
and block the wings to their
proper positions; then measure
the lengths.
Covering
Cover the ship with a good
grade of airplane fabric and give
six coats of dope. Tape the ribs
and wings carefully, for that
makes a lot of difference in the
looks of the ship. Use pigmented
dope for the last three coats, as
the cloth will not stand sunlight
otherwise. • ••
Record  Setting  Aeronca  (-2N 
This rare bird, donated to the EAA Air Museum
Foundation by John H. McGeary, Miami, Florida, is an
Aeronca C-2N seaplane. Standing next to the airplane
is Benjamin King, who flew it in setting five official
national and international records in 1935. On June 25
of that year he set a distance record for single seat
light seaplanes, Class C-2, Second Category, single
seater, by flying 221.20 miles non-stop. On September 24,
entered in Class C-2, Fourth Category for light seaplanes,
he set an altitude record of 15,081.976 feet . In the same
category, on September 26 he set a distance record of
230.314 miles. On December 11, at Miami, Florida, he set
two speed records, one for a distance of 100 kilometers,
80.931 mph, and the other for 500 kilometers, 70.499
mph.
This airplane is presently being restored in the EAA
Air Museum Shop. Meanwhile, an effort is being made
to learn more about the pilot, Benjamin King, and whether
or not he is still living. Anyone having information
(National Air & Space Museum Photo)
about the pilot or airplane is requested to write to
In l ate 1935, Benjamin King attained an altitude of 16,000
George Hardie, EAA Historian, P. O. Box 229, Hales
ft . for a new seaplane altitude record.
Corners, WI 53130.
MYSTERY  PLANE 
Two views are shown of this unique aircraft. Close examination will show the powerplants to be
Continental A-40s. What about that super skinny fuselage? Airplanes in the background will help to
establish the vintage.
VI NTAGE AIRPLANE 19
was a barn-storming, crop-dusting, fire-fighting, airplane
mechanic, whom people either loved or resented.
Sale  Of "Red" 
Jensen's  Estate 
Ends  An  Era 
The estate of aviation's crop-dusting pioneer C.T.
"Red" Jensen goes on the auction block at his private
airfield in Sacramento, California, April 25. Cancer took
his life on July 1, 1980.
Jensen's career spans over fifty years of flying, and
almost the entire history of agricultural aviation. He
His lifetime friend , Bill Paynter, owner of Union
Flights in Sacramento, says, "Charlie was fearless. He
simply led his life the way he wanted. If someone got
in his way, he told them to go to hell, whether it was the
bureaucracy or a business associate. Charlie lived his
life as he wanted. He was the last of a breed."
Jensen's collection of Stearmans, Travel Airs, N3Ns,
TBMs, and helicopters represents his diverse ventures
in the fields of agriculture, aerial advertising, charter
services, and fire-fighting. He modified war surplus
planes for use in his seeding, crop-dusting, and spraying
business. Those planes today are being converted back to
their original status by airplane buffs. Many of his
inventions are still being used, such as the roto-brush
in crop-dusting. In the fifties, he began using helicopters;
and some of his modifications on the Alouette have the
Jensen name.
C. T. " Red" Jensen provided planes for Howard Hughes' movie,
" Hell ' s Angels". He began flying at 16, and soon became one
of the pioneers of the crop-dusting industry in California.
20 APRIL 1981
LETTERS 
Dear Gene:
I want to thank you so much for the well written story
about t he Sedan in The VINTAGE AIRPLANE and
SPORT AVIATION. You did a super job of wr iting
and telling it like it happened. Having the Aeronca on
the covers of two of the finest publications going today
is an honor I'll not soon forget. Also t he photos are j ust
fantastic as they always are. Please pass along my compl i-
ments to Ted Koston on a great, great job.
We went to Tullahoma with the Sedan and had a
wonderful time. Sure is a nice place with lots of room.
Would like to think we could make it an annual event.
Hoping to see you again sometime in the near fut ure.
Sincerely, Jim Thompson (AlC 5759)
Box 102
Roberts, IL 60962
Dear Paul :
About ten years ago I went to an auction at Warren,
Ohio where the property of the estate of Earl Hall was
being disposed of. Hall was an Early Bird Pilot who had
several J-3s and parts for several other aircraft.
I bid on a tail skid dolly, and got it. I was interested
because it was made from Model T wheels of the cl incher
type in use before 1918. The wheels were in good condi -
tion and complete with hub caps.
I restored t he dolly .in my basement this winter and
I think it looks qui te nice. I have no real use for it
at my airport and I t hought it might be of some use at
the Museum.
I also bought about a dozen aviation magazines pub-
lished between 1927 and 1928 whi ch are in good condition.
I also got two signs from Hall's offi ce. I will be glad to
donate all of t hese items to t he Museum and will deliver
them when we come to Oshkosh '81.
The enclosed photo was taken in 1935 and shows
myself and my fi rst airplane, an Aeromarine-Klemm with
a 40 hp Salmson.
Bill Hinde, Manager
HURON AIRPORT INC.
1909 Boos Road
Huron, OH 44839
Jacket:  Unlined Poplin jacket, features knit waist
and cuffs. The gold and white braid trim on a
Tan body emphasizes the colors proudly dis-
played in the Antique/Classic logo.
Sizes: X-small thru X-large
$28.95 ppd
Cap: Complete the look in this gold mesh hat
with contrasting blue bill , trimmed with a gold
braid. Your logo visibly displayed, makes this
adjustable cap a must.
Sizes: M & L (adjustable rear band)
$6.25 ppd
WEAR  the  IMAGE 
in  an  Antique/Classic  jacket and  cap 
Send  Check  To: 
EAA  ANTIQUE/CLA.SSIC  DIVISION,  INC. 
P.O.  Box  229  Hales  Corners,  WI  53130 
Allow  4-6  Weeks  For  Delivery 
Wisconsin  Residents  Include  4%  Sales  Tax 
VINTAGE AIRPLANE 21
Calendar Of Events 
MAY  1-3  - BURLINGTON,  NORTH  CAROLINA  - Fly-In.  Antiques, 
Classics,  Homebuilts,  Ultralights  and  Warbirds  invited.  Awards 
and  banquet  Saturday  night.  For  further  information,  contact 
Geneva  McKiernan, 5301  Finsbury  Place, Charlotte,  NC  28211 . 
MAY  2  - PLATTEVILLE,  WISCONSIN  - University  of  Wisconsin-
Platteville,  University  Flyers  are  sponsori ng  a  fly-in  at  Platteville 
Airport  (Nodorft  Aviation) .  All  types  of aircraft  welcome.  Awards  will 
be  presented  in  all  categories.  A  pork  roast  is  being  planned.  Rain 
date: May  9. For further information,  please  contact:  Vern  Thompson, 
608/348-7136. 
MAY  15-17  - CAMBRIDGE,  MARYLAND  - The  Potomac  Antique 
Aero  Squadron  and  the  Dorchester  Heritage  Museum  will  host  the 
13th  Annual  Antique  Fly-In  at  Horn  Point  Aerodrome  on  the  former 
Francis  duPont  Estate.  May  14,  Early  Bird  Day.  For  further  infor-
mation,  please  contact,  Barry  P.  Flashman,  P.O.  Box  478,  Severna 
Park, MD  21146. 
MAY  29-31  - COLUMBIA,  CALIFORNIA  - Fifth  Annual  Luscombe 
Fly-In  sponsored  by  the  Continental  Luscombe  Association.  Goal 
is  100  Luscombes  in  attendance.  For  further  information,  please 
contact,  C.L.A.,  5736  Esmar  Road , Ceres,  CA  95307. 
JUNE  5-7  - MERCED,  CALIFORNIA  - 24th  Annual  West  Coast  An-
tique  Fly-In  sponsored  by  the  Merced  Pilot's  Association.  Early 
Bird  reception,  dinner  and  dance  Friday  night ;  Award  Banquet 
Saturday  night;  Air  Show  Saturday  and  Sunday.  For  further  informa-
tion,  contact  Don  or  Dee  Human,  209/358-3487  or write,  Fly-In  Com-
mittee, P.O.  Box 3212, Merced, CA  95340. 
JUNE  6-7  - LINDEN,  NEW  JERSEY  - Northeast  Aviation  Fair  at  the 
Linden  Airport.  Military,  warbirds,  antiques,  homebuilts,  fly-market , 
awards. U-1230. Sponsored  by  EM Chapter 230. For further informa-
tion, please  contact :  EM Chapter  230,  Box  357-WOB, West  Orange, 
NJ  07052,  201/736-9092. 
JUNE  7-13  - FORT  WAYNE,  INDIANA  - 70  KNOTTERS  TOUR,  an-
nounced  by  EM  Chapter  2.  This  seven-day  tour  for  aircraft  flying 
at  approximately  70  knots  will  visit  Blakesburg,  Iowa;  Wichita, 
Kansas;  Little  Rock,  Arkansas;  Tullahoma,  Tennessee;  and  Sey-
mour,  Indiana.  For  further  information  about  the  tour  send  a  self-
addressed,  stamped  envelope  to,  Joe  Dickey,  70  KNOTTERS 
TOUR, 511  Terrace  Lake  Road , Columbus,  OH  47201. 
JUNE  13-14  - ANDERSON,  INDIANA  - 2nd  Annual  Summer  Festival 
sponsored  by  EM Chapter  226.  Free  breakfast  to  sport  plane  pilots 
(antiques,  classics,  experimental,  ultralights,  warbirds) ,  balloon 
races,  camping,  fly  market.  For  further  information,  please  contact, 
Steve  Darlington  317/644-1238  or Dale  Faux  317/378-5028. 
JUNE  20-21  - FREDERICKSBURG,  VIRGINIA  - 14th  Annual  Antique 
Aircraft  Fly-In  and  Air  Show  at  the  Shannon  Airport.  Air  Show  at-
tractions:  Eagle's  Aerobatic  Flight  Team,  Bob  and  Pat  Wagner  -
wing  rider,  Chuck  Carothers  - Pitts  Special , Charlie  Kulp.  For  further 
information,  please  contact ,  Shannon  Airport,  P.O.  Box  509,  Fred-
ericksburg,  VA  22401 . 
JUNE 21  - ANSONIA,  CONNECTICUT  - 3rd  Annual  PIPER  VAGABOND 
Fly-in ,  Ansonia  Airport,  80  octane  fuel.  For  further  information, 
please  contact:  Jim  Jenkins,  569  Moose  Hill  Road,  Monroe,  CT 
06468,  203/261-5586. 
JUNE  26-28  - HAMILTON,  OHIO  - 22nd  Annual  Waco  Reunion . 
This  year  Wacos  50  years  or  older  will  be  honored.  For  further 
information,  please  contact:  Ray  Brandly, 700  Hill  Avenue,  Hamilton, 
OH  45015,  513/868-0084. 
JUNE  26-28  - AIRDRIE,  ALBERTA,  CANADA  - Wild  Rose  Antique/ 
Classic  Fly-In,  sponsored  by  the  Airdrie  Country  Club  of  the  Air,  at 
Airdrie  Airport ,  8  miles  north-northeast  of  Calgary  International 
Airport.  All  aviators,  enthusiasts,  and  aircraft  are  welcome.  For 
further  information,  please  contact,  Airdrie  Field,  Attn.  Mr.  George 
B.  Pendlebury,  RR  2,  Airdrie, Alberta,  Canada. 
JULY  3-5  - PORT  LAVACA, TEXAS  - Gulf  Coast  Sport  Aviation  Fly-in, 
Calhoun  County  Airport.  Sponsored  by  the  Port  Lavaca  Chamber  of 
Commerce,  EM  Chapter  340  and  EAA  Antique/Classic  Chapter  2. 
For  further  information,  please  contact:  Port  Lavaca  Chamber 
of Commerce,  P. O.  Box 528,  Port  Lavaca, TX  77979, 5121552-2959.
JULY  12  - EASTON,  PENNSYLVANIA  - Fifth  Annual  Aeronca  Fly-in. 
Largest  Aeronca  Fly-in  in  the  East .  Fun  events  scheduled .  Easton 
Airport.  For  further  information,  please  contact:  Jim  Polies,  299 
Nazareth  Drive,  Nazareth, PA  18064,  215/759-3713.  Rain  date July  19. 
AUGUST  1-8  - OSHKOSH,  WISCONSIN  - 29th  Annual  EAA  Fly-In 
Convention.  It  is  never  too  early  to  start  making  plans  for  the 
world's  GREATEST  AVIATION  EVENT. 
AUGUST  7-9  - LEWISTOWN,  MONTANA  - 4th  Annual  Montana 
Chapter  AAA  Fly-In  at  Beacon  Star  Antique  Airfield.  For  further 
information,  please  contact,  Frank  Bass,  Beacon  Star  Antique 
Airfield, Star  Route,  Moore, MT  59464.  406/538-7616. 
AUGUST  9-15  - FOND  DU  LAC,  WISCONSIN  - 12th  Annual  lAC  Inter-
national  Championships. 
SEPTEMBER  17-19  - CHARLOTTE,  NORTH  CAROLINA  - Silver  Wings 
23rd  Annual  Convention.  Highlights  are  old  time  pilots  reunion  and 
air  show.  Firestone  Pitts  aerobatic  team,  skydiving,  hot  air  balloon. 
comedy  acts,  etc.  All  eligible  pilots,  active  or retired, civil  or  military 
welcome.  Make  your  reservations  now!  For  further  information, 
please  contact:  Haskell  Deaton,  Chairman,  Box  18222,  Charlotte, 
NC  28218  or  National  Headquarters,  Box  1228,  Harrisburg,  PA 
17108. 
SEPTEMBER  30  - OCTOBER  4  - TULLAHOMA,  TENNESSEE  - 3rd 
Annual  EM National  Fall  Fly-In. Don't  miss  this  one. 
OCTOBER  16-18  - CAMDEN,  SOUTH  CAROLINA  - Fly-In.  Antiques, 
Classics,  Homebuilts,  Ultralights,  and  Warbirds  invited.  Awards 
and  banquet  Saturday  night .  For  further  information,  contact 
Geneva  McKiernan, 5301  Finsbury  Place, Charlotte,  NC  28211 . 
THE  VINTAGE  AIRPLANE 
ADVERTISING  RATES 
DISPLA Y RATES:
1 Issue 3 Issues 12 Issues
1 Page $125.00 $120.00 $114.00
'h  Page 65.00 60.00 54.00
' /3 Page 55.00 50. 00 48.00
v.. Page 35.00 32.00 30.00
' /6 Page 30.00 26.00 24.00
'/8 Page 25.00 21.00 19.00
Rates are for black and white camera-ready ads.
Layout Work: $18.00 per hour.
CLASSIFIED DISPLAY RATE: Regular type per word 40c. Bold
Face Type: per word 45c. ALL CAPS: per word 50c (Minimum
charge $6.00). (Rate covers one insertion one issue.)
COMMISSIONS: Non-Commissionable.
CLASSIFIED  ADS 
ACRO  SPORT  - Single place biplane capable of un-
limited aerobatics. 23 sheets of clear, easy to follow plans,
includes nearly 100 isometrical drawings , photos and
exploded views. Complete parts and materials list. Full
size wing drawings. Plans plus 88 page Builder's Manual
- $60.00. Info Pack - $4.00. Super Acro Sport Wing
Drawing - $15.00. Send check or money order to: ACRO 
SPORT,  INC.,  Box 462, Hales Corners, WI 53130. 4141
425-4860.
22  APRIL  1981 
ACRO  II  - The new 2-place aerobatic trainer and sport
biplane. 20 pages of easy to follow, detailed plans. Com-
plete with isometric drawings , photos, exploded views.
Plans - $85.00. Info Pack - $4.00. Send check or money
order to: ACRO  SPORT,  INC. ,  P.O. Box 462, Hales Cor-
ners, WI 53130.414/425-4860.
POBER  PIXIE  - VW powered parasol - unlimited in
low cost pleasure flying. Big, roomy cockpit for the over
six foot pilot . VW power insures hard to beat 3V2 gph at
cruise setting. 15 large instruction sheets. Plans - $45.00.
Info Pack - $4.00. Send check or money order to: ACRO 
SPORT,  INC.,  Box 462, Hales Corners, WI 53130. 414/
425-4860.
DERRICK  INDUSTRIES,  INC.  - Repair Station 464-61.
Wooden propeller repair and manufacturing. 1565 North
Broadway, Stockton, CA 95205. Phone 209/462-7381.
WANTED:  120 hp upright Gipsy II engine or 145 hp in-
verted Mark 7 engine. Need propeller and hub for same.
Engine must be complete. Al Kelch, 622 North Madison
Avenue, Cedarburg, WI 53012.
WANTED:  Kinner K-5 or comparable 5 cylinder radial
engine for my 1929 Ace aircraft. Norman J. Kapson, 174
Mill, Box 208, Ortonville, MI 48462. Phone collect 313/
627-3241 or 627-3670.
AVAILABLE  BACK  ISSUES 
1973  March  through  December 
1974  All  Are Available 
1975  July/August,  September/October, November/ 
December 
1976  January  through  May,  August  through  Decem-
ber 
1977  All  Are  Available 
1978  January, March  through  June, August, October , 
November 
1979  February  through  December 
1980  - All  Are  Avai lable 
1981  - January,  February,  March 
Back  issues  are  available  from  Headquarters  for  $1.25 
each ,  postpaid,  except  the  July  1977  (Lindbergh  Com-
memorative) issue, which  is  $1.50 postpaid. 
Sketch  of  Doug  Creech' s  " Carolina  Coupe"  by  AI  Wheeler, 
EI  Sobrante, CA. 
FLYING AND 
GLI DER  MANUALS 
1929,  1930, 1931 
1932,  1933, 
2.50  ea. 
SEND  CHECK  OR  MONEY  ORDER  TO: 
EAA  Air  Museum  Foundation, Inc. 
Box 469  Hales  Corners, WI  53130 
Allow 4-6  Weeks  For  Delivery 
Wisconsin  Residents  Include 4%  Sales  Tax 
DRESS 
IT  UP 
WITH  A  NEW 
INTERIOR!
All Items READY-MADE  for
DO·IT· YOURSELF  INSTALLATION 
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-Send  for  FREE  Catalog 
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259  Lower  Morri.ville  Rd' r-::;;=-==-, 
Fall.ington, Pa.  19054  fll ' .•.
°,. 1 I.•.VIS4 .  .  , ,  (215)  295-4115  l cw> ;
MEMBERSHIP INFORMATION
•  Membership  in  the  Experimental  Aircraft  Association,  Inc.  is  $25.00  for  one  year ,  $48.00  for  2  years 
and $69.00  for  3  years.  All  include  12  issues  of Sport  Aviation  per  year.  Junior  Membership  (under  19 
years  of age)  is available at  $15.00 annually. 
fAA 
•  fAA  Member  - $14 .00.  Includes  one  year  membership  in  EAA  Antique-Classic  Division,  12  monthly
ANTIQUf- issues  of  The  Vintage  Airplane  and  membership  card.  Applicant  must  be  a  current  EAA  member  and 
must give  EAA  membership  number.)
CLASSIC  •  Non-fAA' Member  - $24.00.  Includes  one  year  membership  in  the  EAA  Antique-Classic  Division ,  12 
monthly  issues  of  The  Vi ntage  .Airplane,  one  year  membership  in  the  EAA  and  separate  membership 
cards. Sport AvIati on not included. 
•  Membership  in  the  International  Aerobatic  Club,  Inc.  is  $16.00  annually  which  includes  12  issues 
of Sport  Aerobati cs. All  lAC members  are required  to  be members  of  EAA. lAC 
•  Membership  in  the  Warbirds  of  America,  Inc.  is  $20.00  per  year.  whi ch  includes  a  subscription  to 
Warbirds  Newsletter.  Warbird  members  are required  to  be members  of  EAA. WARBIRDS 
is  $25.00  per  year  which  includes  the  Ultralight  publication
ULTRALIGHT 
• Membership  in  the  EAA  Ultralight  Assn. 
($15,00  additional for  Sport  Aviation  magazine) .  For  current  EAA  members  only,  $15.00,  which  includes 
Ultralight publication. 
MAKE  CHECKS  PAYA BL E  TO  EAA  OR  THE  DIVISION  IN  WHICH  MEMBERSHI P  IS  DESI RED. 
ADDRESS  ALL  LETTERS  TO  EAA  OR  THE  PARTI CULAR  DIVI SION  AT  THE  FOLLOWI NG  ADDRESS: 
P.  O.  BOX 229  HALES  CORNERS,  WI  53130 
VINTAGE  AIRPLANE  23