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Asbury Park Press :: Monmouth Edition APP.COM $2.00
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/sbury Park Press 3unday

07.20.14
VOLUME 135
NUMBER 172
SINCE 1879
ADVICE E11
BUSINESS AA6
CLASSIFIED D1
LOCAL A3
LOTTERIES A2
OBITUARIES A18
OPINION AA4
PUZZLES E9
SPORTS C1
TV C10
PRESS ON YOUR SIDE
CHRYSLER FIXES RUST PROBLEM
An Ocean Township couple was told the engine
mounts were rusting away on their Chrysler
Pacifica and the warranty wouldn’t cover repairs.
So they turned to us. YOUR MONEY, AA6
USA TODAY CHRISTIE SAYS HE’D CONSIDER HOUSING IMMIGRANT CHILDREN IN N.J. PAGE 1B
With Atlantic City’s gambling monop-
oly in tatters and the city making a slow
transition to build a more family-friend-
ly resort, Shore-area officials are brac-
ing for a dry spell.
They have seen the good times: em-
ployees with middle-class wages who
can buy homes, visitors who spend mon-
ey on the drive down and precious tax
revenue.
And the bad times? “When Atlantic
City suffers, the entire area suffers,”
said David Breeden, administrator of
Barnegat in southern Ocean County.
“The most important thing that people
need to realize is, as Atlantic City goes,
so goes the region.”
More than 1,000 casino workers live in
Ocean County, the second highest con-
centration of gaming workers outside of
Atlantic County. And that doesn’t include
employees who work for companies that
support the casinos, such as food and
equipment suppliers. About 100,000 jobs,
or 2 percent of the state’s workforce,
were tied to the gaming industry in some
way, according to a 2008 Rutgers Univer-
sity study.
Atlantic City’s $2.9 billion casino in-
dustry is retrenching, and few areas in
the state will escape the pain that comes
with it. The biggest concerns: a flood of
unemployed workers and falling in-
comes and property values that will cut
into tax revenue. Less taxes for state cof-
fers usually means higher taxes for ev-
eryone else or cuts to services.
The casino industry and its workers
paid nearly $1 billion in state and local
taxes in 2008, Rutgers said. That’s
enough money to run both Atlantic and
Ocean counties’ governments for more
than a year.
OCEAN COUNTY RELIES ON ATLANTIC CITY JOBS
A couple walks on the Atlantic City Boardwalk past the Trump Plaza Hotel and Casino, which is scheduled to close in
September unless a buyer is found. MIKE DESOCIO/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER
“It breaks
my heart to
see this
happening
to our
people.”
ARTHUR MIDGLEY,
Little Egg Harbor mayor
Transition that de-emphasizes gaming will
take years to equal lost gambling revenue
By Jean Mikle @jeanmikle
andMichael L. Diamond@mdiamondapp
Atlantic
City casinos
total gross
revenue
$
1
.
4
B

$
1
.
3
B
$
3
B
$
2
.
9
B
2012
2013
Jan.-
June
2013
Jan.-
June
2014
See CASINOS, Page A4
SHORE TO BE
HIT BY CASINO
CLOSINGS
Last of a two-part series on the Asbury Park school
system
Asbury Park’s school system is broken.
But it can be fixed.
Success stories from across the state and the nation
abound.
Board of Education member Corey Lowell said it
might be time to start looking at leadership tactics in
school districts that are succeeding.
One example that has received national accolades is
the Union City district.
That school system has spent the past 20 years re-
pairing itself after it neared a state takeover in the late
1980s because of a plummeting graduation rate and low
test scores, retired Superintendent Stanley M. Sanger
said.
Today, the district graduates 79 percent of its sen-
iors, and students have achieved among the highest
The Barack Obama Elementary School on Bangs Avenue
closed July 1. Its students will move to other schools in
Asbury Park. TOM SPADER/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER
How to save
Asbury Park’s
schoolchildren
Success stories elsewhere offer
clues, such as a united board
By Nicquel Terry @NTerryAPP
See ASBURY, Page A15
TRENTON— Gov. Chris Christie’s administration has
mailed $185 million in “Senior Freeze” property tax re-
imbursements and is reminding senior and disabled
homeowners they have two more months to apply for
the program.
While more than 152,000 homeowners are receiving
checks that average $1,213, some applicants will wind
up disappointed. The state budget has frozen the eligi-
bility threshold at $70,000 for the last few years, even
though the Senior Freeze law would have boosted it to
$84,289 for this year.
This year’s state budget sets aside $203 million for
Senior Freeze checks, so it still has $18 million budgeted
to pay additional benefits.
Residents who don’t qualify because of the reduced
‘Senior Freeze’ checks
income cap still frozen
By Michael Symons @MichaelSymons_
See FREEZE, Page A17