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STRAIGHT AND LEVEL

By Bob Lickteig
President
Antique/ClassicDivision
Many pe.ople think that Antique/Classic members are
a little different - that the enthusiasm f.or .our kind .of
flying makes us strange. They kn.ow we spend every spare
h.our we have in the summer either w.orking .on .or flying
the .old birds. Maybe s.ome .of these .odd .opini.ons .our friends
have are justified, that is until we intr.oduce them t.o the
pe.ople we enj.oy being with - then things change just as
the seas.ons change. And as we appr.oach fall and winter,
let's admit it ... flying d.oes bec.ome m.ore difficult f.or m.ost
.of us. If s.o, let's turn .our attenti.on t.o .other activities that
keep us in c.ontact with .our friends and like-minded
pe.ople.
The best way t.o survive the winter is thr.ough l.ocal
chapter activities. We have all read ab.out chapter ac-
tivities and pr.ograms, but reading is .one thing, and being
a part.of and creating the fun is a wh.ole new winter sp.ort.
As y.ou have heard, y.our Antique/Classic Divisi.on is
gr.owing in all areas, with m.ore activities, pr.ograms, and
pr.ojects. N.ow is the time t.o c.ontinuethis enthusiasm and
excitement in .our l.ocal areas with the f.ormati.on .of An-
tique/Classic chapters.
I have had an .opp.ortunity t.o be inv.olved in the f.orma-
ti.on .of a new Antique/Classic chapter and thr.ough this
ass.ociati.on my Antique/Classic membership is n.ow c.om-
plete and it fulfills all .of my expectati.ons.
N.ow is the time I ask every Antique/Classic member
and his .or her EAA member friend t.o discuss the f.orma-
ti.on .of an Antique/Classic chapter in y.our area.
The .organizati.on and f.ormati.on .of a chapter is a simple
pr.ocedure, and n.ormally requires appr.oximately 20 days
t.o get an .organizati.onal meeting set up. Y.our Antique/
Classic Divisi.on has a c.omplete packet .of h.ow t.o f.orm a
chapter in a few easy. steps. The packet als.o c.ontains sam-
ples .of all the inf.ormati.on y.ou will need.
EAA's Nati.onal Chapter Direct.or, Chuck Larsen, and
y.our .own A/C Divisi.on Chapter Chairman, R.oy Redman,
stand ready t.o help and supply all the inf.ormati.on. Dis-
trict representatives fr.om y.our Antique/Classic Divisi.on
are als.o available in y.our area and ready t.o help. All .of
this service is available with just a ph.one call t.o EAA
Headquarters in Oshk.osh. The number is 414/426-4800.
When we st.op and think ab.out it, what better way t.o
enj.oy .our Antique/Classic flying interest than with .our
.own l.ocal area friends and the .opp.ortunity t.o meet and be
with .other interested pe.ople fr.om the surr.ounding area.
Chapters are a s.ource .of enj.oyment with a meeting
.once a m.onth. And if y.our Chapter c.overs a large ge.o-
graphic area, it can meet in different places .or y.ou can
have fly-in meetings .or hangar c.o.ok.outs. It's als.o p.ossible
t.o have interesting Chapter pr.ojects. During the l.ong
winter, a rec.overing j.ob .or the rest.orati.on .of chapter air-
craft, .or even a c.ommunity pr.oject all keeps the fun alive
and we have an .opp.ortunity t.o make m.ore pe.ople aware
.of .our great Antique/Classic m.ovement.
S.o as the leaves turn, with the air crisp and clear, and
the sun m.oving s.outh, let's make plans t.o get .our friends
t.ogether, call EAA Headquarters and prepare f.or the fun
that will sh.orten the l.ong winter.
PRIMARYAIRCRAFTPETITIONINFEDERALREGISTER
The petiti.on filed j.ointly by AOPA and EAA t.o create
a new class .of aircraft called Primary Use Aircraft has
been printed in the Federal Register f.or Oct.ober 5, 1984.
C.omments are expected .on .or bef.ore January 3, 1985 and
they must identify the petiti.on d.ocket number 23345. This
90-day peri.od will pass rapidly, s.o d.on't delay sending
y.our c.omments in triplicate t.o: Federal Aviati.on Adminis-
trati.on, Office .of the Chief C.ounsel, Att: Rules D.ocket
(AGC-204), Petiti.on D.ocket No. 23345, 800 Independence
Avenue, SW, Washingt.on, DC 20591.
2 NOVEMBER 1984
PUBLICATION STAFF
PUBLISHER
Paul H. Poberezny
DIRECTOR,
MARKETING &COMMUNICATIONS
DickMatt
EDITOR
Gene R. Chase
MANAGING EDITOR
MaryJones
EDITORIALASSISTANT
Norman Petersen
FEATURE WRITERS
GeorgeA. Hardie, Jr.
DennisParks
RoyRedman
EAAANTIQUE/CLASSIC
DIVISION, INC.
OFFICERS
Presidenl Vice Presidenl
R. J.Lickteig RoyRedman
1620Bay Oaks Drive Rt. 3, Box 208
Albert Lea, MN 56007 Faribault,MN 55021
507/373-2351 507/334-5922
Secretary Treasurer
Ronald Fritz E.E."Buck"Hilbert
15401SpartaAvenue P.O.Box 145
Kent City, MI 49330 Union, IL 60180
616/678-5012 815/923-4591
DIRECTORS
John S. Copeland Stan Gomoll
9Joanne Drive 1042 90th Lane, NE
Westborough,MA 01581 Minneapolis, MN 55434.
617/366-7245 612/784-1172
ClaudeL. Gray, Jr. Dale A.Gustafson
9635 SylviaAvenue 7724 Shady Hill Drive
Northridge, CA 91324 Indianapolis,IN 46274
818/349-1338 317/293-4430
ArthurR. Morgan
Box 468
EspieM. Joyce,Jr.
3744 North 51st Blvd.
Madison,NC 27025
Milwaukee,WI 53216
414/442-3631
919/427-0216
MortonW.Lester AI Kelch
P.O. Box 3747 7018 W. Bonniwell Rd.
Martinsville, VA 24112 Mequon,WI 53092
703/632-4839 414/377-5886
Gene Morris John R. Turgyan
115CSteve Court, R.R. 2 Box 229,R.F.D.2
Roanoke,TX 76262 'Wrightstown,NJ 08562
817/491-9110 609/758-2910
S. J. Wittman GeorgeS. York
Box 2672 181 Sloboda Ave.
Oshkosh, WI 54901 Mansfield,OH 44906
414/235-1265 419/529-4378
ADVISORS
Daniel Neuman Ray Olcott
1521 Berne CircleW. 1500Kings Way
Minneapoli s,MN 55421 Nokomis, FL33555
612/571-0893 813/485-8139
S.H. " Wes"Schmid GarWilliams
2359 Lefeber Road Nine South 135Aero Drive
Wauwatosa,WI 53213 Naperville,IL 60540
414/771-1545 312/355-9416
NOVEMBER 1984 Vol. 12, No. 11
Contents
2 StraightandLevel
byBobLickteig
4 AlCNews
byGeneChase
5 VintageLiterature
byDennisParks
6 SavoiaMarchettiS.56
See Page6
byGeneChase
10 Cessna140
byNormPetersen
13 MysteryPlane
byGeorgeHardie,Jr.
13 BookReviews
byDennisParks
14 HamiltonStandardPropeller
Designations
byJamesC.Gorman
16 AlCDivision'sOshkoshFly-Out
byBobLumley
20 FirstFlight
byJuneLikich
22 VintageTrader
26 CalendarofEvents
SeePage10
See Page 16
FRONT COVER ...The Antique Silver Age Champion Award at
Oshkosh'84wenttothis1930SavoiaMarchettiS.56amphibian,flown
here by owner R. W."Buzz"Kaplan of Owatonna, MN.
(Photo by Ted Koston)
BACKCOVER...An interestinglineupofSwiftsatOshkosh'84.The
various cowling shapeshouse differentengine installations.
(Photo by Jack McCarthy)
ThewordsEAA, ULTRALIGHT,FLYWITHTHEFIRSTTEAM, SPORTAVIATION,andthelogosofEXPERIMENTAL
AIRCRAFT ASSOCIATION INC. , EAA INTERNATIONAL CONVENTION, EAA ANTIQUE & CLASSIC DIVISION
INC., INTERNATIONALAEROBATICCLUB INC., WARBIRDSOFAMERICA INC., areregisteredtrademarks,THE
EAA SKY SHOPPE and logos of the EAA AVIATION FOUNDATION INC. and EAA ULTRALIGHTCONVENTION
are trademarks of the above associations and their use by any person otherthan the above associationsis strictly
prohibited.
Editorial Policy: Readers are encouraged to submit stories and photographs. Policy opinions expressed inarticles
are solely those of the authors. Responsibility for accuracy in reporting rests entirely with the contributor.Material
should be sent to:Gene R.Chase, Editor, The VINTAGE AIRPLANE, Wittman Airfield, Oshkosh,WI 54903-2591.
The VINTAGE AIRPLANE (ISSN 0091-6943) is published and owned exclusivelyby EAA Antique/Classic Division,
Inc. ofthe Experimental AircraftAssociation, Inc.and is published monthlyatWittman Airfield, Oshkosh,WI 54903-
2591. Second Class Postage paid at Oshkosh, WI 54901 and additional mailing offices. Membership rates for
EAA AntiquelClassic Division, Inc. are $18.00 for current EAA members for 12 month period of which $12.00 is
for the publication of The VINTAGE AIRPLANE.Membership is open to all who are interested in aviation.
ADVERTISING- Antique/Classic Division doesnotguaranteeorendorseanyproductofferedthroughouradvertis-
ing.We inviteconstructivecriticism andwelcomeanyreportofinferiormerchandiseobtainedthroughouradvertising
sothat corrective measurescan be taken.
Postmaster:SendaddresschangestoEAAAntique/ClassicDivision,Inc ,WittmanAirfield,Oshkosh,WI54903-2591 .
VINTAGE AIRPLANE 3
EAA UNDERTHE CHRISTMASTREE
Wehopeyoudidn'tmissthegreatChristmasgift
ideainlastmonth'sissueofSPORTAVIATION. A
specialadvertisingsectiondescribedthedistinctive
Horizons line ofEAA sportclothes. SPORTAVIA-
TIONtakesthehassleoutof Christmasshoppingby
suggestingEAAbooks,publications,andvideotapes
that can be enjoyed by anyone any time. EAA
members round the world are already orderingthe
giftitemsdescribed intheOctoberissueofSPORT
AVIATION. There is still time for delivery before
Christmas...ifyouordernow. Do ittoday!
FAREWELLTO TWO MORE
AVIATION PIONEERS
We have just learned ofthe passing oftwo aviation
pioneers. BettieLunddiedon 6/25/84ina Mesa, Arizona
hospital after a bout with cancer. Leonard James "Len"
Povey passedawayinhissleepon 9/26/84 in hishome in
Highlands, NorthCarolina.
Bettie and herhusband Freddie, who preceded herin
death, were noted exhibition flyers in the late 1920sand
early'30sandboth competed invariousracing, aerobatic
and deadstick landing events atthe National Air Races
during thatperiod. Bettie first made a name for herself
when she set a world record for women by executing 67
barrelrolls in28 minutes.
Len Povey was a celebrated aerobatic pilot who had
won a numberofinternationaltrophiesandtitles.Hewas
creditedwithoriginatingtheCuban8maneuverwhenhe
performed it at the Miami All-American Races in the
mid-thirties.
In 1934 he was hired by the Cuban government to
train thefledgling CubanAirForce. WhenWW II broke
outhereturnedtotheU.S.andbecameheadof allinstruc-
torsintheCivilianPilotTrainingPrograms.Laterhewas
placed in charge of Embry-Riddle's flight schools which
trained 19,000 cadets duringWW II. Following the war,
Povey wasnamedmanagerofmilitarysalesfor Fairchild
Aircraft.
Len Povey (EAA 99145) was one ofthespecial guests
atOshkosh'75 andhonored asan"Aviation Great".
To the family and friends of Bettie Lund and Len
Povey, we extendourdeepest sympathy.
NEW DATES FOR OSHKOSH '85
The dates for the 1985 EAA Convention will be
Friday,J uly26through Friday,August2.Thisisa
change of one day from the dates previously an-
nounced. The convention will remaineightdaysin
length, butwill startone day earlier and end one
dayearlier.
LATEST EAA AUTO FUEL STCs
With the addition of the following airframe/engine
combinations, EAAnow offers a totalof302STCsfor the
use of auto fuel in aircraft. Cub and Funk owners will
welcome thefollowing:
Piper
J3F-50
J3F-50S
J3F-60
J3F-60S
J3F-65
J3F-65S
J3L
J3L-S
J3L-65
J3L-65S
McClish (Funk)
B85C
Nosebowl for Taylor E-2 CUb.
CUSTOMSHEET METALWORK AT
REASONABLE PRICES
We've received several reports ofoutstandingcustom
sheet metal work coming out of the Specialty Sheet &
Machineshop in Griffin, Georgia.Thisisa one-manshop
usingtechniquesstraightoutofthe '20s and '30s.
OwnerJohnB. Neel isa craftsmanwhocanreproduce
almost any formed aluminum part. Some of his recent
work hasincluded: nosebowls for E-2 andJ-3Cubs; nose
bowlsandsidepanelsforWACORNFandCirrus-powered
GreatLakes;Travel Air"MysteryShip" sub-cowl pieces;
P-51 wingtips, wingrootfairings andtail fairings; Ryan
STA sub-cowl pieces and landing gear fairings; Bucker
tail fairings, wingrootfairings andwheelfairings; wheel
pants and bump cowl for Warner-powered Davis D-I-W;
plusmiscellaneouscustomwheelpants,wheelcoversand
nosebowls.
John'sworkistrulymuseumqualityandhispricesare
definitelyreasonable.Formoreinformationcontact:John
B. Neel, Specialty Sheet & Machine, 521 Experiment
Street,Griffin, GA 30223. Phone404/227-7514.
4 NOVEMBER 1984
ByDennisParks(EAA 115388)
Purdue UniversityLibraries
AirProgress,originally published by Street and Smith,
is probably the longest running aviation journal to survive
without a title change. The first issue was published in
January 1938 as an Air Trail's Annual. The title first
appeared as a monthly section in AirTrails, the "Air Prog-
ress" section, and provided news of current events in avia-
tion.
AirProgressappeared in January 1938, January 1940
(dated 1939/40), January 1941 and January 1942. These
annuals contained materials selected from articles previ-
ously appearing in AirTrails to form an annual. These
selections included the "Language of Flight", a continuing
illustrated glossary, "Air Progress in Pictures", a photo
spread of aviation happenings, the "Aero Album", photos
of the latest aircraft, other selections and fine three-view
drawings.
AirProgresswas published as a quarterly three times;
July 1942, October, 1942; and January 1943. The content
no longer featured reprints but presented new and exclu-
sive materials. With the war in progress the emphasis was
on current trends in the air war. Included were fine color
photos of military aircraft and black and white pictorial
features. Articles were written by Alexis Dawydoff, Willey
Ley and Douglas Rolfe among others. Also featured were
drawings by Rolfe and a section of cutaways of new equip-
ment called "Off the Drawing Board."
Starting with February 1943 the publication became
monthly, but this only lasted until October 1943 when the
publication suspended because of the wartime paper short-
age During the suspension, the title "Air Progress" reap-
peared as a section in AirTrails. This featured two pages
of drawings by Douglas Rolfe on a particular topic in avia-
tion history. Such topics included: tail first aircraft, diri-
gibles, and the development of the personal plane. These
drawings plus others to come formed the basis for Rolfe's
book AIRPLANESOF THE WORLDpublished in 1954.
In 1952 AirProgressresumed publication as an annual
and the five following issues, 1953/54 to 1957/58 were pub-
lished as annuals. From the Spring of 1958 issue to the
Winter 1960issue, frequency increased from bi-annual to
quarterly. It was published as a quarterly until the Winter
1963/64 issue.
The time period 1952 to the mid 60's was the Golden
Age of Air Progress. When the publication resumed in
1952 it was subtitled "History of Aviation" and that was
the editorial thrust for a decade under the leadership of
Alex Dawydoff and Albert Lewis.
Among the outstanding features of this time period
were the drawings by Douglas Rolfe, the scale views by
Walter Jefferies, Bjorn Karlstrom and James Triggs and
the cutaways of Rudolf Das. The 1954/55 issue had draw-
ings of Fairchild, Fokker, and Aeronca aircraft by Rolfe.
The 1956/57 issue had scale views by Jefferies illustrating
Army and Navy fighter development. The 1953/54 issue
had cutaways by Das on the Supermarine "Swift" and Fok-
ker Trainer.
ress

Not only were there good drawings and photographs
but also good history as written by Peter Bowers, Howard
Levy, Warren Shipp, John Underwood and Douglas In-
gells. Some examples are: The Cessna story and the Cur-
tiss HS-1 Flying Boat (Winter, 1960), Ford powered air-
craft (Spring, 1960) and the Homebuilt Hall of Fame
(Spring, 1959).
Production stepped up to six times a year in 1963 and
then increased to eight times a year, and in 1966 began a
monthly schedule again and has remained so since. With
the increase in frequency of publication came a decrease
in historical content and an increase in contemporary in-
formation, flight tests of new aircraft and articles on flying
skills until it became a general aviation magazine.
During its Golden Age, AirProgresswas a unique jour-
nal and provided a fascinating source of pictorial and tex-
tual history of aviation.
Though AirProgressdidn't change titles it did change
publishers several times:
1) Street and Smith, 1938 - Winter 1961/62
2) Conde Nast, 1962 - June 1971
3) Petersen, July 1971 - October 1975
4) Challenge, November 1975 - to date.
The EAA Library has a nearly complete collection of
AirProgress.
HI R T R A ILS' Ann UA1 1939
25 CEnTS 8 COPY 19"40
VINTAGE AIRPLANE 5
R. W. "Buzz" Kaplan (EAA 70086, AlC 8609), 623
l.idge Road, Owatonna, MN 55060, admits he is hung up
on float flying. His private "air force" of seaplanes includes
a Super Cub, Cessna 185, Waco ZKS-6, Curtiss Robin with
CI Tank engine and an ultralight.
So when he read an article in a fall of 1976 issue of
Antique Airplane Association News that a Mr. Roger
Keeney had a basket case Savoia Marchetti S.56 which he
planned to restore, Buzz instantly became interested. He
wrote to the owner and learned the "baby amphibian" was
not for sale. But Buzz was persistent and he continued
with his attempts to purchase the Savoia.
Finally, two years later he was successful and in Feb-
ruary, 1979, his good friend and top-notch mechanic, Gary
Underland, picked up the pieces in Keeney's hangar at
Torrance Airport, Torrance, California. Gary's first feel-
ings when he saw Buzz's newly acquired treasure were-
it's a piece ofjunk - not rebuildable - why bother - it's
going to cost too much - we're crazy - my life won't last
that long - etc.!
Gary admits the wings didn't look so bad. They were
still covered and didn't seem to be damaged too badly. But
the fuselage had been cut in two to facilitate storage, and
only the bottom of the forward portion of the hull remained
... the sides and top were gone as was the entire vertical
fin.
The cockpit area was intact. All the fuselagelhull
hardware seemed to be there and they looked good. The
wood was in absolutely terrible shape though and even
with as much care as possible in loading and transporting
the remains from California to Minnesota, about two
bushels of screws and rotten chunks of wood dropped off
the structure.
The Savoia was off-loaded at Gary's hangar on his
farm where a frame was built and the surviving pieces
were taped and wired to it to get some idea of what it
might have looked like. This was when they knew they'd
6 NOVEMBER 1984
have to have plans to work from. The project sat like this
for two years while a frustrating search for factory draw-
ings was made.
R. W. "Buzz" Kaplan (L) and Gary Underland proudly hold the
Oshkosh '84 Antique Silver Age Champion award.
The search included trips to the National Air and
Space Museum in Washington, D.C. and to the Franklin
Institute in Philadelphia to see an example of a Savoia
Marchetti-designed amphibian called the "Pioneer" built
entirely of stainless steel by the E. G. Budd Co. Buzz also
traveled to Milan, Italy to inspect an S.56 on display in
the Caproni Museum. The Savoia Marchetti factory is in
Milan but it was bombed out during WW II and no draw-
ings for the plane exist.
Now Buzz's back was to the wall and he knew why
none of the previous owners were able to restore this rare
craft. Incidentally, one of those owners was well-known
EAAer Volmer Jensen.
Finally, Buzz received the tip that would unlock the
puzzle. He made an official inquiry under the Freedom of
Information Act requesting the FAA to search their acres
offiles at New York's J. F. Kennedy Airport for t he Savoia
Marchetti S.56 drawings he so desperately needed.
In a couple of months the FAA responded saying they
had indeed located the drawings and were willing to sell
copies. They provided a list of drawings and Buzz ordered
enough to get the project started. The drawings were on
microfilm and the price was reasonable at $2.00 each.
Buzz and Gary had prints made from some of the micro-
films, but the quality was so poor they ended up installing
a microfilm reader in the hangar where the plane was
being restored. Buzz recalls on several occasions finding
Gary in the darkened hangar studying the screen with a
Crew of the Savoia Marchetti (L-R) : Jim Haney, Donald Cram-
mond, Tony Seykora, Buzz Kaplan and Gary Underland.
Gary Underland and Donald Crammond steer the S.56 with the
tailskid dolly.
Gary Underland (EAA 43898, AlC 8198) pulls the propeller
through prior to engine start.
magnifying glass to determine critical dimensions. Al-
though the microfilms gave sufficient basic information so
an accurate reconstruction of the plane could be made,
Gary feels they ended up with only about 40% of the data
they would like to have had.
One problem was the prints dated prior to mid-1929
showed a different hull bottom than on the later amphib-
ians like Buzz's, so none of those measurements could be
trusted. Buzz's Savoia NC194M, SIN 7 was built in 1929
and first licensed in January, 1930. It's an Italian design
built under license by the American Aeronautical Corpo-
ration in Port Washington, Long Island, New York.
About 30 of these S.56 versions were built by A.A.C.
with 100 hp Kinner K-5 engines. The original price at the
factory was $7300. By mid-1930 the new S.56B was intro-
duced powered with the Kinner B-5 of 125 hp, and ten or
more of these were built according to Joe Juptner's U.S.
Civil Aircraft, Volume 4, Page 127. Also, several of the
early S.56's were later updated at the factory by installa-
tion of the more powerful engine.
Although Gary Underland did most of the restoration
himself, he gives much credit to Dana Ulen, a young
carpenter who loves to carve and work with wood. Dana
taught Gary many tricks of the trade and Gary feels the
project wouldn't be finished yet if Dana hadn't been avail-
able to help. Together, they completely wore out three
chisels! When the woodwork was finished, Dana left to
build a house for himself.
D. V. Roberts two-part epoxy glue was used throughout
as recommended by such seaplane experts as P. H. Spencer
and Volmer Jensen. This resulted in a very strong struc-
ture, and with every wood joint fitting perfectly it was one
of those jobs that "was a shame to cover up."
VINTAGE AIRPLANE 7

Gary didn't keep track of the quantity of brass nails
used in the project, but he knows approximately 6,000
brass screws and 4,000 copper rivets were used.
The fuselage was extremely complicated to build as no
two pieces of wood in the entire structure were identical
of the many angles involved. Every single piece
of ongmal structure to which stringers were attached was
cracked, so rather than duplicating the slab spruce pieces,
Gary substituted 9-ply '12" birch plywood. These look nice
and obviously added strength to the frame.
After the fuselagelhull was framed up, it was covered
with plywood, then fabric per the original. Gary chose to
use dacron for this job, but the wings and tail surfaces
were covered with grade A cotton. All covered surfaces
were then given a coat of fungicidal dope followed by just
enough silver butyrate dope (mixed by Gary) to duplicate
the finish which was typical of the 1930-era airplanes.
Great pains were taken throughout to not "over-restore"
this rare bird.
All wing spars are newly-made spruce hollow box-
beams. The wing ribs are built up using spruce and
plywood and each is in three pieces, consisting of nose,
center bay and trailing edge sections. Then l/S" x 1/2" cap
strips were glued in place from the leading edge to the
trailing edge. The center sections of the ribs are original
while both leading and trailing edge sections are new. The
original wing tip bows were also repaired and used.
The wing leading edge members were hollowed out to
1/ 16" thickness with new 3/32" ply cover. Even the wing
struts are hollowed spruce. Gary stated that every piece
of wood in the original plane was either hollowed, routed,
or contained lightening holes in an effort to save weight.
This practice was duplicated on the re-build and much to
everyone's pleasure, the empty weight of NC194M came
out two pounds less than the empty weight of the original.
Part of that difference could be made up by the anchor and
mooring lines which were offered as standard equipment
in 1930.
As called for in the plans, NC194M had an application
of tar on the bottom of the hull and "anti-putrid black
varnish" on the interior floor. Neither Buzz nor Gary
could bring themselves to be that authentic with this new
restoration so they opted to used an exterior urethane
varnish which will provide more than adequate water-
proofing as well as protection from oil and gas spills.
This S.56, SIN 7 was powered with the lower horse-
power Kinner K-5 engine but Buzz had in his possession
a 125 hp Kinner B-5, SIN 38 with front exhaust which he
chose to use. This installation converts the Savioa Mar-
chetti to a Model S.56B as was done by the factory to
several of the aircraft at the request of owners; therefore
this modern-day conversion is completely authentic.
The lever on the pilot's control stick can be actuated to disen-
gage the copilot's rudder bar and control stick.
8 NOVEMBER 1984
- d
The 5.56 instrument panel. The Heywood starter pUIl-to-start
T-handle is in the upper left corner.
The B-5 was overhauled by Gary and he also built the
exhaust system. The engine cowl was fabricated by Gary
photos as no prints were available. The surplus K-5
engme was then traded to the Air Power Museum for a
Heywood air-operated engine starter which was listed as
standard equipment on these planes.
Buzz is greatly impressed with the unique and depend-
able Heywood starter. It always starts the Kinner on the
count of two and he wonders why more aircraft without
electrical systems didn't use this system.
The Savioa came from the factory with a Paragon
propel.ler, but that company hasn't made props for so many
years It would be virtually impossible to find an airworthy
example matching the original specifications. For the first
taxi tests, a ground adjustable metal prop was used to
determine if the specific pitch would be okay for this
plane. It was, so a new Sensenich 90D63P propeller with
a no. 25 hub was ordered which provides the expected
performance.
The original wheels came with the plane and Gary
re-spoked them. As no 12.00 x 4 aircraft tires are avail-
able, a pair of heavy duty implement tires with suitable
tread were located and installed after the name was re-
moved from the outboard side of both tires.
Buzz had many photos of both the Italian and Amer-
ican of the S.56 from which to choose a paint
scheme. HIS plane was all red when he acquired it but
under the red paint, remnants of the original silver paint
scheme could be found. By studying the photos and seeing
the unrestored example in Milan, he and Gary came up
with an authentic paint scheme.
The on the bow.came from a drawing supplied by
the Amencan AeronautIcal Corporation. This logo and all
the lettering was painted by a professional sign painter,
but Gary made the stencils.
After Gary worked on the project nearly full time for
four aided .by Dana Ulen for about three years, the
SavOIa MarchettI "baby amphibian" was ready to fly. Buzz
the first flight in April of this year and was pleased
wIth the outcome. The trim was perfect in pitch but he
had to hold. nearly full left aileron to maintain level flight.
Upon landmg, Gary adjusted the rigging and solved the
problem.
. The 125 hp Kinner provides adequate power. The plane
lIfts. off at mph and climbs at a "pretty good rate".
'.I'YPlcal of aIrplanes of that vintage the Savoia is very slow
m roll but in pitch. And with the high
thrust of the engme mounted on the top wing it is
also sensItIve to power adjustments.
NC194M will cruise at the advertised rate of 75 mph
1800 rpm, but Buzz normally runs at 1750 rpm which
gIves 70 mph. A landing approach speed of 60 mph gives
good control and about 500 fpm rate of descent carrying
power. When the power is chopped the Savoia "drops like
a - Buzz compares it to the effect of applying full
flaps m a Cessna 180 or 185!
(Photo by Norm Petersen)
The Savoia Marchetti 5.56 is an agile performer with its 125 hp
Kinner, shown here taking off at Lake Winnebago.
The aft cockpit can be enclosed with this metal cover.
All landings are described as an adventure because
with a tail skid and no brakes there is little or no direc-
tional control at low power settings. The Savoia simply
can't be operated on hard surfaces and even on sod if not
into the wind you can expect the plane to do pretty much
as it pleases when power is reduced below rudder effective-
ness. Cross-wind landings generally result in a ground
loop into the wind.
During take-off, full power must be used before any
steering is possible. Once rolling, directional control is
pretty good.
Buzz also describes all water take-offs and landings as
adventurous. They always result in a thorough soaking of
both pilot and passenger with water coming over both
sides and the windshield.
The amphibian handles poorly in water as it has no
water rudder. The aerodynamic rudder itself is small and
completely ineffective without a good deal of power supply-
ing adequate slipstream. This makes it extremely difficult
to safely approach a dock or taxi in a confined space.
Carrying sufficient power for steering results in excessive
maneuvering speed. Buzz says an oar is an important item
to carry and he recommends shutting off the engine and
using the oar to dock the Savoia.
The airplane has seating for three, but Buzz has car-
ried his first and last passenger in the rear cockpit! It flies
fine with a passenger in the right seat of the two-place
front cockpit, but when he carried a 90-pound boy as the
second passenger it was necessary to hold nearly full for-
By the last day of the Convention, the
crowd had trampled the ground around
the 5.56 leaving this green grass outline.
ward stick to maintain level flight. The rear cockpit serves
better as an area for stowing lightweight gear.
An interesting feature of the S.56 is the capability of
the left seat pilot to disengage the flight controls on the
right side by squeezing a lever on the stick. Buzz feels the
motivation for this was stories of students "freezing on the
controls."
Buzz said his flight to Oshkosh '84 was great fun. He
brought four guests who also served as his ground crew
- three of them drove while the fourth rode in the S.56.
Three enroute stops were planned, but four were made.
The first leg was from Owatonna to Dodge Center,
Minnesota with Tony Seykora, a WW II Marine aviator
on board. The flight was uneventful and after landing
they were refueled by their ground crew.
Donald Crammond was the passenger on the second
leg. He came from his home in London, England to fly
with Buzz and to see Oshkosh. Donald flies both fixed
wing and helicopters. They planned to refuel at Sparta,
Wisconsin but a fog bank 30 miles from their destination
altered that. They spotted an inviting golf course, landed,
and found their new hosts to be exceedingly helpful. After
several hours the weather cleared and they proceeded to
Sparta where they met their ground crew and re-fueled.
The next passenger was Jim Haney, a commercial
bush pilot from Alaska who had travelled to the lower 48
to see Oshkosh. Jim is building an Avid Flyer on floats
and at Convention time it was ready for cover.
Buzz and Jim flew to Wautoma, Wisconsin where they
landed at 2:00 p.m. By this time they were really hungry
and they asked a farmer who had driven up on his tractor
(Continued on Page 19)
VINTAGE AIRPLANE 9
-CESSNA140
OSHKOSH '84 GRANDCHAMPIONCLASSIC
By Norm Petersen
(Photo by Gene Chase)
The Grand Champ Cl assic Cessna 140 on take-off roll during the Parade of Flight at Oshkosh '84.
If the word "persistent" was ever
applied in its truest sense, it would
have to be used in describing the 1984
Oshkosh Grand Champion Classic
Cessna 140 and its owners, Rick and
Kathie Paige (EAA 104240, AIC
2621), P. O. Box 5298, San Mateo, CA
94402. Even their 3
1
/2-year-old
daughter, Sara, was excited when
Rick walked up the stairs at the
Theater in the Woods to accept the
Grand Champion Classic Award for
their beautiful 1947 Cessna 140,
NC4135N, SIN 13598, with its highly
polished aluminum exterior.
The saga of this award goes back
eleven years to when Rick was a col-
lege student at the University of Ne-
10 NOVEMBER 1984
braska at Omaha and he and Kathie
had gone across the Missouri River
one Sunday to visit the Council
Bluffs, Iowa airport. While "hangar
strolling", they chanced upon a
Cessna 140 that had just been put up
for sale that day! An investigation
revealed the plane had only 1300
hours total time and was in a rather
remarkable state of repair. As Rick
had flown 140s before, he was well
aware of the nice personality these
two-seaters possessed and here was a
low-time machine at a reasonable
price. Not wasting any time, they
bought the 140.
Thus began what the Paige family
refers to as a "Progressive Restora-
tion", continual upgrading and im-
proving the airplane every year.
In 1975, Rick graduated from col-
lege and he and Kathie moved to San
Mateo, CA on the bay, just below San
Francisco (salt air and all!), where
Rick became an officer with the San
Mateo Police Department. This occu-
pation gives a certain amount of au-
thority to the small sign in the left
rear window of the Cessna 140. It
says, "This Aircraft Protected by
Smith & Wesson!"
The Cessna's lower cowling had
caused problems when it shook loose
coming out of a small landing strip
back in Amana, IA. In fact, Rick had
all he could do to nurse the airplane
back to the narrow strip with the
cowling flopping all over the place!
The years of polishing had worn away
the aluminum to where it would no
longer hang together! A search in
California turned up a Cessna dealer
who had three factory new lower
cowls for sale at $100 each! Rick
couldn't buy one fast enough. (The
cowl latches alone were $78 each.)
As Rick is allergic to wool, he was
fortunate to find synthetic upholstery
material on a bargain rack that was
a perfect substitute. And one night he
was called to a carpet store on a
burglary alarm (in the line of duty)
and inquired about samples. The store
owner said they had over 900 samples
on hand and opened a book to show
Rick. The displayed sample was just
exactly what was needed. Together
with the new interior, the panel was
carefully repainted to original specs.
Even the original G.E. Low Fre-
quency Radio was retained in the
lower left side. Behind the right side
glove box cover, a Radair 360 channel
VHF radio was cleverly hidden to re-
tain the original look (including the
old carbon mike).
Rick and Kathie have developed an
excellent relationship with John God-
win, their A&P and AI, who literally
does the annual inspections with
white gloves. John is a stickler for
details and has been of immense help
in their progressive restoration.
Oshkosh '81 proved to be a har-
binger of things to come as NC4135N
ran off with the Class II (81-150 hpj
Classic Award and Rick and Kathie
knew they were on the right track.
Their brilliant polish job was getting
brighter each year due to the effects
of Blue Magic polish (for which Rick
is a distributor).
The 85 hp Continental engine was
rebuilt during the next year. Their
faithful AI John Godwin noted that
parts had not been replaced at the
previous major overhaul as required.
A mandatory AD on the magnetos
had never been met as both mags had
never been opened. To really help the
smoothness, the pistons were care-
fully balanced to within liz gram. This
resulted in an engine that will now
turn redline without hesitation and
even sounds different than before.
The prop is the original MacCauley
Klip Tip of 71 x 48 specs.
The windshield had been replaced
along the way and was now one inch
higher than it should have been. Re-
moving all the screws, John Godwin
carefully worked it down to proper
size and reinstalled it with original
rivets as it came from the factory.
Again the long flight to Oshkosh
'82 proved fruitful as the Cessna won
Class II Classic Award for the second
straight year and the judges were be-
ginning to perk up their collective
(Photo by Ted Koston)
Kathie and Rick Paige and daughter Sara are still grinning the morning after receiving
the top classic award at Oshkosh '84.
(Photo by Ted Koston)
The Oshkosh "Award Winner" decals say it all. The Paige' s were unable to attend
Oshkosh in '83 or there undoubtedly would be one more decal in the collection.
VINTAGE AIRPLANE 11
(Photo by Ted Koston)
The original G.E. low frequency radio was retained in the authentically restored instru-
ment panel. A modern 360 channel VHF radio is concealed behind the right side glove
box door. The Loran set (lower left) can be slipped out for the total authentic look.
(Photo by Norm Petersen)
These are factory-new aluminum wheel pants recently manufactured by Cessna on
request of the Cessna 170 Club. The pants on Cessna models 140, 170 and 180 were
identical.
(Photo by Norm Petersen)
Not a bug in sight on the front of this beauty. Attention to detail is obvious. Rick was
fortunate in locating a factory-new lower cowl at a Cessna dealer in California.
12 NOVEMBER 1984
eyebrows at this beauty from Califor-
nia.
With the engine in top shape, the
airframe looking like a jewel, the job
of recovering the wings was next on
the schedule. The wings were re-
moved and carried home for recover-
ing; one wing in the garage and one
in the family room along with the
wing struts. One morning the door
bell rang and Kathie rushed through
the family room - only to stub her
bare foot on a wing strut! The result-
ing broken bones in her foot required
a cast on her foot for a number of
weeks. Such are the joys of rebuilding
airplanes!
Internally, the wings looked good
except for a wing repair that had been
done incorrectly years before. Once
this was repaired, the Ceconite 102
covering was installed and Cessna
fabric clips were used instead of rib
stitching. Careful sanding, especially
over these clips, was necessary during
the nine coat application. The final
silver coats brought the finish back to
factory original.
Additional refinements included a
low frequency trailing antenna which
doubles as the antenna for a snap-in
Loran and a set of factory new
aluminum wheel pants with the fac-
tory stripe on them. These were re-
cently manufactured by Cessna on re-
quest (spelled: money) of the Cessna
170 Club at $400 per set including
fittings.
Being unable to attend the 1983
Oshkosh Fly-In gave Rick and Kathie
an extra year to refine, complete, in-
stall , upgrade and polish 01' 4135
November to the point where they
felt "the big one" might be within
reach.
Arriving at Oshkosh '84 with a
Classic Beauty such as Rick and
Kathie had drew many envious
glances from the crowd and the judges
asked if they minded parking in the
back row, closer to the Red Barn. The
competition was indeed keen
throughout the week as the long wait
began, but on Friday evening, August
3, 1984, the lingering doubts were
gone when the Paiges, Rick, Kathie
and Sara, were named with winners
of the Grand Champion Classic
Award with their beautiful Cessna
140. Their persistance had paid om
Two things of note are that the
Cessna 140 NC4135N is one year
older than Rick and the big award
was won at Wittman Field - named
for the same man who designed the
spring steel landing gear on the
Cessna 140! Small world.
Editor's Note: A Ted Kaston color
photo of Rick and Kathie Paige's
Grand Champion Cessna 140 will be
featured on the front cover of next
month's THE VINTAGE AIRPLANE.
By George Hardie, Jr.
Designers have been challenged
continually to achieve the perfect
multi-place airplane with wide appeal
for private and commercial use. This
month's Mystery Plane is an example
of one attempt to meet this need in
the mid-1930's. The photo was sub-
mitted by an anonymous donor so lo-
cation and date are unknown. An-
swers will be published in THE VIN-
TAGE AIRPLANE for February,
1985.
The Mystery Plane in the August
1984 issue of THE VINTAGE AIR-
PLANE is the Charles Hall experi-
mental helicopter. The photo was
taken at the Western Avenue airport
in Los Angeles by Roy Russell, who
said it never flew. The added weight
of the engine mounted in the wing
made it too heavy and cooling of that
engine was blocked by the fuselage.
This must have been a tough mystery
plane as no answers were received
at headquarters. Better luck next
time!
BOOK R"EVIEWS
By Dennis Parks
CELLULOIDWINGSby James H. Farmer. TAB Books,
Inc. 1984. 369 pages, illustrated, notes, bibliography, ap-
pendices, softcover, $25.50.
This large format (8
1
12 x 11) by TAB standards, is a
boon for the aviation enthusiast who is also a film buff.
From Wings (1927) to Twelve O'Clock High (1949), James
Farmer presents a fascinating chronological cavalcade of
this history of Hollywood aviation epics.
The flavor of aviation films is recalled through inter-
views with directors, writers, producers, actors and pilots.
Thesp- films, along with aviation pulps, aviation
magazines and headline-making flights helped inspire a
generation to enter the field of aviation.
Illustrated by hundreds of production and publicity
stills this book is also a visual feast. Appendix I contains
capsule reviews and production notes of over 300 movies
in alphabetical order of films released between 1908 and
1950. Of special note to the aviation historian is Appendix
II. This is a listing of aircraft screen appearances by type.
As the films listed are the only available dynamic record
of many older aircraft, this listing is a valuable contribu-
tion.
Not only a history and a record of wings on film, but
fun to browse, this work is highly recommended for the
aviation enthusiast and film buff.
UNCONVENTIONAL AIRCRAFT by Peter M. Bowers.
TAB Books, Inc. 1984. 278 pages, 300 + photos, softcover,
$17.50.
Pete Bowers, author of over a dozen aviation books,
innumerable articles and the possessor of an extensive
negative collection, has culled from his experience and
photos, descriptions of hundreds of "unconventional air-
craft."
These unconventional aircraft are those considered by
today's standards to be of unusual configuration. The air-
craft are presented in chapters grouped by their most
prominent features - canards, tandem wings, tailless,
deltas, etc. Each aircraft is presented with a photo and a
short history along with some general specifications.
Of special interest to EAA members are the several
aircraft in this book that are now in the EAA collection.
These include the Stits Sky Baby, Taylor Aerocar, and
Rutan VariViggen.
This entertaining and fact-filled work is recommended
for any aviation enthusiast.
VINTAGE AIRPLANE 13
Hamilton StandardPropellerDesignations
By James C. Gorman
(EAA 29182, AIC 306)
P. O. Box 2599
Mansfield, OH44906
Many Howards, Staggerwings, Stinsons and Wacos
eitherwereshippedfrom thefactoryorhavebeenrefitted
withHamilton StandardConstantSpeedPropellers.
To many, blade and hub designations are somewhat
confusing. Perhapsthefollowing may help.
HUB ASSEMBLY
Counterweight propellers are identified by a model
designationwhichexplainsinpartthetypeanduseofthe
propeller. Thenumbersandlettergroupin front oft he
dashindicatesbasichubassembly,andthenumbergroups
whichfollow thedashindicateminormodificationsincor-
poratedinthebasic model.
EXAMPLE: 2B20-213
2- Numberofblades
B- Bladeshanksize of1"
20- SAE propellershaftsplinesize
213 - Minormodificationofbasicmodel.
EXAMPLE: 2D30-247
2- Numberofblades
D- Bladeshanksizeof1W'
30- SAEpropellershaftsplinesize
247- Minormodificationof basicmodel
Most all Prattand Whitney R-985 andWright R-975
engines used 2D30 hubs.Jacobs, Lycomings and smaller
Wrightswere generallyequippedwith2B20 hubs.
BLADE ASSEMBLY
Blades are identified by design numbers stamped on
thecircumferenceofthebuttendofeach blade.
The blade designation is similarto thatofthehubin
thatitdescribes inparttheuse andtype ofunit.
EXAMPLE: 6167A-12
6167- Basicbladedesign
A- Letter"A" indicatesa bladeassembly which
includes bearing, chafing ring, bushing,
bushing drive pins, screws, and balancing
plugassembly.
12- Indicates the number of inches propeller
diameter is reduced from thatofblade de-
sign.Inthisexample,diameterhasbeenre-
duced 12inchesbyshorteningeachblade6
inches.Thisoperationwasperformedatthe
factory,notinthefield.
APPROVED HUB AND BLADE ASSEMBLIES
Beechcraft - D17S - 2D30 hub with following blades:
6095-15, 6095A-16, 6167A-15, 6167A-16, 6101A-21T,
6101A-22T. Pitch setting - low 11 degrees, high 26
degrees.
G17S - 2D30-237 hub with 6167A-15 blades. Pitch
setting- low 11 degrees, high26 degrees.
Waco - SRE - 2D30-235 hub with 6167A-12 blades
ARE, AVN-8, EGC-8 - 2B20-213 hub with 6135A-9
blades.
Howard - DGA-8,Wrightengine,2B20hubwith6109A-
12or6135A-12 blades.
DGA-11- 2D30hubwith6095A-15,6095A-16,6167A-
15, 6167A-16 blades.
DGA-15 - no data,butprobablysameasDGA-11.
Stinson - Lycoming R-680 - 2B20 hub with 6109A,
6135Ablades. Dashnumbers-6,-10. WrightR-760-E1
- 2B20hubwith6109A, 6135Ablades. Dashnumber
-12, -13.
Wright R-760-E2 - 2B20 hub with 6109A, 6135A
blades. Dash numbers -9, -10. Pitch setting with
Wright engines, E-1 13.75 degrees; E-2 13.25 degrees
low. Prattand Whitney R-985 - 2D30-209 hub with
6101A-18blades.Alsothe2D30-237hubhasbeenused.
Twotypesofbladesareinuse: the"Toothpick",a nar-
row tapered blade, and the "Paddle Blade", a thicker al-
most non-tapered blade. Which is better may never be
settled. It has been reported that the "Paddle Blade" is
better for climb and high altitude operation; while the
"Toothpick"isbetterfor cruiseandlowaltitude,butdon't
counton it!
Examples:
Toothpick- 6167-15, 6167-16, 6135-10
Paddle- 6101-21, 6101-22, 6109-9
Thefollowing "TableA" wasreproducedfrom dataon
pages 30-31 oftheHamiltonStandardPropellersService
Manual No. 110D. Ifthe propeller assembly has an oil
pipe, itcanbe usedasa full featheringpropwhichis not
muchhelpona singleengineairplane.Wheninstalledon
a singleengineaircraft, thepipeshould be plugged.
Many thanksto Ray Brandly,JohnTurgyanandRoy
Redmanfor theirhelp incompilingthedatafor thisarti-
cle.
14 NOVEMBER 1984
TABLE A
PropeUer
Model
Oracket
RRnlle
(De.
lire.,)
Cwl.
Cap
Weight
(Lb,.)
Cwt.
Cle.i, Pin Thru.t
(Cwt. Cop) lJeRrinll
A..y.
CrRnkl'R'.
(C)
011 Pit,. Front Cr.nkca.. (C) Sl1rinl! lJarrel
Cune or Shalt R n SUl'flort Spider
PRcking IJre. thinl! (S) lJ.l.nce RinK
n Wher Phton .. J. Whe..
Remark.
or Sholt
IIrcRthlnl!
(S)
1-----1--- ---1---_1___ ----1----1___ ------------ ________1
2B20-209 8 0. 38 AN392-47 no S
pipe S
-----1--- ---------- - --
2B20-213 15
0.38 AN392-47 no pipe
1- - ---1---- --- ----- __ ______ ___ _ ___ __
2B20-223
15 0.38 AN392-47 no c neither
2020-225 15 1.59 AN392-63 no c neither
---- - ---- --- - - - . "-- - --
2B20-229 15
0. 38 AN392-47 no neither
2B20-24I 15
0.70 AN392-51 no neither
1--- - - 1---- --- --- - ___.
2B20-249 15 0.25 AN392-5-1 no c neither
1- - --1- -- - --- -------- - - -
2B20-251 15 0.38 AN 392-47
S pipe no
2B20-317 15 0. 38 AN392-47 no
neither
1----- - -- --_________ _________ _
2B20-329 15
0.70 AN392- 51 no
1-------
2B20-337 15
0.25 AN392-51 no
---- - 1--- --- -- ---- _ _ ______
203029
2030-207
10 0.23 AN392-45 no
10 0. 23 AN392-45 yes
1----1-- --
2030-209 15
2030-227 10
0.23 AN392-45 yes
0.23 AN392-45 yes
c
c
c
c
1- - - --1- -- ----- --- ---- ..------ -- -- -___
2030-233 10 0.23 AN392-45 yes s
2D30-2 35 15 O.2j AN392-45 ye5 c
2030-237 15 0.63 AN392-45 yes c
2030-243 15 0. 23 AN392-45 yes s
neither
neither
neither
pipe
neither
neither
pipe
neither
neither
pipe
no
no S
yes c
yes c
yes c
yes c
yes c
no S
yes c
yes c
yes c
yes c
- ----
no S
yes c
no yes
no yes
no yes
no yes
no yes
no yes
no yes
no yes
no yes
yes
yes Same as -209 except
has 15-degree range.
yes
yes
yes
yes
yes
yes
yes
Same as -213 except
is crankcase breather.
Same as -223 except
has heavier counter-
weight caps and spider
is one inch longer.
Same as -223 except
spider is one inch
longer.
Same as -229 except
has heavier counter-
weight caps.
Same as -241 except
has lighter counter-
weight caps.
Same as -213 except
spider is one inch
longer.
Same as -229 except
cylinder has thrust
washers and steel cyl -
inder bushings.
--- ----- ---1-------------
no yes yes Same as -317 except
has heavier counter-
weight caps.
- -- --- --- ------------
no yes yes Same as -329 except
has lighter counter-
weight caps.
---- --- - --1----------
no no yes
no no yes Same as -29 except is
shaft breather and has
barrel supports and
counterweight thrust
bearings.
- - - - ---1----------
no no yes Same as -207 except
has 15-degree range
and is crankcase
breather.
---- .. -- - ---- --- -- --- ----- -----------
no
yes
no
c no yes yes Same as -209 except
has 10-degree range
and vertical
washers.
- ---- -- - -- --- ----------
S
c
c
no yes yes Same as -227 except
is shaft breather.
- - --- ----------
no yes
no yes
yes
yes
Same as -209 except
has vertical
washers, and slightly
different counter-
weight bearing parts.
Same as -235 excep
has heavier counter
weight caps.
--- --- - --- -- - - --- ------- - - 1
S no_
yes yes
2030-247
Same as -235 excep
is shaft breather.
- - --- ----- 1- -- ---- -- ---- -- ----- ----- ----- - --- ________ 1
1.40 AN392-51 yes C neither yes C no yes yes Same as -235 except
15
--- - - - -----
2030-249 15 0.63 AN392-45 yes C neither yes
2030-259 10 0.63 AN392-23 yes C neither yes
2030-261 15 2.56 52458 yes C neicher yes
-----
C
C
C
has heavier counter-
weight caps.
-----------------
no yes yes
--- -- --1--------1
Same as -237 except
has 10-degree range.
no yes
no yes
yes
yes Same as -249 except
has heavier counter-
weight caps.
VINTAGE AIRPLANE 15
Albert Barbuto in his Commonwealth
Skyranger and Buzz Kaplan -in his very
rare Savoia MarcheHi S.56 compete in the
spot landing contest.
Harry Thompson arrives in his Dormoy
Bathtub.
Ale DIVI&ION'&
O&l1KO&l1 ~ L Y O U T
By Bob Lumley, Chairman
(EAA 106379, AlC 6560)
W58 Nll070 Legend Avenue
Germantown, WI 53022
(Photos by Jack McCarthy)
A variety of vintage aircraft on the flight line at Wautoma.
Jack McCarthy views some of the Fly-out planes at Wautoma
through his camera lens and the wires on Buck Hilbert's Swal-
low.
The EAA Antique/Classic Division staged a pleasur-
able Fly-Out during Oshkosh '84. Tuesday, July 31,
dawned a beautiful day with the flight briefing at 7:30
a.m. and the departure scheduled at 8:00. Forty aircraft
and approximately 100 people made the 37-mile flight to
Wautoma, Wisconsin.
Wautoma Mayor Rick Bei and Chamber of Commerce
President Jerry Locy welcomed the group to the beautiful
grass field located three miles south of town.
Morning coffee and rolls, with sandwiches for lunch,
followed by the spot landing and bombing contests made
the outing something special. But most of all, the fellow-
ship was enjoyed by everyone and the Antique/Classic Di-
vision's second Fly-Out from Oshkosh was an unforgetta-
ble event. The first Fly-Out occurred during Oshkosh '72,
and it was also made to Wautoma.
An early afternoon departure allowed everyone to re-
turn to Oshkosh in time to enjoy the air show.
The following pilots were winners in the contests:
Flour bombing:
1st - Nick OwenlVagabond - 6'
2nd - Roy Redman/Stinson - 9'
3rd - Dan Lewkowicz/Stearman - 10'
Spot Landing:
1st - Roy Redman/Stinson - 20'
2nd - Chris BullerdicklPiper - 58'
3rd - Joyce Laird/Cessna - 70'
Following are t he pilots who fl ew an interesting vari-
ety of aircraft to Wautoma:
1. Gene Morris Cessna 140
2. Jack Copeland Cessna 182
3. Stan Gomoll Waco EQC-6
4. Joe McGrath PiperJ-3
5. Glen Loy Cessna 170B
Preflight briefing at the
Wittman Field.
6. Don Perry
7. Carl Hineborg
8. Scott Lickteig
9. Dan Lewkowicz
10. Chris Bullerdick
11. Ron Johnson
12. Albert Babbuto
13. Les Bryan
14. Vern Brown
15. Bob Hilbert
16. Buck Hilbert
17. Ian Hjertaas
18. Joe McLaney
19. John Shea
20. Bill Rose
21. Bob Lumley
22. Sharron Mitchell
23. Ron Wojnar
24. Bill Jennings
25. Glen Frels
26. Charles Cogil
27. David Pritchard
28. Harry Thompson
29. Lavern Brown
30. Bob Ziegler
31. Buzz Kaplan
32. Allen Grarnzu
33. Alan Brakefield
34. John Morris
35. John Leenhats
36. Roy Redman
37. Nick Owen
38. Joyce Laird
39. Failed to get name
40. Failed to get name
Red Barn prior to departure from
Culver V
T-Craft
PiperJ-3
Stearman
PA-18A
RyanPT-22
Commonwealth Skyranger
Aeronca 7BC
Ercoupe
AeroncaC-3
Swallow
Luscombe8A
RyanPT-22
Stearman
RyanST
Aeronca Chief
PiperPA-28
Aeronca 7AC
Swift
Cessna 170
Cessna 172
Cessna 195
Dormoy Bathtub
Ercoupe
Cessna 195
Savoia Marchetti S.56
Ercoupe
Fairchild PT-19
Taylorcraft
Stampe
Stinson SR-9
Piper Vagabond
Cessna 170
VINTAGE AIRPLANE 17
Welcoming Committee at Wautoma (L-R) City Councilman Russ
Nero, Mayor Rick Bei and Jerry Locy, President of the Chamber
of Commerce.
Time out for snacks.
Mayor Rick Bei greets AlC Division
President Bob Lickteig.
18 NOVEMBER 1984
SAVOIA MARCHETTI S.56 ...
(Continued from Page 9)
to look at the strange flying contraption, what the people
were picking in the adjacent field. "Cucumbers" was the
reply and the two airmen were invited to help themselves.
They were also given permission to pick as much sweet
corn as they wanted in another nearby field. Their lunch
of fresh, raw sweet corn and cucumbers was a first for both
men and they thought the combination was great.
By this time the ground crew caught up with them, the
S.56 was refueled and Gary Underland became Buzz's
passenger for the flight to Wittman Field at Oshkosh. The
NORAD arrival procedure was used and Buzz landed on
the N-S grass runway with no problems.
This rare and beautifully restored aircraft was one of
the most popular at Oshkosh '84 and was named Antique
Silver Age Champion. When Buzz acquired the S.56 it had
only 347 hours total time. He had about 20 hours in it
when he arrived at Oshkosh. More time was added during
the Convention as he flew the plane several times, includ-
ing water landings on nearby Lake Winnebago.
Buzz was pleased when he was asked to lead the An-
nual Seaplane Fly-By on Monday. About 40 various makes
and models participated in this popular event which was
appropriately announced on the public address system.
When Buzz's Savoia Marchetti was described, a gentle-
man from Italy, Mr. Giancarlo Monti couldn't believe his
ears! He is Advertising/Marketing Director for SIAl Mar-
chetti and was manning his Company's booth in the Com-
mercial Aircraft Display area. This is the company which
built the S.56 and when Buzz landed, Mr. Monti was wait-
ing at the amphibian's parking spot.
It was difficult for the visitor from Italy to contain his
enthusiasm as he had no idea that a 1930 model Savoia
Marchetti was flying anywhere in the world. He promised
he would search his company's files for any information
on the S.56 and send copies to Buzz.
But best of all, he invited Buzz to Italy to be guest of
honor at a banquet and all the company employees would
also be there. Now that's recognition with a capital R!
Editor's Note: Buzz Kaplan took his 8.56 to the AAA
Fly-In at Blakesburg, IA the week following Oshkosh '84
and flew home with the Grand Champion trophy. R. W.
Kaplan is Chairman of the Board of Owatonna Tool Com-
pany, Owatonna, Minnesota .

LETTERSTO THE EDITOR
To the Members of the EAA Antique/Classic Association,
The EAA Air Academy '84 was the most enjoyable,
satisfying and exciting learning experience of my life.
The opportunity to meet people such as Steve Wittman,
whom I've only been able to read about before was great.
I really enjoyed my flight in the J-3 Cub and getting to
handle the control s. And the Hot Balloon flight ...
The EAA Foundation workshop is a real "neat" place
to work. I hope to get to see the Moni we worked on fly
someday.
I thank you for your part in making it all possible for
me.
Thank you so much,
Julie M. Abel
(EAA 202760)
2125 Cottontail Drive
MO 63033
Offered by tax exempt
foundation. Will accept
clean '74 or later Cessna
150,172orCherokeeaspar-
tial payment. Phone
414-763-7692 Mr.Wagner.
1916HALBERSTADT BIPLANE FIGHTER
Flying Replica by Carl Swanson
Museum quality. 42 hours TT.
Powered by E.N.M.A.Tigre.
Conventional anddocile in all respects.
VINTAGE AIRPLANE 19
By June Likich
Have you ever said, "I wouldn't fly in an airplane if
they gave me a million dollars." This is how I always felt,
and if! really had to fly, I would have to have a parachute,
even though 1 don't believe I would have the nerve tojump.
As long as I can remember I have always admired air-
planes, all shapes and sizes. Whenever I heard one in the
sky I would think, "Boy, he's brave, but I'm glad it's him
and not me up there. I'm staying on firm and solid ground!"
As years went by, I began to notice planes flying to air
shows at the nearby airport. Watching the air shows was
exciting, but still , seeing the planes up close was enough
for me.
Two and a half years ago I met a wonderful man and
we were married. So what was his hobby? Flying, and
building a Smith Miniplane. Mike loves to fly and thiswas
fine with me, as long as 1 could stay on the ground. Mike
knew my fear of height, plus 1 had a slight case of claus-
troDhobia, so he never pushed me to fly.
20 NOVEMBER 1984
As the months rolled by, he would take me to Big
Beaver Airport (Michigan) which was close by, and show
me all the different types of phmes. He talked about en-
gines, landing gears, nose wheels, wings, what makes it
go up, what makes it come down, and all sorts of things.
It was interesting to hear him explain all these things to
me, but I must admit, not much of it was sinking in.
One day Mike asked if I would like to sit in one of the
planes. I knew it was tied down so I agreed to try it. I
climbed in and sat in one of those little seats. Before my
husband could close the door, I was out in a flash! I feit
as if 1 was sitting in a box and everything was closing in
on me. Mike couldn't help but laugh. I looked so funny
trying to scramble out of that plane.
Each week Mike would take me to the airport on some
sort of pretense and each time 1 found myself sitting in a
parked plane. In a couple of months I had no fear of the
closeness of the cockpit. This made me feel very good, but
still I never would go up in one.
One lovely summer day last year, my husband and I
took a drive. The sky was solid blue, with not a cloud in
sight. There wasn't much of a breeze, so Mike drove our
convertible with the top down. I laid my head back and
enjoyed the sun. Before long we stopped at Big Beaver
Airport. Being Sunday, everyone who owned a plane was
there.
As we walked around I was introduced to some of his
friends and he told me the types of planes they flew. As
we continued our walk I kept looking up into the sky
watching planes circle the field to land and take off again.
I was starting to get a kink in the back of my neck when
Mike stopped in front of a friend's plane. He introduced
me to Bob Harcourt and Mike told him how I had con-
quered my claustrophobia.
While the two of them were busy talking, I was busy
looking over Bob's Cessna 140. It was red and white and
I was fascinated by it. After a few minutes Mike came over
and asked if I would like to sit in it and hear the sound of
the engine from the inside. I made Mike promise that this
was all he was going to do, otherwise I wouldn't get in.
He smiled, and made the promise. We climbed in and fast-
ened the seatbelts.
Mike called, "Clear?". Bob yelled back, "Clear!". Mike
turned the ignition on and the engine started. I sat there
stiffiy, watching the silver propeller spinning until it was
a blur. The plane was shaking, worse than I was, and to
me the sound of the engine was deafening. We sat there
for a few minutes with Mike watching me as I experienced
this new sensation.
Then he said, "I'm not going to break my promise to
you, but I would like to just taxi across the runway and
back. I will not take it off the ground." I nodded my head
in acknowledgement and we did just that. I knew my hus-
band wouldn't break his promise. I sat wide-eyed as we
taxied across the runway, feeling every bump on the way.
I had a strange feeling of excitement and fear, all rolled
into one.
We taxied back to where Bob was standing, parked the
Cessna and got out. Bob asked Mike why he didn't just go
ahead and take me up for a ride. Mike explained that his
medical had expired and that I wouldn't go anyway. Bob
then turned to me and said, "Well, June, do you want me
to take you up for a ride?" "Yes!" I couldn't believe I had
said yes. Mike's eyes widened and he asked if I was sure
I was ready to go. I told him I was, although in the back
of my mind I wasn't sure, but I had said yes, and I wasn't
backing out. Bob said he would just take me around the
pattern which would take only three minutes.
Before I knew it I was back in the plane and strapped
in. Bob started the engine and we taxied to the end of the
runway for the take-off. "This was it, I'm really going up."
All sorts of thoughts ran through my mind as we sat there.
"What sort of feeling will I get when we leave the runway
and climb up into the sky?" I was now going to learn the
answer.
While waiting to take off, I watched Bob. I didn't have
the faintest idea what he was doing, but every motion
fascinated me. When it was time, Bob turned to me and
said, "Well , June, here we go!" I waved good-bye to Mike
and took a deep breath as we turned on to the runway.
Excitement started to race through me as I gave Mike a
smile that reached from ear to ear.
I turned and looked ahead. We were now picking up
speed and the runway flashed beneath us. The trees at the
end of the runway were coming up fast . I felt the tail of
the plane go light and knew at any moment we would be
airborne. I looked out the window and noted the ground
dropping from under us as we left the runway.
What did I do? I closed my eyes and waited for some
odd feeling. Would my stomach jump up into my throat?
I waited, but no feelings came. Were we really off the
ground? I opened my eyes and looked out. We were in the
air, but we weren't moving. At least that's the feeling I
had. I learned later that this illusion occurred because
there was nothing in the air to compare our speed with.
I looked at Bob and asked if we had stopped or at least
slowed down. He shook his head no and smiled. Looking
outside again the sight I beheld was breathtaking. I
couldn't believe my eyes. Without the slightest feeling of
fear I started talking to Bob, rattling on as it I was wound
up with a key. Below me was God's creation. The ground
layed out like a patchwork quilt of browns, greens and
yellows. The houses look like those from a Monopoly
Game, arranged in a specific pattern. The trees were also
miniature with the lakes looking like small ponds. It was
beautiful! I felt free and honored that I was able to view
this lovely sight which all pilots enjoy.
When Bob saw how excited and happy I was, he turned
out of the flight pattern and headed west. Mike told me
later that when he saw Bob leave the pattern he then
knew I was all right. He had no cause to worry now for
Bob was going to take me for a ride.
We were at 2,200 feet and I could see the horizon and
Lake St. Claire. Not too far away I could see what looked
like a city. Bob told me it was Utica. I couldn't believe it.
I said, "Why, that's were we live." Bob turned the plane
toward Utica as I started to watch for landmarks that I
knew from my driving. It was easy. I started naming the
streets and highways. Bob was getting a kick out of this,
so he asked me if I could find our house. As we passed
over our subdivision, I identified the streets and there it
was. Bob banked the plane to the right and I pointed to
our house. The second from the corner next to the house
with the blue umbrella. Bob spotted it and started to
laugh. I looked again and I laughed too ... it wasn't an
umbrella, it was our neighbor's pool!
We then headed back to the airport. We had been gone
25 minutes - 25 wonderful minutes I'll always remember.
I spotted the airport and even though everything was so
small, I could still find Mike standing there waiting for
us. We turned into the flight pattern, made our turns,
then started to descend toward the runway. I looked down
and one thought came to mind ... if I was going to die, I
would rather die this way - down into the beauty I had
seen.
The runway came up fast, the wheels touched and we
were down. I had been up in a plane! I had seen what some
people will never see. I had done it!
We taxied back to where Mike was standing. I was
waving to him so hard I thought my arm would come off.
Bob parked the plane and turned off the engine. I un-
strapped my belt and tumbled into Mike's arms. I was
bubbling over with my experience. I gave Bob a hug and
thanked him from the bottom of my heart for giving me
this most treasured thrill. I was so happy I cried.
While driving home Mike couldn't keep me quiet. 1was
telling him all I had seen and how I had felt. I had forgot-
ten that this was nothing new to him. He was happy for
me.
Since my first ride in Bob's plane, I have been up in
an old Ford Tri-Motor and last but certainly not least, in
a Stearman, an open cockpit biplane. That was another
thrill in itself. There was no fear. This had been con-
quered and won.
Editor's Note: "First Flight" was received at EAA Head-
quarters with the following note - "This is a story written
by my late wife June about her first airplane ride in about
1964 or 1965. She died in an auto accident on August 1,
1980. I rediscovered these papersjust recently and thought
June's description of her first flight would be of interest
to other EAA members. I am a member ofyour great or-
ganization and am currently flying a Phantom ultralight
which I built." Michael Likich (EAA 223535, UL 9224),
29210 Pratt Road, Armada, MI48005.
VINTAGE AIRPLANE 21
Where The Sellers and Buyers Meet...
AIRCRAFT:
FAIRCHILD 24 Project , 245 Jake. Fuselage cov-
ered with Stits. Red velvet interior. One wing needs
repair. $7,600.00. Ralph, 501 /843-2788. (11-3)
J-3 Cub Float Plane parts. 1320 and 1400 Edo
front fuselage fitting. SAS.E. for list. R. Matt , EAA
Wittman Airfield, Oshkosh, WI 54903-2591 .
1933 Fairchi ld 22, Menasco 0-4, Some extra en-
gine parts, picture on cover of April '82 VINTAGE
AIRPLANE. $31 ,000/make offer. 312/358-4035 or
3121742-2041 .
MISCELLANEOUS:
Wanted - Aviation related autographs on letters,
books, photos. flight covers, scrap books. Buy or
trade. Dave Jameson, 4322 Bellhaven, Oshkosh,
WI 54901. (11 -3)
EAGLE PROPELLERS - Superior performance.
87 type-certificated models; 60 custom models.
Contemporary, homebuilts, classics, antiques, an-
cients. Free engineering design service for custom-
ers. EAGLE PROPELLERS, Saratoga Municipal
Airport, Box 71 , Saratoga, Wyoming 82331 . 3071
326-8020.
ENGINES:
Wright J-5 parts needed, particularly seeking ser-
viceable master rod, valves, ignition wire clips,
carburetor heat box, one piston, and miscellaneous
mechanical parts. All help appreciated. Brian Dal-
ton, 7915 Spartan Court, Olympia, WA 98503, 2061
459-8035. (1 1-1 )
Warner Engines and parts, one 145 SS50 with
100:00 since new and zero SOH. Another with
300:00 since new, needs overhaul. Have extensive
inventory of 145 parts. Write needs. P. O. Box
9702, Greensboro, NC 27429. (12-2) .
ACRO SPORT - Single place biplane capable of
unlimited aerobatics. 23 sheets of clear, easy to
follow plans includes nearly 100 isometrical draw-
ings, photos and exploded views. Complete parts
and materials list. Full size wing drawings. Plans
plus 139 page Builder's Manual - $60.00. Info
Pack - $5.00. Super Acro Sport Wing Drawing -
$15.00. The Technique of Aircraft Building -
$10.00. Send check or money order to: ACRO
SPORT, INC., Box 462, Hales Corners, WI 53130.
414/529-2609.
POBER PIXIE - VW powered parasol - unlimited
in low-cost pleasure flying . Big , roomy cockpit for
the over six foot pilot. VW power insures hard to
beat 3 '12 gph at cruise setting. 15 large instruction
sheets. Plans - $47.00. Info Pack - $5.00. Send
check or money order to: ACRO SPORT, INC.,
Box 462, Hales Corners. WI 53130. 414/529-2609.
ACRO II - The new 2-place aerobatic trainer and
sport biplane. 20 pages of easy to follow, detailed
plans. Complete with isometric drawings, photos,
exploded views. Plans - $85.00. Info Pac -
$5.00. Send check or money order to: ACRO
SPORT, INC., P.O. Box 462, Hales Corners, WI
53130. 414/529-2609.
STEARMAN 1941 PT-17 - Completely rebuilt by
a nationally known company, original blue and yel -
low, stars and bars on cotton. 220 Continental , 50
hours since major, but aircraft not flown since com-
pletion. Sell or trade Cessna 182 or equivalent .
904/546-3141 . (12-2)
CESSNA 170B, 1953, 1400 SMOH, 65 STOH.
Rebuilt gyros, Imron paint, 7.5 gal. l hr. $14,000.
Call 217/488-6283. (12-2)
Old airplane parts cluttering up your garage? Make
room for your car by selling those items you don't
need with an ad in the Vintage Trader. 25ft per
word, 20 word minimum. Send your ad with pay-
ment to: THE VINTAGE TRADER, Wittman Air-
field, Oshkosh, WI 54903-2591.
1930s Cessna - Factory ("Airmaster") logo lapel
pins, cloisonne enameled, gold plated. $5.00 each
or 3 for $13.00, ppd to: Jacran Aero, Dept. V, Box
2106, Downey, CA 90242. (11-2)
Intercom - 2 cloth helmets, 2 headsets, 2 boom
mikes, $400 value for $175, as-is, where-is. Needs
work. 504/892-5756. (11-2)
AIRCRAFT AND ENGINES:
FOR IMMEDIATE SALE
1940 T-Craft BC-12 - Original round control
wheels and center round instrument panel. Ceco-
nite on wings, 412 SMOH. Ferryable, $4700.00.
1948 PA-15 Vagabond - Hand-rubbed finish.
Wheel fairings. Mint condition - $6995.00.
BIPLANE PLANTERS - one of a kind , hand-
crafted works of art . 24" wing span, 18" length.
Holds 30 Ibs. of plants. Excellent Christmas Gifts
for home or office. Send $19.95 plus $5.00 UPS
postage and handling to Thor's Enterprises, P. O.
Box 5868, Ocala, FL 32678-5868. Christmas de-
livery guaranteed if order received by December
15. (11 -1)
Foster Taperwing - Baby Ace look-alike. 65 Lyc.
$2.495.00.
Lyc. 0-290G Complete - Original , $800.00.
(2) Lyc. 0-480-IA - off twin Bonanza. Military
records. One - 1383 SMOH, other, 455 SMOH.
$4,800 for the pair or $2.500 each.
Beech Staggerwi ng Club needs data, history and
parts. Want former ownerl pilot to tell us your ex-
periences and whereabouts of any parts - any
condition. Club Secretary George York, 181
Sloboda Avenue, Mansfield, OH 44906, phone
419/755- 1208 days, 419/529-4378 evenings and
weekends. (12-2)
All above items located at Burlington, Wisconsin
Municipal Airport . Contact Mr. Wagner at 414/763-
7692. (11-1)
FREE, FREE, FREE - This space reserved for
free "Want to Buy" ads in the January 1985 issue
of THE VINTAGE AIRPLANE. First come, first
served. Need parts for your restoration? Send your
ad to: The Vintage Trader, Wittman Airfield, Osh-
kosh , WI 54903-2591 .
22 NOVEMBER 1984
ATTENTION - COLLECTORS
The EAA Aviation Foundation Library has a limited
supply of original editions of the following publication for
sale. Each is in mint condition - they are ori ginals, not
reprints:
Instruction Manual and Parts Price List for the 1934-1938
Waco Standard Cabin Models UKC, YKC, UKC-S, YKC-S,
YKS-6, YKS-7 and ZKS-7.
43 pages plus four fold-outs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. $22.00
Orderfrom:
EAAAviation Foundation Library
Wittman Airfield
Oshkosh, WI 54903-3065
Attention: DennisParks
THE JOURNAL OF
THE EARLYAEROPLANE
SAMPLE ISSUE $4
(
15 CRESCENT RD. POUGHKEEPSIE, N.Y. 12601
MEMBERSHIPINFORMATION
MAKE CHECKS PAYABLE TO EAA OR THE DIVISION IN WHICH MEMBERSHIP IS DESI RED.
ADDRESSALL LETTERS TO EAA OR THE PARTICULAR DIVISIONATTHE FOLLOWING ADDRESS:
WITTMANAIRFIELD- OSHKOSH, WI54903-2591 - PHONE414/426-4800
OFFICEHOURS:8:30- 5:00MONDAY-FRIDAY
VINTAGE TRADER
You mayhaveagoldmineinsparepartsstoredinthebasement,shoporgarage.Offertheseitemsin VINTAGETRADER.
You'll be amazed atthe response! It'sprofitabletoadvertiseevenifyou haveonlyonesmallitemtosellortrade.Special
offer - 25 per word - 20 word minimum. Take advantage of this outstanding offer. Use form below to print or type
message.(Useseparatesheetifmorespaceisnecessary.)SendcheckormoneyorderwithcopytoVintageTrader- EAA,
Wittman Airfield,Oshkosh,WI 54903-2591.
TotalWords_________ NumberofIssuestoRun________Total $, __________
Signature ________________ ______________________ _
fAA
ANTIQUf-
CLASSIC
lAC
WARBIRDS
U
LTRALIGHT
Membership in the Experimental Aircraft Association, Inc. is $25.00 for one year, $48.00 for 2 years
and $69.00 for 3 years. All include 12 issues of Sport Aviation per year. Junior Membership (under 19
years of age) is available at $15.00 annually. Family Membership is available for an additional $10.00
annual/y.
EAA Member - $18.00. Includes one year membership in EAA Antique-Classic Division, 12 monthly
issues of The Vintage Airplane and membership card. Applicant must be a current EAA member and
must give EAA memberShip number.
Non-EAA Member - $28.00. Includes one year membership in the EAA Antique-Classic Division, 12
monthly issues of The Vintage Airplane, one year membership in the EAA and separate membership
cards.SportAviation notincluded.
Membership in the International Aerobatic Club, Inc. is $20.00 annually which includes 12 issues of
Sport Aerobatics.All lAC membersare required to be members ofEAA.
Membership in the Warbirds of America, Inc. is $25.00 per year, which includes a subscription to
Warbirds Newsletter. Warbirdmembersarerequiredto bemembers ofEAA.
Membership in the EAA Ultralight Assn. is $25.00 per year which includes the Ultralight publication
($15.0? additionallorSport Aviation magazine) . For current EAA members only, $15.00, which includes
UltralIght publicatIOn.
FOREIGN MEMBERSHIPS: Please submit your remittance with a check ordraft drawn on a United States
bank payable in United States dollars oran international postalmoneyordersimilarlydrawn.
VINTAGE AIRPLANE 23
engine/airframe combinations listed.
MoreFlyingFortheDollar
...withEAA'SAutoFuelSTC's
Aircraft approved with all 80 octane TCM engines
(not fuel inj.) and Lycoming 0-320-A, C, and E
engines. STC's are sold and approved only for
Joi n EAA - be a part of the dedicated group that works constantly to
make flying safer, more enjoyable, more affordable for everyone in aviation.
Write Attn: STC
Wittman Airfield Oshkosh, WI 54903-3065
Annual membership $25.00 includes monthly magazine, SPORT AVIATION
and many other benefits. Join today, get the member rate on your STC.

FORD TRI MOTOR



J:
CO LLE CTO RS 01 AVIATION
MEMORAB ILI A

i
i




t
t

This collectors package includes a rare 1927
brochure reprint of Ford suggestions for Tri -Motor
use, circa 1927.
This entire offer, including a personalized certifi -
cate and a book on Ford history by EAA, is avail-
able for $100.00 postpaid to your address or as a
gift, mailed directly to requested address. Send
your tax deducti ble contri bution to the Ford Tri-
Motor Umrted Edition Fund, Wittman Airfield, Osh-
kosh, WI 54903-3065. Checks should be made
payable to EAA Aviation Foundation.

24 NOVEMBER 1984
LiD1ited
EAA's Ford Tri-Motor Will be flying soon' The wings are
installed, engines install ed and new exterior finish sparkles.
Interior appointments, gold trim and new seats are in place,
the same as it left Ihe factory in 1929. During the restorati on
some of the corrugated aluminum was replaced and these
remaining "original " pieces have been mounted onto a lim
ited quantity of commemorative plaques.
The first flighl is being planned now and all of us will be
seeing this historic aircraft flyi ng agai n!
Shown here is the
actual 1929 Ford
NC8407 wall plaque
with corrugated alumi-
num artifact, etched
photoplate and Ford
nameplate.
AERONCA,
FULLY APPROVED BY FAA
Including BeJlanca.
Switch to readily available, less costl y auto Champion. Trylek. WaOnei.
B&B AViatIOn. Inc.
gas and cut down your flying costs. STC's
5OTC
for auto gas now available from the EAA

Aviation Foundation at per engine
YO58
horsepower. Example - 85 hp Cessna 140 0588
50588
- (.50x 85) = $42.50. (Non EAA members
058A IL3A)
add $15.00 to totaL) Send check with air- 7AC
craft N no., aircraft and engine model and
7BCM IL.15AI
7CCM L16B
serial no.' s, EAA member number. Com- IDC
plete low cost insurance protection includ-
7EC
7fC
ing autogas coverage available through EAA 7JC
approved program.
7ECA
S7AC
S70C
S7CCM
SIEC
IIAC
EAA- WORKING FOR YOU!

STC's AVAILABLE FOR:
llBC
IICC
SIIAC
SI1 8C
SI1 CC
KCA
5OC
65C
65CA
S50C
S65C
S65CA
ARCTIC AIRCRAFT
CO., INC.
s:TI\""
BEEC HCRAFT,
0.35,
E35. f35. 635. 35R
CESSNA
120. 140. 140A
150. 150AH. 150J-M.
AI50KM
170, 170A. B

m:
182. I62AP
ITO 10 0 10.
IO-1G1
305f .
ERCOUPE,
Including Alleo. Fomey.
G, 415CO
f l . fIA
A2, A2A
M IO
LUSCOMBE
6. 6A. C. O. E, f. T6f
PIPER
J3C40
J3C65S
J4E ILAE I
J5A80
LAJ INE2i
PA 18
PA-28' 150
J3C50
J4
J5A IL4f)
L4A
PA II
PA-19
PA28151
J3C50S
J4A
J2
LA8 INE l1
PA llS
E2
J3C65ILA)
J4AS
J3
L4H
PA17
PA26140
TAYLORCRAFT
BC
8C12065
BCS1265
19
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Cushion upholsterysets
Wall panel sets
Headliners
Carpet sets
Baggage compartment sets
Firewall covers
Seat Slings
Recoverenvelopesand dopes
FreeCatalogofcompleteproductline.FabricSelectionGuide
showing actual samplecolorsand styles of materials:$3.00.
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LOG BOOKS
NEWAND REVISED FOR ...
Pilots: EMPilot Log Book $2.95 ppd.
AircraftOwnersand Builders:
EMAmateur Built Aircraft
Log Book ............... $2.95 ppd.
EMPropeller (or Rotor)
Log Book ............... $2.95 ppd.
EMEngine and Reduction Drive
Log Book ............... $2.95 ppd.
UltralightOwnersand Operators:
EAA Ultralight Pilot's Log and
Achievement Record ...... $2.95 ppd.
EAA Ultralight Engine and
Aircraft Log .............. $2.95 ppd.
AlsoNowAvailable:
CAM-18 (Reprint of early
CMManual) ............ $6.95 ppd.
Amateur-Built Aircraft Service and
Maintenance Manual ...... $5.95 ppd.
OrderFrom:
EAA
Wittman Airfield Oshkosh,WI 54903-2591
Phone 414/426-4800
Includepaymentwith order- Wisc. residentsadd5%sales tax
Allow4-6weeks fordelivery
WARBIRDSINWALNUT
Miniature Scale Replicas of Your Favorite Military
Aircraft from Yesteryear to Today, Meticulously
Handcraftedin AmericanBlackWalnut.
ATruly Unique DeskSetwith MatchingPenand
Goldtone I.D. Platefor Gift,Award orFlying Event
Trophy.
PlanesCan be Pedestal Mounted Depicting"In-
Flight," orBase Mountedto Depicta "Landed"At-
titude.
For FREE Color
Brochure with
PriceList and
Full Details:
WRITE orPHONE
PLANEPEOPLE
2017FieldcrestCourtSo.
Salem,Oregon97306
(503)370-9806
STITSPOLY-FIBER
IS THE WORLD'S ONLY COMPLETE FABRIC COVERING
SYSTEM APPROVED BY FAA UNDER AN STC AND
MANUFACTURED UNDER AN FAA-PMA.
WILL NOT SUPPORT COMBUSTION.
WITH POLY- FIBER FINISHES, WILL NEVER RINGWORM,
CHECK OR PEEL.
IS THE LIGHTEST COVERING METHOD APPROVED UNDER
AN FAA-STC.
IS THE MOST ECONOMICAL, CONSIDERING THE YEARS
OF TROUBLE FREE SERVICE.
SAMPLE OF OUR NEW HIGH STRENGTH, LIGHT WEIGHT,
SMOOTH FABRIC STYLES, WOVEN FROM SECOND
GENERATION POLYESTER FILAMENT.
NEW 68 PAGE MANUAL #1, REVISION 13, WITH DETAILED
INSTRUCTIONS FOR FABRIC COVERING, REFINISHING
FABRIC SURFACES, AND PAINTING AIRCRAFT FOR
CORROSION CONTROL.
LATEST CATALOG AND DISTRIBUTOR LIST.
VINTAGE AIRPLANE 25
CALENDAR
OF EVENTS
We would like to list your aviation event in our
calendar. Please send information to the Editor,
The VINTAGE AIRPLANE, Wittman Airf ield,
Oshkosh, WI 54903-2591 . Information must be
received at least two months in advance of the
issue in which it will appear.
MARCH 17-23 - LAKELAND, FLORIDA - 11th
Annual EAA Sun 'n Fun Spring Celebration of
Flight. Contact Sun 'n Fun office at 813/644
2431 Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. ,
or write to P. O. Box 6750, Lakeland, FL 33807.
JULY 26 - AUGUST 2 - OSHKOSH, WISCONSIN
- 23rd Annual EAA Flyln and Convention.
Make your plans now to attend the World's
Greatest Aviation Event. Contact EAA,
Wittman Airfield, Oshkosh, WI 54903 2591 .
It'sExciting!It'sfor Everyone!
See thi s priceless colllecti on of rare, historically
significant aircraft, all imaginatively displayed in the
world's largest. most modem sport aviation
museum. Enjoy the many educational displays and
audi o-visual presentat ions. Stop by- here's
something the entire family will enjoy. Just
minutes away!

FOUNDATION
Wittman Airfield
414-426-4800 Oshkosh. WI 54903-3065
8:30 to 5:00 p.m.
Monday thru Saturday
HOURS
11000 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Sundays
Closed Easter. Thanksgiving. Christmas
and New Years Day (Guided group tour
arrangements must be made two weeks
in advance).
CONVENIENT
LOCATION
The EM. Aviation Center is located on
Wittman Field. Oshkosh. Wis. -just off
Highway 41. Going North Exit Hwy. 26 or
44. Going South Exit Hwy 44 and follow
signs. For fiy-ins-free bus from Basler
Flight Service.

..
RE-UVEIT!
\
The fabulous times of T umer. Doolittle, Wedell
and Wittman recreated as never before in this
600-page two-volume series. Printed on high
grade paper with sharp, clear photo reproduction.
Offical race results 1927 through 1939 - more
than 1,000 photos-3view drawings-scores of
articles about people and planes that recapture
the glory, the drama, t he excitement of air
racing duri ng the golden years.
Volume 1 and 2 @ $14.95 each - acid
$1.50 for postage and handling. Special -
both volumes $28.50 postage free. Send- check
or money order to: EAA Aviation Foundation,
Wittman Airfield, Oshkosh, WI 549033065.
26 NOVEMBER 1984
Relive EAA'84
Anytime...
Aspecial EAAvideo team wason
theconvention siteeveryday,
capturing all thecolorand
excitementofEAAOSHKOSH '84.
Only EAA hastheexperienceto
producethis uniqueand dazzling
view ofthe world's greatest
aviation event.
The EAAOSHKOSH '84
documentarywill feature the
airplanes, airshows, forums, the
arrival ofRutan's VOYAGER, the
JohnnyRivers' concert, Theatre in
theWoods, and on and on...with
exciting coverage you musthave
tocompleteyourvideo library.
OTHERVIDEO TAPES AVAILABLE
ADD $2.50 FOR POSTAGE AND HANDLING
$29.95
WISCONSIN RESIDENTS ADD 5%SALESTAX
EAAOSHKOSH
Video tapes may be ordered from:
'84 VIDEOTAPE
EAA FoundationVideoSales
TODAY! $52.00
EAA - Wittman Airfield
Oshkosh,WI 54903-2591
*AVAILABLE FOR INTERNATIONAL - SECAM AND PAL $25.00 EXTRA
EAAOSHKOSH '83
A26 minutefilm produced by Cumulus
Productions for EAA which covers the complete
'83 Convention and the opening ofthe EAA
Aviation Center.
$39.00
EAAOSHKOSH '77
Covers the complete '77 Convention plus some
excellentexcerpts ofthe SpiritofSt. Louis
CommemorativeTour.
$39.00
AERONAUTICALODDITIES
Ahistorical film which covers the odditiesand
comediesofthe historyof flight. Has all the
newsreel footage you have alwayswanted for
your private library, combined intoone17 minute
show.
WE SAW IT HAPPEN
70 minutescovering the historyofflight with
historical footage from the early 20's through
the present.
$59.00
WINGSON DREAMS
The now famous John Denver film which is an
innovative in-depth lookat EAA, itsprograms,
and features the ground breaking of the new
Aviation Center.
$29.00
BASIC WELDING
Learn the intricaciesofwelding with practical
demonstrationson the subject. An excellent
film for the builder.
$39.00
ORDER YOUR
VINTAGE AIRPLANE 27