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DONORREPORT
May 1-4, 2014
Impact Hub Seattle
220 2nd Ave. S.
Partners
Sponsors
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To our donors and supporters:
We are thrilled to report back to you that Hack to End Homelessness was a huge success,
and we cannot thank you enough for helping to make it happen.
As many of you know, this effort began organically. A group of us at Impact Hub Seattle
decided to do something about the homelessness we see every day outside our doors. We
did not know was how hard it would be to nd things our community could do that were
both meaningful and compelling.
The immediate suggestions from our community--distribute sack lunches, build apps--met
with resistance from experienced change-makers who have seen such efforts fail to make
impact before. On the other hand, the rst suggestions from partners--give money, attend
trainings, or participate in long-term projects--did not resonate with our volunteers.
In other words, we discovered a huge gap between those with vested interests in the
community and the newcomers our city has welcomed during this most recent tech boom.
Not only was that frustrating for us as would-be volunteers, it exposed a problem that, left
unsolved, could lead to major problems for Seattle even in the near future.
As our local economy grows, we want to make sure that the most vulnerable are not left
behind--or worse, pushed off the margins, deepening inequality and exacerbating political
rifts. Rather, we think Seattle can be a global leader in sustainable urban growth. We
believe that the more people recognize that homelessness impacts families, children, and
adults who sincerely want to escape their situation, the more inclined they will be to treat it
as a problem that can be solved.
With Hack to End Homelessness, we have unlocked a model for collaboration that can be
applied to any number of issues in any number of places. In fact, we have been contacted
by organizations from Vancouver to Vienna who want to undertake similar efforts in their
own communities.
This report highlights just some of the outcomes of the event. We hope you will be pleased
to see the impact your support has had, not only on local nonprots and the people they
serve, but on those who are watching our efforts around the world.
It has been an honor and privilege to work with so many people dedicated to solving one of
our communitys most pressing socioeconomic problems. We succeeded this time around
by listening to the community. The single most important thing we can ask for now is to
keep the conversation going.
At the end of this report, well offer some ideas for how we can continue our collaboration.
For now, we are excited to walk you through the highlights of our event, show you how we
did it, and demonstrate some of the impact weve had already. We hope you are as eager
to see the results as we were.
Yours,
The Hack to End Homelessness Organizing Team
EVENT SUMMARY
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MAIN HIGHLIGHTS
! 14
projects pitched by local nonprots
! 63
participants in the hackathon
! 200+
people who attended at least one event May 1-4
! 3063
approx. volunteer hours donated before, during, and after the event
! 20,000
estimated number of people who visit Impact Hub Seattle each
month and would have seen our exhibits on homelessness
! 50,000
number of people experiencing homelessness in the United States
who benet from the advocacy, services, and outreach of our partners
! 8.5 million
total potential reach of the event through print, broadcast, digital, and
social media
! 100 percent
Partners who said they would participate again themselves and
recommend a similar event to others
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Great job! Great idea! Great weekend!
-- Union Gospel Mission
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Of the 14 projects pitched:
- 12 were selected
- 9 total teams formed
- 6 products are already in use
Some highlights include:
! Team WeCount, led by Graham Pruss of Seattle University and Jeff
Lilley of Union Gospel Mission. The app empowers volunteers to
track their interactions with people sleeping outside and make note
of any needs, streamlining and geocoding the data collected and
reducing the time spent by Mission staff to sort through volunteer
records.
! Team Haystack, led by Committee to End Homelessness in King
County, who mapped homelessness across 25 U.S. metro areas,
visualizing rates of homelessness as well as availability of shelter.
This was featured in a review story by Fast Company that was
shared 405 times.
! Team YouthCare, which developed an Excel macro to help
YouthCare analyze its current spreadsheet data and completed
work on a new interface for data collection that will make future
analysis much easier.
You can nd more information about all these projects, as well as direct
links to those hosted online, at hacktoendhomelessness.com.
SPECIFIC OUTCOMES
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The site is already starting to generate
revenue.
-- Sanctuary Art Center
The tool saves one of our staff
members four to six hours a month.
-- YouthCare
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OUR REACH
The total number of people who were exposed to our efforts through print, online, and social media,
is at least 8.3 million.* While much of our coverage has been local, our team has received requests
for information and support from organizations in Vancouver, BC, Portland, Los Angeles, Austin,
New York, and Vienna, Austria.
Additionally, more than one thousand people interacted with this content, sharing it with their own
friends and networks, and copies of the below articles have been syndicated on numerous external
sites.
Here is the breakdown of channels and estimated audience size, where possible:
Prior to event During event After event Social
GeekWire (800k)
ProPublica (490k)
KIRO radio (433k)
Crosscut (164k)
Puget Sound
Business Journal (18k)
Real Change (16k)
The Urbanist
4Culture
KOMO 4 television
(multiple airs; 371k)
KIRO 97.3 radio
(433k)
Fast Company/Fast
Coexist (6.3m)
Geekwire (800k)
Real Change
centerfold story (16k)
Codefellows blog
220&Change blog
Intels MasheryDev
blog
Twitter (19.8k direct
impressions; 938
interactions with 528
unique users)
LinkedIn (UW alumni
group, 34k members,
21 interactions)
Want to learn more? Live links to these stories are featured on our website at
hacktoendhomelessness.com.
*Calculated for us by an advertising and campaign professional with experience in audience
measurement, based on substantive, original stories alone. Excludes event announcements and
syndications to secondary publishers.
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All the projects helped bring hidden data to
light, and potentially help advocates for the
homeless do their work.
-- Ben Schiller, Fast Company
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$27,323.86
the total cost of our event (not including labor, taxes, or fees)
$14,864.00 (54 percent)
donations and in-kind contributions
$12,459.86
direct cash outlays, of which
! 48 percent was covered by sponsorships
! 29 percent was covered by ticket sales
! 23 percent was covered by Seattle University
Liability and nancial risk were covered by Whoa Strategies, with expenses
fronted by Candace Faber, Ethan Phelps-Goodman, and Aparna Rae.
$229,725
estimated value of total volunteer hours contributed throughout event
(3063 hours x avg. value of $75/hour)
1510 hours
contributed by 5-person organizing team alone
Spending by category:
OUR FUNDING
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OUR FEEDBACK
We asked our attendees what they thought....
This could change the way non-prots think about their work, pace,
overall approach.
[This is] an amazing way to give the technology community a way to dig in.
The location was immensely powerful.
You guys did it absolutely the right way.
This is the beginning of learning how much non-prots can harvest from
technology.
It was really two communities coming together and learning from each
other.
... and asked non-prots what was they valued most.
community engagement and awareness
rethinking the workstyles and priorities in non-prots
the relationships
the connections to people
the community you built
the time spent thinking specically about technology and the place it
holds in our work
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This event would not have been possible without the generous support
of individual sponsors, advisors, and volunteers, who each deserve our
thanks!
VOLUNTEERS
Seth Vincent of Code for Seattle, who built our website.
Kathleen Warren from Urban ArtWorks, who designed our logo.
Sol Villarreal, who served as our emcee.
Anne Blackburn and Virginia Shelby Powell, who helped with our art display.
Dan Lamont, Rex Hohlbien, and Michael Maine, who lent their art and time.
Rosa Mitsumatsu Scotti, who helped us to coordinate the ArtWalk.
The team from Seattle-based startup REBLS, led by Bryan Copley.
All our amazing students from Seattle University.
Other volunteers, including Emily Shoemaker and Evan Barocas.
ADVISORS
Hakon Verespej, Madrona Venture Group
Lindsey Engh, Impact Hub Seattle
Sarah Studer, Impact Hub Seattle
Rebecca Lovell, Startup Seattle
Mike Mathieu, FrontSeat and WalkScore
John Sechrest, Seattle Angel Conference Founder
Jennifer Barry and Anne Blackburn from Shunpike Arts
Yonnas Getahun, Jeanine Anderson, and Juan Alonso-Rodriguez
Mark Peterson of Pointer PR
Richard Kendall and April Moh of Allison + Partners
INDIVIDUAL SPONSORS
Dave Nichols
Greg & Jenny Bellinger
Steph & Keerat Sharma
Val Sanford of Hopela
Chris Pirillo of Vlogger Fair
Cynthia Adkins
Gretchen Burger
Zakaria Zajac
Chad Johansen
Bhushan Mehendale
Hilary Lovelace
Joneil Custodio
ALSO: We would like to thank Starbucks Coffee, Essential Baking Company, and
DRY Soda for their donations of food and beverages during our event.
OTHER THANKS
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WHATS NEXT?
We worked hard to translate our good intentions into meaningful experiences for all
our participants and measurable impact on our community. Our next step is to
translate this into a more sustainable model for engagement by the tech community
that guarantees we can take advantage of everything we learned.
After this event, we are condent in our model. We made an impact on our
community by exposing our guests to the realities of homelessness, including family
homelessness. We provided valuable to support to non-prots by helping them
understand and take advantage of technological possibilities. We gave the tech
community an effective way to make a difference.
We also showcased our sponsors throughout the event and via our website and
social media channels, delivering a positive message about their brand and
commitment to sustainable growth in our community.

We are grateful to each of our supporters this time for helping us prove that it is not
only possible, but worthwhile, to engage Seattles tech community in meaningful
ways.
Please stay in touch with us as we move forward! You can follow us on Twitter
@hack2end, sign up for email updates on our website, or reach out to us via email.
Whatever happens next, we thank you for supporting us -- and for showing the world
that Seattle is a place where tech growth can benet everyone.
Many thanks,
The Hack to End Homelessness Organizing Team
Candace Faber, Catherine Hinrichsen, Peter Kittas, Ethan Phelps-Goodman, and Aparna Rae
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THANK YOU!
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Please keep in touch:
@hack2end
contact@hacktoendhomelessness.com
http://www.hacktoendhomelessness.com