River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 21 No.

861 • July 24 - August 6, 2014 2 Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com
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River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 21 No. 861 • July 24 - August 6, 2014 3 Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com
GUEST COMMENTARY
What I Don’t Like About Life in America
by John W. Whitehead
johnw@rutherford.org
T
here’s a lot to love about America and its
people: their pioneering spirit, their entre-
preneurship, their ability to think outside
the box, their passion for the arts, etc. Increasingly,
however, I find things I don’t like about living
in a nation that has ceased to be a sanctuary for
freedom.
Here’s what I don’t like about living in America.
I don’t like being treated as if my only value to
the government is as a source of labor and funds.
I don’t like being viewed as a consumer and bits
of data. I don’t like being spied on and treated as
if I have no right to privacy, especially in my own
home.
I don’t like government officials who lobby for
my vote only to ignore me once elected. I don’t
like having representatives unable and unwilling
to represent me. I don’t like taxation without
representation.
I don’t like being bullied by government
bureaucrats, vigilantes masquerading as cops, or
faceless technicians. I don’t like being railroaded
into financing government programs whose only
purpose is to increase the power and wealth of
the corporate elite. I don’t like being forced to
pay for wars abroad that serve no purpose except
to expand the reach of the military industrial
complex.
I don’t like being subjected to scans, searches,
pat downs, and other indignities by the TSA. I
don’t like VIPR raids on so-called “soft” targets
such as shopping malls and bus depots by
black-clad Darth Vader lookalikes. I don’t like
fusion centers, which represent the combined
surveillance efforts of federal, state, and local law
enforcement.
I don’t like being treated like an underling
by government agents who are supposed to be
working for me. I don’t like being threatened,
intimidated, bribed, beaten, and robbed by
individuals entrusted with safeguarding my
rights. I don’t like being silenced, censored, and
marginalized. I don’t like my movements being
tracked, my conversations being recorded, and my
transactions being cataloged.
I don’t like how the presidency has developed
into a neo-monarchy replete with all the luxury
and lasciviousness of the feudal lords of old.
I don’t like politicians who spend most of their
time running for office, fundraising, and enjoying
being feted by lobbyists and corporations alike.
I don’t like being kept at a distance from my
elected representatives, including the president. I
don’t like free-speech zones, roving bubble zones,
and trespass laws that restrict Americans’ First
Amendment rights.
I don’t like laws that criminalize Americans
for otherwise lawful activities such as holding
religious studies at home, growing vegetables in
their yard, and collecting rainwater. I don’t like
the National Defense Authorization Act, which
allows the president and the military to arrest and
detain American citizens indefinitely. I don’t like
the PATRIOT Act, which opened the door to all
manner of government abuses and intrusions on
our privacy.
I don’t like the Department of Homeland
Security (DHS), which has become America’s
standing army in direct opposition to the dire
warnings of those who founded our country.
I don’t like military weapons such as armored
vehicles, sound cannons, and the like being used
against American citizens. I don’t like government
agencies such as the DHS, the Postal Service, the
Social Security Administration, and the Fish &
Wildlife Service stocking up on hollow-point
bullets. And I definitely don’t like the implications
of detention centers being built that could house
American citizens.
I don’t like the fact that since President Barack
Obama took office, police departments across
the country “have received tens of thousands
of machine guns; nearly 200,000 ammunition
magazines; thousands of pieces of camouflage
and night-vision equipment; and hundreds of
silencers, armored cars, and aircraft.”
I don’t like America’s infatuation with locking
people up for life for nonviolent crimes. There are
more than 3,000 people in America serving life
sentences for nonviolent crimes, including theft of
a jacket, siphoning gasoline from a truck, stealing
tools, and attempting to cash a stolen check. I don’t
like paying roughly $29,000 a year per inmate just
to keep these nonviolent offenders in prison.
I don’t like having my hard-earned taxpayer
dollars used against me.
I don’t like the partisan nature of politics
today, which has so polarized Americans that
they are incapable of standing in unity against the
government’s abuses. I don’t like the entertainment
drivel that passes for news coverage today.
I don’t like the fact that those within a 25-mile
range of the border are getting a front-row seat
to the American police state, as Border Patrol
agents are now allowed to search people’s homes,
intimately probe their bodies, and rifle through
their belongings – all without a warrant.
I don’t like public schools that treat students
as if they were prison inmates. I don’t like zero-
tolerance laws that criminalize childish behavior.
I don’t like a public educational system that
emphasizes rote memorization and test-taking
over learning, synthesizing, and critical thinking.
I don’t like police precincts whose primary
purpose – whether through the use of asset-
Continued On Page 17
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River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 21 No. 861 • July 24 - August 6, 2014 4 Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com
Rauner’s Plan Polls Well –
but Only in Broad Strokes
by Rich Miller
CapitolFax.com
ILLINOIS POLITICS
“T
his morning,” 1,063 respondents
were told the evening of July 17
during a Capitol Fax/We Ask
America poll, “Republican candidate for
governor Bruce Rauner released an economic
plan for Illinois.
“That plan calls for a freeze on property
taxes and rolling back the 2010 tax increase.
It also implements a new tax on
services, such as advertising,
legal services, and mini-storage
centers. We’d like to know
whether this type of plan would
make you more likely or less
likely to vote for him.”
Rauner had certainly tested
his service-tax proposal
backward and forward before
presenting it to the public last
week, so I figured it had to poll
fairly well. It did.
The poll found that 53
percent said they’d be more likely to vote for
Rauner, while just 32 percent said they’d be
less likely to vote for him and 15 percent said
it made no difference.
As we’ve discussed before, Rauner has
struggled a bit with women, but they actually
liked the idea more than men. Fifty-six
percent said the idea made them more likely
to vote for Rauner, while just 28 percent said
they were less likely. The male split was 47
percent more likey, 39 percent less likely.
The highest regional support for the plan
came from the suburban collar counties,
where Rauner did the best in the primary.
Sixty-six percent of collar-county voters said
the proposal made them more likely to vote
for Rauner, while 25 percent said less. The
split among Downstaters was 53-27, it was
49-38 among suburban-Cook County voters,
and he was upside-down in Chicago (where
he always polls poorly) 32-50.
Just 17 percent of Republicans said they’d
be less likely to vote for Rauner, while 66
percent said they’d be more likely. Among
independents, 56 percent were more likely
and 29 percent were less likely to vote for
him. And among Democrats, 33 percent
were more likely while 53 percent less likely.
Why does this look so popular? Well,
people hate that income-tax hike and they
hate their property taxes. On its face, this
could look like a magic bullet to folks.
There are no magic bullets, of course. If
there were, they would’ve already been used.
Rauner specified a mere $577 million
in new annual revenues via his service tax,
which is nowhere near the $8 billion he
wants to give up from the income-tax hike.
Rauner says he’d phase out that tax hike
over four years, and he’s said he could
accomplish this with economic growth.
According to the state’s Commission on
Government Forecasting & Accountability,
income-tax-revenue growth averaged just 6.8
percent between Fiscal Year 1998 and Fiscal
Year 2013. Rauner wants to increase those
revenues by almost 67 percent over just four
years.
“Rauner’s plan would
add more than a half-billion
dollars to state coffers but
wouldn’t come close to
replacing the $8 billion from
the taxes he would roll back,”
polling respondents were told.
“Do you think the state can
afford the Rauner plan?”
Illinoisans were split, with
41 percent of the respondents
saying the state can afford it
and 43 percent saying it can’t.
“They want the benefits of overall lower
taxes but doubt the viability,” said pollster
Gregg Durham. The poll had a margin of
error of 3 percent. Twenty-eight percent of
respondents were reached on mobile phones..
That second set of numbers might’ve been
far worse had more specifics been used.
“Too bad [Rauner’s plan] is entirely phony
and false and paid for by massive cuts to
education,” texted Governor Pat Quinn’s
campaign spokesperson, Brooke Anderson,
last week. “Wonder how that polls.”
Anderson rightly pointed out that the state
budget includes around $16 billion in “non-
mandated” expenditures; the rest is pretty
much required and/or locked-in spending.
Without massive, unprecedented growth,
Rauner would have to cut that $16 billion
in spending roughly in half – and education
also makes up half of that $16 billion. “Talk
about decimating public education – you’re
pretty much eliminating it,” Anderson said,
giving us a likely preview of the upcoming
TV attack ads.
Not to mention the massive fiscal cliff
created by this year’s state budget, which
adds billions in deferred costs to next year’s
budget. The only way to avoid that is to raise
the income-tax rate back up to 5 percent after
January 1, when it’s scheduled to go down to
3.75 percent.
Rauner’s campaign refused to talk about
specific phase-out percentages and timelines
last week. But the cold, hard reality is: That
tax hike isn’t going away very soon, no matter
what he says.
Rich Miller also publishes Capitol Fax (a daily
political newsletter) and CapitolFax.com.
Rauner specified
$577 million in new
annual revenues,
nowhere near the
$8 billion he wants
to give up from the
income tax.
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River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 21 No. 861 • July 24 - August 6, 2014 5 Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com
Westphal, who led the fine-art quilt
movement; Ted Hallman, who explored
plastics; and two artists who used emerging
technologies: Sherri Smith (Sloan telescope
images of the cosmos) and Cynthia Schira
(electronic Jacquard loom). Also represented
is Gerhardt Knodel, a pioneer of fiber
installations during the 1970s, with a 2011
entry titled Do You See What I See?
ART
Innovators & Legends: Generations in Textiles & Fiber, through September 7 at the Figge
Short on Legends, Loaded with Innovation
by Sherry C. Maurer
sherry_maurer@yahoo.com
I
t is as if a Jimi Hendrix concert outfit
collided and merged with great-grandma’s
doily and potholder collection in the 2009
Soundsuit by Nick Cave, part of the exhibi-
tion Innovators & Legends: Generations in
Textiles & Fiber that runs through September
7 at the Figge Art Museum.
Cave’s 97-inch-tall soundsuits enclose
the head and are made to be danced in,
akin to African practices where the body is
completely covered with an outfit. When
traditionally “danced,” an African ensemble
imbues the wearer with its particular
spiritual power. For full effect, Cave’s suits
need his performance energy and musical
accompaniment.
Yet his suits alone are still imposing in
size and detail. On the front of this suit at
the Figge is a colorful, kaleidoscopic array of
salvaged homemade crocheted and knitted
goods, the kind that lovingly protected
modest American tabletops. The back of the
suit presents an opulent spectacle of sequined
and beaded floral designs in gold, silver, and
jewel colors that visually spin and pop. All
of the components are unified by a common
shimmering black-beaded and -sequined
background.
The Figge’s newsletter notes that the
traveling exhibition, organized by the
Muskegon Museum of Art, includes more
than 50 artists who explore the technical
possibilities in fabric, thread, fiber, and yarn.
The exhibition title perhaps overreached
the capacity of a single undertaking. To
feature the “legendary” protagonists who,
beginning in the mid-1950s, rapidly moved
traditional fiber “craft” to “fine art” would
require a linear tracing of their progress and
profound change. The earliest pieces in this
presentation date to the mid-1980s.
Nonetheless, the included works –
mostly dating from the past 10 years – are
accomplished and innovative in their
technical mastery, surprising breadth of
materials, and strength of statement.
Cave, for example, might ultimately
prove to be “legendary.” He comes from a
large African-American Missouri family of
modest means, and the previously mentioned
suit references both a humble home and
an opulent gala, perhaps reflective of the
trajectory of his career.
Cave said in a 2012 PBS interview that
his soundsuits arose from a concern about
racial profiling and identity assumptions. The
doily/gala suit balances imagery of economic
and social disparity – a prevalent, unresolved
issue of our era.
Cave’s other 2009 Soundsuit in the exhibit
has pink and violet arcs and circles bobbing
on a dark-brown background, all made of
soft, straight human hair. While in jest I’d say
it looks like a cross between a Wookiee and
a lava lamp, it challenges our expectations
and prejudices about hair color: pinkish
blonde versus brunette versus violet streaks.
Cave has a sense of humor and a keen grasp
of pushing traditional materials in new
directions.
Many pioneering fine-art fiber artists are
noted in the exhibition catalog, but their
actual work is not represented. Among the
missing big names are Annie Albers, Jack
Lenor Larsen, Ed Rossbach, and Lenore
Tawney. Tawney once told me that when
she started in the mid-’50s at the Cranbrook
Academy of Art in Michigan, she wove
table runners as expected, but she graduated
as something new: an experimental fiber
sculptor.
Earlier trailblazers included in
Innovators & Legends are Katherine
Knodel lines up a kind of carnival
shooting gallery of three tiers of stylized
fringed heads, each of slightly different facial
configuration. Tipped heads reveal a drawing
design. Knodel states in the exhibition
catalog that the drawings are derived from
Victorian-period stencils “used by children
Sweaterman 7 by Mark Newport
Continued On Page 18
Globalization III by Gyöngy Laky
This Land by Sara Rockinger
Do You See What I See? by Gerhardt Knodel
She Was Happiest
When Surrounded by
Art by Dawn Wolford
Soundsuits by Nick Cave
River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 21 No. 861 • July 24 - August 6, 2014 6 Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com
Artisans and Students Make Hot Glass in a New Davenport Studio
Hearts of Glass
W
hen you first walk in the doors
of downtown Davenport’s
recently opened Hot Glass art
studio, there are a few things you might
notice right off the bat.
Initially, your eye is drawn to the
vibrant splashes of color on the shelving
units to the left: multi-hued glass
bowls, vases, and paperweights, all
located beneath a striking, meticulously
assembled, golden glass chandelier
that wouldn’t look out of place in the
ballroom of Beauty & the Beast.
To your right, you see much of the
studio’s equipment: a workbench and
containers of colored glass and a pair of
sizable furnaces, one of whose indicators
reveals its interior temperature to be just
over 2,300 degrees.
On the opposite side of the studio,
through the windows facing River Drive,
you’re treated to a view of Modern
Woodmen Park so picture-perfect that
the ballpark should consider using it on
souvenir postcards. (Hot Glass is located
at 104 Western Avenue, in the rear of the
Davenport Printing Company facility.)
But if you turn around and face the
direction you came in, you’ll find what
is the most beautiful sight in the entire
studio, at least for Hot Glass Executive
Director Joel Ryser and his co-founder
son Logan: a large sign on the wall
listing the names of local organizations,
businesses, and individuals who provided
the money, equipment, and experience
necessary to make their dream studio a
reality.
“All those people donated everything
we needed,” says Joel, pointing to the
sign during our recent interview. “Some
gave us materials, some gave advice and
helped me write grants, some of these
folks did all the labor along with myself
and Logan ... . It’s been a real community
effort.”
And an effort that its founders hope
will also greatly benefit the community.
In addition to Hot Glass serving as a
downtown art studio with fee-based
classes, the Rysers plan for their 501(c)3
charitable organization to be a valuable
resource for area students, with youths
able to enjoy tuition-free programs and
the opportunity to join the studio’s “Glass
Team” of working apprentices.
“It’s been hours and hours and hours
and hours of work,” says Logan, who,
like his father, teaches glass-blowing
techniques at the studio. “Starting this
business has been a journey and a
dream.”
But as Joel adds, the dream hasn’t been
fulfilled quite yet. “We still need help
from people in the community. I put
my hand out for months to do this, and
there’s a time and place for donations,
but I’d rather earn what I want to do
now. It takes a lot to run this place, with
the furnaces and oven and everything.
I mean, if we don’t turn anything on, it’s
not gonna be very expensive ... .”
Artistic Juices
Many Quad Citians know Joel Ryser
from his years of coaching football at
Moline High School, serving as the
team’s head coach from 2001 to 2009.
Yet over his 25-year teaching career at
the school, Moline High’s chair of the
Fine Arts Department has also been a
fierce proponent of visual-arts education,
particularly in the field of glass.
“I fell in love with it in college,” says the
Eastern Oregon University graduate of
his fascination with glass. “I was a potter
and a glass artist. But the thing about clay
is ... I can make whatever I want at the
wheel. But once you make it, you have to
let it dry before you do the other steps,
and then you have to let it dry again, and
then you have to fire it, and then you
have to glaze it, and then you have to fire
it again ... . I like it, but it’s just too slow.
And you just don’t get those colors.
“Also, with pottery, you’re by yourself,”
Joel continues. “But in glass, you have to
work as a team – at least on bigger pieces.
And because of all my years as a coach,
teamwork was always a big thing, so I felt
really comfortable with that.”
Joel had implemented flame-working
and fusing into the art curriculum at
Moline High, and – following his 2009
retirement from coaching – also spent
two years honing his glass-blowing skills
alongside Quad Cities glass artist Mark
Fowler.
“That really got my artistic juices
flowing again,” he says. “I didn’t really
do a lot of art when I was coaching and
was missing it terribly. And that’s when
we started to do classes with at-risk kids”
that were funded through a Moline High
“Lights on for Learning” grant.
“My idea for that,” says Joel, “was to
bring in at-risk students, and bring their
parents with them, and to have them
blow glass with each other so they could
develop a better relationship.” Yet while
the program “fell through” after two
years, Joel had long been considering an
even bigger artistic venture.
“It was probably about 15 years ago,”
he says. “I was watching Sunday Morning
on CBS, and they had a segment about an
artist named Dale Chihuly, who started
a program in Tacoma, Washington,
called Hilltop Artists. It was a program
for at-risk teens from a really bad area
of town – a lot of drugs and crime and
drop-outs. And if they enrolled in the
program and got their GED or got back
into school, they could come in and learn
how to blow glass. Even if they were rival
gangs or whatever, they could go there
and work together and learn how to
communicate with other kids.
“I saw that,” Joel continues, “and it just
turned me on. I had taped it, and I would
show it to the kids in my high-school
class. ‘Someday, we’re gonna do this.
We’re gonna bring kids in, and show you
all how to blow glass, and everyone will
work together.’
“I mean, when I was coaching, it was
pretty intense. It was high-energy, and
COVER STORY
Photo by Meghan McLaughlin
Joel Ryser
River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 21 No. 861 • July 24 - August 6, 2014 7 Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com
by Mike Schulz
mike@rcreader.com
I did a lot of character-development
stuff with the kids, and I thought I was
reaching them pretty well. So I wanted
to find another way to do it. And after
working with Mark Fowler, I knew I had
to blow glass. That was just it. I thought I
was in heaven.
“So this,” Joel says, with a smile, as
he looks around the Hot Glass studio,
“seemed like a way to combine everything
I loved. What my passions were.”
The Glass Bug
At first, says Joel of the studio’s origins,
“I was about ready to do it out of my
house. I have a pretty-good-sized garage
where I have my potter’s wheel and a kiln
and everything where I would do my clay.
But once I got the glass bug from Mark
and worked with him for a couple years,
I was moving everything out of my clay
shop at home and was gonna make it a
glass place.
“But really, that wasn’t a very good
locale for it,” he adds. “So that’s where
Logan came in.”
Joel’s son, who will be entering Drake
University as a senior this fall, says his
own interest in visual art “always came
through my Dad. Back in the day, he
would make these huge fish out of
pottery, and my friends would see the
work and be like, ‘Your Dad did this?!’
“So I always knew about it and always
respected it,” Logan continues, “and about
three or four years ago, I started doing a
couple workshops with him. And once I
actually started blowing glass, I just ... . It
was shock and awe. I love it.”
But beyond the art, he says, “I’ve
been into entrepreneurship, and have
always wanted to get into business to
help change lives. So when I caught on
with my dad’s idea to start a glass shop, I
thought, ‘Let’s do it on a large scale. Let’s
reach as many people as we possibly can.’”
Joel says, “Logan had a friend who
used to rent space here [in the Davenport
Printing Company facility], so after they
told me about it, I said, ‘Let’s call the
owner and tell him our idea.’ Originally,
we were gonna look upstairs, where
there’s a big storage area. But the owner,
John Liljequist – a great guy – brought
us in here and said, ‘You want this space,’
because it had its own entrance and
would be much more private.”
Yet while the Western Avenue space
was an appropriate size for a studio
requiring several ovens and furnaces, “I
still needed a lot of convincing,” says Joel,
“because once you start something like
this, you have to maintain it and sustain
it. And I still work full-time as a teacher.
I have five more years before I retire. So
on top of thinking. ‘How are we gonna
sustain it?’, I thought, ‘How are we gonna
do it?’ Because I didn’t have enough
money to begin this myself.”
Pointing to the sign by the Hot Glass
doorway, Joel says, “So I started talking to
some of these folks.
“The first ones I went to were GETT
Industries,” the Milan-based machining
company. “A friend of mine named
Timmy Edwards owns the business, and I
brought him some pictures of equipment
and said, ‘Could you make me some of
this stuff?’ And he said, ‘Yeah, I think
so,’ and got me together with one of
my old friends from high school, Tim
Miner, who’s the general manager there. I
hadn’t seen him in 20 years, and Timmy
[Edwards] says, ‘This guy’s gonna take
care of you. Just work with him.’
“And Tim took it by the horns,” Joel
continues. “They made this furnace – it’s
called a glory hole. They made two of
those, actually. They made two yokes.
Two benches. Two marvers. The pipe-
warmer. And they donated everything.
Probably $80,000 to $90,000 worth of
stuff.
“So then I thought, ‘Okay, well, if
they believe in the idea, maybe I can get
somebody to do my electrical.’ So I went
to an old friend of mine, Jeff Lanum,
Continued On Page 16
wqpt.org
S E A S O N T WO
Miss Fisher’s
Murder
Mysteries
All new episodes
Sundays 9:00pm
Tuesdays 9:00pm
Photo by Meghan McLaughlin
River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 21 No. 861 • July 24 - August 6, 2014 8 Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com
covered eyes, and, most significantly,
her stoic, slightly condescending, mildly
angry demeanor. What’s even more
wonderful about Israel’s portrayal are its
undertones of evil power and wrath, as if
her controlled countenance is really just
Mephistophilis’ effort to hold back her
true, much more terrifying nature.
Among Faustus’ first demands is
knowledge of the true nature of the
universe, and to oblige, Mephistophilis
calls forth demons to demonstrate the
movements of our solar system. Actors
clad fully in black, and wearing masks
with red lights in the “eyes” atop their
heads (the performers walk with their
heads down but their masks facing
forward), enter holding glowing spheres
of various sizes and colors above them,
and mimic the movements of the planets
around the sun. Accompanied by one of
many effective bits of incidental music,
and with the only light coming from the
planets and the demons’ eyes, the scene is
mesmerizing, a true marvel to behold.
While designer Kate Farence is
responsible for many notable costumes,
none are as remarkable as her selections
for the demons representing the deadly
sins, which Molly Wilkinson’s truly
horrifying Lucifer – growling, purring,
and shrieking to terrifying effect
– summons to entertain Faustus.
Among them, Denise Yoder’s Wrath
brandishes two swords while clothed
in leggings that make it appear as if
flames are licking at her calves. Lauren
Moody’s Covetousnous wears a short,
sparkly gold dress and pulls items
from the pajama and bathrobe pockets
of James Palagi’s sleeping Sloth. (On
Friday, she also eyed an audience
member’s watch.) Sound designer
Spoerl, meanwhile, makes the scene
all the more delightful with incidental
music to accompany each demon,
matching their defining sin with
smooth jazz, German polka, or some
other befitting genre.
Faustus’ fate is the thrust of the
plot, but there are also side stories,
including that of a woman he
impregnates – Stephanie Moeller’s
Gretchen. While the role fits perfectly
with Moeller’s strongest character type,
that of the young innocent, the actor has
a chance to show her range when the girl
goes mad while locked away for atrocious
crimes. River Cities’ Reader employee
Nathan Klaus also provides much-
welcome, and tremendously amusing,
comic relief as Robin, an animatedly
crass, uneducated servant to Faustus
who dabbles in magic to impress Palagi’s
bumbling lothario Dick and lands them
a humorous punishment. Jessica White
earns a similar fate as Benvolio, a brash,
big-talking knight who belittles Faustus
publicly.
While the depictions are commendable
across the board, it’s the visual and aural
effects that really sell the Prenzie Players’
Doctor Faustus. I’m still marveling at the
effectiveness of such simple actions to
create a disturbingly haunting atmosphere
that’s perfect for the material.
Doctor Faustus runs at the QC Theatre
Workshop (1730 Wilkes Avenue,
Davenport) through July 26, and more
information and tickets are available
by calling (309)278-8426 or visiting
PrenziePlayers.com.
T
here were moments during Fri-
day’s performance of the Prenzie
Players’ Doctor Faustus in which
I was creeped out, but with a fascina-
tion that had me begging for more.
Director Jake Walker, sound designer
Elizabeth Spoerl, and lighting de-
signer Tyson Danner create effectively
ominous scenes, particularly those
involving chanting or whispering from
behind the black curtains surrounding
the audience, or red light pouring forth
from an opening in that cloth wall.
Chills ran up my spine, goosebumps
rose along my legs and arms, and the
hair on the back of my neck stood up
multiple times – all signs of a thrilling
production.
Aaron E. Sullivan leads us on this
dark path as the titular character in
Walker’s and Catie Osborn’s adaptation,
and amalgamation, of Johann Wolfgang
von Goethe’s and Christopher
Marlowe’s plays about the doctor who
sells his soul to the devil, in exchange
for 24 years of having Mephistophilis
at his beck and call. Sullivan starts
the production in physician mode as
Faustus examines and then administers
medication to a woman in the early
throes of the plague. He speaks in a
matter-of-fact nature before retiring
to his personal library to less clinically
bemoan the inadequacy of religious and
scientific tomes. Yet his frustration soon
turns into a breathtakingly passionate
awe and reverence for a book on the dark
arts, ushering in Doctor Faustus’ first
spooky element.
For his first magical practice, Faustus
attempts to summon a demon by way of
a conjuring circle. On Friday, the ring
Sullivan drew was so perfect, with an
equally flawless bowed triangle inside
of it and symbols along the edges, that
I wondered if the actor would indeed
successfully call forth a demon from Hell.
And the hell-spawn he does arouse is
Kitty Israel’s Mephistophilis – not a real
hellion, but a suitable substitute given
her black clothing with red stockings
and scarf, thick eyeliner drawn to a
point at the corner of her white-contact
Nathan Klaus and James Palagi
Vol. 21 · No. 861
July 24 - August 6, 2014
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Doctor Faustus, at the QC Theatre Workshop through July 26
The Devil “Made Him” Do It
By Thom White
thomasjasonwhite@gmail.com
THEATRE
River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 21 No. 861 • July 24 - August 6, 2014 9 Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com
B
eau Sample,
the bassist and
bandleader of
the Fat Babies, has
said he doesn’t want
his Chicago-based
septet to present the
jazz of the 1920s as
either a caricature or
museum piece.
By all accounts,
Sample and his
bandmates have succeeded wildly –
almost certainly a result of the Fat Babies
balancing its performance schedule
between bars and festivals.
The group has regular gigs at the Windy
City’s Green Mill lounge and Honky Tonk
BBQ – places where the nuances are less
important than the swing. “The people
who come to see us are really there to
dance and drink and have fun,” Sample
said in a phone interview last week. “A lot
of the bands playing this stuff [early jazz]
don’t have the opportunity to play for those
crowds. ... The dancers are a big influence
on what we do.”
The Fat Babies, he noted, are “trying to
put it [old-time jazz] back in the taverns,
where it came from. ... Basically, we’re
doing what people have always done –
which is just playing in bars for people
drinking and having a good time.”
But at festivals – such as the ensemble’s
upcoming gigs at the Bix Beiderbecke
Memorial Jazz Festival – audiences are
more likely to listen than dance. And
Chicago Tribune jazz critic Howard Reich,
in reviewing a performance at Katerina’s,
said the band thrives in that quieter
context, too: “Though there’s no denying
the energy that couples dancing at the
Green Mill add to the Fat Babies’ sets there,
this time one could savor the details of
voicing, color, and phrase that distinguish
this band from lesser counterparts.”
The group’s two releases, 2012’s Chicago
Hot and 2013’s 18th & Racine, both made
the Tribune’s list of the best jazz albums
of the year. Reich’s praise for the latter
album was concise and direct: “Few
ensembles today play early-period jazz as
authentically and exuberantly as the Fat
Babies, who prove it once again.”
Also discussing 18th & Racine,
AllAboutJazz.com wrote: “The relative
obscurity of these delightful pieces and
the deftness by which the dust of history
is polished off them exposes their raw
emotion and makes for a very intriguing
listening experience.”
For the Fat Babies’ first album, Sample
by Jeff Ignatius
jeff@rcreader.com
Back in the Taverns
The Fat Babies, July 31 through August 3 at the Bix Fest
said, the
group used
arrangements
they learned or
developed on
the bandstand
or in the studio.
But 18th &
Racine, he said,
was a reflection
of the group’s
development
since its founding in 2010.
“We definitely evolved, and started
doing more and more arrangements,” he
said. Those, he added, come from cornetist
Andy Schumm (a student of Bix’s music
whose own band has played the Bix
festival) and pianist Paul Asaro (heavily
influenced by Jelly Roll Morton and Fats
Waller): “They sound a little more lush.
... Obviously, we try to do them so they
sound spontaneous, but ... I would say
it’s a little more uptown ... . A little more
sophisticated, I guess.”
Sample – who’s in his early 30s and
also performs everything from rockabilly
to country blues (“I’ve played all kinds
of old American music”) – said that
when it comes to recording, his jazz
band tries to mimic the hi-fi sound of
the 1950s and ’60s, using only two or
three mics and recording to tape. “That
alone takes care of a lot of the things
that make [contemporary] recordings
sound unnatural in my opinion,” he said.
(Although the Fat Babies recorded at
Steve Albini’s Electrical Audio studio, the
bandleader said its acoustics and vintage
equipment made it a perfect fit for the
classic-jazz outfit: “The room he uses
sounds almost like a theatre.”)
At the Bix festival, you’ll likely hear from
the Fat Babies plenty of music by the man
who lends his name to the event – as well
as tunes that don’t play well to bar crowds.
Jelly Roll Morton’s “Freakish,” Sample said,
is “a really crazy arrangement that drives
dancers nuts. We don’t get to do that often
at the Honky Tonk BBQ.”
The Fat Babies are scheduled to play six sets
during the Bix Beiderbecke Memorial Jazz
Festival, running July 31 through August 3
in downtown Davenport. Single-event tickets
are $30, and all-day passes are $55. For
tickets, performance schedules, and more
information on the festival, visit BixSociety.
org.
For more information on the Fat Babies,
visit TheFatBabies.com.
MUSIC
River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 21 No. 861 • July 24 - August 6, 2014 10 Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com
Davenport, Iowa • 563.326.7804
www.figgeartmuseum.org
Grant Wood, Fertility, 1939, Lithograph, Museum Purchase: Friends of Art Acquisition Fund, 1965.31
Two Americans in Paris:
Stuart Davis and Grant Wood
Through November 2, 2014
Artists Grant Wood and Stuart Davis both studied in Paris during the1920s.
While both depicted scenes of American life in their art, they adhered to vastly
different styles. This exhibition features paintings and works on paper from the
Figge’s Grant Wood Archive as well as a selection of Stuart Davis lithographs
from a private collection.
Sponsored by Don and Connie Decker and Robert W. Baird
EXHIBITION OPENING
River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 21 No. 861 • July 24 - August 6, 2014 11 Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com
side career as a thief, prone to stealing
everything he appears in?
3:55 p.m.-ish: I’m at The Purge:
Anarchy, a sequel to the horror hit
about future America’s annual night of
legalized murder and mayhem, and my
first thought when I see his (inevitably)
victimized character on-screen is: poor
Zach Gilford. The Friday Night Lights
star begins the movie year with his Devil’s
Due wife impregnated by Satan, and now
this? The rare case of a fright flick that’s
brutally effective without actually being
fun, writer/director James DeMonaco’s
outing takes some unexpected narrative
detours, and sets up intriguing
possibilities for future Purge installments.
But this violent cat-and-mouse tale is too
grim to be a good time and photographed
too darkly for us to see much of the bad
time, and you can count the sincerely
scary moments on the fingers of one
hand. Castmates Frank Grillo, Carmen
Ejogo, and Justina Machado, though, are
excellent, and John Beasley has a haunting
presence as an old man who grumbles,
“I’m going to try to sleep through this
godforsaken holiday.” Just like me on New
Year’s Eve.
6:15 p.m.-ish: Home with some
dinner and a new book. A book of movie
essays. I really have to start expanding my
interests.
For reviews of Dawn of the Planet of
the Apes and other current releases, visit
RiverCitiesReader.com.
Follow Mike on Twitter at Twitter.com/
MikeSchulzNow.
Movie Reviews
by Mike Schulz • mike@rcreader.com
F
riday, July 18, 10:30 a.m.-ish: My 3D
glasses in place, I prepare to watch the
animated sequel Planes: Fire & Rescue
with surprisingly vivid memories of its
precursor, probably because it was released a
mere 11 months ago. I’m really hoping that,
this time around, director Roberts Gan-
naway’s tale of anthropomorphic vehicles
with bulging eyes and recognizable celebrity
voices won’t remind me of Pixar’s Cars
every three minutes, and happily, it doesn’t.
Instead, I’m frequently reminded of the as-
tronaut epic The Right Stuff, which is a much
cooler movie to pilfer from.
With Dane Cook’s crop-duster Dusty
newly hampered by a broken gearbox, the
champion racer now takes up with a national
park’s team of emergency firefighters,
leading to all manner of visually beautiful,
if dishearteningly dull, rescue sequences. In
truth, for this grown-up, the unfortunate
blankness of the characters’ expressions
– which seem vacant even in the midst of
danger – makes much of the entire movie
dishearteningly dull. But the numerous
Right Stuff references (A Yaeger-like free fall
from the heavens! A wall of deceased-flier
photos! Ed Harris!) help make the film more
enjoyable than the first Planes, as do some
ticklish bits of business and vocal performers
(Hal Holbrook! Julie Bowen! Stiller &
Meara!). Second-best bit: a ChiPs parody
featuring the voice of Erik Estrada. Best bit: a
broken-down car explaining his misery with
“She left me for a hybrid. I didn’t even hear
it coming.”
12:15 p.m.-ish: Even though I eventually
pay dearly for my curiosity, I find myself
mildly anticipating writer/director Daniel
Lusko’s Persecuted, because the film’s IMDb
page revealed
that Dean
Stockwell was
among its
cast, and in all
honesty, I was
sure the man
died years
ago. Blessedly,
he didn’t,
even though
the great
character actor doesn’t look terribly well
here. But I don’t know how anyone could
look good in this hopelessly, staggeringly
feeble folly for the religious ultra-right – a
thrill-less political thriller whose plotting
is wholly absurd, whose characters make
utterly no sense, and whose dialogue can
only be considered dialogue because its
unfathomable sentences boast nouns and
verbs. James Remar, who has played no end
of screen psychopaths, portrays some sort of
heroic televangelist whose global popularity
makes him a threat to the government’s
proposed “Faith & Fairness” bill, and I find
myself suppressing laughs on a regular
basis: at the casting of actor and former
Republican Senator Fred Dalton Thompson
as Remar’s cigar-chomping pastor father; at
the hysterically hammy facial contortions of
co-star Brad Stine; at absolutely everything
involving what are clearly the most dim and
ineffectual FBI agents ever. Lusko’s movie is
like what you’d get if you mixed The Fugitive,
The Firm, and Michael Clayton in a blender
and served it with a communion wafer, and
it all ends with one of those patronizing
“What would you do?” finales that used to
climax 1950s educational shorts on dating
etiquette
and hygiene.
I leave the
auditorium
feeling the
need to either
immediately
shower or …
1:55 p.m.-
ish: … catch
an R-rated,
profanity-
laden entertainment with almost no
redeeming moral value whatsoever. Success!
Unfortunately, the film I’m at is director
Jake Kasdan’s Sex Tape, which turns out to
be pretty lame. Cameron Diaz and Jason
Segel play married parents whose recorded
attempt to spice up their love life results in
three hours of naked calisthenics hovering
in the cloud, and consequently viewable to
the couple’s iPad-toting acquaintances. As
even the characters eventually conclude, this
really isn’t that big a deal, and this slapstick’s
attempts to make it one are generally forced,
protracted, repetitive, and unfunny. Still,
it’s easy enough to sit through. The leads
are friendly, if not as inspired as they were
together in Kasdan’s 2011 comedy Bad
Teacher, and second bananas Rob Corddry,
Ellie Kemper, Nancy Lenehan, and grade-
schooler Giselle Eisenberg help enormously.
(Jack Black, unfortunately, not so much.)
Finest of all is Rob Lowe, whose coke-
snorting nebbish with the ear-to-ear grin
proves as riotous, and as essential to the
proceedings, as the actor’s lacquered, barely
ambulatory plastic surgeon in 2013’s Behind
the Candelabra. He’s been wonderful for
years, but when exactly did Lowe begin his
Mike and the Bearable, Horrible, Not-Good, Fairly Bad Day:
Notes on Another Quadruple Feature
Planes: Fire & Rescue
by Mike Schulz • mike@rcreader.com by Mike Schulz • mike@rcreader.com
River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 21 No. 861 • July 24 - August 6, 2014 12 Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com
What’s Happenin’
Music
Jackson Emmer and Sam Moss
Rozz-Tox
Saturday, July 26, 8 p.m.
A
s the late, great jazz trumpeter Louis
Armstrong once said, “All music is
folk music. I ain’t never heard a horse sing
a song.” Be that as it may, Rock Island’s
Rozz-Tox venue, on July 26, will turn into a
folk-music paradise during its combined set
with artists Jackson Emmer and Sam Moss –
gifted folk musicians with more in common
than just, you know, not having four legs and
a mane.
With 21 self-released records under
his belt, Jackson Emmer is one of the
most prolific and gifted performers on
the American folk-music scene. An active
member of the old-timey band the Howling
Kettles, the Colorado-based Emmer has
opened for the likes of David Lindley and
the Devil Makes Three, and – with his
gifts extending to the mandolin – he was
memorably described by fellow folk artist
Will Stratton as “a cold, tall glass of water
from a spigot out in the backyard.”
Moss, meanwhile, is based in New England
and has eight well-received solo albums to his
name. With his Appalachian and Americana
stylings also earning him a devoted fan base
through his frequent tour stops, Moss is a
modern finger-picking master, and his talents
even earned him a 2012 residency at New
Hampshire’s esteemed MacDowell Colony.
Yet beyond their statuses as acclaimed
folk musicians, more links Emmer and Moss
Theatre
Monty Python’s Spamalot
District Theatre
Friday, August 1, through Sunday, August 17
T
he cheeky, ridiculous, hilarious musical
comedy Monty Python’s Spamalot runs at
Rock Island’s District Theatre from August 1
to 17, and as the venue has been the frequent
home to similarly Tony-dominating smashes
– Avenue Q, Chicago, Next to Normal – the
show’s eventual booking, while welcome,
wasn’t necessarily a surprise.
But what was a surprise, when recently
announced, was that the home itself was
moving, as the District Theatre is now located
three doors down from its
former site, in the space that
previously housed the Grape
Life Wine Emporium.
“To be honest, it’s a surprise
to us as well,” says the theatre’s artistic director
– and Spamalot director – Tristan Tapscott. “At
least given the time frame. It has been a topic
of discussion at several board meetings, but
certainly not something we had planned on
happening this soon.”
Yet as Tapscott adds, the former Grape Life
venue is also “a temporary space while another
location is found and remodeled. It’s all part of
a master plan. This move, and our partnership
with Rock Island Renaissance, is phase one
of a plan to rehab and design our own facility
that fits our wildest expectations. The facility
that we have in mind is going to take some
time to complete, and this is a very important
step toward that goal. People think we are
downgrading. We are not. We are making
plans and making progress. It’s very exciting.”
For those familiar with the show, the
company’s first production in its new locale
is pretty damned exciting, too. Adapted from
the film classic Monty Python & the Holy Grail,
Spamalot is a supremely goofy and tuneful
take on the legend of King Arthur. It’s also an
endlessly malleable slapstick that fits perfectly
with Tapscott’s plan for the new space’s own
malleability.
“This venue takes us back to the diversity
we once had in Davenport,” says Tapscott,
referencing his company’s former identity
as the Harrison Hilltop Theatre. With every
new show, “our goal is to create a different
environment for the audience the minute they
Music
New Duncan Imperials
Rock Island Brewing Company
Saturday, July 26, 8 p.m.
H
ard as it is to believe, RIBCO is
celebrating its 35th anniversary
this summer. In honor of the
milestone, the beloved District of
Rock Island venue is hosting an
outdoor concert with the equally
beloved party rockers of New Duncan
Imperials. The traditional 35th-
anniversary gift is coral. So make
sure you bring some when you arrive
for the band’s July 26 engagement,
because you can’t spell “New Duncan
Imperials at RIBCO” without “coral.”
Ha! And people say I strain in these
introductions!
But you also can’t spell “New
Duncan Imperials at RIBCO” without
“a mad blast,” which is what you’ll
surely have in this special event in the
Rock Island Brewing Company’s 35th-
Anniversary Concert Series.
Natives of Bucksnort, Tennessee,
NDI’s original musicians eventually
landed in Chicago, and found
themselves rocking the 1980s’ club
scene as part of the popular Windy
City group The Service. Yet after
that group’s disbandment, guitarist
Pigtail, bassist Skipper, and drummer
Goodtime decided to keep the music
going with their own ensemble, and
launched New Duncan Imperials in
1989 – meaning that while RIBCO
gets the coral this
summer, NDI lands the
silver.
Proudly proclaiming
themselves a
combination of “the
explosive elements of
white-trash culture,
Dada art, and Chuck Berry,” New
Duncan Imperials have, since their
1989 album Hanky Panky Varley Voo,
gone on to release more than a dozen
additional CDs, EPs, and tapes. And
the group’s unique, hard-rocking,
totally unpretentious talents led
Cosmik Debris magazine to rave about
“their smörgåsbord of sounds and
styles that touch on power pop and
punk to trash rock,” and Music Dish
magazine to call NDI’s songs “just
plain cool/weird, rife with punk-rock
guitar riffs and rapid-fire percussion.”
Consequently, if you enjoy your
rock dosed with a healthy blast of
humor (which you should expect
from a group whose song list
includes “I Love You, Honey, but I
Hate Your Band”), you won’t want
to miss the New Duncan Imperials’
Saturday-night set in RIBCO’s 35th-
Anniversary Concert Series. Wow, 35.
I remember my 35th birthday. Well ...
most of it. I spent it at RIBCO.
New Duncan Imperials perform
locally with an opening set by 3 on
the Tree, RIBCO’s 35th-Anniversary
Concert Series continues with August
2 headliners Tripmaster Monkey, and
more information is available by calling
(309)793-4060 or visiting RIBCO.com.
A n s w e r s : 1 – B , 2 – A , 3 – A , 4 – B , 5 – A , 6 – B . O n t h o s e l a s t t w o , t h e s a m e h a s f r e q u e n t l y b e e n s a i d i n r e f e r e n c e t o m e . T h e “ a d e q u a c y ” p a r t , n o t t h e g o o d s t u f f .
1) “Intensely personal, deeply felt, and well-played.” – Dusted magazine
2) “Giddily communicative, celebratory, and wildly, rhythmically physical.” – Dusted magazine
3) “Impressive singing and songwriting.” – Aspen Sojourner
4) “Deeply, softly, enchantingly beautiful vocals.” – No Depression magazine
5) “A Dylan-esque ability to conjure poetry out of ostensibly mundane lyrics.” – Adequacy.net
6) “Raw, intimate, occasionally lo-fi, and often brilliant.” – Adequacy.net
A) Jackson Emmer
B) Sam Moss
River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 21 No. 861 • July 24 - August 6, 2014 13 Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com
MUSIC
Thursday, July 24 – Sophistafunk.
Funk, hip-hop, and soul musicians in
concert, with an opening set by The
Mainstays. The Redstone Room (129
Main Street, Davenport). 8 p.m. $7. For
tickets and information, call (563)326-
1333 or visit RiverMusicExperience.
org.
Friday, July 25 – Jake Owen. Chart-
topping country musician in concert,
performing with guests Parmalee and
The Cadillac Tree. i wireless Center
(1201 River Drive, Moline). 7:30 p.m.
$22.50-42. For tickets, call (800)745-
3000 or visit iwirelessCenter.com.
Friday, July 25 – Ultraviolet
Hippopotamus. Rock and electronica
musicians in concert, with an opening
set by Half Naked. The Redstone
Room (129 Main Street, Davenport).
9 p.m. $8-10. For tickets and
information, call (563)326-1333 or visit
RiverMusicExperience.org.
Sunday, July 27 – Jessica
Hernandez & the Deltas. Detroit-
based rockers in concert, with an
opening set by Lewis Knudsen. Rozz-
Tox (2108 Third Avenue, Rock Island).
8 p.m. $10. For information, call
(309)200-0978 or visit RozzTox.com.
For a 2013 interview with Hernandez,
visit RCReader.com/y/hernandez.
What Else
Is Happenin’
What’s Happenin’
by Mike Schulz
mike@rcreader.com
Continued On Page 14
Moss, meanwhile, is based in New England
and has eight well-received solo albums to his
name. With his Appalachian and Americana
stylings also earning him a devoted fan base
through his frequent tour stops, Moss is a
modern finger-picking master, and his talents
even earned him a 2012 residency at New
Hampshire’s esteemed MacDowell Colony.
Yet beyond their statuses as acclaimed
folk musicians, more links Emmer and Moss
than divides them. Both are accomplished
guitarists and banjo players. Both write their
own material. Moss, too, recorded with the
Howling Kettles. And both have been the
beneficiaries of ecstatic reviews ... as the
adjoining quiz should prove. For each rave
about either the musician or his music, was it
Emmer or Moss who received the praise?
Admission to Jackson Emmer’s and Sam
Moss’ Saturday-evening concert is $5 at the
door, and more information on the night is
available by calling (309)200-0978 or visiting
RozzTox.com.
time to complete, and this is a very important
step toward that goal. People think we are
downgrading. We are not. We are making
plans and making progress. It’s very exciting.”
For those familiar with the show, the
company’s first production in its new locale
is pretty damned exciting, too. Adapted from
the film classic Monty Python & the Holy Grail,
Spamalot is a supremely goofy and tuneful
take on the legend of King Arthur. It’s also an
endlessly malleable slapstick that fits perfectly
with Tapscott’s plan for the new space’s own
malleability.
“This venue takes us back to the diversity
we once had in Davenport,” says Tapscott,
referencing his company’s former identity
as the Harrison Hilltop Theatre. With every
new show, “our goal is to create a different
environment for the audience the minute they
walk into the door.” And patrons can certainly
expect something completely different from
Spamalot, which boasts a cast including
Bob Manasco as Arthur, Matt Holmes as Sir
Lancelot, Christopher Tracy as Sir Robin,
Wendy Czekalski as Sir Galahad ... .
Wait. Wendy Czekalski as Sir Galahad?
And just what would the Python guys say of
this reverse-gender casting? Says Tapscott, “I
think they would say something like, ‘Women
have the perfect right to play a part in our
movement, Mike.’”
The District Theatre (now at 1623 Second
Avenue, Rock Island) will stage Monty Python’s
Spamalot Thursdays through Saturdays at
8 p.m. and Sundays at 2 p.m., and more
information and tickets are available by calling
(309)235-1654 or visiting DistrictTheatre.com.
Music
Gaelic Storm
The Redstone Room
Thursday, July 31, 7 p.m.
O
n July 31, the Redstone Room
will host a concert with Gaelic
Storm, the acclaimed Celtic band
that achieved international fame
when its original musicians were cast
as the steerage performers who got
Leonardo DiCaprio and Kate Winslet
dancing in Titanic. So considering
its familiarity with water, the group
should feel perfectly at home during
its summertime set in downtown
Davenport. (Hmm. Too soon?)
But Titanic was – pardon the
horrible pun – just the tip of the
iceberg for this noted traveling
ensemble that boasts a schedule of
more than 125 tour stops per year.
With 10 albums to its name since
the band’s self-titled 1998 debut,
including July 29’s “best of ” release
Full Irish, Gaelic Storm is currently
at the forefront of modern Celtic
(and Celtic-rock) masters. And if
you won’t take my word for it, ask
some of the artists the group has
opened for in recent years – if, that
is, you have access to the phone
numbers for Lyle Lovett, Emmylou
Harris, the Zac Brown Band, and the
Goo Goo Dolls.
Best known for explosive
renditions of traditional Irish and
Scottish tunes, Gaelic Storm’s first
taste of spectacular
Billboard success came
when the group’s
2004 CD How Are
We Getting Home? hit
number three on the
World Music Charts. That’s actually
the lowest World Music Charts
ranking for the band over the past
decade, as 2006’s Bring Yer Wellies
made it to Billboard’s number two,
and Gaelic Storm’s four subsequent
albums all strode comfortably to
number one.
Time will tell if the same will
hold true for the musicians’ Full
Irish release. But there’s no question
that the group – composed of Ryan
Lacey, Patrick Murphy, Peter Purvis,
Steve Twigger, and Kiana Weber – is
presently at the top of its game, with
Denver’s Examiner.com praising
Gaelic Storm live sets for their
“high energy, consistent interaction
with the audience, and exceptional
musical performance.”
The New York-based
IrishCentral.com, meanwhile,
writes, “Gaelic Storm blends indie
folk and world grooves with Celtic
tradition to serve up a ringside
seat for 15 rounds of pugilistic,
poultry-pounding sounds.” So enjoy
the group’s special Redstone Room
engagement. And maybe leave your
chicken at home.
For more information on
Gaelic Storm’s July 31 concert,
call (563)326-1333 or visit
RiverMusicExperience.org.
A n s w e r s : 1 – B , 2 – A , 3 – A , 4 – B , 5 – A , 6 – B . O n t h o s e l a s t t w o , t h e s a m e h a s f r e q u e n t l y b e e n s a i d i n r e f e r e n c e t o m e . T h e “ a d e q u a c y ” p a r t , n o t t h e g o o d s t u f f .
1) “Intensely personal, deeply felt, and well-played.” – Dusted magazine
2) “Giddily communicative, celebratory, and wildly, rhythmically physical.” – Dusted magazine
3) “Impressive singing and songwriting.” – Aspen Sojourner
4) “Deeply, softly, enchantingly beautiful vocals.” – No Depression magazine
5) “A Dylan-esque ability to conjure poetry out of ostensibly mundane lyrics.” – Adequacy.net
6) “Raw, intimate, occasionally lo-fi, and often brilliant.” – Adequacy.net
A) Jackson Emmer
B) Sam Moss
River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 21 No. 861 • July 24 - August 6, 2014 14 Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com
Thursday, July 31, through Sunday,
August 3 – 2014 Bix Beiderbecke
Memorial Jazz Festival. Annual
celebration of jazz great Beiderbecke,
featuring performances at numerous
downtown-Davenport venues,
workshops, children’s activities, and
more. $30 single-event tickets, $55
all-day passes. For information, call
(563)324-7170 or visit BixSociety.org.
Friday, August 1 – Jerry Garcia’s
Birthday Celebration. Tribute concert
with performances by folk-rock and
psychedelic musicians Old Shoe and Sun
Stereo. The Redstone Room (129 Main
Street, Davenport). 8 p.m. $8-10. For
tickets and information, call (563)326-
1333 or visit RiverMusicExperience.org.
Saturday, August 2 – Tripmaster
Monkey. Legendary rockers from the
Quad Cities in an outdoor reunion
concert for RIBCO’s 35th-Anniversary
Concert series, with opening sets by
Dylan Sires & Neighbors and The Last
Glimpse. Rock Island Brewing Company
(1815 Second Avenue, Rock Island). 8
p.m. For information, call (309)793-4060
or visit RIBCO.com.
THEATRE
Thursday, July 24, through
Saturday, September 6 – Love, Lies,
& the Lottery. World-premiering
farcical comedy by author/director Jim
Hesselman. Circa ’21 Dinner Playhouse
(1828 Third Avenue, Rock Island). Fridays,
Saturdays, Wednesdays, and July 24: 6-7
p.m. buffet, 7:15 p.m. pre-show, 7:45 p.m.
show. Sundays: 4-5 p.m. buffet, 5:15 p.m.
pre-show, 5:45 p.m. show. Wednesdays:
11:45 a.m.-12:45 p.m. plated lunch, 1
p.m. pre-show, 1:30 p.m. show. $29.26-
49.12. For tickets and information,
call (309)786-7733 extension 2 or visit
Circa21.com.
Thursday, July 24, through
Saturday, August 2 – Wonderful
Town. Composer Leonard Bernstein’s
Tony Award-winning musical comedy.
Clinton Area Showboat Theatre (311
Riverview Drive, Clinton). Thursdays
through Saturdays 7:30 p.m., Sunday and
Wednesday 3 p.m. $16-23. For tickets
and information, call (563)242-6760 or
visit ClintonShowboat.org.
Saturday, July 26, through Sunday,
August 3 – Plutus. Genesius Guild’s
presentation of Aristophanes’ comedy,
adapted by Don Wooten. Lincoln Park
(11th Avenue and 38th Street, Rock
Island). Saturdays and Sundays 8 p.m.
Donations encouraged. For information,
visit Genesius.org.
Thursday, July 31, through Sunday,
August 10 – Les Misérables. Broadway
musical based on Victor Hugo’s novel,
directed by Matthew Teague Miller.
Timber Lake Playhouse (8215 Black Oak
Road, Mt. Carroll). Tuesdays through
Saturdays 7:30 p.m., Sundays and
Wednesdays 2 p.m. $17-23. For tickets
and information, call (815)244-2035 or
visit TimberLakePlayhouse.org.
EVENTS
Friday, July 25, and Saturday, July
26 – 2014 Street Fest. Annual event
featuring live music, vendors, arts-and-
crafts vendors, children’s activities, and
more. Downtown Davenport between
Brady and Ripley streets. Free admission.
For information, call (563)823-2681 or
visit DowntownDavenport.com.
Saturday, July 26 – Quad-City Times
Bix 7. Annual foot race through the
streets of Davenport, with cash prizes to
the top finishers, the Junior Bix for young
racers, live music, and more. Downtown
Davenport. $37-45 registration, For
information, call (563)383-2489 or visit
Bix7.com.
Tuesday, July 29, through Sunday,
August 3 – Mississippi Valley Fair.
Annual event featuring carnival
attractions, vendors, a children’s petting
zoo, games, 4-H competitions, and
grandstand concerts with Eli Young
Band, Lady Antebellum, Craig Morgan,
Cheap Trick, Alan Jackson, and Jerrod
Niemann. Mississippi Valley Fairgrounds
(2815 West Locust Street, Davenport).
$4-10 daily admission, $50 fun cards
for all six days and grandstand-show
admission. For information, call
(563)326-5338 or visit MVFair.com.
Saturday, August 2 – Broadway
Historic District Wine Walk. Fourth-
annual fundraiser with attendees
visiting four premier homes and
enjoying wine and gourmet appetizers.
Broadway Historic District (Fifth to
16th avenues, 17th to 23rd streets,
Rock Island). 6 p.m. $35. For tickets and
information, call (309)786-2699 or visit
BroadwayDistrict.org.
Continued From Page 13
What Else Is Happenin’
River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 21 No. 861 • July 24 - August 6, 2014 15 Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com
River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 21 No. 861 • July 24 - August 6, 2014 16 Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com
get some high-school kids that catch the
glass bug – that get hooked on it and say,
‘I want to come back and help.’ And when
that happens, we’re gonna put ’em on
what’s called our ‘Glass Team.’ The Glass
Team is gonna be made up of students
who want to spend extra time here at the
shop as apprentices, and will help us with
commissions, like if a hospital or a casino
wants to commission us for one of those
big chandeliers. It takes a team of people
to make that.
“But we also want to be able to let the
students make their own things,” Joel
continues. “And once they accumulate
some art of their own, we want them to be
able to go to the farmers’ market and have
a booth, and be able to sell their stuff. We
want to give them practical experience in
business, as well. Because you can make
things that are attractive, but what are you
going to do with it when you’re done?
“Even if the kids don’t end up being
professional artists, they’ll definitely end up
with some skills here. I mean, you can come
in and learn something cool, but as you
walk out, you’re gonna realize you learned
about a little bit more than glass.”
Hot Glass will host an open house on
Friday, July 25, beginning at 5:30 p.m.,
and more information on the company
is available by calling (309)236-9223 or
visiting HotGlassArt.org.
Never Pick Anything Up
Off the Floor
Since Hot Glass’ opening, the Rysers
and fellow glass artist Andrew Lehn –
an art instructor and football coach at
Davenport West High School – have
led several free glass-blowing classes for
youths, experiences that Logan describes,
in the most positive way, as “absolutely
nuts.”
Says Logan, “In the first class we had,
there was this kid who was pretty quiet
at the beginning. But once he was on the
bench, and had the blowpipe in front of
him, he was totally engaged. And after
he made his first piece, he came up to me
and said, ‘When are we gonna be able to
come back here?’”
Laughing at the memory, he continues,
“They also get to pick from between three
or four different forms. There’s a straight
bowl, a fluted bowl, and a few different
types of vases. And they get to choose out
their color schemes – which is sometimes
the longest part of the day. ‘Wait, what if
I want to change it to this color ... ?’ But
it’s so great seeing these kids learning
vital skills, and being excited about it, and
seeing what creativity young minds can
come up with.”
But Joel adds that, for glass-blowing
novices, appreciation for the art is taught
with equal consideration for safety and
teamwork.
“The first thing we go over is safety,”
he says. “We show them how hot
everything is, and remind them never to
pick anything up off the floor. Anything.
Those furnaces run about 2,300 degrees,
and even if there’s a really cool-looking
piece on the floor, you gotta assume that
everything’s hot.
“And then we demonstrate,” Joel
Continued From Page 7
who owns Electric Doctor” in
Bettendorf. “I had his sons in
football, and so I had developed
a relationship with him, and
he said, ‘Yeah, I’ll donate the
electrical.’ He donated all the
panels, the transformers, all the
conduits – everything.
“So then I went to East Moline
Glass, where I talked to a friend
of mine, Larry Anderson – I
had his boys in football, too. He
said, ‘Yeah, I’ll donate some new
windows,’ and they put in new
windows for me.
“So then,” Joel continues, now
laughing at the ever-growing
examples of generosity, “I called
Pyxis Refractory and said, ‘Here’s
this project I’m doing ... .’ And they
donated all the refractory. And then I
called up Guardian Glass in DeWitt and
said, ‘Would you guys be interested in
backing this? It’s all about glass.’ ‘Oh yeah,
we’ll give you some materials.’ And they
gave me boxes and boxes of materials.”
However, Joel says that the process –
which took roughly 20 months from the
Hot Glass studio’s inception to July 2’s
opening-day celebration – wasn’t exactly
that simple. “It took a lot of patience,”
he says. “When you’re the guy asking for
donations, you can’t pressure them, you
know. It was tough sitting here waiting
for all of the different phases to be done.”
Plus, there was the waiting for money.
“I probably wrote 15 different grants,”
says Joel, “and didn’t get some.” But he
did receive them from, among other
groups, the Community Foundation
of the Great River Bend and Quad
City Arts, “and the Hubbell-Waterman
Foundation came through with a $20,000
matching grant. And once people saw
their name, I had my $20,000 match in
about two weeks. So we were able to buy
the tools, the color, the glass, a furnace,
the blowpipes ... . Some 40-grand worth
of stuff we had to buy that really couldn’t
be donated or made.”
Shaking his head, Joel says, “It was very
hard. And for a while, I was saying, ‘Man,
I feel like I’m not gonna get the money.
We might have to just give up.’ But after I
had GETT involved, and Electric Doctor
involved, and all these other people, I
just thought, ‘I can’t give up now. Look
at what all these people have given. We
gotta keep going.’ And we did. And look
what we made together.”
Hearts of Glass
by Mike Schulz
mike@rcreader.com
COVER STORY
continues, “and Logan
and Andrew and I work
as a team. Three people is
best. There’s the gaffer –
the designer who makes
all the decisions. And
then you have one person
giving air, and another
who’s either holding tools
or taking these wooden
paddles and shielding the
heat ... . And everyone needs everyone.
And we always say ‘please.’
“Then we split the kids into groups and
let them switch roles, so they get each
experience, and that’s when they really
learn, ‘Okay, these kids you’re working
with? They’re counting on you. You can’t
fall asleep on them. You have to be ready
to help.’ It’s all about being a team.
“One of my favorite sayings is by
[motivational speaker] Zig Ziglar: ‘You
can have everything in life that you want
if you would just help enough other
people get what they want.’ So we’ve
tried to use that message. ‘If you want
people to help you, you have to be able
to communicate with them properly, and
you have to be nice to them.’ We really
work on that. And they realize that.”
Yet while the Rysers hope to continue
their free courses for students, the
materials used, of course, do cost
money. Funds for these programs will
consequently come not only through
grants, but through fee-based instruction
for the public – with Hot Glass currently
offering two-hour private courses and
classes for couples – and corporate team-
building programs for area businesses.
Plus, says Joel, commissioned artworks
will likely bring in added revenue.
“Once we start having more classes,”
he says, “hopefully we’re gonna be able to
Photo by Meghan McLaughlin
Photo by Meghan McLaughlin
River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 21 No. 861 • July 24 - August 6, 2014 17 Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com
So I’m not giving up, at least not anytime
soon. But I’m also not waiting around for the
government to clean up its act. I plan to keep
fighting, writing, speaking up, speaking out,
shouting if necessary, filing lawsuits, challenging
the status quo, writing letters to the editor,
holding my representatives accountable, thinking
nationally but acting locally, and generally raising
a ruckus anytime the government attempts to
undermine the Constitution and ride roughshod
over the rights of the citizenry.
Constitutional attorney and author John W.
Whitehead is founder and president of the
Rutherford Institute (Rutherford.org) and editor of
GadflyOnline.com. His latest book, A Government
of Wolves: The Emerging American Police State,
is available online at Amazon.com.
PHOTOGRAPHY
(Editor’s note: The River Cities’ Reader
each month will feature an image or images
from the Quad Cities Photography Club.)
S
cott Nagel’s image of two eagles was
awarded the Image of the Year at
the recent annual awards banquet of
the Quad Cities Photography Club. Scott
shot his image at Lock & Dam 14 on a late
afternoon in early February. He said he
shot a sequence of 14 images of the same
“fish fight,” and that these fights seem to
be more common in February than in De-
cember. He felt lucky to get this pair flying
toward the camera side-by-side with both
heads visible while the light happened to
be good. He said he’s amazed eagles can fly
like this without hitting wings.
Scott used a Canon 1D Mark 4 with
a Canon 500-millimeter f/4 lens on a
tripod with a gimbal mount. He shot it at
1/1600 of a second at f/11 and ISO 400.
He used the suggestions for setting up his
camera that were given at a program by
Featured Image from the Quad Cities Photography Club
Stan Bousson at the club’s annual seminar
in January. He did basic processing in
Lightroom and then used Photoshop to
blur some distracting details on the far
shore.
The Quad Cities Photography Club
welcomes visitors and new members.
The club sponsors numerous activities
encompassing many types and aspects of
photography. It holds digital and print
competitions most months. At its meetings,
members discuss the images, help each other
to improve, and socialize. The club also
holds special learning workshops and small
groups that meet on specific photography
topics, and occasionally offers interesting
shooting opportunities. The club meets at
6:30 p.m. the first Thursday of the month
September through June at the Butterworth
Center, 1105 Eighth Street in Moline.
For more information on the club, visit
QCPhotoClub.com.
cheap labor for corporate America.
I don’t like feeling as if we’ve come full circle
back to a pre-Revolutionary era.
I don’t like answering to an imperial president,
who operates above the law. I don’t like the
injustice that passes for justice in the courts. I
don’t like prosecutors so hell-bent on winning
that they allow innocent people to suffer for
crimes they didn’t commit.
I don’t like the double standards that allow
government officials to break laws with
immunity, while average Americans get the book
thrown at them. I don’t like cops who shoot first
and ask questions later. I don’t like police dogs
being treated with more respect and afforded
more rights than American citizens.
I don’t like living in a suspect society. I don’t
Continued From Page 3
forfeiture laws, speed traps, or red-light cameras –
is making a profit at the expense of those they have
sworn to protect. I don’t like militarized police and
their onerous SWAT-team raids.
I don’t like Department of Defense and DHS
programs that transfer surplus military hardware
to local and state police. I don’t like government
programs that reward cops for raiding homes and
terrorizing homeowners. I don’t like local police
dressing and acting as if they were the military
while viewing me as an enemy combatant.
I don’t like being treated as if I have no rights.
I don’t like cash-strapped states cutting deals
with private corporations to run the prisons in
exchange for maintaining 90-percent occupancy
rates for at least 20 years. I don’t like the fact that
American prisons have become the source of
What I Don’t Like About Life in America
by John W. Whitehead
johnw@rutherford.org
like Americans being assumed guilty until they
prove their innocence. I don’t like the fact that
38 states require that a property owner prove his
innocence when police have laid claim to it in a
civil-forfeiture proceeding, whether or not that
individual has done anything wrong.
I don’t like technology being used as a double-
edged sword against us. I don’t like agencies
such as the Defense Advanced Research Projects
Agency developing weapons for the battlefield
that get used against Americans back home. I
don’t like the fact that drones will be deployed
domestically in 2015, yet the government has yet
to establish any civil-liberties protocols to prevent
them from being used against the citizenry.
Most of all, I don’t like feeling as if there’s no
hope for turning things around.
GUEST COMMENTARY
River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 21 No. 861 • July 24 - August 6, 2014 18 Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com
boyfriend you’re feeling sensitive about
your birthday, your future, or whatever
else, and you’ll at least find out where you
stand. Assuming you get the reassurance you
need, maybe you can do the loving thing
and put your partner’s interests up there
in importance with your own, perhaps by
celebrating your birthday the weekend before
the actual day. You might also try to get in the
habit of using spoken-word communication
– fun as it can be to surprise a man with a
game of naked charades, a.k.a. “Guess what
I’m thinking when I weep inconsolably
during sex!”
Clairol and Present
Danger
After reading a magazine article
about movie stars with “pixie cuts,”
my girlfriend got her hair cut really
short, and I absolutely hate it. She’s very
pretty, and short hair doesn’t change
that, but I love how she looks with long
hair. Is it controlling to ask her to grow
it back?
– Worried
The good thing about bad haircuts is
that they are fixable with time. (You can’t
tell your girlfriend, “Hey, I’m not a big fan
of your personality. Can you grow it out
a little?”)
When you first saw her new ’do, you
probably squeezed out something positive
like “Looks great!” – while thinking,
“Did your stylist go blind in the middle
of cutting your hair or pretty much right
when she started?” It’s good to be kind,
but because staying happy with somebody
takes staying attracted to them, it’s best
for your relationship to be kind in a
verging-on-honest way. Wait a few weeks
and say, “You know, you’d be beautiful
even if you shaved your head, but I love
your hair long. Would you grow your
hair out for me?” (You aren’t asking her
to bolt on a new set of boobs; you’re just
requesting more of what’s already on her
head.)
And yes, you do have to tell her what
you need, because if you don’t, there’s a
good chance you’ll get resentful and act
like a jerk about things that aren’t really
the thing. It might even lead to a breakup.
The bottom line: You’re all for her having
movie-star hair – as long as the movie
star it’s modeled on isn’t Chuck Norris.
Got A Problem? Ask Amy Alkon.
171 Pier Ave, #280, Santa Monica, CA 90405
or e-mail AdviceAmy@aol.com (AdviceGoddess.com)
©2014, Amy Alkon, all rights reserved.
Ask
the
Advice
Goddess
BY AMY ALKON
Tales from the Cryptic
My boyfriend of two years got an early
birthday present from his sister and her
husband: a really expensive, second-row
ticket for a major sporting event next
year. The trouble is that it falls on my
30th birthday (a Saturday). He knows I
usually don’t care about my birthday, and
I confess that I also judge people who care
about theirs. Still, I can’t help but feel
that my 30th is a bit of a milestone, and
I wanted to spend my birthday weekend
together somewhere with my boyfriend. I
understand that he doesn’t want to seem
ungrateful for his sister’s gift, and he’s
courteously told me about this conflict
well in advance. Do I need to just get over
myself? Or should I raise my concerns?
– Neglected
As a child, I was not one to turn down
birthday loot, but around age eight, I
developed a sort of jadedness about birthdays
that continues to this day. The way I see it, if
you are over 12 and not a cancer patient, do
we really need to throw you a party and give
you prizes for surviving another year?
It seems you communicated some similar
thinking to your boyfriend. Bizarrely, he
believed you. Yet apparently out of love and
consideration (and perhaps the suspicion
men have that all women are at least a little
nuts), he let you know a year in advance that
hockey or auto racing or whatever’s special
day coincides with your usually-not-so-
special day. What more was he supposed to
do – well, other than travel back in time and
ask your mom, “Hey, can you hold the baby
in one more week? There’ll be a scheduling
conflict in 30 years”?
Wait ... were you expecting him to turn
down the ticket? If so, what’s that really
about? Maybe a recent public-service
announcement from your ovaries? “Hi, we’re
also turning 30, as in, it won’t be long before
we retire, move to the countryside, and take
up scrapbooking.” You may also be looking
for what evolutionary psychologists call a
“costly signal” – some show of commitment
requiring such a big outlay of money, effort,
or forgone opportunity that it’s likely to be
sincere. (In the absence of a proposal and a
diamond, maybe it seems the least he could
do is light that ticket on fire.)
If you do want more from the relationship,
you may be able to get it, but expecting a
man to read your thoughts is like expecting
your dog to understand algebra. Tell your
as an aid in early image-making.” Behind
the tiers of heads, the design on a quilted
backdrop swirls in cursive freedom. The
artist seems to convey that it takes time and
effort to notice these features; careful seeing
is needed for much in life. He also may be
warning that rote learning results when
creativity is “shot.”
There is much innovation to
contemplate, beginning on the third floor
where the viewer is greeted with a flowing
silk organza robe, This Land (2010), by
Sara Rockinger. A combination of photo
silkscreen, freestyle machine embroidery,
line-drawing, and hand-stitching creates
the delicate imagery on the tan, wide flare
of the garment – an echo of the decorated
tipi skins of the Plains Indians. The imagery
moves in historical overview, beginning
with ancient pictographs. Fluid dyed sky
blues soak down the neck into the sleeves
where images of modern ships float. All is
balanced with restraint similar to a Japanese
ink-painting. The different techniques
unobtrusively work together for a beautiful
effect.
Several entries probe social issues,
including the spooky feral Chernobyl cats
by Sarah Wagner and Globalization III: Red
Ink (2005) by Gyöngy Laky. Globalization
III comprises three 32-inch-high capital
letters spelling “WAR.” The word is made
up of collaged tree cuttings, banded across
the center with a horizontal red line
of jostling painted commercial blocks.
Hundreds of screws attach the components
to a backing board, at a distance looking
like bullets that have pierced the wood.
Laky works with salvaged tree trimmings
as an environmental statement. She uses
the visual power of concrete poetry; here
the stark layout intensifies the presence of
the word. The letters suggest a deforested
landscape divided by a blood-soaked
trench. The bisection implies an impasse,
with no winners. The result is a succinct,
direct, and disturbing gestalt.
At the fourth-floor entry are the hand-
knit hero suits of Mark Newport. These
garments consider expectations for men
as well as the childhood fascination with
superheroes. The suits are reminiscent of
awkward sweater fashions for boys and
include big gloves that have the parental-
requisite “room to grow.” The ensemble
of Sweaterman 7 (2011), in canary yellow
striped with black and navy, is subtly
accented with mismatched socks. We could
imagine that, if a boy wore the outfit, he
might feel he could accomplish more – but
he would have to mature into the role.
Among many worthy exhibition
inclusions are those that prompt wonder.
Short on Legends, Loaded with Innovation
Continued From Page 5 by Sherry C. Maurer
sherry_maurer@yahoo.com
How did Amy Clarke Moore have the
patience to handle the thousands (?) of
Japanese seed beads stitched to create her
images? It is hard to believe the machine-
embroidered scenes by Carol Shinn are not
paintings. The 96-by-96-inch Dome (2010),
by Piper Shepard, presents a monumental
gray, filigreed circle with a small center
circle pierced with regular dots. The lacy
surface allows light to travel through and
bounce against the back wall, turning the
centermost circle into a lens that focuses
a shadow below. From afar, the work has
some weight, like a millstone. Up close, it is
clarified that this cloth was cut by hand to
produce all of the delicate openings; it must
take Zen persistence to bring about such
a result. For sheer labor intensity, I’d guess
this exhibition would win a record.
In addition to the traveling exhibit, the
Figge invited participation by some area
fiber artists for Local Threads, blending
those into the fourth-floor display.
The contributions from Astrid Hilger
Bennett, Carol Coohey, Tricia Coulson,
Mary Merkel-Hess, Amber O’Harrow,
Rowen Schussheim-Anderson, and Dawn
Wohlford could have been an entire
separate exhibition, but it is nice to see
them hold their own alongside a nationally
touring presentation. Schussheim-
Anderson’s works, also displayed in the
Figge gift shop, reflect the trend of fiber
artists drawing inspiration from global
textile traditions. In her tapestry Thursday
Market (2012), she merges sensations of the
visual richness of a marketplace in Ghana,
Africa. In contrast to the dusty earth tone,
there is a wealth of vibrant shapes and
patterns, from stacked baskets to richly
designed woven and dyed garments, all
suffused in golden sunshine.
Wohlford’s She Was Happiest When
Surrounded by Art (2014) has a great title,
and the artwork lives up to it. The “dress” is
composed of hundreds of slides of artworks,
wired together to form a chic summer
sheath. These slides – obsolete tools of the
art profession – have been recycled for a
new purpose. The clever dress is completed
with a matching necklace of a slide with a
purple mount.
This exhibition might be light on legends,
but it offers an amazing variety of works
covering two galleries and well worth a visit.
So ... what if Nick Cave’s soundsuit took
Dawn Wohlford’s dress out on a date ... ?
Sherry C. Maurer holds an MFA in painting,
an MA in art history, and a BFA with a
printmaking concentration. She was the
director of the Augustana College Art
Museum from 1983 to 2013.
ART
River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 21 No. 861 • July 24 - August 6, 2014 19 Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com
was growing up. His future destiny was hidden
from him. The wizard Merlin trained him but
made sure he never found out he was special.
When the old King Uther Pendragon died, a
tournament was staged to find a replacement.
The winner would be whoever was able to
withdraw the enchanted sword that was
embedded in a large stone. Quite by accident,
our hero got a chance to make an attempt.
Success! I have reminded you of the broad
outlines of this tale, Leo, because at least one of
its elements resembles your destiny in the next
11 months.

VIRGO (August 23-September 22):
When a crocodile slams its jaws shut,
the energy it summons is powerful.
But when the beast opens its jaws, the force it
exerts is weak. That’s because the muscles used
to close are much more robust than the muscles
used to open. I’m wondering if an analogous
story might be told about you these days, Virgo.
Are you more prone to close down than to open
up? Is it easier for you to resist, avoid, and say no
than it is to be receptive, extend a welcome, and
say yes? If so, please consider cultivating a better
balance. You need both capacities running at full
strength in the coming days.

LIBRA (September 23-October 22):
In the latter part of the 18th Century,
American rebels and rabble-rousers used to
gather regularly in the basement of the Green
Dragon Tavern in Boston. There they plotted the
Boston Tea Party, Paul Revere’s ride, and other
dissident adventures that opposed British rule.
That’s why the Green Dragon became known
as the “Headquarters of the Revolution.” I think
you and your cohorts need a place like that,
Libra. It’s high time for you to scheme and dream
about taking coordinated actions that will spur
teamwork and foster liberation.

SCORPIO (October 23-November
21): “When one has not had a good
father, one must create one,” said
philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche. What does
that mean? How might you go about “creating”
a good father? Well, you could develop a
relationship with an admirable older man who is
an inspiring role model. You could read books by
men whose work stirs you to actualize your own
potentials. If you have a vigorous inner life, you
could build a fantasy dad in your imagination.
Here’s another possibility: Cultivate in yourself
the qualities you think a good father should have.
And even if you actually had a pretty decent
father, Scorpio, I’m sure he wasn’t perfect. So it
still might be interesting to try out some of these
ideas. The coming weeks will be an excellent
time to get more of the fathering energy you
would thrive on.

SAGITTARIUS (November
22-December 21): “If I seem free,
it’s because I’m always running.” So
said Sagittarian musician Jimi Hendrix, widely
regarded as one of the most inventive and
Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny's
EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES
& DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES
The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at
1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700
FREE WILL ASTROLOGY by Rob Brezsny
ARIES (March 21-April 19): A report
in the prestigious British medical
journal BMJ says that almost 1 percent
of young pregnant women in the U.S. claim to be
virgins. They testify that they have conceived a
fetus without the benefit of sex. That’s impossible,
right? Technically, yes. But if there could ever
be a loophole in natural law, it would happen
for you, Aries, sometime in the coming weeks.
You will be so exceptionally fertile, so prone to
hatching new life, that almost anything could
incite germination. A vivid dream or captivating
idea or thrilling adventure or exotic encounter
might be enough to do the trick.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): As you
weave your way through the next
chapter of your story, I suggest you take
inspiration from the turtle. You may even want
to imagine that the turtle is your animal ally,
a guide that helps you access the gradual and
deliberate kind of intelligence you will need.
Moving quickly will not be appropriate for the
leisurely lessons that are coming your way. The
point is to be deep and thorough about a few
things rather than half-knowledgeable about a
lot of things. There’s one other turtle-like quality
I hope you will cultivate, too: the ability to feel at
home wherever you are.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): America’s
biggest winery is E & J Gallo. It sells
more wine than any other company,
and has been named the planet’s “Most Powerful
Wine Brand” four different years. Ernest and
Julio Gallo launched the enterprise in 1933 after
studying the art of wine-making in pamphlets
they found in the basement of a public library in
Modesto, California. I foresee a less spectacular
but metaphorically similar arc for you, Gemini.
Sometime soon – maybe it has already happened
– information or inspiration you come across
in a modest setting will launch you on the path
to future success. There is one caveat: You must
take seriously the spark you encounter, and not
underestimate it because it appears in humble
circumstances.

CANCER (June 21-July 22):
Diamonds are not rare. They are so
numerous that if they were evenly
distributed, you and me and everyone else on
the planet could each have a cupful of them.
And if you are ever in your lifetime going to
get your personal cupful, it may happen in the
next 11 months. That’s because your hard work
and special talent are more likely than usual
to be rewarded with tangible assets. Strokes of
luck will tend to manifest in the form of money
and treasure and valuable things you can really
use. Be alert for the clues, Cancerian. One may
appear momentarily.

LEO (July 23-August 22): According
to the legends about Camelot and the
Knights of the Round Table, the boy
who would ultimately become King Arthur
didn’t know he was heir to the throne while he
electrifying guitarists who ever lived. Does that
prospect have any appeal to you, Sagittarius?
I don’t, of course, recommend that you keep
running for the rest of your long life. After a
while, it will be wise to rest and ruminate. But
I do think it might be illuminating to try this
brazen approach for a week or two. If it feels
right, you might also want to mix in some
dancing and skipping and leaping with your
running.

CAPRICORN (December
22-January 19): In the next 11
months, Capricorn, you will be given
some choice riddles about the art of togetherness.
To solve them, you will have to learn much more
about the arts of intimacy – or else! It’s up to you:
Either work your ass off as you strengthen your
important relationships, or else risk watching
them unravel. But don’t take this as a grim,
sobering assignment. On the contrary! Play
hard. Experiment freely. Be open to unexpected
inspiration. Have fun deepening your emotional
intelligence. That approach will work best.

AQUARIUS (January 20-February
18): Hypothesis: The exciting
qualities that attract you to someone in the
first place will probably drive you a bit crazy if
you go on to develop a long-term relationship.
That doesn’t mean you should avoid seeking
connections with intriguing people who
captivate your imagination. It does suggest you
should have no illusions about what you are
getting yourself into. It also implies that you
should cultivate a sense of humor about how
the experiences that rouse your passion often
bring you the best tests and trials. And why am I
discussing these eccentric truths with you right
now? Because I suspect you will be living proof
of them in the months to come.

PISCES (February 19-March 20):
In 1961, Paul Cezanne’s painting
The Artist’s Sister was on display at a
museum in Aix-en-Provence, France. Then
a lucky event occurred: It was stolen. When
it was finally recovered months later, it had
been ripped out of its frame. An art restorer
who was commissioned to repair it discovered
that there was a previously unknown Cezanne
painting on the back of the canvas. As a result,
the appraisal of the original piece rose $75,000.
Now both sides are on view at the St. Louis City
Art Museum. I foresee a comparable progression
in your life, Pisces. An apparent setback will
ultimately increase your value.

Homework: Make up a secret identity for
yourself. What is it? How do you use it?
Testify at Truthrooster@gmail.com and visit
FreeWillAstrology.com.
July 10 Crossword Answers
River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 21 No. 861 • July 24 - August 6, 2014 20 Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com
June 26 Answers: Page 19
WEIGHTY MATTER · July 24, 2014
ACROSS
1. Storage bin
5. Inventor Nikola _
10. Kirk’s frst ofcer
15. Lhasa _
19. Clothesline
20. Eggbeater part
21. Aquatic plants
22. Bric-a- _
23. Bayh or Lysacek
24. Start of a quip by Mae West: 4 wds.
27. Crammed
29. Best or Seeger
30. Doggy doc
31. Seed coat
32. “A Death in the Family”author
34. Stand for
37. Spread to dry
38. ER items
41. Pinna
42. Hated anagram
44. Part 2 of quip: 3 wds.
47. Collar
50. Jai _
51. Control mechanism
52. Bird of prey
56. Kett of old comics
57. Ravine
59. Villainous look
60. Fasten
61. Animal enclosures
62. Print measures
64. _ Van Winkle
66. Acquired relative: Hyph.
68. Squatted
69. Part 3 of quip: 4 wds.
76. Man in a haberdashery
77. Shire or Balsam
78. Upperclassmen: Abbr.
79. _ -jongg
80. Costume jewelry
82. Chef d’oeuvre
84. Pros
87. Helped along (with “over”)
91. Punta del _
92. Slanting
93. Smooth, in music
95. Fleshy fruit
96. Stymie
98. Part 4 of quip: 3 wds.
101. Skeletal parts
103. Actress _ Wasikowska
104. Thankless one
105. Campaign funds org.
107. Pathless
111. Girl in a Hardy title
112. Place of sacrifce
114. Operate
115. Terrible tsar
117. Prate
121. End of the quip: 5 wds.
125. Perry’s creator
126. Wallaroo
127. Seasoning
128. Make frost-free
129. Shower
130. “East of _”
131. River in Texas
132. Slip
133. Young oyster
DOWN
1. Rowers in a race
2. Ramble
3. Tablet PC
4. Big cat: 2 wds.
5. Spears
6. Year after year after year
7. Walk
8. Inamorato
9. Ridge among mountains
10. Adage
11. Wading bird
12. Monstrous ones
13. Hauled
14. Coral reef
15. French cleric
16. Maker of replacement parts
17. Cook in oil
18. Group of four pairs
25. Fend of
26. Fragrance
28. Protection: Var.
33. Waters or Kennedy
35. A fabric
36. Unmixed, no ice
38. Tower of a kind
39. Pome fruit
40. Dried out
43. Weight allowance
44. Mr. Hammarskjold
45. Remodel
46. Water wheel
48. Kind of engine
49. Liking
53. Wall paneling
54. Dryer fuzz
55. She, in Chartres
58. Overact
61. Blood, _ and tears
63. Depot: Abbr.
65. Liq. measures
67. Tentacle
69. Like a superhero
70. Humble
71. Organize anew
72. Opening
73. Conical dwelling (var.)
74. Sultan’s decree
75. Captains at sea
81. Duck
83. Sober
85. For grades 1-12
86. Trail of a kind
88. Liability
89. Thrusting weapon
90. Beetle
92. Chester _ Arthur
94. Call forth
97. Habituate
99. Spokes of a wheel
100. Sky bear
102. Kind
103. Tax haven in Europe
105. Money recipient
106. Audibly
108. Of old written characters
109. Sidestep
110. Christener
113. Old Greek contest
116. Film _
118. Springe
119. “Essays of _”
120. Torn
122. Recipe qty.
123. _ Plaines
124. Mil. rank
River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 21 No. 861 • July 24 - August 6, 2014 21 Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com
Live Music Live Music Live Music
Email all listings to calendar@rcreader.com • Deadline 5 p.m. Thursday before publication
Gary Allan -Riverside Casino and Golf
Resort, 3184 Highway 22 Riverside, IA
Hap Hazard -Milan American Legion, 515
W 1st Ave Milan, IL
Jared Svoboda (4pm) -RME Community
Stage, 131 W. 2nd St. Davenport, IA
Jim Ryan -Third St. Bar & Grill, 831 W. 3rd
St. Davenport, IA
Joe Tingle’s DJ Entertainment -Barrel
House Moline, 1321 5th Ave. Moline, IL
Karaoke Night -Boozie’s Bar & Grill, 114
1/2 W. 3rd St. Davenport, IA
Kindred Karma -On the Rock Grille
& Bar, 4619 34th St Rock Island, IL
New Duncan Imperials - 3 on the Tree
-RIBCO, 1815 2nd Ave. Rock Island, IL
Open Mic Night -Downtown Central Perk,
226 W. 3rd St. Davenport, IA
Pierced Productions Karaoke & DJ
featuring Leigh Timbrook -The Old
Stardust Sports Bar, 1191 19th Street
Moline, IL
Red Rock Hill -Uptown Bi l l ’s Coffee
House, 730 S. Dubuque St. I owa
City, IA
Saliva -Riverside Park, Muscatine, IA
Sam Moss - Jackson Emmer -Rozz-Tox,
2108 3rd Ave. Rock Island, IL
Smooth Groove -River House, 1510 River
Dr. Moline, IL
Southern Thunder Karaoke -Hollar’s
Bar and Grill, 4050 27th St Moline, IL
Suzy Bogguss -CSPS/Legion Arts, 1103
3rd St SE Cedar Rapids, IA
The Main Squeeze - Surrounded by Gi-
ants -Iowa City Yacht Club, 13 S Linn
St Iowa City, IA
The Ripplers (4pm) -Wide River Winery
- Clinton, 1776 East Deer Creek Rd.
Clinton, IA
Wild Oatz -Riverside Casino and Golf
Resort, 3184 Highway 22 Riverside, IA
Winterland -Gabe’s, 330 E. Washington
St. Iowa City, IA
2014/07/24 (Thu)
ABC Karaoke -The Rusty Nail, 2606 W
Locust Davenport, IA
Billy Peiffer & Collin Keemle Jam Night
-On the Rock Grille & Bar, 4619 34th St
Rock Island, IL
C.J. the D.J. -RIBCO, 1815 2nd Ave. Rock
Island, IL
Double Dz Karaoke -Purgatory’s Pub,
2104 State St Bettendorf, IA
Fablos Karaoke Night -RME Community
Stage, 131 W. 2nd St. Davenport, IA
Furia - Bull Black Nova -The Mill, 120 E
Burlington Iowa City, IA
Grant Wallace Band - Quince -CSPS/
Legion Arts, 1103 3rd St SE Cedar
Rapids, IA
Gray Wolf Band -Bass Street Landing
Plaza, Moline, IL
Karaoke Night -Applebee’s - Moline,
3805 41st Ave. Moline, IL
Minus Six (6:30pm) -Bettendorf Public
Library, 2950 Learning Campus Bet-
tendorf, IA
Open Mic Night -The Quarry, 2202 W. 3rd
St. Davenport, IA
Open Stage Night -Theo’s Java Club, 213
17th St. Rock Island, IL
Sophistafunk - The Mainstays -The
Redstone Room, 129 Main St Dav-
enport, IA
Soulshake - Mixology -Gabe’s, 330 E.
Washington St. Iowa City, IA
Stardust Talent Night -The Old Stardust
Sports Bar, 1191 19th Street Moline, IL
Viking Moses - Padraig Steadman -Ro-
zz-Tox, 2108 3rd Ave. Rock Island, IL
2014/07/25 (Fri)
2014 Street Fest: Morgan Williams &
the Winter Blue Allstars (11am) -
Powell (1:45pm) - Whoozdads (4pm)
Wylde Nept -The Mill, 120 E Burlington
Iowa City, IA
2014/07/27 (Sun)
2014 Iowa Solo/Duo Blues Challenge
Preliminary Round: “Detroit”Larry
Davison & Charlie Hayes - Dan
Peart - SaJes - The Zach and Mike
Show (4pm) - Brent Johnson & the
Call Up (6pm) -The Muddy Waters,
1708 State St. Bettendorf, IA
ABC Karaoke -11th Street Precinct, 2108
E 11th St Davenport, IA
ABC Karaoke -The Rusty Nail, 2606 W
Locust Davenport, IA
Buddy Olson (3pm) -Ducky’s Lagoon,
13515 78th Ave Andalusia, IL
Chuck T. Murphy -Parksi de Gri l l &
Lounge, 2307 5th Ave Moline, IL
Daniel & the Lion -River’s Edge Gallery,
216 W 3rd St Muscatine, IA
Detroit Larry Davidson & Charlie Hayes
-On the Rock Grille & Bar, 4619 34th St
Rock Island, IL
Jessica Hernandez & the Deltas - Lewis
Knudsen -Rozz-Tox, 2108 3rd Ave.
Rock Island, IL
Jim Ryan (3pm) -Len Brown’s North
Shore Inn, 700 N. Shore Dr. Moline, IL
Keep Off the Grass (5pm) -The Captain’s
Table, 4801 River Dr. Moline, IL
Open Mic for Originals Only (noon)
-Mama Compton’s, 1725 2nd Ave
Rock Island, IL
Open Mic Night w/ Rob Dahms (5pm)
-Rustic Ridge Golf Course Grille & Pub,
1151 East Iowa St. Eldridge, IA
Sunday Jazz Brunch (8:30 & 10:30am,
12:30pm) -Bix Bistro, 200 E. 3rd St.
Davenport, IA
Sunday Live Jazz (10:30am) -Brady
Street Chop House, Radisson QC Plaza
Hotel, 111 E. 2nd St. Davenport, IA
Nick Sly Record-Release Party & Live DJ
Show - Ryan Roberts - DJ Higgy -Ro-
zz-Tox, 2108 3rd Ave. Rock Island, IL
Pierced Productions Karaoke & DJ
featuring Leigh Timbrook -The Old
Stardust Sports Bar, 1191 19th Street
Moline, IL
Sin City -River House, 1510 River Dr.
Moline, IL
Southern Thunder Karaoke -Hollar’s
Bar and Grill, 4050 27th St Moline, IL
The Deutsche Polka Band -Bill Bowe
Memori al Bandshel l, Mi ddl e Park
Bettendorf, IA
The Funk Daddies (6:30pm) -Sheraton
Iowa City Hotel, 210 S. Dubuque St.
Iowa City, IA
The Ukulele Connection (noon) -Moline
Public Library, 3210 41st St. Moline, IL
Ultraviolet Hippopotamus - Half Naked
-The Redstone Room, 129 Main St
Davenport, IA
Vagabond Entertainment presents
Kooby’s Karaoke -Bier Stube LeClaire,
1001 Canal Shore Dr. LeClaire, IA
Wild Oatz -Riverside Casino and Golf
Resort, 3184 Highway 22 Riverside, IA
- Night People (6pm) - Soul Storm
(8pm) - Dirt Road Rockers (10pm)
-Downtown Davenport, Davenport, IA
ABC Karaoke -Circle Tap, 1345 Locust St.
Davenport, IA
ABC Karaoke -Creekside Bar and Grill,
3303 Brady St. Davenport, IA
ABC Karaoke -Moose Lodge - Davenport,
2333 Rockingham Rd Davenport, IA
Battery: Master of Metallica -RIBCO,
1815 2nd Ave. Rock Island, IL
Cody Road -Doc’s Inn Bar & Grill, 985
Avenue of the Cities Silvis, IL
Conjunto Chappottín -CSPS/Legion Arts,
1103 3rd St SE Cedar Rapids, IA
Damn Good Summer 4 -Gabe’s, 330 E.
Washington St. Iowa City, IA
DollaMiiite Live Dance Mix -The Smok-
ing Dog Pub, 1800 2nd Ave. Rock
Island, IL
Funktastic Five -On the Rock Grille
& Bar, 4619 34th St Rock Island, IL
Jake Owen - Parmalee - The Cadillac
Tree -i wireless Center, 1201 River
Dr Moline, IL
Jared Svoboda (6pm) -RME Community
Stage, 131 W. 2nd St. Davenport, IA
Jazz After Five: Blake Shaw & Grace
Leong (5pm) - OSG - Fire Sale (9pm)
-The Mill, 120 E Burlington Iowa City, IA
Joe Seng -Joe’s Club, 1402 W. 7th St.
Davenport, IA
Jordan Danielsen (5pm) -Wide River
Winery - LeClaire, 106 N. Cody Rd.
LeClaire, IA
Karaoke Night -Bowlmor Lanes, 2952 N.
Brady St. Davenport, IA
Karaoke Night -Rooster’s Sports Bar &
Grill, 2130 3rd Ave. Rock Island, IL
Lost Country Dancers’ Dance -Walcott
Coliseum, 116 E Bryant St Walcott, IA
Moodie Black - AWTHNTKTS - Rusty
Buckets - Sotr Caf - DJ Johnny Sixx
-Iowa City Yacht Club, 13 S Linn St
Iowa City, IA
Zach Harris Band -The Muddy Waters,
1708 State St. Bettendorf, IA
2014/07/26 (Sat)
2014 Street Fest: Dirty Water Boys
(10am) - River City 6 (11:30am) - Ma-
chine Gun Willie (1pm) - The Tailfins
(3pm) - Cosmic (5pm) - Wheelhouse
(7:30pm) - Jason Carl & the Whole
Damn Band (10pm) -Downtown
Davenport, Davenport, IA
ABC Karaoke -Creekside Bar and Grill,
3303 Brady St. Davenport, IA
Cecali Castenada a.k.a. Silly C (2pm)
-Creekside Vineyards Winery & Inn,
7505 120th Ave. Coal Valley, IL
Chris & Wes Show -The Muddy Waters,
1708 State St. Bettendorf, IA
Cody Road -Me & Billy Kitchen & Bar, 200
W. 3rd St. Davenport, IA
Community Drum Circle (10:30am)
-RME (River Music Experience), 131
W. 2nd St. Davenport, IA
DollaMiiite Live Dance Mix -The Smok-
ing Dog Pub, 1800 2nd Ave. Rock
Island, IL
Brent Johnson @ The Muddy Waters – July 27
30
26 SATURDAY
00
25 FRIDAY
Continued On Page 22
00
24 THURSDAY
27 SUNDAY
River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 21 No. 861 • July 24 - August 6, 2014 22 Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com
Live Music Live Music Live Music
Email all listings to calendar@rcreader.com • Deadline 5 p.m. Thursday before publication
Open Jam Session -Brady Street Pub,
217 Brady St. Davenport, IA
Open Mic Night (6:30pm) -Cool Beanz
Coffeehouse, 1325 30th St. Rock
Island, IL
Open Mic Nite w/ Alan Sweet -Van’s
Pizza, Pub, & Grill, 3333 Harrison St.
Davenport, IA
Open Mic w/ Corey Wallace & Friends
-11th Street Precinct, 2108 E 11th St
Davenport, IA
Residual Kid - Bummer - Ice Hockey
-Rozz-Tox, 2108 3rd Ave. Rock Is-
land, IL
2014/07/30 (Wed)
ABC Karaoke -11th Street Precinct,
2108 E 11th St Davenport, IA
ABC Karaoke -Circle Tap, 1345 Locust
St. Davenport, IA
Acoustic Jam Night w/ Steve Mc-
Fate -McManus Pub, 1401 7th Ave
Moline, IL
Bebop Jazz Night -Rozz-Tox, 2108 3rd
Ave. Rock Island, IL
Bike Night w/ The Marvels (6pm)
-Purgatory’s Pub, 2104 State St Bet-
tendorf, IA
Jam Session w/ Ben Soltau -Iowa City
Yacht Club, 13 S Linn St Iowa City, IA
Karaoke Night -RIBCO, 1815 2nd Ave.
Rock Island, IL
Lady Antebellum -Mississippi Valley
Fai rgrounds, 2815 W. Locust St
Davenport, IA
Open Mic Night w/ Karl Beatty & Mike
Miller -Boozie’s Bar & Grill, 114 1/2
W. 3rd St. Davenport, IA
Rising Lion -Gabe’s, 330 E. Washington
St. Iowa City, IA
The Chris & Wes Show -Ubriaco’s Trat-
toria, 1029 Mound St. Davenport, IA
The Harris Collection Open Jam Ses-
sion -Brady Street Pub, 217 Brady St.
Davenport, IA
2014/08/01 (Fri)
3 on the Tree (6pm) - Dirt Road Rock-
ers (7:45pm) -Clinton Riverview
Bandshell, Clinton, IA
ABC Karaoke -Circle Tap, 1345 Locust
St. Davenport, IA
ABC Karaoke -Creekside Bar and Grill,
3303 Brady St. Davenport, IA
ABC Karaoke -Moose Lodge - Daven-
port, 2333 Rocki ngham Rd Dav-
enport, IA
All Dogs Invited - Teen Daad - The
Men from... Beyond -Gabe’s, 330 E.
Washington St. Iowa City, IA
Bettendor f Park Band -Bi l l Bowe
Memorial Bandshell, Middle Park
Bettendorf, IA
Bix Beiderbecke Memorial Jazz Fes-
tival: Bix Youth Jazz Band (noon)
- Jim Cullum Jazz Band (1pm) -
River City 6 (2pm) - Jim Valentine
Quartet (3pm) - The Fat Babies
(4pm) - Banu Gibson’s New Orleans
Hot Jazz (6pm) - Jim Cullum Jazz
Band (7pm) - Josh Duffee & His
Graystone Monarchs (8pm) - Jim
Valentine Quintet w/ Dave Ben-
nett (9pm) - Peter & Will Anderson
Twins Sextet (10pm) -Adler Theatre,
136 E. 3rd St. Davenport, IA
Bix Beiderbecke Memorial Jazz Fes-
tival: Bix Youth Jazz Band (6pm)
- Basin Street Boys (7pm) - Tony
Hamilton Orchestra (8pm) - Rock
River Jazz Band (9pm) -LeClaire
Park, River Dr & Ripley St Daven-
port, IA
Bix Beiderbecke Memorial Jazz Fes-
tival: Dan Levinson’s Roof Garden
Jass Band (noon) - Banu Gibson’s
New Orleans Hot Jazz (1pm) - Josh
Duffee & His Graystone Monarchs
(2pm) - Dave Bennett Quartet
The Problems -Gabe’s, 330 E. Washing-
ton St. Iowa City, IA
2014/07/28 (Mon)
ABC Karaoke -The Muddy Waters, 1708
State St. Bettendorf, IA
Freakabout - Surrounded by Giants
- Milk Duct Tape - The Men from...
Beyond -Gabe’s, 330 E. Washington
St. Iowa City, IA
Live Lunch w/ Lewis Knudsen (noon)
-RME Community Stage, 131 W. 2nd
St. Davenport, IA
Open Mic w/ J. Knight -The Mill, 120 E
Burlington Iowa City, IA
2014/07/29 (Tue)
ABC Karaoke -Creekside Bar and Grill,
3303 Brady St. Davenport, IA
ABC Karaoke -The Muddy Waters, 1708
State St. Bettendorf, IA
ABC Karaoke -The Rusty Nail, 2606 W
Locust Davenport, IA
Acoustic Music Club (4:30pm) -RME
(River Music Experience), 131 W. 2nd
St. Davenport, IA
Adam Faucett - Eric Pettit Lion -The
Mill, 120 E Burlington Iowa City, IA
Daniel Bonespur -Gabe’s, 330 E. Wash-
ington St. Iowa City, IA
Eli Young Band -Mi ssi ssi ppi Val l ey
Fairgrounds, 2815 W. Locust St Dav-
enport, IA
Glenn Hickson (5pm) -Jake O’s Grille,
2900 Blackhawk Rd. Rock Island, IL
Hap Hazard -Farmers Tent - Mississippi
Valley Fairgrounds, 2815 W. Locust St
Davenport, IA
Live Lunch w/ David Smith (noon)
-RME Community Stage, 131 W. 2nd
St. Davenport, IA
(3pm) - Peter & Will Anderson
Twins Sextet (4pm) - Josh Duffee
Orchestra (6pm) - Dave Bennett
Quartet (7pm) - River City 6 (8pm)
- Dan Levinson’s Roof Garden Jass
Band (9pm) - The Fat Babies (10pm)
-Davenport RiverCenter, 136 E. 3rd St
Davenport, IA
Bradford Lee Folk & the Bluegrass
Playboys -The Mill, 120 E Burlington
Iowa City, IA
Brilliant Beast - The Post Mortems
-Rozz-Tox, 2108 3rd Ave. Rock Island, IL
Caught in the Act (6pm) -Hey Bryan’s,
1140 15th Ave. Moline, IL
Cheap Trick -Mississippi Valley Fair-
grounds, 2815 W. Locust St Dav-
enport, IA
Cody Road -The Rusty Nail, 2606 W
Locust Davenport, IA
Dennis Florine -Kilkenny’s, 300 W. 3rd
St. Davenport, IA
Future of Rock Showcase: 1380 -
Shadow Stone - Escape Your Prism
-RIBCO, 1815 2nd Ave. Rock Island, IL
Jerry Garcia Birthday Bash w/ El Dub
& the Dirty Water Ramblers - Derek
Perez -Iowa City Yacht Club, 13 S Linn
St Iowa City, IA
Jerry Garcia’s Birthday Celebration
featuring Old Shoe - Sun Stereo
-The Redstone Room, 129 Main St
Davenport, IA
Jessica Egli - Surf Zombies (6:30pm)
-Sheraton Iowa City Hotel, 210 S.
Dubuque St. Iowa City, IA
Joe Seng -Joe’s Club, 1402 W. 7th St.
Davenport, IA
Karaoke Night -Bowlmor Lanes, 2952 N.
Brady St. Davenport, IA
Karaoke Night -Rooster’s Sports Bar &
Grill, 2130 3rd Ave. Rock Island, IL
Live @ Five: The Mercury Brothers
(5pm) -RME Courtyard, 131 W. 2nd
St. Davenport, IA
Wild Oatz -Wells Fargo Pavilion - Mis-
sissippi Valley Fairgrounds, 2815 W.
Locust St. Davenport, IA
2014/07/31 (Thu)
ABC Karaoke -The Rusty Nail, 2606 W
Locust Davenport, IA
An Evening with Gaelic Storm -The
Redstone Room, 129 Main St Dav-
enport, IA
Billy Peiffer & Collin Keemle Jam Night
-On the Rock Grille & Bar, 4619 34th St
Rock Island, IL
Bix Beiderbecke Memorial Jazz Fes-
tival: Bix Youth Jazz Band (6pm) -
River City 6 (7pm) - Dan Levinson’s
Roof Garden Jass Band (8pm) - Josh
Duffee Orchestra (9pm) - Ji m
Cullum Jazz Band (10pm) -Dav-
enport RiverCenter, 136 E. 3rd St
Davenport, IA
Bix Beiderbecke Memorial Jazz Fes-
tival: Jim Cullum Jazz Band (4pm)
-Putnam Museum, 1717 W 12th St
Davenport, IA
C.J. the D.J. -RIBCO, 1815 2nd Ave. Rock
Island, IL
Cody Road -Wells Fargo Pavilion - Mis-
sissippi Valley Fairgrounds, 2815 W.
Locust St. Davenport, IA
Cosmic -Bass Street Landi ng Pl aza,
Moline, IL
Craig Morgan -Mississippi Valley Fair-
grounds, 2815 W. Locust St Dav-
enport, IA
Dogs in Ecstasy - (ORB) - Alex Body
-The Mill, 120 E Burlington Iowa
City, IA
Double Dz Karaoke -Purgatory’s Pub,
2104 State St Bettendorf, IA
Electric Rag Band -Iowa City Yacht Club,
13 S Linn St Iowa City, IA
Fablos Karaoke Night -RME Community
Stage, 131 W. 2nd St. Davenport, IA
Hal Reed & the Friends of the Blues
(6:30pm) -Bettendorf Public Library,
2950 Learning Campus Bettendorf, IA
Julie Byrne - Adam Lempel - Suna-
tirene - Patrick Stolley - Aiden
Landman -Rozz-Tox, 2108 3rd Ave.
Rock Island, IL
Karaoke Night -Applebee’s - Moline,
3805 41st Ave. Moline, IL
Lewis Knudsen Live Lunch (11am)
-Mama Compton’s, 1725 2nd Ave
Rock Island, IL
North of 40 -Farmers Tent - Mississippi
Valley Fairgrounds, 2815 W. Locust St
Davenport, IA
Open Mic Night -The Quarry, 2202 W.
3rd St. Davenport, IA
Open Stage Night -Theo’s Java Club, 213
17th St. Rock Island, IL
Soulshake - Mixology -Gabe’s, 330 E.
Washington St. Iowa City, IA
Stardust Talent Night -The Old Star-
dust Sports Bar, 1191 19th Street
Moline, IL
Julie Byrne @ Rozz-Tox – July 31
31 THURSDAY
Continued From Page 21
00
1 FRIDAY
30 WEDNESDAY
28 MONDAY
29 TUESDAY
River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 21 No. 861 • July 24 - August 6, 2014 23 Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com
Live Music Live Music Live Music
Email all listings to calendar@rcreader.com • Deadline 5 p.m. Thursday before publication
Open Jam Session -Brady Street Pub,
217 Brady St. Davenport, IA
Open Mic Night (6:30pm) -Cool Beanz
Coffeehouse, 1325 30th St. Rock
Island, IL
Open Mic Nite w/ Alan Sweet -Van’s
Pizza, Pub, & Grill, 3333 Harrison St.
Davenport, IA
Open Mic w/ Corey Wallace & Friends
-11th Street Precinct, 2108 E 11th St
Davenport, IA
2014/08/06 (Wed)
ABC Karaoke -11th Street Precinct, 2108
E 11th St Davenport, IA
ABC Karaoke -Circle Tap, 1345 Locust St.
Davenport, IA
Acoustic Jam Night w/ Steve Mc-
Fate -McManus Pub, 1401 7th Ave
Moline, IL
Jam Session w/ Ben Soltau -Iowa City
Yacht Club, 13 S Linn St Iowa City, IA
Karaoke Night -RIBCO, 1815 2nd Ave.
Rock Island, IL
Open Mic Night w/ Karl Beatty & Mike
Miller -Boozie’s Bar & Grill, 114 1/2 W.
3rd St. Davenport, IA
Orquesta Son del Tumbao -Wiman
Park, south of Forest Rd at the end
of 6th St East Moline, IL
Shania Twin & Adam Tucker (4pm)
-Riverside Casino and Golf Resort,
3184 Highway 22 Riverside, IA
Stereocircus - Mystery Crash - Cody
Tracy -Rozz-Tox, 2108 3rd Ave. Rock
Island, IL
The Chris & Wes Show -Ubriaco’s Trat-
toria, 1029 Mound St. Davenport, IA
The Harris Collection Open Jam Ses-
sion -Brady Street Pub, 217 Brady St.
Davenport, IA
Victory Heights (6pm) -Gabe’s, 330 E.
Washington St. Iowa City, IA
Band (1pm) - Peter & Will Anderson
Twins Sextet (2pm) - Jim Valentine
Quintet (3pm) - Jim Cullum Jazz
Band (4pm) - River City 6 (6pm) -
Dan Levinson’s Roof Garden Jass
Band (7pm) - The Fat Babies (8pm) -
Dave Bennett Quartet (9pm) - Josh
Duffee & His Graystone Monarchs
(10pm) -Davenport RiverCenter, 136
E. 3rd St Davenport, IA
Bix Beiderbecke Memorial Jazz Festi-
val: Five Bridges Jazz Band (6pm)
- Four Other Brothers (7pm) - Jim
Buennig & Friends (8pm) - River
City 6 (9pm) -LeClaire Park, River Dr
& Ripley St Davenport, IA
Bix Beiderbecke Memorial Jazz Fes-
tival: Peter & Will Anderson Twins
Sextet (10am) -Oakdal e Memo-
rial Cemetery, 2501 Eastern Avenue
Davenport, IA
Caught in the Act -11th Street Precinct,
2108 E 11th St Davenport, IA
Cody Road -The Rusty Nail, 2606 W
Locust Davenport, IA
Cosmic -River House, 1510 River Dr.
Moline, IL
Dave Moore -Uptown Bi l l ’s Coffee
House, 730 S. Dubuque St. Iowa
City, IA
Dennis Florine -Kilkenny’s, 300 W. 3rd
St. Davenport, IA
Hold On Band -Riverside Casino and
Golf Resort, 3184 Highway 22 Riv-
erside, IA
Joe Tingle’s DJ Entertainment -Bar-
rel House Mol i ne, 1321 5th Ave.
Moline, IL
Karaoke Night -Boozie’s Bar & Grill, 114
1/2 W. 3rd St. Davenport, IA
Lojo Russo (4pm) -Wide River Winery
- Clinton, 1776 East Deer Creek Rd.
Clinton, IA
Moonshine Run -On the Rock Grille
& Bar, 4619 34th St Rock Island, IL
Mi tch Goudy & Di ana Upton-Hi l l
(2pm) -Creekside Vineyards Winery
& Inn, 7505 120th Ave. Coal Valley, IL
Open Mic for Originals Only (noon)
-Mama Compton’s, 1725 2nd Ave
Rock Island, IL
Open Mic Night w/ Rob Dahms (5pm)
-Rustic Ridge Golf Course Grille &
Pub, 1151 East Iowa St. Eldridge, IA
Sunday Jazz Brunch (8:30 & 10:30am,
12:30pm) -Bix Bistro, 200 E. 3rd St.
Davenport, IA
Sunday Live Jazz (10:30am) -Brady
Street Chop House, Radisson QC Pla-
za Hotel, 111 E. 2nd St. Davenport, IA
2014/08/04 (Mon)
ABC Karaoke -The Muddy Waters, 1708
State St. Bettendorf, IA
Bix Beiderbecke Memorial Jazz Fes-
tival: Jim Cullum Jazz Band (6pm)
-Jim’s Knoxville Tap, 8716 Knoxville
Rd. Milan, IL
Kristin Ford (7:30pm) - Open Mic Night
(9pm) -Uptown Bill’s Coffee House,
730 S. Dubuque St. Iowa City, IA
Trapdoor Social -Gabe’s, 330 E. Wash-
ington St. Iowa City, IA
2014/08/05 (Tue)
ABC Karaoke -Creekside Bar and Grill,
3303 Brady St. Davenport, IA
ABC Karaoke -The Muddy Waters, 1708
State St. Bettendorf, IA
ABC Karaoke -The Rusty Nail, 2606 W
Locust Davenport, IA
Arkham - Motives - The Easy Mark -
Leviathans - Faces Turned Ashen
(5:30pm) -Gabe’s, 330 E. Washington
St. Iowa City, IA
Glenn Hickson (5pm) -Jake O’s Grille,
2900 Blackhawk Rd. Rock Island, IL
ABC Karaoke -The Rusty Nail, 2606 W
Locust Davenport, IA
BareFoot Becky (4pm) -Riverside Ca-
sino and Golf Resort, 3184 Highway
22 Riverside, IA
Bix Beiderbecke Memorial Jazz Fes-
tival: Bix Youth Jazz Band (10am)
- Banu Gibson’s New Orleans Hot
Jazz (11am) - Jim Cullum Jazz
Band (noon) - The Fat Babies (1pm)
-Davenport RiverCenter, 136 E. 3rd St
Davenport, IA
Bix Beiderbecke Memorial Jazz Fes-
tival: Dave Bennett Quartet (8:30
& 10: 30am) -Fi rst Presbyteri an
Church of Davenport, 1702 Iowa St.
Davenport, IA
Buddy Olson (3pm) -Ducky’s Lagoon,
13515 78th Ave Andalusia, IL
Greg & Rich Acoustic Duo (2pm) -Len
Brown’s North Shore I nn, 700 N.
Shore Dr. Moline, IL
Jerrod Niemann -Mississippi Valley
Fairgrounds, 2815 W. Locust St Dav-
enport, IA
Open Mic Night -Downtown Central
Perk, 226 W. 3rd St. Davenport, IA
Pierced Productions Karaoke & DJ featur-
ing Leigh Timbrook -The Old Stardust
Sports Bar, 1191 19th Street Moline, IL
River Prairie Minstrels (6pm) -RME
Community Stage, 131 W. 2nd St.
Davenport, IA
RME Guitar Circle (2pm) -RME (River
Music Experience), 131 W. 2nd St.
Davenport, IA
Southern Thunder Karaoke -Hollar’s
Bar and Grill, 4050 27th St Moline, IL
The Killigans -Iowa City Yacht Club, 13
S Linn St Iowa City, IA
Tripmaster Monkey -RIBCO, 1815 2nd
Ave. Rock Island, IL
World Famous Polka Chips (noon &
2:30pm) - Barefoot Becky & the Ivan-
hoe Dutchmen (1:30, 4, & 7:30pm)
- Karl & the Country Dutchmen (5:30
& 8:30pm) -Walcott Coliseum, 116 E
Bryant St Walcott, IA
2014/08/03 (Sun)
ABC Karaoke -11th Street Precinct, 2108
E 11th St Davenport, IA
Mollie B w/ the Squeezebox Band
-Walcott Coliseum, 116 E Bryant St
Walcott, IA
Night People -On the Rock Grille &
Bar, 4619 34th St Rock Island, IL
Olivia Dvorak (5pm) -Wide River Winery
- LeClaire, 106 N. Cody Rd. LeClaire, IA
Pierced Productions Karaoke & DJ
featuring Leigh Timbrook -The
Old Stardust Sports Bar, 1191 19th
Street Moline, IL
Shania Twin & Adam Tucker -Riverside
Casino and Golf Resort, 3184 High-
way 22 Riverside, IA
Southern Thunder Karaoke -Hollar’s
Bar and Grill, 4050 27th St Moline, IL
Vagabond Entertainment presents
Kooby’s Karaoke - Bi er St ube
LeCl ai re, 1001 Canal Shore Dr.
LeClaire, IA
2014/08/02 (Sat)
ABC Karaoke -Creekside Bar and Grill,
3303 Brady St. Davenport, IA
Alan Jackson -Mississippi Valley Fair-
grounds, 2815 W. Locust St Dav-
enport, IA
Bix Beiderbecke Memorial Jazz Festi-
val: Josh Duffee Orchestra (noon)
- Dave Bennett Quartet (1pm) - The
Fat Babies (2pm) - Banu Gibson’s
New Orleans Hot Jazz (3pm) - Josh
Duffee & His Graystone Monarchs
(4pm) - Bix Youth Jazz Band (6pm)
- Jim Valentine Quintet w/ Dave
Bennett (7pm) - Peter & Will An-
derson Twins Sextet (8pm) - Banu
Gibson’s New Orleans Hot Jazz
(9pm) - Jim Cullum Jazz Band
(10pm) -Adler Theatre, 136 E. 3rd
St. Davenport, IA
Bix Beiderbecke Memorial Jazz Fes-
tival: Bix Youth Jazz Band (noon)
- Den Levinson’s Roof Garden Jass
6 WEDNESDAY
4 MONDAY
5 TUESDAY
30
2 SATURDAY
3 SUNDAY
Ultraviolet Hippopotamus @ The Redstone Room –
River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 21 No. 861 • July 24 - August 6, 2014 24 Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com

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