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Sociodemographic determinants of safe delivery practice and its association with antenatal
counseling in rural Bangladesh.
EN_SYS.22
Track: Enabling Systems for Effective Global Health Programs
Presenter: Rashed Shah, Department of International Health, Bloomberg School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins University
Authors: Rashed Shah
1
, Saifuddin Ahmed
2
, Abdullah Baqui
1

1
Department of International Health, Bloomberg School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins University, United States of America
2
Department of Population and Family Health, Bloomberg School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins University, United States of
America
Eligible for the Student Poster Competition: Yes
Background
Globally around half a million women die of pregnancy related causes and at least one million die during labor annually, while more
than 98% maternal deaths occur in low and middle income countries where most of the deliveries occur at home following unhy-
gienic practices and conducted by unskilled birth attendants in unsafe delivery places. To design an effective community based Ma-
ternal, Newborn and Child Health Promotion (MNCHP) Program, it is critically important to identify determinants of safe delivery
practices among rural pregnant women. We aim to investigate the sociodemographic determinants of safe delivery practice and to
unfold the association between safe delivery practice and antenatal counseling, if any exists, at community level in rural Bangladesh.
Methods
The study was conducted in two unions in Sylhet district, Bangladesh during September November 2009 among recently delivered
women who delivered their last child within last 30 months. Cross sectional data collected from 542 women who delivered recently
and consented to participate in the study were analyzed using STATA (ver. 12).
Results
Women with lower socioeconomic and higher educational status, younger age and lower parity were more likely to use trained at-
tendant at birth and to deliver at health facility. For each year increase in attending school, women had an estimated 15% higher
odds of delivering at facility than women who never attended school for education (OR : 1.15, 95% CI = 1.04 - 1.24). Primipara
women were 20% more likely to go for delivering at facility compared to women who had delivered earlier (OR : 0.80, 95% CI = 0.69
0.93). Women who made ANC visit once were 33% more likely to deliver at facility (OR : 1.33, 95% CI = 1.20 1.46) compared to
women who never had an ANC visit during index pregnancy.
Conclusion
Antenatal counseling has been revealed as a significant potential predictor to promote safe delivery practices among rural pregnant
women. This finding recommends for improving womens access and utilization of antenatal counseling services at community lev-
el, for better health outcome of mothers and newborn within a rural population.
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