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CONFIDENTIAL

Chattanooga, Tennessee u r b a n d e s i g n a s s o c i a t e s
f e b r u a r y 2 0 0 8
us p i p e / whe l and f oundry mas te r p l an:


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us pipe / wheland foundry master plan | february 2008 | urban design associ ates b
CONFIDENTIAL
acknowledgements
PREPARED F OR
Pipe Properties
Perimeter Properties
The Lyndhurst Foundation
F UNDED BY
The Lyndhurst Foundation
MANAGED BY
RiverCity Company
CONSULTANT TE AM
Urban Design Associates
LaQuatra Bonci and Associates
Walter Kulash, P.E.
Zimmerman / Volk Associates, Inc.
ZHA, Inc.
US Pipe/Wheland Foundry Master Plan


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us pipe / wheland foundry master plan | february 2008 | urban design associ ates
CONFIDENTIAL
Table of Contents
PREFACE 1
I NTRODUCTI ON 2
URBAN DESI GN PLAN 3
Phase I Plan 4
Build Out Plan 7
Development Program 1 0
Connectivity Framework 1 2
Street Framework 1 3
I-24 Ramp and Interstate
Proposals 1 4
DEVELOPMENT AREAS 1 5
Foundry Row 1 6
Residential Development 1 8
Office and Flex Buildings 20
Hotels and the Marina 22
Broad Street Development 23
SUSTAI NABI LI TY 24
Addressing Sustainability with
Landscape, Architecture, and
Infrastructure 25
Strategies for Existing
Buildings 27
Strategies for New
Buildings 28
Strategies for Transitional
Development Blocks 29
The Green Network 30
Open Space Network:
Framework for
Sustainability 31
Chattanoogas Landscape
Character 32
Public Space Character 33
Landscape Elements 35
MASTER PLANNI NG BACK-
GROUND 36
Analysis 37
UDA X-Rays 38
Transportation Issues 41
Focus Group Summary 4 4
c table of contents


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us pipe / wheland foundry master plan | february 2008 | urban design associ ates 1
CONFIDENTIAL
Preface
the us/pipe wheland foundry master plan is a vision
plan for the reuse of a 141-acre industrial site in Chattanooga based
on sustainable development principles. The plan outlines a mixed-use
development based on current commercial and residential market
studies, and establishes an urban design framework of development
blocks, streets, parking, and open space. The mix of uses is flexible
within that framework to respond to future market conditions and
demand.
Located midway along the Tennessee River between the two
most visited attractions in Chattanooga, the Downtown Aquarium
and Lookout Mountain, the development will become an anchor for
the revitalization of south Chattanooga and a new gateway to the
city. In February, 2008, cleanup of the US Pipe site is well under-
way, and environmental clearances have already been secured for
the Wheland site. A significant investment in on-site storm water
infrastructure is already in place. The next step will be to attract pri-
vate developers and to secure public investment that will affirm and
implement the bold vision for the US Pipe/Wheland site described
in these pages.
preface
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PORTRAIT OF EXISTING CONDITIONS An illustrative drawing showing the existing
conditions of the site and the surrounding area
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us pipe / wheland foundry master plan | february 2008 | urban design associ ates 2
CONFIDENTIAL
Introduction
this master plan for the redevelopment of a brownfield site in
Chattanooga is the result of an eight month planning process. The
141-acre river front industrial property, formerly the location of two
Chattanooga based companies, US Pipe and Wheland Foundry, is a
strategic gateway to the city from interstate I-24 and from communi-
ties to the south, west and east.
The goal of the owners is to create a high quality mixed-use
development containing residential, retail, office, technology, and
recreational uses. The built project must be sustainable, including
environmental cleanup, ecological balance, energy efficiency, and
green building technology, and should address the social, financial,
and entrepreneurial aspects of responsible redevelopment.
The pre-development process was managed by the RiverCity
Company on behalf of the two local property owners, Perimeter
Properties and the Lyndhurst Foundation, who funded the master
plan study. RiverCity engaged a consultant team to prepare a master
plan for the site:
Urban Design Associates Lead firm, urban design, planning
LaQuatra Bonci Associates Landscape design
Walter Kulash, P.E. Transportation
Zimmerman Volk Associates Residential Market Study
ZHA, Inc. Commercial Market Study

introduction
The planning process for the US Pipe/Wheland Foundry site was
highly collaborative between the owners, RiverCity, and the consul-
tant team and was completed in three phases, including outreach to
over 100 key community stakeholders:
PHASE I Data Base and Analysis: Understanding
PHASE I I Design Charrette: Discovering
PHASE I I I Final Plan: Deciding
The vision for this document is built on a history of public plan-
ning processes including the adopted downtown and South Broad
plans, and the publicly-generated principles contained therein. The
successful outcome of the master planning process is best summa-
rized by the vision statement adopted by the ownership group, illus-
trated in the box to the left.
The report that follows includes: overall urban design plan,
including a Phase I plan and development program; sustainable
development plan; detailed description of the key initiative areas; and
master planning background. The residential and commercial market
studies are separate documents.
VI SI ON STATEMENT
There was a clear consensus that this site represents a unique
opportunity in the history of Chattanooga - one which allows us to
celebrate our industrial heritage while making a bold step forward
to create a distinctive 21st century place.
The project should embody principles of environmental responsibility
including the adaptive reuse of distinctive historic buildings
The project should include diverse housing types, support innovative
businesses, and be an economic generator for the region.
This new neighborhood should have an attractive and engaging mix
of uses in a town-center type setting that will attract young people,
inspire creativity and includes spaces for art and the performance arts.
This new neighborhood should create a visually distinctive gateway
entrance to the city with strong connections to the CBD for all modes
of transportation and transit.
The open space plan should include passive and active public space
that create a new address on the Tennessee River that fully takes
advantage of connections to Rosss landing, the Riverwalk, and nearby
National Park lands.


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us pipe / wheland foundry master plan | february 2008 | urban design associ ates 3
CONFIDENTIAL
urban design plan
the design and development principles are the result
of a collaborative process between the ownership group, stakeholder
citizens, and the consulting team. These principles were developed at
an August 2007 working meeting, and summarize the main themes
that emerged from the May 2007 focus group meetings which
included strengths, weaknesses, and visions for the project. These
draft principles were further edited and refined to their present form
at the August 2007 design charette, and are the foundation with
which decisions will be guided.
Creation of a 21st Century gateway image for Chattanooga and for the
South Broad neighborhood
Creation of a place of commerce and art that inspires creativity, nur-
tures innovative businesses, and becomes an economic generator for the
region
Mix of employment opportunities, including high technology, retail,
service, light industrial, and other
Affordable housing in an urban street grid for a range of age groups, life
styles, and incomes
Vibrant pedestrian friendly village center with retail, housing, offices,
and public spaces
Connections to the Tennessee River and the open space and trail net-
works of Chattanooga and region
Connections to the employment, service, educational, recreational, and
cultural assets of Downtown Chattanooga by bikeways and public tran-
sit (shuttle bus, streetcar, water taxi)
Large and small parks and recreational amenities for residents, workers,
and visitors
Highest standards of environmental responsibility and state-of-the-art
sustainable design and practices
Preservation and celebration of the industrial heritage of Chattanooga
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ILLUSTRATIVE MASTER PLAN The former US Pipe/ Wheland Foundry site will be
transformed into a new, mixed-use district within the City of Chattanooga.
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Urban Design Plan
New development on Chattanoogas
Tennessee riverfront
Chattanooga Riverfront and Riverwalk
Keystone Commons, East Pittsburgh,
Pennsylvania


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us pipe / wheland foundry master plan | february 2008 | urban design associ ates 4
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Phase I Plan
Chattanooga has a tradition of principle-based planning, leading
to new development throughout the city. Growth is inspired by the
values and aspirations of its citizenry. Following suit, the quality and
character of development on the US Pipe/Wheland Foundry site will
reflect the principles set forth in this document. They will guide the
implementation of this vibrant, mixed-use district.
The first phase of redevelopment will feature a retail and enter-
tainment development, called Foundry Row, of approximately
525,000 square feet (A), situated along the western edge of the site,
highly visible from I-24. Residential development will occur central
to the site along 28th Street (B), and additional retail development
along Broad Street, will flank 28th Street creating a gateway entrance
to the development (C). This first phase will have a mix of uses,
some within historic industrial structures, which will distinguish this
development from other retail and mixed-use developments in the
region.
Foundry Row will consist of the primary retail and entertainment
uses forming the core of the master plan. This first phase will create a
regional destination, near Downtown Chattanooga and easily acces-
sible from the regional highway system. Because this development
will blend retail with entertainment, office, and residential uses, it
will be attractive to those seeking a unique, urban environment.
Foundry Row is envisioned as a distinct development initiative.
Its main feature will be the re-use of the historic US Pipe foundry
shed as a covered main street shopping experience. New buildings
will also be located along this shopping street, anchored on both
ends with major retail uses. Large retail buildings will require special
design features, including sustainable, green design details. These
structures will form the image of the property and must make a gate-
way statement along Foundry Row and I-24.
urban design plan: phase i plan
PHASE I ILLUSTRATIVE MASTER PLAN Near-term development will focus at the core of the site between 26th and 28th Streets,
extending towards Broad Street.
MI XED- USE
( RETAI L / OFFI CE/ RESI DENTI AL)
RETAI L
MULTI - FAMI LY RESI DENTI AL
HOTEL
OFFI CE FLEX USE
PHASE I DEVELOPMENT DI AGRAM
Note: Areas A & B will require 2-3 feet of fill and grade transitions to heritage buildings
will be needed
A) FOUNDRY ROW B) PHASE I RESI DENTI AL
AND PARKS
C) BROAD STREET RETAI L
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PARKI NG STRUCTURE
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Chattanooga Creek
Foundry
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Public Art
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us pipe / wheland foundry master plan | february 2008 | urban design associ ates 5
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The in-line retail buildings will have upper floor residential units
and/or office space. The mix of uses at construction will be deter-
mined by market demand and the densities planned are nominal for
the creation of a mixed-use district. Density of subsequent phases
may increase, but shall not be decreased. It is important to create
multi-story buildings at Foundry Row to initiate a mix of compatible
uses early in the redevelopment of the site. In addition, designing
buildings for adaptive reuse and conversion of uses must be consid-
ered to create a truly sustainable district, flexible over time.
An urban hotel, located adjacent to restaurants and shopping will
be included in the mix of uses in this first phase. The hotel will be
highly visible from I-24, and will have views of the Tennessee River,
Moccasin Bend, and Lookout Mountain.
Phase I will include the construction of streets, sidewalks, the
park space, and trails adjacent to Chattanooga Creek, and surface
parking areas as land banks for future buildings. The framework
of streets and sidewalks will establish the vehicular and pedestrian
access patterns to parking areas and new buildings. The street frame-
work will also set up a block structure for future infill development.
Green spaces will set up a framework for storm water management.
One of the strongest links to Foundry Row from Broad Street, in
Phase 1, will be 28th Street. New streets will be constructed south
of 28th to form the block structure for the first phase residential
development, including about 435 apartment/condominium units.
The proposed 28,000 square foot grocery store and the reuse of the
Combustion Engineering building for retail will form a gateway and
whole new experience from Broad Street as a gateway to Foundry
Row. 28th Street also links new development to the heritage build-
ings, which will be renovated and adaptively reused in Phase I, estab-
lishing the authentic core of the mixed-use district.
An aerial view of the first phase of development
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urban design plan: phase i plan
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urban design plan: phase i plan
PHASE I DEVELOPMENT CAPACI TY
Block
Flex / Office
Sq. Ft.
Retail
Sq. Ft.
Hotel
Rooms
Townhouse
Residential*
Condo / Apt.
Residential*
Total
Residential
Required
Parking
Structured
Parking / Pvt
Garage
Garage
Levels
Surface
Parking
Street
Parking
Total Parking
per Block
Parking
Calculation
2 cars / 1000
Sq. Ft.
4 cars / 1000
Sq. Ft.
1 car /
room
1.25 cars /
unit
A 345 12 357
B 105,000 420 25 25
C 22,000 22,000 132 150 35 185
D 20,000 15 15 99 20 20
E 15,000 26,500 150 288 55 55
F 44,000 44,000 264 70 45 115
G 115,000 460 350 50 400
H 115 115
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K 45,000 90 140 60 200
L 190 190
M
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P 35,000 140 100 15 115
Q 20 20 25 40 40
R 245 245 306 310 3 50 360
S 175 175 219 225 3 35 260
T 28,000 112 110 10 120
U
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Totals 126,000 395,500 150 0 455 455 2,555 535 6 1,765 452 2,752
PHASE I KEY PLAN Block uses and development capacities are noted in the table on
the right.
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Chattanooga Creek
*NOTE A desired mix of rental and ownership units is important to the sustainability of the development over time. This mix is outlined in the Residential Market Study prepared by Zimmerman/ Volk, Inc. (under separate cover)


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urban design plan: build out plan
Build Out Plan
With the creation of the shopping and entertainment center at
Foundry Row, and a mix of office space and residential development
in Phase I, the district will expand its diversity of uses to create a
transformational, mixed-use, and sustainable development emerging
from the former industrial site. The redevelopment of the remain-
der of the site can occur according to market demand and evolve
over a number of years. Its density will be designed to increase over
time if the market can bear it. The creation of a significant resident
population and a concentration of research and high-tech jobs at
this gateway location will anchor the southern end of Downtown
Chattanooga as an attractive place to live, work, and play. It is impor-
tant for the continued success of the Phase I Foundry Row to capi-
talize on the opportunity for high-quality jobs and residential neigh-
borhoods in the full build-out of the site.
The district will transform the current perception of this area of
the city, and will act as a gateway from both the river and the inter-
state highway, as well as South Broad Street. Visible from Lookout
Mountain, buildings and public spaces must be designed to make a
bold statement within the city and beyond. The district is also meant
to serve as a catalyst for the South Broad Area, including single fam-
ily housing east of Broad Street and the new land created through
redevelopment of the I-24 interchange.
Several residential neighborhoods are proposed for the district
offering a range of units from townhouses to condominiums/apart-
ments, both ownership and rental. Neighborhoods have a pedestrian-
friendly network of streets and trails, making it possible to live, work,
and, recreate without having to use an automobile.
BUILD OUT PLAN Over the longer term, a district containing a variety of uses will be built to reconnect Chattanooga to the Tennessee
River.
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A gateway to the district will be created at 28th Street
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MI XED USE
RETAI L
MULTI - FAMI LY RESI DENTI AL
TOWNHOUSE RESI DENTI AL
OFFI CE
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Howard
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PARKI NG STRUCTURE
Marina
A typical residential courtyard
Public Art
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CONFIDENTIAL
urban design plan: build out plan
An aerial view of the district at build out
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Moccasin
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Phase 1
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Several high-quality office and research sites are proposed, most
adjacent to Foundry Row. The development of some of these build-
ings may occur in a subsequent phases, located on the site of the
original surface parking lots. Parking for the existing Foundry Row
uses and the new office uses will ultimately be located in adjacent
parking garages as surface parking lots are developed over time.
The top of the former landfill site is a prime site for a destination
hotel and condominium resort. Buildings will be situated to capture
views of Downtown Chattanooga, the Tennessee River, and Lookout
Mountain to the southwest. With close proximity to retail and enter-
tainment of the city, this site provides an urban oasis. Additionally,
a marina will be created along the Tennessee River. This marina will
provide water-borne access to the district, and will connect to the
proposed Riverwalk extension into the core of the site.
Development will also occur between Chattanooga Creek and St.
Elmo Avenue to revitalize and establish a new development address
on South Broad Street. A flexible mix of residential and flex uses are
appropriate for this area.
The parks and trails framework will establish a high quality of life
for the residents and workers of the district. A system of parks and
trails will link the district to the Tennessee River and to the Citys
trail system, and eventually to the extended Riverwalk. The Chestnut
Street corridor and parallel rail-trail corridor will be extended into
the development, giving cyclists and hikers the option of walking
along Foundry Row or a parallel natural corridor off-street. The trails
will also be extended south along Chattanooga Creek to St. Elmo
Avenue connecting an important gap in the current trail system. A
linear park space along 26th Street will tie Foundry Row to the banks
of the Tennessee River with access underneath I-24 to the water.
Marina
Public Art
Location


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us pipe / wheland foundry master plan | february 2008 | urban design associ ates 9
CONFIDENTIAL
urban design plan: build out development capaci ty
A
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BUI LD OUT DEVELOPMENT CAPACI TY
Block
Flex / Office
Sq. Ft.
Retail
Sq. Ft.
Hotel
Rooms
Townhouse
Residential*
Condo / Apt.
Residential*
Total
Residential
Required
Parking
Structured
Parking / Pvt
Garage
Garage
Levels
Surface
Parking
Street
Parking
Total Parking
per Block
Parking
Calculation
2 cars / 1000
Sq. Ft.
4 cars / 1000
Sq. Ft.
1 car /
room
1.25 cars /
unit
A 120,000 240 240 2 12 252
B 105,000 420 25 25
C 46,000 22,000 180 600 5 35 635
D 20,000 15 15 99 20 20
E 15,000 26,500 150 288 55 55
F 44,000 44,000 264 70 45 115
G 81,000 115,000 45 45 679 740 4 50 790
H 12 20 32 40 12 30 42
I 175 70 70 263 175 1 20 195
J 84,000 168 170 35 205
K 45,000 45 45 147 45 140 60 245
L 12,500 24 24 80 24 70 30 124
M 12 12 15 12 10 22
N 5,000 5,000 10 10 43 10 30 15 55
O 12,500 10 6 16 70 10 100 40 150
P 35,000 140 100 15 115
Q 20 20 25 20 40 60
R 245 245 306 310 3 50 360
S 175 175 219 225 3 35 260
T 28,000 112 115 10 125
U 35,000 33 33 112 33 20 60 113
V 31,000 45 45 119 45 20 72 137
Totals 506,000 425,500 325 191 596 787 4,029 2,501 18 855 744 4,100
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NOTE A desired mix of rental and ownership units is important to the sustainability of the development over time. This mix is outlined in the Residential Market Study prepared by Zimmerman/ Volk, Inc. (under separate cover).
BUILD OUT KEY PLAN Block uses and development capacities are noted in the table
on the right.


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us pipe / wheland foundry master plan | february 2008 | urban design associ ates 1 0
CONFIDENTIAL
Development Program Market studies for the US Pipe/Wheland Foundry Site were con-
ducted in Summer 2007. These studies provide a basis for design
decision-making and positioning of the site by the owners, clients,
design team, and future developers. The entirety of the studies is
found under separate cover, however, the key program elements are
summarized below.
ZHA, Inc. conducted a commercial market study for the site on
the basis that it is developed in an urban fashion. A summary of the
commercial, retail, and hotel uses to be targeted is noted in the table
at the left. The following are brief definitions for some of the specific
terminology used:
Signature Tenant: A tenant that anchors a building/space of a
considerable size in relation to the total square footage
Business Development Center: A cluster of business incubator
spaces
Resort Hotel: A signature or marquee hotel that may or may not
have high-end ownership units related to its campus
Zimmerman/Volk, Inc. conducted the residential market study.
Using the target market methodology, unique to their practice, they
have determined the optimum market position for the site, based on
a variety of factors relating to the way the site is planned and market-
ed, such as the characteristics of the target households, the residential
context, and development of the property in an urban manner. The
Optimum Market Position differs from the development program
in that it relates the possible program for the site, while the develop-
ment program/capacity is a measure of what comfortably fits on the

COMMERCI AL PROGRAM FOR URBAN VI LLAGE CONCEPT


( ZHA, I NC. )
LAND USE TYPE SQUARE FEET
OFFI CE/ RESEARCH
Signature Tenant 120,000
Business Development Center 125,000
High-Tech Space Following Signature
Tenant
(Flex and General Office)
70,000-100,000
General Office 120,000-250,000
Total Office/Flex 435,000-595,000
RETAI L
Green Grocer/Drug Store 40,000-60,000
Department Store (Two-story) 125,000
Office Depot/Staples, Kohls, Borders, etc. 100,000-150,000
Lifestyle/Convenience Shoppers
Goods Tenants
30,000-60,000
Eating/Drinking 30,000-40,000
Total Retail 325,000-435,000
Resort Hotel (Overlooking River) 175 rooms
Westin/Aloft-type Hotel (in Foundry Row) 150 rooms
urban design plan: development program
site, given site constraints, public streets and lands, and other design
complexities. A summary of the Optimum Market Position is noted
at the table on page 11. The following are brief definitions for the
terminology used (more detailed definitions may be found in the core
study itself:
Mid-rise Apartments : An urban, pedestrian-oriented equiva-
lent to conventional garden apartments, typically three or more
stories, often combined with non-residential uses on the ground
floor
Mansion Apartment Building : A two- to three-story flexible-use
structure with a street faade resembling a large detached house
(hence, mansion), primarily residential in use, though it can
accommodate other uses
Hard Loft: The adaptive re-use or raw space version of the man-
sion apartment residence, adaptable for a wide range of non-resi-
dential uses
Soft Loft: The raw space version of the mansion apartment resi-
dence, adaptable for a wide range of non-residential uses, similar
to existing factory or industrial building forms
Artists Loft: A hard or soft loft created for dual residential and
studio space
Townhouse: Similar in form to a conventional suburban town-
house except that the garageseither attached or detachedare
located to the rear of the units and accessed from an alley or auto
court, and the development pattern defers to the urban network
of streets


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us pipe / wheland foundry master plan | february 2008 | urban design associ ates 1 1
CONFIDENTIAL
THE U. S. PI PE/WHELAND FOUNDRY REDEVELOPMENT SI TE
OPTI MUM RESI DENTI AL DEVELOPMENT MARKET POSI TI ON ( ZVA, I NC. )
NUMBER OF
UNI TS
AVERAGE
NET
DENSI TY/
ACRE
HOUSI NG TYPE UNI T TYPE
BASE RENT/
PRI CE RANGE
UNI T SI ZE
RANGE
BASE RENT/
PRI CE PER SQ.
FT.
MULTI - FAMI LY FOR- RENT 30. 2% OF ALL UNI TS
50 n/a
Artists Lofts
(Chestnut St. bldgs.)
Open lofts
1 to 1.5 ba
$500 to $750 560 to 960 $0.78 to $0.89
100 n/a
Hard Lofts
(over retail;
adaptive re-use)
Open lofts
1 to 1.5 ba
$575 to $1,150 500 to 1,200 $0.96 to $1.15
175 35 du
Soft Lofts
(New Construction)
Studio to
2br/2ba
$650 to $1,100 550 to 1,000 $1.10 to $1.18
128 30 du
Mansion Apts.
(New Construction)
1br/1.5ba to
2br/2.5ba/
den
$975 to $1,700 800 to 1,450 $1.17 to $1.22
MULTI - FAMI LY FOR- SALE: 29. 2% OF ALL UNI TS
200 30 du
Soft Lofts
(New Construction)
Studio to
2br/2ba
$115,000 to
$150,000
700 to 1,000 $150 to $164
150 25 du
Mansion Apts.
(New Construction)
1br/1.5ba to
3br/2ba
$175,000 to
$325,000
850 to 1,900 $171 to $206
88 50 du
Mid-Rise Apts.
(New Construction)
1br/1.5ba to
3br/2ba
$350,000 to
$525,000
1,400 to
2,400
$219 to $250
SI NGLE- FAMI LY ATTACHED FOR- SALE: 24. 7% OF ALL UNI TS
211
1,600 sf
(20x80)
Two-Story
Townhouses
2br/1.5ba to
2br/2.5ba
$165,000 to
$185,000
1,100 to 1,250 $150 to $164
140
2,250 sf
(25x90)
Two-Story
Townhouses
2br/2.5ba to
3br/2.5ba
$225,000 to
$285,000
1,350 to 1,850 $154 to $167
20
2,700 sf
(30x90)
Live-Work
500-750 sf work
space
2br/2.5.5ba
$315,000 to
$345,000
1,800 to
2,000
$173 to $175
URBAN SI NGLE- FAMI LY DETACHED FOR- SALE: 15. 9% OF ALL UNI TS
138
3,150 sf
(35x90)
Cottages
2br/1.5ba to
2br/2.5ba
$165,000 to
$250,000
950 to 1,6000 $156 to $174
1100
3,600 sf
(40x90)
Bungalows
2br/2.ba to
3br/2.5ba
$225,000 to
$335,000 and up
1,450 to 2,100
and up
$160 to $176
and up
1,500 Dwelling Units Total
Live-Work: a unit or building type that accommodates non-resi-
dential uses in addition to, or combined with living quarters
Cottage: A one-and-a-half-story single-family detached house
on a small lot with alley-loaded parking (not in project)
Bungalow: A one-and-a-half - to two-story single-family
detached house, with the garage located to the rear of the house
and accessed from an alley or auto court (not in project)
In general, effort was made to incorporate all programmatic
elements into the core design plan. Site constraints and design
considerations limited the amount of each use. Urban single-
family detached housing types, such as the cottage and bungalow,
were not planned on-site, but provide residential opportunities
within the neighborhood east of Broad Street to spur the collective
revitalization of the area.

urban design plan: development program


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us pipe / wheland foundry master plan | february 2008 | urban design associ ates 1 2
CONFIDENTIAL
While the street network of Chattanooga provides form and struc-
ture to the district, various other important transportation systems
helped shape the design of the district as well. Utilizing and pro-
viding for a variety of transportation options is crucial to creating
a vibrant, mixed-use district and is in keeping with the City of
Chattanoogas overall goal of being a pioneer in creating sustainable
and unique places.
Developed during the Design Charrette, the diagrams at right
illustrate:
Existing and abandoned railroad lines to be utilized or proposed
as bicycle trails and open recreational space
On-street bicycle routes and off-street multi-modal greenways
that connect with the City of Chattanoogas existing bicycle
system
Extending the Riverwalk through the site, connecting existing
facilities to the north to the extensive trail system on Lookout
Mountain
A prominent greenway along 26th Street that will lead from the
banks of the Tennessee River to Howard High School
A potential river transit route that would be an extension of the
popular Downtown to North Shore River Taxi
Preserved land along Chattanooga Creek to aid in the cleanup
and restoration efforts currently in progress

CONNECTIVITY FRAMEWORK In addition to the street network, a system of greenways, blueways, trails, paths and public transit
provide a variety of meaningful transportation linkages throughout the City.
Connectivity Framework
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Chickamagua
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SITE CONNECTIVITY The proposed design accommodates various transportation
modes to create connections within the site and to the surrounding community.
Furthermore, the design of all streets within the district will encourage and provide for
safe use by pedestrians
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PROPOSED RI VER TRANSI T ROUTE
PROPOSED BI KE ROUTE
( ON CHESTNUT STREET)
PROPOSED MULTI - MODAL TRAI LS
PROPOSED TRAI L HEADS/
CONNECTI ON POI NTS
EXI STI NG MULTI - MODAL TRAI LS
urban design plan: connecti vi ty framework
Marina
Lookout
Mountain
PROPOSED BUS ROUTES
EXI STI NG BUS ROUTES
PROPOSED BUS STOP
PROPOSED RI VERWALK
EXI STI NG RI VERWALK


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us pipe / wheland foundry master plan | february 2008 | urban design associ ates 1 3
CONFIDENTIAL
Street Framework
The existing street network of Chattanooga is a mixture of the tra-
ditional American street grid, apparent on the east side of Broad
Street, and a more loose arrangement that accommodates large-scale
industrial use. However, the construction of Interstate 24 and U.S.
Highway 27 removed many historic local connections, forcing most
traffic onto a few high-capacity streets.
A number of different options were explored to improve and
respect the local street network. The proposed street framework plan
on this page illustrates the recommendations, including:
Reconfiguring the I-24 Broad/Market interchange (see following
page for further detail)
Extending the residential-scale street grid of the South Broad
neighborhood west into the new district
Extending Chestnut Street into the site and routing it past some
of the most prominent site features, thereby creating a core devel-
opment address (Foundry Row)
Creating a well-connected network of streets on-site to allow for
a number of access options within the district
Placing a street alongside I-24 that creates an address for adjacent
buildings and a route for vehicles that may be accessing the dis-
trict via a possible future exit from the I-24

EXI STI NG STREETS PROPOSED STREETS


(ABOVE) EXISTING STREET FRAMEWORK The City street grid extends toward
the former US Pipe/Wheland Foundry site but never entered the site due to its historic
industrial use. Interstate 24 orients itself to the local street grid but still separates the site
from the Tennessee River.
(RIGHT) PROPOSED STREET FRAMEWORK The proposed street network weaves
the site into the overall City street grid. East/west streets largely run toward the river, while
the north/south network connects the various development parcels. Most notably, a strong
linkage is created by continuing Chestnut Street through the core of the new district, and
encouraging cross access to Broad Street, assisting in revitalization of the neighborhoods
east of it.
Site
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urban design plan: street framework
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us pipe / wheland foundry master plan | february 2008 | urban design associ ates 1 4
CONFIDENTIAL
I-24 Ramp and Interchange
Proposals
EXISTING CONDITIONS
In its current configuration, the interchange of Interstate 24 and Broad/Market Streets
occupies approximately fifteen city blocks. The system of loops, ramps, and one-way
surface streets is designed to accommodate large volumes of vehicles, facilitates
high-speed travel, and is out of context within the surrounding neighborhoods. The
interchange is one of the primary access points to Downtown Chattanooga, but does
very little to create a sense of arrival into the City. The interchange also creates a
significant perceptual and physical barrier within the City.
EXI STI NG T WO- WAY SURFACE STREETS EXI STI NG ONE- WAY SURFACE STREETS
EXI STI NG I NTERSTATE AND ACCESS RAMPS
DESIGN PROPOSAL
The redesign of the interchange drastically simplifies traffic movements, clarifies
access, and improves safety for drivers and pedestrians alike. The design consolidates
the interstate exit and entry points and restores the local street grid. In turn, the design
unlocks much land for development opportunities. All but one of the loop ramps are
removed in favor of a frontage road design. High-capacity traffic circles or signaled
intersections handle the transfer of vehicles from the interstate to surface streets.
Furthermore, the remaining one-way streets are converted to two-way traffic flow to
restore the character of the surrounding neighborhood and increase local access. In an
effort to minimize costs, very little new interstate infrastructure is required. Lastly, the
traffic circles and simplified street network provides a much more attractive and less
confusing entrance to the City.
DEVELOPABLE LAND
With the removal of the interstate access ramps and loops, approximately 19.7 acres
of land would be available for development. Development in this area would serve to
unify the City fabric that was separated with the construction of the interstate. Also,
new development would serve as an attractive gateway into the City. New and improved
streets would provide better access to the area on the west side of Broad Street,
ultimately aiding the redevelopment of the study site and other adjacent lands. Proceeds
from the sale of the development parcels can help finance street improvements.
EXI STI NG T WO- WAY SURFACE STREETS PROPOSED T WO- WAY STREETS
EXI STI NG I NTERSTATE AND ACCESS RAMPS
RECL AI MED L AND/ DEVELOPMENT PARCELS RECL AI MED STREET FRONTAGE
PROPOSED TRAFFI C CI RCLES
TRAFFI C DI RECTI ON
TRAFFI C DI RECTI ON
PROPOSED I NTERSTATE AND ACCESS
RAMPS
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1 3.6 Acres
2 0.8 Acres
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4 3.4 Acres
5 0.9 Acres
6 2.4 Acres
7 2.0 Acres
8 2.3 Acres
9 1.3 Acres
10 2.3 Acres
Total: 19.7 Acres
urban design plan: i-24 ramp and interchange proposals
DEVELOPMENT PARCELS
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us pipe / wheland foundry master plan | february 2008 | urban design associ ates 15
CONFIDENTIAL
Development Areas
development areas
a mixed-use community such as this new district has a wide
variety of land uses. Although many of the buildings will be capable
of accommodating a vertical mix of uses, distinct development areas
have been designated:
Foundry Row
Residential Development
Office Development
Hotel and Resort
Broad Street Development
Parking
Parks/Open space/Marina (described in Landscape Character
and Sustainability sections)
As can be seen on the plan to the right and as described in
detail on the following pages, these development areas can be seen
as opportunities for individual investors or developers according to
market demand.

DEVELOPMENT AREAS Diagram illustrating land uses throughout the development


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HOTEL / RESORT
FOUNDRY ROW OFFI CE BROAD STREET DEVELOPMENT
RESI DENTI AL FLEX USES PARKI NG STRUCTURE
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us pipe / wheland foundry master plan | february 2008 | urban design associ ates 1 6
CONFIDENTIAL
Foundry Row
ini ti ati ve areas : foundry row
Foundry Row is a retail and entertainment development organized
along the re-aligned extension of Chestnut Street running inside the
main foundry shed north to Central Park. The street is lined with
multi-story buildings that have ground floor specialty shops with
upper floor uses that may include office space and/or residential
units. Several historic industrial buildings clustered northwest of the
foundry shed along the new retail street will be re-used for commer-
cial uses including retail, restaurants, and offices. The preservation,
rehabilitation, and reuse of several of the original foundry buildings
will give this area a character unique in the country and will connect
back to the sites heritage.
The north /south street of specialty shops and restaurants will be
anchored on both ends by department stores. The southern anchor
will be highly visible from Interstate 24 as one approaches the down-
town area. The prominent location of this anchor use necessitates
special design treatment, as it serves as Chattanoogas front door
when approaching from the south. Quality of architecture treat-
ment, such as massing, materials, and integration of sustainable
building practices should be used. The other anchor is highly visible
fronting Central Park at a major entrance to the district along 26th
Street from Broad Street. The walking distance from one anchor to
the other is 1,200 feet. About half of the street experience is inside
the restored foundry shed, which will become an industrial ver-
sion of a European galleria. The shed will be lined with shops and
upper floor office uses. Parking for this first phase initiative can be
achieved with surface lots. Foundry Row will have 220,000 square
feet of anchor stores and 112,500 square feet of specialty retail and
entertainment uses.
(ABOVE) PROPOSED FOUNDRY ROW Aerial view focusing on the proposed Foundry
Row development
(LEFT) FOUNDRY ROW PLAN Illustrative plan showing the proposed Foundry Row
development
Central
Park
The Foundr y
Shed Shops
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CONFIDENTIAL
ini ti ati ve areas : foundry row
10' 22' 10' 50' 5' 8' 5'
P P
20' 15' 50' 15' 70' 70'
13' 14' 16'
43'
26'
HISTORIC CORE SECTIONS The area around the restored heritage buildings will be a node of activity within the district
26TH STREET PARK SECTION This public space will connect the district to the Tennessee River, incorporating stormwater
management features
FOUNDRY SHED SECTION A mixed-use street runs through the Foundry Shed celebrating the citys industrial heritage
15' 30' 12' 10' 38' 5' 5' 70'
P P
CENTRAL PARK SECTION The existing railroad right-of-way will run through the large gathering space at the center of the district
P
Downtown Chattanooga
South Market Street,
Downtown Chattanooga
Keystone Commons, East Pittsburgh,
Pennsylvania


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CONFIDENTIAL
Residential Development
ini ti ati ve areas : residenti al development
CHESTNUT STREET LOFTS
(ABOVE) Illustrative plan of proposed housing to be developed near the Chestnut Street
heritage building
(BELOW) Illustrative view highlighting the proposed Chestnut Street Lofts
NORTH CREEK RESIDENCES
(ABOVE) The proposed North Creek Residences are large apartment or condominium
buildings served by structured parking
(BELOW) Illustrative view highlighting the proposed buildings known as the North Creek
residences
The master plan proposes a mix of uses to create a 24-hour environ-
ment. Key to the transformation of this property into a mixed-use
district is the inclusion of residential units. The residential market
study recommends a mix of attached single-family, condominium/
apartment-style, and loft units, both home-ownership and rental
tenure. Several residential neighborhoods are proposed throughout
the district.
Chestnut Street Lofts
These units are gathered adjacent to Central Park, along the
Chestnut Street corridor, the rail corridor, and 26th Street. These
units will be townhouses and loft style units, potentially including
live/work, with surface parking or garages integral to the units.
North Creek Residences
These units are condominium/apartment-style units in double-
loaded corridor configurations of three or four stories in height with
integral precast above-grade parking structures. These units will be
oriented along the public streets and into courtyards, immediately
adjacent to Foundry Row. This neighborhood is the highest density
of residential units planned, and will be made possible by structured
parking.
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Charlotte, North Carolina
Charlotte, North Carolina
26th Street
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CONFIDENTIAL
ini ti ati ve areas : residenti al development
TYPICAL STREET SECTION New residential streets within the district will be designed
to accommodate pedestrians and bicyclists, as well as automobiles, creating safe and
engaging environments.
SIDNEY STREET HOMES (ABOVE) Illustrative plan of the proposed townhouses and
lofts centered around Sidney Street
(BELOW) Illustrative view highlighting the proposed Sidney Street Homes
SOUTH CREEK HOMES (ABOVE) Proposed design for two residential neighborhoods
south of Chattanooga Creek
(BELOW) Proposed view highlighting the South Creek Homes
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These units are located at a major entrance to Foundry Row from
Broad Street and will be a mix of townhouses and loft-style units
with surface parking or parking integral to the units. These units
will extend the residential land use pattern of the South Broad
neighborhood across Broad Street and connect that land use into
Foundry Row at Central Park.
South Creek Homes
With the reclamation of Chattanooga Creek, and the transition of
this area to mixed-use, the creek will become a highly-desirable nat-
ural amenity for residential development. These units will be a mix
of townhouses and lofts, and will have mostly attached or detached
garage parking. The creek helps organize development, and view
corridors are created to perceptually connect these buildings to
development north of the creek. Community gardens are proposed
along the west side of the creek to provide localized food production
opportunities proximate to the new urban district.
10' 30' 10'
50'
4' 4' 6' 6'
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Cherry Street, Chattanooga
West 19th Street, Chattanooga
Cowart Street, Chattanooga


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CONFIDENTIAL
Office and Flex Buildings
ini ti ati ve areas : office and flex buildings
CHESTNUT STREET FLEX BUILDINGS (ABOVE) Illustrative plan of the restored building
on Chestnut Street and new buildings adjacent to Interstate 24
(BELOW) Illustrative view highlighting the proposed Chestnut Street flex buildings
26TH STREET OFFICES (ABOVE) Illustrative plan of the proposed 26th Street Office
development and the adjacent park space
(BELOW) Illustrative view highlighting the proposed 26th Street Offices
Places for employment will be critical to the success of this mixed-
use environment and help drive the retail, entertainment, and hous-
ing development. Both office and flex buildings are proposed that
include space for both large and small tenants in new and restored
buildings that can be customized to tenant needs.
Chestnut Street Flex Buildings
These sites include new and re-used buildings. The existing building
situated on Chestnut Street proper can be re-used as a unique loft-
style environment that can accommodate a range of specialty func-
tions including lab space, light manufacturing, office, or studios.
The structure of this heritage building lends itself to any number of
uses that may be determined as the district develops.
Flex building sites are also proposed along the curve of Interstate
24. These buildings define the northern edge of the core district.
Parking may be handled in surface parking lots or parking structures
depending on the exact uses determined over time. Buildings should
be oriented in an urban manner that complements the character of
the new district.
26th Street Offices
Multi-story office space is proposed along the 26th Street corridor
and park leading to the Tennessee riverfront. This location is adja-
cent to Foundry Row with adjacent garage parking. These buildings
will have views of the Tennessee River and will be highly visible
from Interstate 24.
Though the buildings will be primarily office in use, retail,
commercial, or public uses are encouraged on the ground floors to
engage the public park with activity. In addition, parking garages
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CONFIDENTIAL
ini ti ati ve areas : office and flex buildings
FOUNDRY ROW OFFICES AND GATEWAY TECHNOLOGY SITE
(ABOVE) Illustrative plan of the proposed Foundry Row offices, located on 28th Street
adjacent to the Foundry Shed, and The Gateway Technology site, south of Foundry Row
(BELOW) Illustrative view highlighting the proposed Gateway Technology site and the
Foundry Row offices
SOUTH CREEK FLEX BUILDINGS
(ABOVE) Illustrative plan of the proposed flex buildings
(BELOW) Illustrative view highlighting the proposed South Creek flex buildings
28th Street
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throughout the district should be conceived and designed as convert-
ible over time. Garages are designed so that the outermost bays can
house other uses in the future, creating a fully flexible and sustain-
able framework.
Foundry Row Offices
Office space will be created above ground floor retail uses and
along 28th Street, adjacent to structured parking. This building will
be attractive to smaller tenants seeking proximity to the dynamic
mixed-use environment of Foundry Row.
Gateway Technology Site
This building will be a signature office/research building custom
designed for a major tenant seeking a prominent gateway loca-
tion. This site is highly visible from I-24, the Tennessee River, and
Lookout Mountain, and the upper floors of this building will have
unique views back to these Chattanooga landmarks. This building
can become a symbol for the future of Chattanoogas redevelopment
along the Tennessee River. Parking for this site should be below
grade. This iconic building will demonstrate the highest form of sus-
tainability principles and will be a symbol for the rest of the site. The
front lawn of this site will contain an important placement of public
art.
South Creek Flex Buildings
Flex space is proposed for this formerly industrial area. With a mix
of uses developing in this area, such as that already associated with
the Saddlery Building, a continuation of this development into a dis-
trict makes sense.
Flex buildings, which could house various uses, such as light
industrial, office, or studio space, will be developed along St. Elmo
Avenue to take advantage of proximity to Broad Street.
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Signature office building
Greenville, South Carolina
Heritage building on Chestnut Street,
Chattanooga
Public Art
Location
Public Art
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CONFIDENTIAL
Hotels and the Marina
ini ti ati ve areas : hotels and the marina
RESORT HOTEL DEVELOPMENT AND MARINA (ABOVE) Illustrative plan of the pro-
posed Mesa development, showing both the resort hotel and condominiums
(BELOW) Illustrative view highlighting the proposed resort hotel development and
marina at the far northern end of the site
HOTEL AT FOUNDRY ROW (ABOVE) The proposed Foundry Row hotel is located adja-
cent to the restored historic buildings
(BELOW) Illustrative view highlighting the proposed Foundry Row hotel in the heart of
the district
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Mt. Washington Hotel,
Bretton Woods, New Hampshire
Newport, Rhode Island
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Hotels in the new district vary in type and arrangement. One is
an urban hotel adjacent to Foundry Row, and the other is a hotel /
condominium in the resort tradition on a hilltop overlooking the
Tennessee River.
Hotel at Foundry Row
The Hotel at Foundry Row is adjacent to a cluster of heritage struc-
tures that will be re-used as retail, restaurants, and office space.
The hotel will be highly visible from I-24, and will be designed to
compliment the heritage buildings that define the character of this
area. Guests will enjoy great views toward the river and Lookout
Mountain in the distance, but will also have immediate access to
the retail core of the district. The proposed hotel of 150 guest rooms
includes meeting space and conference areas.
The Resort Hotel Development and Marina
Foundry sand was deposited over many years at a property along
the river. Views from the top of this site to the city, the river, and
Lookout Mountain, are spectacular. The master plan sites a hotel/
condominium resort destination in this location, accessible by a road
that winds up to an entry court at the main resort hotel building,
containing 175 rooms. Condominiums will extend to the north.
This development can be operated as a single resort complex with
the possibility of time share sales, central services, and a luxury spa.
In the north, a marina is proposed to connect this upland resort
to the Tennessee River itself via trails as an extension of the Citys
Riverwalk south into the new district.


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CONFIDENTIAL
Broad Street Development
Broad Street is a major arterial connecting southern Chattanooga
to Downtown. This street is a heavily traveled route within the city.
Broad Street connects to I-24 between 20th Street and 25th Street
and is developed as a series of disparate uses in this area.
Broad Street is an important commercial corridor within the City
of Chattanooga. Commercial and retail uses align themselves along
this spine from the district to Downtown. Retail uses along Broad
Street between 24th Street and Chattanooga Creek are not coordi-
nated as with the fabric of Broad Street in Downtown. As such, this
district has the opportunity to spur urban revitalization and create a
gateway with the character of new Broad Street development.
Land controlled by the development team is situated at 28th
Street. Given the volumes of traffic along Broad Street, the plan sit-
uates retail to flank 28th Street. This retail will include the re-use of
the Combustion Engineering building as a proposed 35,000 square
foot grocery store with adjacent surface parking, as well as another
medium-sized retail establishment. Surface parking will accom-
modate the given uses. The stores will be central to both the district
and neighborhoods east of Broad Street. By claiming Broad Street
for development, the district creates another meaningful link to the
(ABOVE) INFILL AND LAND ACQUISITION OPPORTUNITIES
Additional land should be acquired to redevelop underutilized property along Broad
Street between 25th Street and 28th Street to increase the presence of the district on
this major artery. Additional land will be required to make street connections shown in
the plan, as well. Several historic buildings located on Broad Street are currently being
used for retail and office uses. These buildings create a very attractive presence on
Broad Street, and any new development should respect their locations and architectural
character. The development team should collaborate with existing land owners to devise
mutually beneficial solutions and increased development opportunities.
Ini ti ati ve areas : broad street development
(ABOVE) Illustrative plan of proposed new construction and adaptive re-use proposed
for the property along Broad Street
(BELOW) Illustrative view highlighting proposed development along Broad Street
AREA OF TARGETED I MPROVEMENT
AND REDEVELOPMENT
L AND NEEDED FOR NEW STREET R. O. W.
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Buildings Along South Broad Street,
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CONFIDENTIAL
Sustainability
sustainabili ty
the goal of the development, as envisioned by the com-
munity and the owners, is to create the most sustainable district in
the city. The new district will be a national model for responsible
brownfield development and will continue to enhance Chattanoogas
reputation as the Souths most sustainable city. The master plan
acknowledges that the development not only needs to be designed
and constructed sustainably, but must provide users with opportuni-
ties to live, work, and recreate in truly sustainable ways in order to
meet its full promise over time. The master plan meets these goals
through a variety of strategies: such as an integrated approach to
building and site design; a range of transportation options; open
space and recreation choices; the creation of productive landscapes;
and providing building and site designs that can accommodate a
range of uses.
The vital components of sustainability should not be limited to
only green solutions for buildings and site work. The goal of sus-
tainability is three fold to eliminate waste and pollution, conserve
energy and resources, and to enhance natural systems. In the book
Ten Shades of Green Architecture and the Natural World, ten
strategies are laid out:
Low Energy Performance Achieved by making maximum use
of natural light and ventilation
Replenishable Sources Harvest non-depletable ambient energies
of the sun, wind, waves, gravity, and geothermal power
Recycling: Eliminating Waste and Pollution Re-use building
materials, design buildings that are flexible and easily re-used;
recycle water and heat

Trails
Green Buildings
Water harvesting along streets
Permeable Paving
Embodied Energy Look at energy efficiency in material selec-
tions in terms of life-time energy use
Long Life, Loose Fit Build with materials that endure and
improve with age; green buildings not only accommodate change
easily but are timeless and pleasant in character so that people
prefer to conserve them
Total Life Cycle Costing Balance capital cost with long-term
maintenance costs
Embedded in Place Green buildings fit seamlessly into, help
reintegrate and minimize negative impacts on their surroundings
Access and urban context to be green, integrate multi-modal
transportation alternatives
Health and Happiness Natural light, fresh air, and contact with
nature and community provide a healthy life
Community and Connection Achieve a sustainable culture
by regenerating a sense of community and connections with the
natural world
The strategies apply to community, architecture, and landscape,
both new and restored. In this section, green topics focus on captur-
ing and treating stormwater, providing for a green infrastructure and
buildings, as well as habitat restoration and urban planting strategies.


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CONFIDENTIAL
Addressing
Sustainability
with Landscape,
Architecture, and
Infrastructure
sustainabili ty:
addressing sustainabili ty wi th landscape, archi tecture, and infrastructure
The current industrialized landscape of the US Pipe site is unique
and offers enormous possibilities for revitalization. A new landscape
green, productive and welcoming can be achieved by applying
innovative sustainable solutions to transform various aspects of the
site.
These should address the following:
Creation of a system of native plant communities and habitats to
connect this site to Chattanoogas current greenways, parks, and
natural systems
Integration of sound stormwater management practices to cap-
ture, cleanse, and reuse run-off
Creation of a functional park system and series of streets that are
ecologically based as well as place makers
Developing design standards for making existing buildings, as
well as new buildings, green
Marrying new development blocks and existing development
blocks to remain in a sensitive, accessible manner that incorpo-
rates green strategies
Design buildings to be adaptable over time and make maximum
use of natural light and ventilation, harvest the non-dependable
ambient energies of the sun; wind and geo-thermal power; build
with constantly replenished materials and ones that endure and
improve with age; integrate water harvesting techniques; recycle
grey water; reduce the urban heat island by using green roof tech-
nology.

Chattanooga Creek
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CONFIDENTIAL
Normally with former industrial sites, there are environmental
challenges. To our advantage, these sites will have been given a posi-
tive report by TDEC by the time development commences. What may
have been challenges on a typical brownfield site have been turned into
opportunities.
The sustainable strategies that can be applied to this site are
divided into four categories that are derived from the application of
new design standards that attempt to integrate the above sustainable
practices:
Urban Streets
Green Streets
Park and Park Connections
Private Development Blocks
The potential sustainable strategies have been divided into four
classifications: Urban street, Green street, Park Land, and Private
Development. Each of these classifications has great potential for a
variety of sustainable strategies, and each will have a different visual
character.
Any development promoted as green or sustainable should not
only seek to restore lost natural processes but should also celebrate
natural systems as an integral component of a healthy community.
The following pages provide inspiration for strategies that might be
employed on the US Pipe site and reinforce the unique landscape
character of Chattanooga.

URBAN STREETS Urbanized streets shown here with infiltration planters PARK LAND Public park lands where pavement and infrastructure is limited may be
locations to display a wide range of sustainable design features
GREEN STREETS Less developed streets, shown here with a bio-swale PRIVATE DEVELOPMENT BLOCKS Private development with public frontage that
enhances the public realm
sustainabili ty:
addressing sustainabili ty wi th landscape, archi tecture, and infrastructure


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CONFIDENTIAL
sustainabili ty:
strategies for existing buildings
Strategies for
Existing Buildings
Some existing heritage buildings on the site exhibit significant
architectural character and sufficient structural integrity to be reha-
bilitated and adapted for new uses. To preserve these buildings,
floor slabs remain intact, working within the shell of the existing
structure. Since subsurface soils are potentially affected, and former
foundations will remain, excavation for sustainable strategies will be
limited. Therefore, controls will be above grade or exposed. These
elements can provide wonderful inspiration for the redesign of the
buildings. Aqueducts, exposed cisterns, and above-grade planters
can be designed to mimic the industrial character of the existing
buildings.
Although there is less opportunity for large-scale strategies sur-
rounding existing buildings, that does not mean that small-scale
strategies are not beneficial. The cumulative effect of many small-
scale, independent strategies will be critical to the overall health of
the district, and will reinforce an ethic of sustainability that is well-
known and practiced in Chattanooga.
Above-grade cistern Aqueducts celebrate rain water collection An aqueduct that conveys water is an architectural feature
Roof water conveyance
Runoff conveyed into planter Roof water collection Adaptive reuse of an industrial site


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CONFIDENTIAL
sustainabili ty:
strategies for new buildings
Strategies for
New Buildings
To maintain consistent sustainable building standards through-
out the development, the LEED (Leadership in Energy and
Environmental Design) Green Building Rating System
TM
standards
will be used. New buildings are to meet LEED certification stan-
dards, with LEED-Silver being the minimum targeted standard for
new development. Where practical and applicable, Gold or Platinum
designations will be sought, particularly on parcels that are highly
visible or symbolic of the development. Strategies for new build-
ing design include durable buildings with flexible floor plates that
can accommodate a variety of uses over time; sophisticated building
envelope systems, including green roofs, that reduce heating, cool-
ing, and lighting requirements; and water and waste management
strategies that reduce water usage and maximize recycling waste.
Many new buildings may need to be sited upon two to three feet
of fill. Therefore, controls and sustainable features can be sunken
below grade. Less of the exposed ground surface needs to be devoted
to sustainable features, so larger plazas and pedestrian spaces can be
developed. Inspiration for the detailing of these spaces can be drawn
from the historic urban development patterns of Chattanooga.
Water collected from canopy is conveyed
into planter
Green roof that is used as a courtyard
Sculptural green roof
Green roof with usable pathways and seating
Green roof and large atrium that provides
natural lighting


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CONFIDENTIAL
sustainabili ty:
strategies for transi tional development blocks
One challenge for sustainable strategies is that portions of the site
may be capped or covered with up to 2 to 3 feet of clean soil. While
this will eliminate the need to remove some of the existing foun-
dations, it also means that new buildings may be sited 2 to 3 feet
higher than existing buildings. Furthermore, in an effort to control
demolition costs, existing foundations may remain in place and cov-
ered by soil. The following relationships may be designed in relating
existing, heritage buildings to new development.
Strategies for Transitional
Development Blocks
Elevated buildings connect to courtyard via steps Roof garden transitions between old and
new construction
A green roof in Paris, France
Terraced seating wall
Raised planters transition grade
Architectural connections between old
and new buildings


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CONFIDENTIAL
The Green Network
Beyond a framework of parks and community connections, applying
specific green strategies related to stormwater capture and treatment,
low-impact site improvements, such as porous paving, and the use of
local, natural and recycled materials, will form the basis of a sustain-
able neighborhood. These strategies would include the re-establish-
ment of natural wildlife habitats, urban forests, and the restoration
of urban watersheds into a new, green network that reinforces mans
connection with nature in context with the urban development.
The best example of such integration is Central Park in New
York City, where in the mid-19th Century, Frederick Law Olmsted
and Calvert Vaux proposed a new urban park on derelict land to bal-
ance the ever-growing congestion of the city. In their vision, a demo-
cratic, public open space, filled with promenades, parade grounds,
greenswards, and civic spaces would provide social interaction and
foster community. In contrast, much of the site was to be restored as
an urban forest with natural waterways, woodlands, rock outcrop-
pings, and wildlife. This environment was to reconnect man and
nature.
On this site, there is an opportunity to establish meadows, wood-
lands, watercourses, and habitats to bring man and nature together
in an urban context. Various landscape types, including densely
planted tree stands, meadows, and woodland edge plantings will
bring re-introduce plant types lost over time. There are also possi-
bilities to integrate urban agriculture into the landscape by providing
orchards, crop squares, and hedgerows to create community gardens
as the focus of a locally-based food source.
Meadow
Mature woodlands
Stream corridor
Central Park, New York City
Wetlands
sustainabili ty:
the green network


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CONFIDENTIAL
Open Space Network:
Framework for Sustainability
OPEN SPACE
Chattanooga Creek
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sustainabili ty:
open space network: framework for sustainability
Precedent photos showing the character of urban spaces existing within Chattanooga
today
The US Pipe/Wheland Foundry Master plan includes recreational
amenities and open spaces that will contribute to both the desir-
ability and the livability of the newly revitalized district. The intent
of the open space network is to provide a variety of spaces for family
and community-oriented recreation in an urban setting. The plan
equitably distributes park land and urban plazas throughout the
community so that each user is within a short walking distance of
public open space.
The open space network addresses sustainability by improving air
quality through the capture and minimization of urban air pollution,
allowing buildings within the district to more fully utilize natural
cross ventilation. Furthermore, the open spaces will be planted with
indigenous plant species that will be able to naturally cope with
the local climate, reduce the urban heat-island effect, and facilitate
stormwater management without extensive maintenance. The open
space network will therefore be able to make visible the sustainable
strategies employed in the district.
Parks will vary in size to accommodate a number of different
amenities. They will also vary in character to promote distinctive
place making. The parks are designed to provide a diverse set of pas-
sive recreational opportunities including walking paths, play areas,
overlooks, piers, and community gathering spaces. District parks will
be connected to retail, commercial, and residential areas through
pedestrian-scale streets and trails, encouraging residents to walk,
shop, browse, and gather. For park users who choose to drive, park-
ing will be provided both on- and off-street in typical urban devel-
opment configurations.


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CONFIDENTIAL
Chattanooga is located on the Tennessee River in Hamilton County
in southeastern Tennessee, and is in a diverse area of farmlands,
forests, and low mountains. The topography is marked by caves and
sinkholes that provide a groundwater resource. The mountains pos-
sess intriguing geologic features that make them attractive and part
of the overall lure of the area to tourists.
The most renown natural features in Chattanooga are the
Tennessee River and the surrounding highlands. The city is nestled
between the southwestern Ridge-and-valley Appalachians and the
foot of Waldens Ridge. The Tennessee River separates the ridge
from the western side of downtown. Several miles east, the city is
bisected by Missionary Ridge. The Tennessee River is impounded
by the TVAs Chickamauga Dam north of the downtown area. Five
automobile bridges, one railroad trestle, and one pedestrian bridge
cross the river.
In 1969, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency cited
Chattanooga as having the worst air quality in the nation. Since
then, community-wide revitalization projects have made the city a
leader in the sustainable development movement. Steps have been
taken to insure that Chattanoogas natural landscapes are conserved
while contaminated areas are being treated and protected.
Chattanoogas
Landscape Character
sustainabili ty:
chattanooga

s landscape character
Tennessee River
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Public Gol f Club
Moccasin Bend
National Park
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Nolan plan of Chattanooga
Illustrative Master Plan


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CONFIDENTIAL
sustainabili ty:
public space character
There will be a variety of urban spaces created within the District.
These range from small pocket parks and central greens to large
informal open spaces. The goal is to provide a variety of recreational
opportunities for residents and to provide the conditions necessary
for improved ecological health. A great urban space can be both
functional and ecologically diverse. The precedent photos on this
page are examples of great urban spaces in different cities. Although
the scale and use is different in each, they all share a common com-
mitment to provide recreational and ecological value through good
design practices.
Sociability
The design of public spaces - the streets, squares, and parks - is criti-
cal to the success of the development. It is in these places of social
interaction that people meet formally and informally to create com-
munity. In turn, this community sustains residents and visitors and
gives a unique identity and particularity to a place.
Variety of Uses
Public spaces should be flexibly designed to handle many different
uses. A well-designed space can accommodate activities ranging
from formal recreation to impromptu performances.
Comfort and Image
Public spaces should be inviting and comfortable for all users. These
spaces are also the first impression visitors have of the community,
so they should be constructed to the highest standards using only the
best materials.
Public Space Character
URBAN SPACES
Chattanooga Creek
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An open lawn
Gabian wall seating
Moveable seating
An urban plaza with integrated art
A public path with a terminated vista Tree-lined walks
Public Art
Location


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CONFIDENTIAL
sustainabili ty:
public space character
Integrated Art
Plazas are activated by the integration of art, oftentimes produced
by local artists. Both children and adults alike may enjoy art instal-
lations, especially those that may take on a functional purpose.
Themes of the sites industrial heritage may provide inspiration for
art to be integrated into buildings and public spaces. The gateway
position of the site, as one enters Chattanooga on I-24 from the
west, suggests the southwestern end of the main site to be an oppor-
tune location for monumental public art. This would introduce visi-
tors to the city and the project as they round the bend of the river on
their way into town.
A small ornamental feature on a buildings
exterior wall
Image of an interactive fountain in
Chattanooga
Large-scale sculptural elements on Chattanoogas riverfront
Public art associated with the Tennessee Aquarium in Downtown
Chattanooga
Sculpture can be integrated into stormwater management and collection techniques Large-scale outdoor sculpture in Downtown Chattanooga
Small-scale sculpture in a public courtyard Natural and industrial materials used in outdoor sculpture


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CONFIDENTIAL
sustainabili ty:
landscape elements
Landscape Elements
PERMEABLE PAVING EXAMPLES LOCALLY-AVAILABLE MATERI ALS SCULPTURAL USE OF WATER
Proper detailing is critical to the success and visual integrity of urban
open spaces. Appropriate details provide richness, a sense of place,
and give scale to the landscape. Details can also enhance the ecologi-
cal diversity and functional aspects of open spaces. The precedent
photos on this page represent just a few possible details appropriate
for Chattanooga.
Permeable Paving
Pavements are necessary for pathways and trails, but pavements that
are permeable allow rain water to move through their structure and
infiltrate into the sub-soil.
Regional Materials
Materials that are locally made, locally quarried or locally produced
allow a project to feel as if it belongs to that region and nowhere else.
Regional materials not only apply to building materials, but also to
locally grown and harvested indigenous plant material as well.
Sculptural use of Water
Water can be one of the most powerful and expressive elements in
the landscape. Captured stormwater can be artfully expressed and
the process of movement and infiltration can be celebrated.


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CONFIDENTIAL
Master Planning
Background
master planning background
the client group, The Lyndhurst Foundation, Pipe Properties,
and Perimeter Properties appointed a Steering Committee who
met collaboratively with the consultant team throughout the design
process. In addition, other stakeholders were invited to focus group
meetings to provide input and feedback.
The UDA consultant team included:
Urban Design Associates Lead firm, urban design, planning
LaQuatra Bonci Associates Landscape design
Walter Kulash, P.E. Transportation
In addition, RiverCity Company separately engaged the following
consultants:
Zimmerman Volk Associates Residential Market Study
ZHA, Inc. Commercial Market Study
The planning process for US Pipe/Wheland was completed
in three phases:
Phase I Data Base and Analysis Understanding
(May-July 2007)
Phase II Charrette Discovering (August 2007)
Phase III Final Plan Deciding (August 2007- January 2008)

PLANNING PROCESS The master


planning process engaged leadership
groups representing the diverse interests
of the Chattanooga community.
Phase I included an initial UDA team trip to Chattanooga in late
May 2007 to meet with the Steering Committee and others, to col-
lect base data and previous reports (such as market or environmental
studies), and to document and photograph the site and adjacent
neighborhoods. The UDA team prepared an analysis of the data,
including UDA X-Ray diagrams, summaries of issues, preliminary
design principles, development frameworks, market studies, and
engineering reports. Representatives of RiverCity, Pipe Properties,
Perimeter Properties, and The Lyndhurst Foundation traveled to
Pittsburgh for a one-day working session on August 6, 2007, prior to
Phase II.
Phase II was done primarily in Chattanooga in August 2007
in the form of a four-day design charrette. Urban design alterna-
tives were developed by the consultant team in collaboration with
the Steering Committee and other invited stakeholders. A debrief-
ing meeting with the Steering Committee concluded the charrette.
One-day working sessions in Pittsburgh were held in September and
November 2007 to refine the urban design master plan.
Phase III involved the preparation of this US Pipe/Wheland
Foundry Master Plan final report. A draft copy was reviewed by the
Steering Committee prior to final publication.


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CONFIDENTIAL
Analysis
master planning background: analysis
The Master Plan built upon previous planning and redevelopment
efforts for Downtown Chattanooga and the Tennessee Riverfront,
including, among others, the South Central Business District Plan,
Tennessee Riverpark Master Plan, Chattanooga Riverfront Parkway
Plan, 21st Century Waterfront Plan, 2030 Comprehensive Plan,
2025 Downtown Plan, and South Broad Redevelopment Plan.
In addition, the consultant team conducted on-site reconnais-
sance of the US Pipe/Wheland properties, adjacent neighbor-
hoods, Downtown, and other significant places in Chattanooga.
Photographs and measurements were taken in addition to the col-
lection of additional documentation. Transportation data was col-
lected and meetings held with government, highway, public works,
and transit officials. The market consultants collected financial and
demographic data from existing governmental and industry websites
and other published information, as well as conducted interviews
with real estate professionals, developers, and financial institutions.
Finally, input from community stakeholders was developed in a
series of focus groups in Phase I that was summarized and distrib-
uted in both graphic and written forms.
City of
CHATTANOOGA
Signal Mountain
Red Bank
East Ridge
Ridgeside
Lookout
Mountain
TENNESSEE
GEORGIA
SITE
REGIONAL LOCATOR MAP The City of Chattanooga is situated in Hamilton County,
around the Tennessee River. The study area is located along a southern river bend.
PORTRAIT OF EXISTING CONDITIONS A map was created to understand the patterns of current land uses in the City. The study area
is outlined in red.
I -24
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Public Gol f Club
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National Park
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CONFIDENTIAL
master planning background: uda x-rays
UDA X-Rays
REGIONAL HIGHWAYS AND ARTERI ALS
Interstate 24 and US 27 converge at a point just south of Downtown
Chattanooga, adjacent to the project site. These two highways provide
regional access to the city center. Interstate 24 creates a barrier to
accessing the river in the study area. Cummings Highway and Broad
Street provide a full access, local entrance to the city from the west and
south.
SETTLEMENT PATTERNS
The mountainous topography of the region shapes the pattern of
regional settlement. Most settlement in the City and surrounding area
has occurred to the south and east of Downtown due to the availability
of flat land. The northern and western portions of the region are much
more mountainous and difficult to access. Industrial uses have historically
tended to locate outside of the Downtown and adjacent to the Tennessee
River, fragmenting the residential settlement patterns.
REGIONAL OPEN SPACE
The Tennessee River passes the foot of Lookout Mountain at Moccasin
Bend adjacent to the project site. These two natural features are widely-
used open space corridors. Additionally, Chattanooga Creek enters the
Tennessee River at this point. The location of the project site at the
juncture of these various open space amenities provides an opportunity
to create connections to the entire region.
A primary tool in analyzing existing conditions are UDA X-Rays,
a technique whereby physical planning information is in effect de-
layered by displaying one attribute at time. Land use drawings
typically depict all characteristics on one multi-colored drawing. It
is difficult to discern underlying patterns or structures. By isolating
uses and physical features in one drawing at a time, these patterns
become revealed.
The X-Rays for the US Pipe/Wheland master plan were con-
ducted at two scales of enquiry: regional (on this page) and project
area (the following two pages). The transportation framework of
highways and local streets becomes very apparent and clear in the
drawings. Likewise the pattern of land uses (residential, commer-
cial, industrial, and open space) is revealed one layer at a time. The
building coverage X-Ray shows the density and scale of development
on site and in adjacent areas. Parking lots and vacant lots diagrams
identify sites were development can take place without displacing
existing residents or businesses.
CITY OF
CHATTANOOGA
Signal Mountain
Red Bank
East Ridge
Lookout
Mountain
TENNESSEE
GEORGIA
SITE I -24
I -24
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TENNESSEE
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Chattanooga
National
Cemetery
Moccasin Bend
National Park
Moccasin Bend
Gol f Course
Chickamagua
and Chattanooga
National Military Park
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CONFIDENTIAL
master planning background: uda x-rays
BUILDING FOOTPRINTS
At the top of the map, Chattanoogas
dense Central Business District can
be located along with large industrial
buildings on the Tennessee River.
The rapidly re-developing residential
neighborhoods are located just north of
the project site, with the South Broad
neighborhood to its east. The land
south of Chattanooga Creek is occupied
primarily by medium-sized warehouses
and industrial buildings. Interstate 24 and
US 27 account for the void north of the
project site.
HIGHWAYS, ARTERI ALS, AND
STREETS
Interstate 24 and US 27 are depicted
in red. The interchange between these
two highways, as well as the massive
interchange of Interstate 24 and Broad
and Market Streets is also recognizable.
This interchange disrupts the City street
grid. Broad and Market Streets are two
major north/south arterials between
Downtown Chattanooga and the site.
Cummings Highway is the historic
approach to the City from the west, and
when combined with Broad Street, this
provides an alternative access to the City
besides to Interstate 24.
INSTITUTIONS, PARKS AND
OPEN SPACE
Many public institutions and schools
(shown in dark green) are located
rather close to the project site, as well
as churches and other community
facilities. Public open space (shown
in light green) is nearby in the west.
Moccasin Bend National Park is located
immediately across the Tennessee River,
and the popular tourist destinations of
Lookout Mountain and Chickamagua
and Chattanooga National Military Park
are located just to the south of the
project site. Chattanooga Creek joins
the Tennessee River immediately south
of the site and is the target of ongoing
restoration efforts.
COMMERCI AL USES
The large concentration of commercial
uses (shown in red) at the top of the
map represents Chattanoogas Central
Business District. The prominent spine of
commercial uses extending north/south
is Broad Street. These uses are primarily
auto-oriented in nature south toward St.
Elmo, however, some of the commercial
buildings near the project site are very
attractive historic buildings in an urban
relationship to the street.
SITE
Chattanooga Creek
Tennessee River
SITE
Chattanooga Creek
Tennessee River
SITE
Chattanooga Creek
Tennessee River
SITE
Chattanooga Creek
Tennessee River
Moccasin Bend
National Park
Howard High School
Finley
Stadium
Chattanooga
Market Battle Academy
Elementary School
Chickamagua
and Chattanooga
National Military Park
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CONFIDENTIAL
INDUSTRI AL USES
Industrial uses are shown in brown and
rail lines are shown in black. This map
indicates the historical tendency of
industrial uses to locate near waterways
and rail lines for ease of transporting
materials. The project site abuts active
industrial uses to its north and south. A
CSX Railroad main line runs through the
southern portion of the project site along
Chattanooga Creek. CSX also operates a
small rail yard along the Tennessee River,
immediately south of the site. Norfolk
Southern Railroad operates a lightly used
line running through the project site to
access industry to the north. The area
south of Chattanooga Creek is largely
occupied by warehouses and light
industrial uses.
VACANT PARCELS
The large number of vacant parcels
(shown in gray) adjacent to the project
site represent the prevalence of vacant
lots in the South Broad Neighborhood.
Also, a large portion of the project site is
comprised of vacant land being prepared
for redevelopment.
RESIDENTI AL USES
The general lack or residential uses
(buildings shown in orange) in the vicinity
of the project site speaks to the largely
industrial and commercial nature of
the area. The Southside neighborhood
is densifying while the South Broad
neighborhood has many vacant lots. At
the southern portion of the map, the
large lot, low-density development that is
typical of Lookout Mountain can be seen.
PARKING LOTS AND PARKING GARAGES
Parking garages are shown in dark gray
and surface lots in light gray. Parking
garages are located in the Central
Business District. The auto-oriented
character of most uses in the vicinity of
the project site is evidenced by the large
number of surface parking lots, many
occupying frontage on Broad Street.
SITE
Chattanooga Creek
Tennessee River
SITE
Chattanooga Creek
Tennessee River
SITE
Chattanooga Creek
Tennessee River
SITE
Chattanooga Creek
Tennessee River
South Broad
Neighborhood
Southside
Lookout Mountain
CSX Railroad
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master planning background: uda x-rays
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CONFIDENTIAL
Transportation Issues
master planning background: transportation issues
Create Innovative
Tri -level
Interchange
Provide Access
From Flanking
Roadway
Create Single
Collection Point
Create Single
Decision Point
Restore Surface
Street Grid
Remove
Looping
Ramps
Diagram of transportation issues
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Complicated signage on Interstate 24 / Highway 27
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The examination of the existing transportation system on-site
revealed two key characteristics: the importance of the I-24/
Highway 27 interchange to future access and marketing of the dis-
trict; the lack of connectivity between the site and city street grid
caused by the lack of internal roads on site; and the termination of
surrounding public streets, such as Chestnut Street and 28th Street,
at the boundary of the property.
The urban design plan depicts an interconnected network of
internal streets linked into the existing street grid. This network
provides both access and multiple entrances into the district. The site
becomes a seamless part of the urban fabric of Chattanooga.
The issue of the highway interchange is much more complicated
and long range. Two issues emerged: access to the site by a new ramp
from I-24; and the reconfiguration of the I-24 interchange. Both
projects will involve the Tennessee Department of Transportation
and expenditure of public funds.
The new ramp from I-24 is less complicated and costly, and
would be an asset in marketing the project to other developers, new
tenants, and new residents. The ramp is designed to terminate at an
at-grade service road running roughly parallel to I-24 and will pro-
vide an important north/south link in the development.
The redesign of the I-24/Highway 27 interchange at Broad and
Market Streets, as described earlier in this report, offers two signifi-
cant advantages: better access and land. However, it will be a more
complicated undertaking. Successful reconnection to the street grid,
however, will provide untold benefits to the new district and the
community as a whole.
26th Street in the vicinity of Interstate 24
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CONFIDENTIAL
28TH STREET GATEWAY
The Broad Street bridge over Chattanooga Creek lands northbound
traffic at its intersection with 28th Street, one of the key entrances to
the district in both its initial development and the build out. There
is concern that safe turning movements are provided and protected
so that this entrance acts as a true gateway into the new mixed-use
district.
Four alternative strategies are typical in this situation, and a cho-
sen solution or series of measures will need to be evaluated during
detailed first phase planning.
SI GNALI ZATI ON : A traffic signal solves many of the problems
of the short sight distance caused by the vertical curve over the
bridge, by stopping traffic on Broad Street and thereby allowing
conflict-free entry from 28th Street to both directions on Broad
Street.
HI GHER SI GNAL FACES AT I NTERSECTI ON : Two common
enhancements are raising the height (to the maximum allowed by
the Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices, or MUCTD)
of the signal faces for northbound traffic at the intersection, or by
additional signal faces for northbound traffic at an even higher
elevation.
AUXI LI ARY UPSTREAM SI GNAL : An additional signal face
for northbound traffic on Broad Street could be located near the
crest of the vertical curve on the bridge. This type of auxiliary
signal (included in the MUCTD), keyed to the operation of the
intersection signal at 28th Street, warns those drivers that will be
required to stop at the upcoming signal. Conversely, the auxiliary

signal reassures those drivers that will arrive at the intersection


during their green phase that they will not be required to stop at
the intersection
LENGTH OF LEFT TURN LANE : The northbound left turn
lane for the movement from Broad Street can be extended for
considerably more distance than the normal storage requirement
of 60 100 feet. This longer left turn lane allows for smoother
and faster transition into the lane by drivers intending a left turn,
and more generous storage area for left-turning vehicles. The
visibility of a left turn lane further in advance of the intersec-
tion alerts all drivers those intending to turn as well as through
drivers that an intersection is near.
A less-often used solution, particularly where a good street
network is available, as in this district, is to limit all turns to/from
the major street (Broad Street) to right in/right out, by extending a
median on Broad Street through the entire intersection area. This
measure, which blocks through movement on 28th Street, should be
held as a second level of approach, to be considered only if the sig-
nalization measures listed prove to be inadequate.
In further discussion of this situation, it will be most helpful to
have a profile of Broad Street over the bridge and through the 28th
Street intersection. Even a rudimentary profile would permit an
assessment against the AASHTO stopping sight distances, a simple
analysis that would confirm if a problem exists, as well as the appro-
priate remedial action.

Detail Plan of the 28th Street Gateway


View of the 28th Street Gateway
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master planning background: transportation issues


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CONFIDENTIAL
TRUCK TRAFFI C I N THE NEW DI STRI CT
If a northbound off-ramp is created running through the new dis-
trict, measures can be taken to limit or balance its effects on the
character of the district. Allowing large truck access is fundamen-
tally a trade-off between the access for all users, including those of
the new district, and the possibility of impacts. Unfortunately, there
is no way to provide all of the access to the district but none of the
trucks. However, there are some common approaches to striking an
acceptable balance.
TRUCK ROUTI NG : While truck use of an Interstate highway
ramp cannot be denied, a great deal of control can be exercised
on routing beyond the Interstate right of way. Thus, a reasonable
truck routing that avoids the districts truck-sensitive areas and
creates greater impedance in terms of distance, time, and effort
for trucks, could reduce or eliminate the advantage of cutting
through the site.
STREET DESI GN : The principles of street design for the dis-
trict reduce or eliminate many of the negative impacts of truck
traffic. Chief among these street design features are the prepon-
derance of two-lane streets, which eliminate vehicle overtaking,
thereby improving the behavior of both trucks and automobile
traffic. Tight urban intersections, particularly where trucks have
to make a right turn, are a deterrent to cut-through traffic by
trucks.
VOLUNTARY AGREEMENT : It is not unusual for major gen-
erators of truck traffic to agree, with a host community, to use a
certain route for large trucks. Some compensating concessions,

such as signal phasing, turn radii, an on-street truck stopping


zone at coffee shop, and the like along the preferred route could
help sell such an arrangement.
DE- MYSTI FI CATI ON OF THE TRUCK TRAFFI C : It is impor-
tant through the construction of the district to truly evaluate the
seriousness of the truck traffic in terms of perception versus real-
ity. It is important to understand the traffic of major generators.
In addition, preliminary traffic counts or models can be studied
to understand if truck traffic surges at peak times, or an all-
day problem.
In terms of marketing, consultants should be tasked to further
understand if residential product types will be adversely affected
by some trucks running through the district, or if trucks, needed
for deliveries and support of a true, mixed-use area, actually
positively influence the perception of the district as an authentic
expansion of the urban fabric of downtown Chattanooga.

master planning background: transportation issues


Detail Plan of potential I-24 ramp and interchange configuration
Typical pedestrian-friendly street within the district
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CONFIDENTIAL
Focus Group Summary
master planning background: focus group summary
An important aspect of the master planning process was the involve-
ment of key stakeholders beyond the ownership group. Although
a full-blown public participation process was not conducted, it was
essential to gather input from persons and organizations represent-
ing adjacent neighborhoods and businesses as well as those with city
wide and regional interest in the redevelopment of the US Pipe/
Wheland site.
On 30 and 31 May 2007, the following focus group meetings
were held at the offices of the RiverCity Company:
Steering Committee
Elected officials, downtown stakeholders
Transportation, parks, open space
South Broad stakeholders
Industry and economic development
Housing and urban development
All participants were asked the same three questions about the
Wheland /U. S. Pipe site:
What are the good things, the strengths of the site?
What are the bad things, the weaknesses of the site?
What is your vision in five or tens years for the site?
At the right is a summary of their responses. They are listed in rank
order of response. Thus the most frequently mentioned items, such as
Gateway to Chattanooga, are at the top of each list with decreas-
ing frequency on down each list. However, all responses listed in the
summary table at the right were mentioned multiple times and con-
stitute a clear consensus on the issues from the six focus groups.
In addition, each person in each group was given nine paste-
on dots (three green, three red, and three blue) and asked to place
them on a map indicating good places (green), bad places (red), and

1
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STRENGTHS / GOOD THI NGS
Gateway to Chattanooga
Tennessee River waterfront
Historic buildings
I-24 access
Large Site
Proximity to CBD
Part of Chattanoogas transformation
Industrial heritage
Local developers
Views to and from the site
Located midway between
the Aquarium and Lookout
Mountain
Potential trail and Riverwalk
connections
The South Broad Initiative
WEAKNESSES/CONCERNS
I-24 interchange, noise, barrier
Rail lines that split the site and
block access to the river
Negative industrial image
Environmental issues, rehabilita-
tion, and clean-up costs
Large, complicated site
Condition of South Broad Street
Empty stretch between down-
town and site
Competition with CBD
Current condition of Chattanooga
Creek
Isolated from Downtown and the
South Broad Neighborhood
Geotechnical concerns
VI SI ON FOR THE FUTURE
Sustainable, green, and environ-
mentally-friendly
New, innovative businesses, and
incubators
Mixed-use center and main street
River access and a new water-
front address
Gateway entrance to the City
Connected to CBD, Rosss
Landing, and Riverwalk
State of the art place, inspiring
UTC SimCenter located here
Mix of housing types, live/work,
and a new neighborhood
Economic generator
KEY POI NTS
NOTE: SITE BOUNDARY SHOWN IN RED
places were there is potential for new development (blue). These are
compiled in the diagrams at the right and gave the consulting team
important insights into the physical features of the site that would
not have been a available otherwise.