Central Coast

August 2014
Central Coast Family
Free!
Inside

Community ........................... 2
Education ............................... 3
Library Voice ......................... 4
Fun & Games ........................ 8
Money ......................................... 10
Local History ....................... 12
Education ............................. 14
Calendar .................................. 17
Family Events ..................... 18
Local Resources ............. 20
Wordmonger ........................ 22
Family
Montessori / Book Love / Learning Music / Higuera History / Brain Drain / Nico Farms Pg 2
Central Coast Family • August 2014 • www.centralcoastfamily.com • Page 2
Central Coast Family
TM
PO Box 6424, Los Osos, CA 93412
Phone: (805) 528-0440 Fax: (805) 439-0798
Our goal is to connect Central Coast families with the resources they need to thrive!

Central Coast Family

is published monthly with a readership over 40,000. Find FREE
copies throughout San Luis Obispo County and North Santa Barbara County.
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PUBLISHER
David Vogel
ccfamilypb@gmail.com
EDITOR
Patrice Vogel
ccfamilyed@gmail.com
ASSOCIATE EDITOR
Claire Vogel
ccfamilyae@gmail.com
ADVERTISING
Inquiries:
ccfamilyad@gmail.com
DISTRIBUTION MANAGER
Eric Woodards
CONTRIBUTING WRITERS
Kristen Barnhart, Jennifer Best, Guy Crabb, Kerrin Edmonds,
Molly Peoples, CS Perryess, Walter Reil, Steven Smith, David Vogel
GRAPHIC DESIGN
Out of the Blue
CCF
Community
Cover Photo:
Nico Farms Family & Tractor “Kermit”
www.nicofarms.com
Nicola Allegretta started farming
early on with his father and
grandfather. He later took his
love for local food and cooking
and ventured out into the world,
learning different farming and
cooking techniques. Nicola
eventually opened his own
restaurant, Mama’s Meatball,
and the exclusive catering
division for weddings and
events, Haute Catering, where
everything is still made from
scratch.
At the beginning of this year, the
farm advocacy group Central
Coast Grown leased 21 acres of
farmland from the city of San
Luis Obispo called Calle Joaquin
Agricultural Reserve or SLO City
Farm, to make it available as a
demonstration farm. Nicola was
the first to lease a majority of
this land, seeing an opportunity
to combine his boyhood love
for farming with his passion
for fresh local organic produce
that could be served at his
restaurant and provided to area
families.
Nico Farms is dedicated to being a
conscientious land steward with
responsible growing methods
and practices, producing high-
quality organic produce to
nourish local and regional
families. Nico Farms promotes
the farm to table concept,
providing opportunities to access
the bountiful harvest directly
through the SLO Farmstand
and You-Pick, CSA program,
local farmers markets, specialty
grocers, and restaurants. The
farm grows diverse seasonal
varieties organically for those
who appreciate a more healthful
lifestyle.
Nicola is fortunate to be working
with Farm Manager Derron Dike,
who is educated in horticulture
and agriculture. In addition to
farming, Derron has worked in
retail and wholesale nurseries,
landscaping, as well as pest
detection and biological pest
control. Derron also maintains
an interest in using horticulture
and agriculture as a modality
to therapeutically improve
people’s lives. Nicola’s wife
Jackeline and their daughter
and son also enjoy working on
the farm.
Nico Farms is excited to invite
local families to come visit and
experience the farm. Those
who donate their time helping
to plant and weed, are offered
a discount on produce boxes or
at Mama’s Meatball restaurant
as an extension of gratitude.
The farmers will be happy to
teach skills, because they want
all members of the community
to share the value of local food
production with respectable
environmental responsibility.
As Part of the Community
Supported Agriculture (CSA)
Program, Nico Farms is offering
a large variety of produce to
families. Each week, subscribers
will receive a harvest box
with an assortment of fresh
vegetables and fruits including
10-15 different items (depending
on season and harvest); enough
to satisfy a family of up to 5
people. The price includes
handling and storage of the
produce, as well as delicious
recipes from master chef Nicola
Allegretta. Once you sign up, the
system will allow subscribers to
place an order for a requested
date. The current cost of the
box is $25. Subscribers can also
purchase more items from the
web store or directly from the
farm stand.
In the future, the farm will
offer educational classes for all
ages on planting of seeds and
starts, irrigation, and growing
and harvesting healthy plants.
Nico Farms looks forward to
welcoming field trips for children
and older students. They hope
that offering an introduction
to how they grow fruits and
vegetables will provide future
generations with an appreciation
for the environment and what
they eat.
Allegretta says, “I love farming
my own vegetables! It is
relaxing and fun. We can pick
them as we need them, when
they are ready to be harvested,
and the most important thing is
that they don’t have pesticide
residue. Buon Apetito!”
For more information, go to www.
nicofarms.com or call (855) 454-3213.
by David Vogel
Family Farm to Table
Central Coast Family • August 2014 • www.centralcoastfamily.com • Page 3
As you begin your search for a
school for your children, you may
want to ask yourself what you
want them to learn during their
early years. We used to think
of school as a place for children
to pack in as much information
as possible, to hurry and learn
academics in age-segregated
classrooms led by teachers.
But what you may really want for
your children is to learn to love
themselves and the world in which
they live. You may want them to
learn confidence, compassion,
creativity, and curiosity. You
probably want them to grow
independent, respectful, and
joyful. You want them to love
to learn! These are the goals of
Montessori education.
Dr. Maria Montessori, the first
female doctor in Italy in the late
19th century, observed children
and the way in which they develop.
She found that children want to
learn, that they go through what
she called “Sensitive Periods”
when they are especially sensitive
to a certain type of learning. If
children are allowed to learn at
their own pace, according to their
own interests, they will thrive.
In a Montessori classroom, the
space is prepared with beautiful
sensory materials that children can
choose freely. For example, in a
preschool classroom, “sandpaper
letters” teach the sounds of
the alphabet, “golden beads”
allow a child to handle cubes of
a thousand beads, and “puzzle
maps” show the continents of
the world. Children are planting
seeds, embroidering fabric,
playing musical instruments,
and preparing their own snacks
independently.
Older children mentor younger
children, which deepens their
understanding while inspiring the
younger ones to work through
sequenced materials, mastering
each concept along the way. In
a multi-age community, each
child works at his own pace with
guidance from teachers educated
in a Montessori training center.
Teachers prepare the school
environment carefully and serve
as the link between the curriculum
and the children. They respect
and accommodate each child’s
unique needs.
A Montessori classroom is a
happy place where children work
on appropriately challenging
activities that they have chosen
themselves. Children are not bored
because the work is too easy, nor
are they frustrated because it is
too diffi cult. They love learning
because they are successful and
it is enjoyable. They are proud of
their accomplishments.
The children work alongside
peers throughout the day, so
social development happens
easily and naturally. Friendships
are made through collaborating
and supporting each other.
Montessori teachers respect the
age-appropriate development of
social skills, grace, and courtesy.
As you research educational
options for your child, consider
visiting a Montessori school. The
children will be happy to show
you their school and their work.
“It is the child who makes the man, and no
man exists who was not made by the child
he once was.” ~ Dr. Maria Montessori
Korey Dudley has been owner, director and
administrator of Children’s House Montessori
School in Atascadero for 35 years. She can be
reached at (805) 466-5068.
Montessori
Education
Convenient Evening & Weekend Hours
Call either location today to take advantage of our
New Patient Special
FREE Childrens Exam
& Necessary X-Rays
New patients only up to age 18 with paid cleaning. Cannot be combined with any other ofer. Exp: 8/31/14
San Luis Obispo Arroyo Grande
544-9440 489-1495
Robert Flores D.M.D.
Robyn Flores D.M.D.
www.rrdentalcare.com
by Korey Dudley
SUMMER & FALL PROGRAMS
for children ages 18 months through 6th grade
Visit our website: www.childrenshouse.cc
or call for more information: 805 466-5068
Openings Available!
Children’s House
Montessori School
of Atascadero
“Celebrating children for over 30 years”
Education
Central Coast Family • August 2014 • www.centralcoastfamily.com • Page 4
Library Voice
I recently ran into some old friends
who had been a vital part of my
village when my daughter was
young, and I don’t use the word
vital lightly. This was the home
of “sure, just bring her over,” or
“we’ll pick her up” and “by the
way, have some chocolate chip
cookies fresh out of the oven.”
When I would pick her up after
working until 8:00 pm, she would
be ready for bed. We would all
pile on their bed to watch a little
TV, and there would always be a
sweet “the kids did the funniest
thing” story. We lost touch in our
busy lives and, as we caught up on
where and what was up with our
20-something-year-old children, a
funny anecdote I shared was met
with a hearty “That’s So Gracie!”
That’s when the “Aha” tears filled
my eyes.
These friends were witnesses to
my girl’s childhood and I could
turn to them with a full-knowing
shared heart and say “yes,” that
little girl is still in there and you
are part of who she still is. I am
blessed with several families
who have included us through
the years and can bear witness
to how Grace has both grown
and stayed the same. When
they share memories with me,
my heart grows and my breath
deepens. Parenting can be lonely
and single parenting can feel like
an island without anyone to turn
to and say, isn’t she, wasn’t she
just amazing! Our children, like
good books, are meant to be
shared.
A good book allows us to witness
and participate in hundreds of
worlds and thousands of lives,
and a series can easily become
part of our extended circle of
friends and family. Harry Potter
allows us to participate in an
entire generation’s coming of
age. Making potions and friends,
learning to fly and stand up
for one’s self, fighting the evils
of dark wizards and the even
darker evils of prejudice against
muggles, “mudbloods” and
house elves, falling in love and
saying final goodbyes involved
us in a community where we all
still dwell as we talk about and
reread the books. The quote
“Seeing someone reading a
book you love is kind of like a
book recommending a person.”
resonates deeply with me and it
definitely works as a conversation
starter when I see a beloved book
in the arms of another.
Sharing the love of a book with
someone is such a lesson in
abundance, since the sharing
never diminishes and only
enhances both the friendship and
the understanding of what makes
a book more than its story. I can
even share my “true love” Chief
Inspector Gamache (from the
Louise Penny books) with his wife
and other women because our
relationship lies only between the
covers of a book! I am currently
awaiting two potential moves
to Canada from England, in two
separate decades, with Flavia
de Luce and Maisie Dobbs that
are adding even further to my
Canadian literary lifestyle. Those
dear friends are written by Alan
Bradley and Jacqueline Winspear.
Flavia’s motherless childhood
invites us to witness the post WWII
crumbling world of an English
country manor through the eyes
of this amazing precocious 11 year
old with a passion for poisons.
She is bonded most deeply with
a bicycle that frees her from
the ever despairing house and
family that is falling in and upon
her. Flavia’s proclivity for danger
and adventure arises from an
insatiable curiosity that bonds her
to me, the reader. During our years
together, from The Sweetness
at the Bottom of the Pie through
The Dead in Their Vaulted Arches,
we have endured heartache,
delight, and hopes raised and
dashed. My relationship with her
has deepened as I have taken on
the mantle of an honorary literary
auntie. I wish her path could cross
with the future Maisie.
We meet Maisie Dobbs when,
at 13, she enters into service for
Lady Rowan Compton. Another
brilliant motherless girl, she lands
in the perfect spot in a suffragette-
headed intellectual household
where she is discovered reading
all night in the library and
mentored into the university.
Maisie joins the medical corps
on the battlefields of WWI, falls
tragically in love and returns to
open her own detective agency.
We witness her navigation
through a world gone mad with
grief after losing nearly an entire
generation of young men, the rise
of women’s independence and
the complex flowering of her own
emotional growth alongside an
intelligence that informs all her
experiences. Maisie’s conflicted
yet deep loyalties color this series
with such a tapestry of layers
that, once met, you became
as entangled as she. Literary
daughters can break my heart and
enter my dreams nearly as much
as my own dear girl.
Children are heading back to
school this month (which just
seems wrong, since school should
never start until after Labor
Day…), and this is a great time to
share memories of other first days
of school. Pull out the pictures
and remember who your friends
were and give them a “remember
when” call. Share a story with
them about their childhood that
lets them know we are all in this
together and forever linked. If
you see a parent alone with a
child, offer to take their photo
together, it could mean the world
to them later. Trust me, I know.
Please note a few changes in
library hours:
Creston: TUE 1:00-7:00 pm
Santa Margarita: TUE 12:00-6:00 pm
by Kristen Barnhart
Can I Get a Witness?
Kristen Barnhart has been telling stories,
recommending books, and stamping little
hands for over 34 years throughout SLO
County. She is currently a Youth Services
Librarian at the San Luis Obispo Library.
Kristen can be reached at (805) 781-5775 or
kbarnhart@slolibrary.org.
Libraries will get you through
times with no money, better than
money will get you through times
with no Libraries! 
PET OF THE MONTH
Available for Immediate Adoption!
875 Oklahoma Ave
San Luis Obispo
(805) 543-9316
LILLIE
5-year-old Brown & White Med Hair Tabby Female
Spayed, Vaccinated, Microchipped, Litter Box Trained
Outgoing, Friendly, Playful, Good w/ Older Kids
Central Coast Family • August 2014 • www.centralcoastfamily.com • Page 5
Like SLOMonart on facebook for discounts!
and check out our website:
www.slomonart.com
4211 Broad St, #D in San Luis Obispo
Call (805) 544-4243 to Register Now!
Monart Birthday Party!
See website for pricing
STUDIO 2014
Central Coast Family • August 2014 • www.centralcoastfamily.com • Page 6
Education
One of the best parts of being a
kid is having the world be your
symphony. Your imagination can
make everything sing in harmony.
When you take a walk in the
woods, the trees are stringed
instruments providing a lush
backdrop for the rhythmic layers
of grass to dance between. With
bare feet running through soft
grass, you look up as the clouds
float by like a pillowy woodwind
melody. You nourish the song
in your heart, the song of your
youth, each time you choose to
orchestrate adventure in your life.
Playing and learning music is a
great way to enhance growth and
development, as well as nurture
life’s adventure. Whether you’re
a big kid in an adult body or you
have young children of your own,
it’s never too late to start music
lessons. Music opens a doorway
into the world of vibration, which
makes up everything we know in
this world (according to quantum
physics), from the music we hear
to the cells in our bodies. When
we play music, we tap into nature
in its simplest form and we can
easily connect with others, across
borders and cultures, through a
universal language.
Learning to play a musical
instrument aids many areas of
human intelligence, such as math,
language skills, spatial reasoning,
and abstract thinking. Music
also enhances other areas of
human development, including
confidence, social fluidity, and
creativity. There is increasing
evidence showing that music can
be helpful in mental rehabilitation.
Playing music is one of the few
activities that use both sides of
the brain. Music students now
have the opportunity to develop
the skill of absolute perfect pitch
(commonly known as “perfect
pitch”), despite the traditional
belief that it can’t be taught.
Absolute perfect pitch is the ability
to hear and identify any note
without a reference note. We are
all born with the predisposition
for absolute perfect pitch, so we
can recognize our own parents’
voices. However, due to lack of
use, the skill usually disappears by
adolescence.
The skill of absolute perfect pitch
can be developed through using
The T.A.P. Method, a new training
method created on the Central
Coast. Students recovering from
traumatic brain injury (TBI) have
reported enhanced rehabilitation
after using The T.A.P. Method
regularly. The method employs
right-brain activity in the creation
of a unique musical language,
a left-brain dominant activity.
The simultaneous utilization of
the right and left sides of the
brain contributes to hemisphere
synchronization, when the two
sides of the brain work together.
Researchers have shown that
the two hemispheres of Albert
Einstein’s brain were unusually
well connected to each other
and theorize that this may
have contributed to his unique
brilliance. The T.A.P. Method will
soon be available to the public and
anyone will be able to experience
these benefits.
Music and voice lessons are a great
way to enhance your experience
of life through knowledge, ability,
creativity, and wonder. Music
can inspire genius and create
possibilities within each passing
moment. Unlock your own genius
one possibility at a time!
Bonnie teVelde is the founder and CEO of
teVelde Music Schools in San Luis Obispo
and Arroyo Grande. She can be reached at
474-1224 or www.teveldemusic.com.
JJ Jackson is an instructor for teVelde
Music Schools, and he also works with
Phoenix Rising Studios. Learn more at:
www.TheTAPMethod.com.
The corpus callosum of Albert Einstein‘s
brain: another clue to his high intelligence?
Brain. 2014 Apr;137(Pt 4):e268.
Music Promotes a Lifetime
of Joy and Growth
by JJ Jackson and Bonnie teVelde
Central Coast Family • August 2014 • www.centralcoastfamily.com • Page 7
115 East Branch Street in Arroyo Grande
Try a new cut or color for Summer!
Call Toni & Toni (805) 489-5100
You Don’t do Perky?
Toni Stephenson does!
Central Coast Family • August 2014 • www.centralcoastfamily.com • Page 8
Fun & Games
S
U
D
O
K
U
Fill empty cells with numbers between 1 and 9 (1 number per cell).
A number should appear only once in each row, column, and region.
Why was school easier for cave people? No History class!
What is the King of all school supplies? The ruler!
Where do the surfers study? Boarding School!
Where does King Arthur get an education? Knight School!
J ack’s J okes
Back to School
Crossword
Central Coast Family • August 2014 • www.centralcoastfamily.com • Page 9
Children’s Activities
SUMMER CALENDAR
Contact Pastor Jenene
August 4-8 9 am-3 pm
Camp H2O Day Camp
Mustang Water Slides $15
Fishing Trip $10
Learn to Surf - Morro Bay $5
Boat Ride to the “spit” Morro Bay $5
Ravine Water Park $20
EL MORRO CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE
1480 Santa Ysabel Ave, Los Osos - 528-0391
Central Coast Family • August 2014 • www.centralcoastfamily.com • Page 10
New and Used Instruments
.
Band Instrument Rental
Locally Owned and Operated
.
Amazing Discounts!
Personal Knowledgeable Service by Flexible Appointment
are essential to developing a
successful estate plan. You should
not only tell your family members
(and anyone else affected by
your estate plan) what you are
thinking of doing but also inform
them about the professionals
with whom you are working and
the locations in which you are
storing any vital documents, such
as your will.
By identifying your goals, working
with the appropriate professionals
to create an effective estate plan,
and communicating regularly with
your family members and other
“key players” in your life, you can
go a long way toward leaving the
legacy you desire. So, do what it
takes to launch that legacy.
Money
Your
Legacy
by Molly Peoples
Molly Peoples is a financial advisor at Edward
Jones in San Luis Obispo. She can be reached
at (805) 784-9013. © 2014 Edward Jones. All
rights reserved. Member SIPC.
Unless you keep close track of
obscure holidays and observances,
you probably didn’t know that
August is “What Will Be Your
Legacy? Month.” Still, you might
want to use this particular month
as a useful reminder to take action
on what could be one of your
most important financial goals:
leaving a meaningful legacy.
A legacy isn’t simply a document
or a bunch of numbers — it’s
what you will be remembered
for, and what you have left
behind that will be remembered.
It’s essentially your chance to
contribute positively to the
future, whether that means
providing financial resources
for the next generation, helping
those charitable organizations
whose work you support, or a
combination of both. To create
your legacy, you’ll need to do
some planning. You can start by
asking yourself a couple of key
questions:
What are your goals? When you
think about leaving a legacy,
what comes to mind? First and
foremost, you may well want
to leave enough money to help
your own grown children meet
their financial goals. After that,
you probably have other things
you’d like to accomplish. Perhaps
you want to provide resources
for your grandchildren to attend
college? Or set up a scholarship
at your own alma mater? Give
financial support to a cultural,
social, religious or scientific
group? By thinking about your
goals and putting them on paper,
even in an informal sense, you’ll
be taking the important first step
in leaving the legacy you desire.
How can you turn your goals into
reality? If you don’t take some
concrete steps, your legacy just
won’t materialize. And the most
important step you need to take
is to create a comprehensive
estate plan. Your estate plan can
be quite involved, because it may
involve several legal documents,
such as a will, living trust, health
care power of attorney, and so
on. In creating these materials,
you will need to work with your
legal and tax advisors because
estate planning is definitely not a
“do-it-yourself” endeavor.
You probably shouldn’t wait until
you are deep into retirement to
take action on your estate plan,
because developing the necessary
documents and arrangements
can take a fair amount of time,
and you’ll want to make these
preparations when you’re in good
mental and physical health. Also,
the longer you wait to set up your
estate plan, the less likely it will
be that you’ve communicated
your wishes clearly to your family
members, who may end up unsure
about what you want and what
their roles are in carrying out your
plans, and that’s an outcome you
certainly don’t want to see.
In fact, clear communications
Central Coast Family • August 2014 • www.centralcoastfamily.com • Page 11
BACK TO SCHOOL SPECIALS
THE WHOLE MONTH OF AUGUST!
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Central Coast Family • August 2014 • www.centralcoastfamily.com • Page 12
I am updating the Higuera book
after about eight years, and I am
having lots of fun adding new
discoveries to the book. I have
been collecting artifacts for the
last 15 years, including many
great pictures that will make the
new Higuera edition lots of fun
to read. I have bought pictures,
slides, 16mm movies, articles,
yearbooks, telephone books,
tokens, pamphlets, objects, and
lots of other things over the last
several years.
As I write the new book, I have
found many interesting facts. This
time, I am taking the addresses
all the way down to where Marsh
and Higuera Streets intersect.
Today, 426 Higuera is near the
intersection of Marsh and Higuera
Streets where Brakes Plus is
located. This was the location of
San Luis Monumental Works from
the turn of the century into the
1940s. After Monumental Works
went out of business, Serafin’s
Body and Paint occupied this
location from around 1960 into
the 1980s. I wonder if Mr. Serafin
found any old grave stones that
were thrown into the creek due
to mistakes made in cutting of the
stone. It would not be outrageous
to think that there might be some
old remnants of the monument
makers half buried in the creek
bed or a few feet underground—
then again, maybe my imagination
is running wild.
Let’s go to other side of the street
to the back of the gas station at
the intersection of Marsh and
Higuera Streets. The address
was 427 Higuera and this was
the location of one of the most
popular restaurants in town. It
was called Tower Café and Lounge
and they had a section in their
menu titled Bar-B-Que Dinners.
You could buy a Porterhouse
Steak for $4.50 with all the fixin’s.
You could get a broiled lobster
for $2.75 as well. The Tower was
there from around the early 1930s
until it was demolished due to
a fire in the mid 1960s. In this
lower section of Higuera Street,
there were also several bottling
companies. Whistle Bottling was
at 461 Higuera for many years,
and there was also a Nehi Bottling
building.
Now, let me jump from lower to
upper Higuera Street just to mix it
up a little bit. Louisa’s Place has
been there for as long as I can
remember and I came to San Luis
Obispo in 1979. Before Louisa’s
Place, there was a Best Ever Grill.
It was there from the 1950s into
the early 1970s and was a very
popular place, just like Louisa’s is
today. I bought an old collection
of slides from someone in Ohio
of a La Fiesta Parade during the
1960s, and found a great picture
of some kids sitting on the roof
above Best Ever Grill watching the
parade. I have a few collections of
La Fiesta Parades during different
years and they are wonderful. I
also have a great picture of the
corner of Higuera and Morro
Streets, where Victoria’s Secret
is today. In the 1960s, this corner
was the home of Norton Eagle
Pharmacy and Copeland’s Shoe
store.
One of my favorite sandwich
places in town is Ben Franklin’s,
which used to be known as
Ben Franklin’s Electric House
restaurant. In the 1960s, this
building housed Cody’s Market.
It closed around 1970 because
in 1971, Lela’s Southern Fried
Chicken served customers in
this building. Since we are back
down on Higuera Street, I’m sure
everyone knows about the Drum
Circuit store at 280 Higuera. This
location was an established local
restaurant for many years. Lucky
Spot Café occupied this big brick
building from around 1939 into
the early 1960s, when it turned
into Wendy’s Café around 1965. In
1975, it was turned into Water Pro
Sporting Goods. If you consider
the number of hotels and motels
on this section of Higuera in the
1930s through 1960s, the number
of eating establishments in the
vicinity makes a lot of sense.
Sandy’s, on the corner of Nipomo
and Higuera, seems like it has
been there forever, but before
Sandy’s established itself as a
long time business, Bullock’s
Delicatessen was at this location
in the 1950s. Directly across the
street is a parking lot. This was not
always a parking lot though. The
parking lot still has an address of
636 Higuera Street, and for years
this was the location of Kustom
Korner Gas Station and Speed
Shop. This would make a lot of
sense because the 1950s was a
very popular era for hot rod cars.
In fact, this corner of Higuera
Street had several gas stations at
one point in the past.
Writing about the history of
Higuera Street is an adventure full
of surprises and fun. I truly love
teaching and discovering new
things about SLO.
Guy Crabb teaches at Charles E. Teach
Elementary School in San Luis Obispo. He
graduated from Cal Poly SLO and has been
teaching for 30 years. Guy was a Teacher of
the Year in 2006 and currently teaches at a
National Blue Ribbon School. Reach him at
crabbx5@charter.net.
Local History
Higuera
by Guy Crabb
Central Coast Family • August 2014 • www.centralcoastfamily.com • Page 13
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CHEERLEADI NG
.
GYMNASTI CS
.
AERI AL SI LKS
.
AGI LITY
Central Coast Family • August 2014 • www.centralcoastfamily.com • Page 14
Summertime brings to mind hot
days spent in a swimming pool,
camping, sleepovers, and freedom
from the demands of school. It’s
a great season to spend quality
time with your kids and help
them to keep up their brain skills
so the transition back to school
won’t be such a shock. For bright
children with attention, behavior,
or learning challenges, it is even
more critical that skills are not lost.
There are many ways to support
cognitive skills with summertime
activities.
Influence the pillars of brain
health
The pillars of brain health include
exercise, nutrition, and sleep.
Summer is often a time for
popsicles, popcorn, and fried fair
food. Limit those treats and pre-
pack food like whole fruits, salads
and cut up vegetables with dip,
which provide phytonutrients and
micronutrients, as well as protein
snacks (raw almonds, yogurt,
baked or broiled free-range
hormone-free chicken or fish),
healthful fats (nuts, seeds, fish)
and whole grains (crackers and
bread). Good nutrition forms and
supports neurotransmitters in the
brain, which influence feelings of
well-being and the brain’s ability to
solve problems, make connections,
and learn. Exercise also influences
feelings of well-being by reducing
stress hormones, transporting
more oxygen to the brain, and
stimulating new cell connections
(brain plasticity). Consistent sleep
and wake times are critical for
mental and physical rejuvenation
and repair, and play a critical role
in brain development.
Create a ‘mental reserve’ with
stimulating activities
Most children default to electronic
devices to play games and connect
with others; however, by seeking
and planning novel summer
adventures, you can help your child
‘unplug’ and stimulate his interests
and his brain. Local teacher and
parent Melanie created a ‘bucket
list’ of activities and adventures
to tackle this summer with her
children, like: kayaking, spa mani-
pedis, creating a loom necklace,
and washing the car in swimsuits.
She posted their fun pictures and
crafts on facebook to share with
others. These types of creative
activities help to build new
neuropathways and a reserve of
mental energy that protects the
brain from neuron damage, which
can lead to learning, attention,
and behavior problems.
Foster critical thinking skills
during quality time
By tapping into your child’s natural
curiosity, you can help him build
language and critical thinking skills,
including logic and reasoning. In
the book, The Teachable Minute
by my friend Dr. Connie Hebert,
parents are taught to “show, ask,
and teach” children in everyday
activities and locations including
those at home (dinner table,
yard), around town (bank, library),
on transportation (airplane,
bus), at public places (bookstore,
movie theater), and recreational
locations (campground, zoo). She
emphasizes the need for parents
to make a conscious effort to look
for “the teachable minute” during
everyday activities and outings to
encourage thinking and learning.
Read and preserve concepts and
vocabulary
Academic concepts and vocabulary
can be lost over long breaks from
school. By setting aside 20-45
minutes per day to review skills
from the past school year, your
child will gain a head start on the
new school year. Academic review
workbooks, such as Brain Quest
Workbooks and Summer Bridge
Activities series provide a good
grade-level overview. Daily reading
should be encouraged. Allow your
child to choose books with topics
that motivate him and that are at
his reading level.
Create a ‘safety net’ for the next
school year
Diffi culty with attention, behavior,
or academics strongly suggests that
Education
your child is missing foundational
learning skills. These are mental
processing skills that all learning is
built upon. They are not taught in
school or at tutoring, but rather at
specialized brain-training centers.
Compounding the demands of
school on top of a weak foundation
only creates more frustration,
stress, homework battles, less
confidence, and poor behavior.
These are merely symptoms of
a deeper problem that needs to
be accurately identified (not just
labeled) and then addressed at
the root level by changing the way
your child processes information.
When you address the missing
foundational learning, attention,
and behavior brain building-
blocks, your child will have the
best chance for success over the
next school year.
Summer is a wonderful time to
enjoy activities with your child–
especially those that support and
build mental skills that reinforce
academic progress. Include the
pillars of brain health, enjoy
creative adventures, build critical
thinking skills during everyday
experiences, and read and review
past academic concepts and
vocabulary. Your child will gain
skills and be better prepared to
enter the next grade level. If you
are worried about your child’s
learning foundation, it is critical
to create a ‘safety net’ by getting
the help needed to support your
child’s future. The next school year
and homework time can be better
and you can make it happen!
Karyn Lutes, MA, CCC-SLP is a Licensed Speech-
Language Pathologist, CA Credentialed Teacher,
author, speaker, mother of 3 and Executive Director
at The Speech And Learning Coach and Brain
Boost Academy. Her team transforms ADD/ADHD
(drug-free), dyslexia, reading, math, behavior,
communication, attention, and learning challenges
into success. Contact Karyn at (805) 474-1144.
© 2014 The Speech And Learning Coach.com.
Reproduction is allowed if origination is included.
Must be used in its entirety.
Hebert, Dr. Connie, The Teachable Minute: The Secret
To Raising Smart And Appreciative Kids, Morgan
James Publishing, New York City, New York, 2013.
by Karyn Lutes, MA, CCC-SLP “The Speech And Learning Coach”
BRAIN DRAIN REMEDIES
Kmart / Quarterdeck Center - Upper Level
Arroyo Grande (805) 474-1144
www.TheSpeechAndLearningCoach.com
Call to attend our free August presentation “Bright
children with learning challenges: The 5 keys to success”
• Drug-free proven results
• Evaluations identify the real problem behind the
symptoms
• Effective brain-training programs (1:1 student -
teacher ratio)
• Parent support
• Children, teens, and adults
MAKE NEXT SCHOOL YEAR BETTER!
Central Coast Family • August 2014 • www.centralcoastfamily.com • Page 15
Open TUE - SUN
10:30 am - 10:00 pm
Week 4A Jul 28-Aug 1 Orcutt (Orcutt Junior High)
Week 4B Jul 28-Aug 1 Paso Robles (Barney Schwartz Fields)
Week 5 Aug 4-8 Arroyo Grande (Soto Sports Complex)
Week 6 Aug 11-15 San Luis Obispo (Hawthorne Elementary)
Register at CATALYSTSOCCER.COM
or call (805) 541-3031
Dr. Marc Irving Weber
Music Lessons for All Ages
Piano, Guitar, Voice,
Winds, Brass, Percussion
Composition & Music Theory
M
W
Composer and performer
with many years of teaching experience
B.M. from the Cleveland Institute of Music
M.M. from Yale School of Music
Ph.D. from the University of Iowa School of Music
Each student is unique and
requires a fexible approach
I teach the student, not the instrument
My goal is to provide students with
a solid musical foundation that will
transcend all genres
Lessons in Your Home
$25/half hour $50/hour
Credit Cards Accepted
661 993-2540
drmarcweber@yahoo.com
http://iowacreativemusic.com
Central Coast Family • August 2014 • www.centralcoastfamily.com • Page 16
Join us in Celebrating our 23rd Anni versary
wi th an UNLIMITED MONTH in August!
Enroll in classes and come as many times
as you want all month long!
805 549-8408 iflipforCCG.com 21 Zaca Lane, SLO
16,000 square feet
of Fun & Fitness!
Gymnastics Cheer Acrobatics Tumble & Trampoline Summer Camps
New and non-enrolled students. Not valid with any other offers.
One coupon per person. Expires August 31, 2014
First Month’s Tuition
23rd Anniversary Celebration!
T
h
e
r
e

a
r
e

s
t
i
l
l
Amazing Race Challenge!
JULY 28 - AUG. 1
CCG’s Got Talent!
AUG. 4 - 8
Splish Splash
Summer Bash!
AUG. 11 - 15
3 more weeks of Summer Camp:
It’s Back to School at CCG!


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2014
23
23% OFF!
Central Coast Family • August 2014 • www.centralcoastfamily.com • Page 17
SUNDAY MONDAY TUESDAY WEDNESDAY THURSDAY FRIDAY SATURDAY
27
FARMERS MARKET:
10:00am-2:00pm SLO, 3889 Long St
11:30am-2:30pm Nipomo Monarch Club
3:00-6:00pm Grover Bch Ramona Park
28
FARMERS MARKET:
2:00-4:30pm Los Osos, 2nd & Santa Maria
29
FARMERS MARKET:
8:00-11:30am Pismo, 555 Five Cities Dr
3:00-6:00 pm Paso Robles City Park
3:00-6:00 pm SLO, 2880 Broad St
LIBRARY STORYTIME: 10:10 SLO
DOC BURNSTEIN’S READING LAB
3:30-4:15pm AG
30
FARMERS MARKETS:
8:30-11am AG, 1464 E Grand Ave
12:30-4:30pm Santa Maria Town Ctr
3:00-6:00pm AT, El Camino & Curbaril
LIBRARY STORYTIME: 10:30 AT,
10:30 AG, 11:00 NI
31
FARMERS MARKETS:
2:30-5:00pm Morro Bay, 2650 Main St
6:00-9:00pm Downtown SLO
LIBRARY STORYTIME: 10:00 MB,
10:10 SLO, 10:15 CAM,10:30 AT, 10:30
AG,10:30 LO, 11:00 CAY, 11:30 SMG
1
BINGO VETS HALL MB - 1st FRI 5:00pm
FARMERS MARKETS:
10:00am-12:30pm Cayucos Vets Hall
2:30-5:30pm Cambria, 1000 Main St
4:00-8:00pm Avila Beach Promenade
LIBRARY STORYTIME: 10:30 LO
RESPECT FOR
PARENTS DAY
FRANCIS SCOTT KEY’S
BIRTHDAY (Born in 1779)
2
FARMERS MARKETS:
8:00-10:30am SLO, 325 Madonna Rd
9:00am-12:30pm Templeton City Park
9:00am-1:00pm Shell Bch Dinosaur Caves
9:00am-1:00pm Paso Downtown Park
12:00-2:30pm AG Village Gazebo
2:30-6:00pm Morro Bay, 800 Main St
LIBRARY STORYTIME: 11:00 AG
SLO CO GENEALOGICAL SOCIETY
1st SAT 12:30am IOOF Hall SLO
NATIONAL ICE CREAM
SANDWICH DAY
3
FARMERS MARKET:
10:00am-2:00pm SLO, 3889 Long St
11:30am-2:30pm Nipomo Monarch Club
3:00-6:00pm Grover Bch Ramona Park
NATIONAL
WATERMELON DAY
COLUMBUS’ 1ST
VOYAGE (in 1492)
4
FARMERS MARKET:
2:00-4:30pm Los Osos, 2nd & Santa Maria
US COAST GUARD
DAY
NATIONAL
CHOCOLATE CHIP DAY
5
FARMERS MARKET:
8:00-11:30am Pismo, 555 Five Cities Dr
3:00-6:00 pm Paso Robles City Park
3:00-6:00 pm SLO, 2880 Broad St
LIBRARY STORYTIME: 10:10 SLO
DOC BURNSTEIN’S READING LAB
3:30-4:15pm AG
NEIL ARMSTRONG’S
BIRTHDAY (Born in 1930)
NATIONAL
WAFFLE DAY
FRIENDSHIP DAY
AMERICAN
FAMILY DAY
6
FARMERS MARKETS:
8:30-11am AG, 1464 E Grand Ave
12:30-4:30pm Santa Maria Town Ctr
3:00-6:00pm AT, El Camino & Curbaril
LIBRARY STORYTIME: 10:30 AT,
10:30 AG, 11:00 NI
WIGGLE YOUR
TOES DAY
7
FARMERS MARKETS:
2:30-5:00pm Morro Bay, 2650 Main St
6:00-9:00pm Downtown SLO
LIBRARY STORYTIME: 10:00 MB,
10:10 SLO, 10:15 CAM,10:30 AT, 10:30
AG,10:30 LO, 11:00 CAY, 11:30 SMG
8
FARMERS MARKETS:
10:00am-12:30pm Cayucos Vets Hall
2:30-5:30pm Cambria, 1000 Main St
4:00-8:00pm Avila Beach Promenade
LIBRARY STORYTIME: 10:30 LO
DOLLAR DAY
(US Dollar created in 1786)
9
FARMERS MARKETS:
8:00-10:30am SLO, 325 Madonna Rd
9:00am-12:30pm Templeton City Park
9:00am-1:00pm Shell Bch Dinosaur Caves
9:00am-1:00pm Paso Downtown Park
12:00-2:30pm AG Village Gazebo
2:30-6:00pm Morro Bay, 800 Main St
LIBRARY STORYTIME: 11:00 AG
BOOK LOVERS DAY
INTERNATIONAL DAY
OF THE WORLD’S
INDIGENOUS PEOPLE
NATIONAL RICE
PUDDING DAY
10
FARMERS MARKET:
10:00am-2:00pm SLO, 3889 Long St
11:30am-2:30pm Nipomo Monarch Club
3:00-6:00pm Grover Bch Ramona Park
HERBERT
HOOVER’S
BIRTHDAY
(Born in 1874)
S’MORES DAY
11
FARMERS MARKET:
2:00-4:30pm Los Osos, 2nd & Santa Maria
HULK HOGAN’S
BIRTHDAY (Born in 1953)
PLAY IN THE SAND DAY
12
FARMERS MARKET:
8:00-11:30am Pismo, 555 Five Cities Dr
3:00-6:00 pm Paso Robles City Park
3:00-6:00 pm SLO, 2880 Broad St
LIBRARY STORYTIME: 10:10 SLO
DOC BURNSTEIN’S READING LAB
3:30-4:15pm AG
IBM PC
ANNOUNCED
(in 1981)
MIDDLE
CHILDREN’S DAY
13
FARMERS MARKETS:
8:30-11am AG, 1464 E Grand Ave
12:30-4:30pm Santa Maria Town Ctr
3:00-6:00pm AT, El Camino & Curbaril
LIBRARY STORYTIME: 10:30 AT,
10:30 AG, 11:00 NI
INTERNATIONAL
LEFT-HANDERS
DAY
ANNIE OAKLEY’S
BIRTHDAY
(Born in 1860)
14
FARMERS MARKETS:
2:30-5:00pm Morro Bay, 2650 Main St
6:00-9:00pm Downtown SLO
LIBRARY STORYTIME: 10:00 MB,
10:10 SLO, 10:15 CAM,10:30 AT, 10:30
AG,10:30 LO, 11:00 CAY, 11:30 SMG
NATIONAL
CREAMSICLE DAY
15
FARMERS MARKETS:
10:00am-12:30pm Cayucos Vets Hall
2:30-5:30pm Cambria, 1000 Main St
4:00-8:00pm Avila Beach Promenade
LIBRARY STORYTIME: 10:30 LO
JULIA CHILD’S
BIRTHDAY
(Born in 1912)
NATIONAL
RELAXATION DAY
16
FARMERS MARKETS:
8:00-10:30am SLO, 325 Madonna Rd
9:00am-12:30pm Templeton City Park
9:00am-1:00pm Shell Bch Dinosaur Caves
9:00am-1:00pm Paso Downtown Park
12:00-2:30pm AG Village Gazebo
2:30-6:00pm Morro Bay, 800 Main St
LIBRARY STORYTIME: 11:00 AG
ROLLER COASTER DAY
(Patented in 1898)
17
FARMERS MARKET:
10:00am-2:00pm SLO, 3889 Long St
11:30am-2:30pm Nipomo Monarch Club
3:00-6:00pm Grover Bch Ramona Park
ARCHEOLOGY DAY
DAVY CROCKETT’S
BIRTHDAY
(Born in 1786)
18
FARMERS MARKET:
2:00-4:30pm Los Osos, 2nd & Santa Maria
INTERNATIONAL
HOMELESS ANIMALS
DAY
BAD POETRY DAY
19
FARMERS MARKET:
8:00-11:30am Pismo, 555 Five Cities Dr
3:00-6:00 pm Paso Robles City Park
3:00-6:00 pm SLO, 2880 Broad St
LIBRARY STORYTIME: 10:10 SLO
DOC BURNSTEIN’S READING LAB
3:30-4:15pm AG
NATIONAL AVIATION
DAY
BILL CLINTON’S
BIRTHDAY (Born in 1946)
ORVILLE WRIGHT’S
BIRTHDAY (Born in 1871)
20
FARMERS MARKETS:
8:30-11am AG, 1464 E Grand Ave
12:30-4:30pm Santa Maria Town Ctr
3:00-6:00pm AT, El Camino & Curbaril
LIBRARY STORYTIME: 10:30 AT,
10:30 AG, 11:00 NI
NATIONAL
RADIO DAY
21
FARMERS MARKETS:
2:30-5:00pm Morro Bay, 2650 Main St
6:00-9:00pm Downtown SLO
LIBRARY STORYTIME: 10:00 MB,
10:10 SLO, 10:15 CAM,10:30 AT, 10:30
AG,10:30 LO, 11:00 CAY, 11:30 SMG
22
FARMERS MARKETS:
10:00am-12:30pm Cayucos Vets Hall
2:30-5:30pm Cambria, 1000 Main St
4:00-8:00pm Avila Beach Promenade
LIBRARY STORYTIME: 10:30 LO
23
FARMERS MARKETS:
8:00-10:30am SLO, 325 Madonna Rd
9:00am-12:30pm Templeton City Park
9:00am-1:00pm Shell Bch Dinosaur Caves
9:00am-1:00pm Paso Downtown Park
12:00-2:30pm AG Village Gazebo
2:30-6:00pm Morro Bay, 800 Main St
LIBRARY STORYTIME: 11:00 AG
1ST PHOTO OF EARTH
FROM THE MOON
(Taken by Lunar Orbiter in 1966)
NATIONAL SPONGE
CAKE DAY
24
FARMERS MARKET:
10:00am-2:00pm SLO, 3889 Long St
11:30am-2:30pm Nipomo Monarch Club
3:00-6:00pm Grover Bch Ramona Park
STRANGE MUSIC DAY
WAFFLE IRON
PATENTED (in 1869)
31
FARMERS MARKET:
10:00am-2:00pm SLO, 3889 Long St
11:30am-2:30pm Nipomo Monarch Club
3:00-6:00pm Grover Bch Ramona Park
25
FARMERS MARKET:
2:00-4:30pm Los Osos, 2nd & Santa Maria
KISS & MAKE UP DAY
NATIONAL BANANA
SPLIT DAY
26
FARMERS MARKET:
8:00-11:30am Pismo, 555 Five Cities Dr
3:00-6:00 pm Paso Robles City Park
3:00-6:00 pm SLO, 2880 Broad St
LIBRARY STORYTIME: 10:10 SLO
DOC BURNSTEIN’S READING LAB
3:30-4:15pm AG
NATIONAL DOG DAY
WOMEN’S
EQUALITY DAY
(Won right to vote in 1920)
27
FARMERS MARKETS:
8:30-11am AG, 1464 E Grand Ave
12:30-4:30pm Santa Maria Town Ctr
3:00-6:00pm AT, El Camino & Curbaril
LIBRARY STORYTIME: 10:30 AT,
10:30 AG, 11:00 NI
MOTHER TERESA’S
BIRTHDAY (Born in 1910)
28
FARMERS MARKETS:
2:30-5:00pm Morro Bay, 2650 Main St
6:00-9:00pm Downtown SLO
LIBRARY STORYTIME: 10:00 MB,
10:10 SLO, 10:15 CAM,10:30 AT, 10:30
AG,10:30 LO, 11:00 CAY, 11:30 SMG
DREAM DAY
(MLK Jr’s “I Have a Dream”
speech in 1963)
NATIONAL CHEERY
TURNOVER DAY
29
FARMERS MARKETS:
10:00am-12:30pm Cayucos Vets Hall
2:30-5:30pm Cambria, 1000 Main St
4:00-8:00pm Avila Beach Promenade
LIBRARY STORYTIME: 10:30 LO
1ST SCOUT CAMP
(Opened in 1934)
30
FARMERS MARKETS:
8:00-10:30am SLO, 325 Madonna Rd
9:00am-12:30pm Templeton City Park
9:00am-1:00pm Shell Bch Dinosaur Caves
9:00am-1:00pm Paso Downtown Park
12:00-2:30pm AG Village Gazebo
2:30-6:00pm Morro Bay, 800 Main St
LIBRARY STORYTIME: 11:00 AG
NATIONAL
TOASTED
MARSHMALLOW
DAY
NEW MOON
FULL MOON
August is:
Artist Appreciation Month
National Eye Exam Month
National Breastfeeding Month
Home Business Month
What’s Your Legacy Month
National Catfish Month
National Golf Month
National Inventors Month
National Water Quality Month
Birthstone: Peridot
Flower: Gladiola
August 2014 Free Ongoing Events
Central Coast Family • August 2014 • www.centralcoastfamily.com • Page 18
Family Events
FRI JUL 4-SUN AUG 10 (times vary):
BAREFOOT IN THE PARK at Pewter
Plough Playhouse, 824 Main St,
Cambria. Neil Simon’s classic comedy
of young newlyweds learning to
adjust to each others’ different
views on life. Cost: $16-30. Contact:
pewterploughplayhouse.org or 927-
3877.
THU JUL 17-SAT AUG 2 (times vary):
CENTRAL COAST SHAKESPEARE
FESTIVAL at Filipponi Ranch, 1850
Calle Joaquin Rd, San Luis Obispo.
Pack a picnic and enjoy Shakespeare
Under the Stars! A Midsummer Night’s
Dream is a wonderful show to enjoy
with the whole family, and a great
introduction to Shakespeare. Join
the mischievous Puck in a moonlit
night of havoc and hilarity. Cost: $5-25.
Contact: centralcoastshakespeare.org
or 546-4224.
MON JUL 28-SAT AUG 2: ROBIN
HOOD THEATRE WORKSHOP at
Spanos Theatre, Cal Poly, 1 Grand Ave.
For actors in grades 1-12 interested
in participating in a fully-staged
production of Robin Hood. Cost: $110.
Contact: 756-5914 or calpolyarts.org.
TUE JUL 29 10:00 am: 4-H PRESENTS
SCIENCE at Los Osos Library, 2075
Palisades. Have some fun with “fizz”
action minus the “boom” with cool
experiments combining substances
to observe chemical reactions. Grades
6-12, pre-register for a spot at the Los
Osos library. This activity is Sponsored
by the Friends of Los Osos Library.
Cost: free. Contact: slolibrary.org or
528-1862
TUE JUL 29 2:30 pm: FIZZ! BOOM!
READ! 4H at Creston Library, 6290
Adams. Spark a reaction with
“fizz” minus the “boom” with cool
experiments combining substances to
observe chemical reactions. Presented
by Rita’s Rainbows for grades 6-12.
Cost: free. Contact: slolibrary.org or
528-1862
THU JUL 31 11:00 am: BLUES FOR KIDS
at the South Bay Community Center,
2075 Palisades, Los Osos. Vocalist
Valerie Johnson and guitarist Al B Blue
will perform blues and gospel styles of
music throughout history on July 31.
Cost: free. Contact: slolibrary.org or
528-1862.
THU JUL 31 11:00 am: ONCE UPON A
FIZZ! BOOM! READ! at Colony Park
Community Center, 5599 Traffi c Way,
Atascadero. This highly engaging,
Story Theater program teaches
concrete skills for story creation, and
actively inspires literacy and fun. Cost:
free. Contact: slolibrary.org or 461-
6163.
THU JUL 31 1:00 pm: FIZZ! BOOM!
READ! 4H at Shandon Library, 240
E Centre. Spark a reaction with
“fizz” minus the “boom” with cool
experiments combining substances to
observe chemical reactions. Presented
by Rita’s Rainbows for grades 6-12.
Cost: free. Contact: slolibrary.org or
781-5775.
THU JUL 31 2:00 pm: FIZZ! BOOM!
READ! 4H at Morro Bay Temporary
Library, 525 Harbor. Spark a reaction
with “fizz” minus the “boom” with cool
experiments combining substances to
observe chemical reactions. Presented
by Rita’s Rainbows for grades 6-12.
Cost: free. Contact: slolibrary.org or
772-6394.
THU JUL 31 6:30-7:30 pm: PAJAMA
STORYTIME at Paso Robles City
Library, 1000 Spring St. Bring the whole
family to the library for an evening of
stories with storyteller Tony Wallace,
July 31. Children may wear pajamas
and should be accompanied by an
adult. Cost: free. Contact: 238-3870.
THU JUL 31-SUN AUG 17 (times vary):
THE SAN PATRICIOS at PCPA’s Marian
Theatre, 800 S College Dr, Santa
Maria. Cost: $16-38. Contact: 922-8313
or pcpa.org.
FRI AUG 1 2:00-5:00 pm: KIDS ART IN
THE PARK at Devaul Park, 1651 Spooner
Dr, San Luis Obispo. All ages welcome
to sell artwork, crafts, jewelry, clay,
etc. Kids can ask for donations for
their work. Free registration by AUG
1st. Park by Costco on the end of
Madonna Rd. Volunteers needed.
Contact: ginacarmen1225@yahoo.
com to register.
FRI AUG 1-SUN AUG 3: MINERAL SHOW
& SALE at Nipomo High School, 525 N
Thompson Ave. FRI & SAT 10:00 am-
5:00 pm, SUN 10:00 am-4:00 pm. Enjoy
a wide variety of lapidary products,
museum-quality displays of materials
and techniques, snack bar, demos,
raffl e, and BBQ on SAT at 5:30 pm. Free
rocks and games for kids. Sponsored
by Orcutt Mineral Society. Cost: free.
Contact: 481-3495 or omsinc.org.
FRI AUG 1-SAT AUG 30 12:00-5:00 pm:
CAT ADOPTION SPECIAL at HART,
2638 Main St, Cambria. Special $5 Cat
Adoptions at the Homeless Animal
Rescue Team (HART) for cats 9 months
or older during August! Includes: spay/
neuter, up-to-date vaccinations, free
follow-up Vet exam and bag of kibble.
Cost: $5. Contact: slohart.org or 927-
7377.
SAT AUG 2 9:00 am-3:00 pm:
TINKERING SCHOOL WORKSHOP
at SLO MakerSpace, 3988 Short
St. Ste. 100. This is the first of 6
sessions to qualify SLO MakerSpace
to be an offi cial Tinkering School.
Gever Tulley’s TED Talk on tinkering
explains the philosophy of this hands-
on educational experience for kids.
We give kids freedom to create,
experiment, and explore. Cost: free.
Contact: slomakerspace.com or 242-
1285.
SAT AUG 2 10:00 am-2:00 pm: WORLD
BREASTFEEDING WEEK CELEBRATION
at St. Patrick’s School, 900 W Branch
St, Arroyo Grande. Breastfeeding
books and authors’ fair. Cost: $5.
Contact: 473-3746.
SAT AUG 2 10:30 am: MANGA
WORKSHOP FOR TEENS at Atascadero
Library, 6555 Capistrano Ave. Teens,
grades 6-12, are invited to a Manga
workshop with Tokyopop’s Irene
Flores. Learn to create or have your
work critiqued. Call to reserve a spot.
Cost: free. Contact: slolibrary.org or
461-6163.
SAT AUG 2 1:00-5:30 pm: 12th ANNUAL
WILSHIRE HOSPICE HOEDOWN at
Hearst Ranch Dairy Barn, 442 San
Simeon Rd, San Simeon. Featuring
Monte Mills & the Lucky Horseshoe
Band, BBQ dinner, live auction, and
raffl e prizes. Cost: $100. Contact:
wilshirehcs.org or 547-7025.
SAT AUG 2 8:00 am-4:00 pm: YARD
SALE FOR HOMELESS SERVICES at 2555
Ocean View, Los Osos. Volunteers for
Maxine Lewis Memorial Shelter and
Prado Day Center are having a benefit
yard sale with art, crafts, gently used
treasures, and baked goods. Come
join the fun and enjoy the free coffee!
Cost: free. Contact: 528-7638.
SUN AUG 3 8:00-11:00 am: SLO
GRANGE PANCAKE BREAKFAST at SLO
Grange Hall, 2880 Broad St. Join family
and friends for a monthly pancake
breakfast. Enjoy bacon, eggs, all you
can eat pancakes, juice, coffee, tea,
and special this month, olallieberries.
Benefits SLO Grange Hall. Cost: $5.
Contact: 543-0639.
SUN AUG 3 1:00-8:00 pm: SLO
BUDDHIST CHURCH OBON FESTIVAL
at SLO Library Community Room, 995
Palm St. Japanese-American cultural
Central Coast Family • August 2014 • www.centralcoastfamily.com • Page 19
Family Events
festival featuring food, games,
Taiko drum performance, martial
arts demos, Bonsai exhibits, Asian
crafts, and traditional Japanese Obon
Odori Dancing. Cost: free. Contact:
slobuddhisttemple.org or 595-2625.
MON AUG 4-FRI AUG 8 10:00 am-12:00
pm: SCIENCE FOR GIRLS CAMP at
Exploration Station, 867 Ramona Ave,
Grover Beach. One week camp for
ages 8-12 to explore with a diferent
mentor each day in biology, chemistry,
materials engineering, technology,
and art. Cost: $50-75. Contact:
explorationstation.org or 473-1421.
WED AUG 6 5:45-7:00 pm: FIZZ-BOOM
LAB at Los Osos Library, 2075 Palisades
Ave. Build a volcano and make it erupt!
Cost: free. Contact: 528-1862.
THU AUG 7 3:00 pm: FIZZ! BOOM!
READ! 4H at Santa Margarita Library,
9630 Murphy Ave. Spark a reaction
with “fzz” minus the “boom” with cool
experiments combining substances to
observe chemical reactions. Presented
by Rita’s Rainbows for grades 6-12.
Cost: free. Contact: slolibrary.org or
438-5622.
FRI AUG 8-SAT AUG 24 (times
vary): RODGER & HAMMERSTEIN’S
CINDERELLA at SLO Little Theatre,
888 Morro St. Presented by SLO
Little Theatre’s Academy of Creative
Theatre. Cost: $13-20. Contact:
slolittletheatre.org or 786-2440.
SAT AUG 9 10:00 am: CANNIN’ &
JAMMIN’ at Windrose Farm, 5750 El
Pharro Rd, Paso Robles. Learn more
about traditional FARMstead-ing skill.
Make & create w/fresh fruit from the
farm. This includes lunch, in-season
fruits, and hands-on jam making (you
take home the fruits of your labor). A
farm tour will teach you more about
in-season fruit. Cost: $75. Contact:
farmsteaded.com or 226-2081.
SAT AUG 9 11:00 am-1:00 pm: 6th
Annual CHILDREN’S CRAFT FAIRE at
Los Osos Library, 2075 Palisades Ave.
Enjoy the best children’s craft faire
on the Central Coast! Children aged
13 and younger ofer hand-crafted
items priced $4 or less. Applications
are mandatory and are available at Los
Osos Library. Cost: free. Contact: 528-
1862.
SAT AUG 9 1:00-3:00 pm: WHERE
ARE THE BEARS? at SLO Botanical
Garden, 3450 Dairy Creek Rd. Join
us to learn the status of the native
bear population, where these elusive
bears reside, and how you can avoid
interaction or encourage wildlife
health. Cost: $5-10. Contact: 541-1400.
THU AUG 14 3:00 pm: RESCUE
WOLVES FIZZ BOOM HOWL FOR
LIBRARY SUMMER READING at Santa
Margarita Library, 9630 Murphy Ave.
Learn about the Paso Robles Whar
Wolf Rescue and Education program
on Aug. 14. This program includes
a visit from a live wolf and handler.
Cost: free. Contact: slolibrary.org or
438-5622.
SAT AUG 16 10:00 am-5:00 pm:
11TH ANNUAL OLIVE FESTIVAL at
Downtown City Park, 12th & Spring
St, Paso Robles. Olive oil, chef cook-
of, cooking contest, artists, crafters,
and wine tasting. Cost: free. Contact:
pasoroblesdowntown.org or 238-4103.
SAT AUG 16 10:30am: 3RD ANNUAL
THANK YOU WHALES CELEBRATION
at Avila Community Center, 191 San
Miguel St. Every year, we celebrate
the miracle of Avila, when in 2012
the whales showed up in prehunting
numbers to Avila Harbor just in
time to bring world attention that
stopped planned seismic testing at
Diablo Canyon. Cost: $27. Contact:
oceanoutfallgroup.com or 748-3233.
SAT AUG 16 11:00 am-4:00 pm:
ENERGY BALANCING sessions at
Sierra Vista Regional Medical Center
Auditorium, 1010 Murray Ave, San Luis
Obispo. Sessions are 25 minutes in
duration, appropriate for all ages, and
no appointment is necessary. All are
welcome. Cost: free. Contact: www.
lightshare.us.
SAT AUG 16 at 2:00 pm: FAMILY MOVIE
at Los Osos Library, 2075 Palisades
Ave. Bring the whole family and enjoy
a comedy flm rated PG. Popcorn
provided. Cost: free. Contact: 528-
1862.
SAT AUG 16 (times vary): SUMMER
READING ENDS at SLO County library!
Finish up your summer reading and
bring your completed logs in to your
local library and pick-up your rewards.
Cost: free. Contact: 781-5775 or
slolibrary.org.
SUN AUG 17 11:00 am:FAMILY DAY
LABOR DAY WEEKEND
SUNDAY, AUGUST 31, 2014
AVILA BEACH GOLF RESORT
GATES OPEN 2:30PM · CONCERT AT 4PM
FOR TICKETS CALL 543-3533 OR
VISIT SLOSYMPHONY.ORG
SAN LUIS OBISPO SYMPHONY
MICHAEL NOWAK, MUSIC DIRECTOR
LUCIA CLEVELAND & PAUL VANDEYDEN
JOE & PEGGY LITTLE · JIM & BEVERLY SMITH
Central Coast Family • August 2014 • www.centralcoastfamily.com • Page 20
Family Events
IN THE PARK/HEALTHY KIDS DAY at
Waller Park, 300 Goodwin Rd, Santa
Maria. Cost: free. Contact: 937-8521.
SAT AUG 23 10:00 am-1:00 pm:
HYPERTUFA WORKSHOP at SLO
Botanical Garden, 3450 Dairy Creek
Rd. Join artist Jennifer Fox as you
create rustic, textured containers that
are lightweight, porous, and perfect
for your garden. Cost: $50-60. Contact:
541-1400.
SAT AUG 23 6:00-9:00 pm: CAMP FIRE
CASINO NIGHT FUNDRAISER in Arroyo
Grande. The 4th Annual Casino Royale
fundraiser will be held at the home
of Jason and Bonnie Len, and feature
cocktails, dinner, gaming, music, and
fantastic prizes including a 3-day/2-
night stay in Las Vegas or Laughlin.
Each ticket enters you in the grand
prize drawing. Cost: $50. Contact: 440-
1898 or 441-4776.
SUN AUG 24 12:00-3:00 pm: Old Timers
Picnic at San Miguel Community Park,
“K” Street; San Miguel. This annual
event is a great time to catch up with
old friends, meet new ones, and visit
with Pioneer Royalty before Pioneer
Day. Enjoy a delicious BBQ meal of
chicken, beans, salad, and bread. Cost:
$12, 80 years and over: free! Desserts
and drinks also available. Contact: 459-
4722.
Twin Cities Community Hospital
Volunteers, a non-profit providing
support to patients, doctors, and
nurses of the hospital, seek volunteers
to work in the gift shop and Obstetrics
(OB) Dept. AM and PM 4 hour shifts
are available. Contact: 434-4524.
Last FRI every month at 6:00 pm:
Family Fun at Unity Church, 1165
Stubblefield St, Orcutt. Contact: 937-
3025.
Every THU-FRI 12:00-5:00 pm & SAT
11:00 am-5:00 pm: Exploration Station
Interactive Science Center welcomes
families at 867 Ramona Ave, Grover
Beach. Cost: $2-3. Contact: 473-1421
or http://explorationstation.org.
2nd THU of every month 6:00-7:00
pm: Grief Support Group at Central
Coast Hospice, 253 Granada Dr, Ste
D, San Luis Obispo. This free group
is for anyone suffering the loss of a
loved one who is in need of support.
Contact: 540-6020.
2nd SAT of every month FEB-NOV at
9:00 am: Santa Maria Recreation and
Parks Dept offers free docent-led
nature walks in Los Flores Ranch, 6271
Dominion Rd, Santa Maria. Contact:
925-0951 x 263.
2nd MON every month 6:30-8:00 pm:
Caregiver Support Group at Cayucos
Community Church, Ocean Ave & S 3rd
St. Free support for caregivers and
family members dealing with long-
term illness, memory loss, dementia,
and Alzheimer’s. Contact: 458-7484.
Every MON 10:00 am-2:00 pm: Remain
Independent Despite Vision Loss at
Santa Maria Terrace, 1405 E Main St.
New ways of doing daily tasks are
taught by the Braille Institute, such
as home managment, traveling, and
using talking library books. Contact:
462-1225.
2nd & 4th MON every month at 6:30
pm: MOPS (Mothers of Preschoolers)
meet at Pacific Christian Church,
3435 Santa Maria Way, Santa Maria.
Childcare is provided. Contact: 934-
3491 or www.pacificchristian.net.
Every TUE 3:00-6:00 pm & FRI 3:00-
5:30 pm: Teen Wellness Program at
Arroyo Grande EOC Health Services
Clinic, 1152 E Grand Ave. Health
services, including reproductive
health, in a safe environment with
staff trained to screen, assess, and to
provide intervention. Appointments
are preferred. Contact: 489-4026.
1st WED every month at 9:00 am:
Community Action Partnership Senior
Health Screening at First United
Methodist Church, 275 N Halcyon
Rd, Arroyo Grande. Free and low-
cost services are offered for people
50 and older: blood pressure, pulse,
weight, total cholesterol, screening
for anemia, diabetes, and fecal blood,
nutritional counseling, and medical
referrals. Contact: 481-2692 or 788-
0827.
1st WED every month at 12:00 pm:
Disabled American Veterans luncheon
at Veterans Memorial Bldg, 313 W.
Tunnell St, Santa Maria. Contact: 345-
0402.
Every WED 5:30-7:00 pm: Widowed
Support Group at New Life Church,
990 James Way, Rm 14, Pismo Beach.
Arrive 10 min early for 1st meeting.
Offered by Hospice of SLO Co. Contact:
544-2266 or www.hospiceslo.org.
Every TUE at 7:00 pm: Al-Anon Family
Support Group at Luis OASIS Senior
Center, 420 Soares Ave, Orcutt.
Contact: 937-9750.
3rd WED every month at 7:00 pm:
How to Survive Divorce seminar
at the San Luis Obispo Women’s
Community Center, 1124 Nipomo St,
#D in SLO. Practical tips, pointers, and
suggestions for handling family law
issues. $10.00 donation requested for
handout materials and book. Contact:
544-9313 to register.
4th TUE every month at 5:30 pm: Legal
Clinic for Self-Represented Litigants at
the San Luis Obispo County Courthouse
Law Library, 1050 Monterey St in SLO,
#125. SLO County Bar Assn Family
Law Section & Women’s Community
Center provide one-on-one legal
advice for persons filing divorces w/o
an attorney, and a document preparer
to assist in completing court-required
forms. Min. $40.00 donation. Limit: 12
participants. Contact: 544-9313.
RISE (formerly Sexual Assault
Recovery and Prevention Center
of San Luis Obispo County) offers:
Weekly Drop-In Support Group for
Sexual Assault Survivors; 24 Hour Crisis
Line; Advocacy and Accompaniment;
Peer Counseling; Individual Clinical
Counseling; Prevention and
Education Programs; and Women’s
Empowerment and Self Defense
Workshops. Contact: 545-8888 or
www.sarpcenter.org.
Every SAT 11:00 am-3:00 pm: ADOPT
A PET at Petco, 2051 Theater Dr, in
Paso Robles. Cats are available for
adoption through NCHS. Dogs are
available through Short n’ Sweet Dog
Rescue. Contact: 466-5403.
Every MON 2:00-4:00 pm & WED 3:00-
5:00 pm: Jacks’ Adaptive Toy Lending
Library-Jack’s Helping Hand at Central
Coast Gymnastics, 21 Zaca Lane, #100,
San Luis Obispo. Traditional and
adaptive toys for children with all
types of disabilities to check out. In-
home appointments available. Cost:
Free! Contact: 547-1914 or www.
jackshelpinghand.org.
Every TUE 2:00-5:00 pm & FRI 4:00-
7:00 pm: Jacks’ Adaptive Toy Lending
Library - Jack’s Helping Hand at
Pat’s Place in Nipomo Recreation
Community Rm, 671 W Tefft St, Ste
2, Nipomo. Toys for children with all
Central Coast Family • August 2014 • www.centralcoastfamily.com • Page 21
Local Resources
types of disabilities to check out. In-
home appointments also available.
Cost-Free! Contact: 547-1914 or www.
jackshelpinghand.org.
Every FRI at 7:00 pm: Senior Ballroom
Dancing at Madonna Inn. If you are
a senior (single or attached) and like
ballroom dancing, this is the place!
Look left of the bandstand for sign:
Senior Dancers. Dance, chat and listen
to good music. No fees; no dues; just
fun! Contact: 489-5481 or dg17@juno.
com.
Literacy Council for San Luis Obispo
County has an ongoing and urgent
need for volunteer tutors and offers
free training in SLO. Contact: 541-4219
or www.sloliteracy.org.
1st THU every month at 6:15 pm:
Commission on the Status of Women
meets at Coast National Bank, 500
Marsh St, San Luis Obispo. This offi cial
advisory group to the SLO County
Board of Supervisors identifies issues
of concern to women that are not
currently the focus of other advocacy
or advisory organizations. Contact:
788-3406.
Every WED 11:00 am-12:00 pm: Growing
With Baby, an infant feeding offi ce
for breastfeeding mothers and their
babies (0-10 mos), offers a free class
on feeding, crying, and sleep at 1230
Marsh St, San Luis Obispo. Pediatric
nurse practioner and lactation
consultant Andrea Herron will answer
questions. Dads are always welcome!
Call to reserve a spot. Contact: 543-
6988.
Morro Bay Museum of Natural History
offers Adventures With Nature & Mind
Walks. Find the schedule at: www.
ccnha.org/naturewalks.html.
Central Coast Commission for Senior
Citizens offers many free services:
Senior Connection - connecting callers
with local resources; HICAP (Health
Insurance Counseling and Advocacy
Program) one on one assistance for
Medicare beneficiaries, advise and
referrals for long term care options,
and help with billing / appeals; Vial
of Life magnetized containers with
medical information; a Senior Resource
Directory for SLO and SB counties,
and much more. Contact: 925-9554 or
www.centralcoastseniors.org.
Hospice of San Luis Obispo County
provides free grief counseling,
group support, counseling, crisis
intervention, and wellness education
to those with a life-limiting illness,
their families, and the bereaved.
This non-profit agency supports
the community in coping with loss
and promoting healing with free
counseling, community education and
volunteer support to those grieving a
death or dealing with potential end-of-
life issues. Offi ces in San Luis Obispo
and Paso Robles. Contact: 544-2266.
Volunteer as a Good Neighbor! Make
a difference in the life of an older
or disabled adult. Once trained,
volunteers choose services to
contribute and schedule hours at their
convenience. Training is scheduled
monthly at Wilshire Community
Services, 285 South St, Ste J, SLO.
Contact: 547-7025 x 17.
Volunteer at San Luis Obispo Museum
of Art! Stop by at 1010 Broad St
(Mission Plaza) or email volunteer@
sloma.org.
San Luis Obispo Senior Center offers
health screening, legal services, meals,
exercise, bridge, and bingo at 1445
Santa Rosa St. Contact: 781-7306.
Central Coast Astronomical Society
sponsors a Dark Sky Star Party
every month at Santa Margarita
Lake KOA Campground at sunset.
CCAS also sponsors special guest
speakers and public programs
periodically. Find event schedules,
weather updates, and resources at:
www.centralcoastastronomy.org.
Contact: Aurora Lipper at aurora@
centralcoastastronomy.org.
San Luis Coastal Adult School’s Parent
Participation Program offers Core
Parenting and Enrichment classes in
SLO, Morro Bay, and Los Osos. Bring
your child to a parent and child activity
class, or find support and education
just for parents. Cost: $74 for 10
wks. Contact: 549-1222 or http://
parentparticipation.org.
Suicide Prevention
Mental Health and
Emotional Support
Free
Confidential
24 hours of every day
A program of Transitions Mental Health Association
lovorganicfarm.com
mail@lovorganicfarm.com
(805) 242 6789
Central Coast Family • August 2014 • www.centralcoastfamily.com • Page 22
Education
CS Perryess writes for teens, narrates audio
books, and ponders the wonder of words
in a foggy little town on California’s central
coast. Find more of his blog posts at http://
csperryess.blogspot.com, or reach him at
csperryess@gmail.com.
CS Perryess
writes
about words
TOPONYMS
English abounds with toponyms
– place names we use to
refer to things other than the
original place. I hope you enjoy
considering this smattering of
toponyms.
Paisley – now a distinctive
shape we print onto fabric, but
originally a town in Scotland
where such fabric was first made.
Interestingly, the word paisley
comes through Middle Irish from
the word baslec, which came
from the Latin word basilica,
which means that the town was
originally identified by its church.
Today, the word babel refers to
a confused medley of sounds, but
originally it referred to Babhel,
the capital of Babylon. Babhel
is a Hebrew word that started
out as Bab-ilu, an Accadian word
meaning the gate of God, which
causes those of my generation to
wonder what Ricky Riccardo was
really singing about.
Our modern colors burgundy and
magenta are both toponyms.
Burgundy was originally a region
in France named in Late Latin with
the term Burgundiones, which
translates to highlanders. In time,
the wine of the area picked up the
name, and the deep hue of the
wine gave us the word burgundy
as it refers to color. On the other
hand, the town of Magenta was
where the Sardinians and French
teamed up to fight the Austrians
during the Second Italian War of
Independence in 1859. The town
was originally named after Marcus
Aurelius Valerius Maxentius. It
wasn’t until a few short years after
the battle that a deep reddish
purple dye was discovered in that
region, and voila, magenta.
Even in the 13
th
century, some
folks (royalty, anyway) enjoyed
relaxing at a spa. Our modern
word spa is a toponym taken from
Spa, Belgium, a town blessed with
mineral hot springs. The town’s
name came from the Walloon
word espa, meaning spring or
fountain.
Because many of New York’s
financial institutions ended up
situated along the wall that once
offered defense to the struggling
Dutch town of New York, the
adjacent street was named Wall
Street. That struggling little town
has done all right for itself, to
the point that we now use this
toponym to refer to the entire
American financial world.
My niece and nephew refer to
those lovely plastic playgrounds
some fast food restaurants offer
as king cities. Any of you here
in California will easily fill in the
etymology on that one.
HOMONYMS
We’ll start off with a homonym
that takes its multiple-meaning
status seriously.
Almost all forms of dessert/
desert came to English through
French. Dessert came to English
in the 1500s, in reference to the
last course of a meal. The French
word it came from is deservir,
which (because serving the last
course involved clearing the
table of the previous courses)
translates literally to un-serve,
with des- meaning undo and
servir meaning to serve. The
wasteland meaning of desert
came to English in the 1200s from
Old French, which came from the
Late Latin word desertum, which
meant thing abandoned. It wasn’t
until the 1700s that the meaning a
waterless, treeless region eclipsed
the wasteland meaning. The
desert that means suitable reward
or punishment (as in getting one’s
just deserts) came through French
from the Latin word deservir (not
to be confused with the French
word deservir). It meant to serve
well. I suppose one is served well
by getting what one deserves.
But so much for nouns – the
verb desert came through the
Old French deserter in the 1300s
from the Latin desertare (closely
related to desertum), which
meant to abandon. This particular
desert is built of the word parts
de-, meaning opposite or undo,
and serere, meaning to put in a
row. Serere also gave birth to the
word series.
Now let’s take a look at the near-
homonym pairs form/from and
definitely/defiantly. In my humble
opinion, the from and form
confusion is a matter of typing,
more than a homonym issue. We
just get typing away and muck
it up. The confusion between
definitely and defiantly, however,
is another matter altogether. I’ve
been grading English papers since
the 1970s, and in my experience,
these two words were never
confused before computers. The
confusion didn’t even exist with
the first raft of word processors.
I call this phenomenon spellcheck-
induced error. It occurs because
many of us type definAtely instead
of definItely. Our spell-checker
tries to “read” our intentions and
comes up with defiantly, (which
contributes to some hysterical
sentences).
We’ll finish with a homonym trio
I find intriguing: by, bye and buy.
By has been around since Old
English was born and came from
a Proto-Germanic word meaning
about, near, or around. Though
we pronounce it differently today,
we find by’s sister (with the same
meaning) at the end of place
names that end in –by. In Yorkshire
alone, there are over 210 place
names ending this way (Wetherby
and Selby, for instance). Our
modern word buy, came from
another Proto-Germanic source,
the word bugjan, meaning to pay
for. When it first entered English,
the soft g sound remained at
the end of the word, and is one
of the reasons the past tense,
bought includes the letter g. The
completely unrelated word bye is
a shortening of good-bye, which
was spelled godbwye in the 1570s
as a shortening of something else
-- the term God be with ye.

Many thanks to sources: OED, Fact Index, Place
Names in England, Wordnik, and Etymonline.
Central Coast Family • August 2014 • www.centralcoastfamily.com • Page 23
Registration Now Open!
4th Grade Camp
For students entering 4th grade in Fall 2014
M-Th, July 28-31
Sciensational Workshop
Four day workshop for students age 6-12
Creative Engineering M-Th, August 4-7
Aquatics & Swim Lessons
Baby & Me - Levels 1-6
2-week Sessions running through Aug 7

Call: (805) 546-3132
or visit: www.cuesta.edu/communityprograms
Register Online, via Phone, Fax or Walk-In!
Family
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Display advertising in Central Coast Family offers an
extraordinary value. Our loyal readers are relatively
mature, prosperous, and educated family members
in two of California’s most affl uent counties. They
take an active role in all aspects of parenting and
purchasing.
Every issue includes original feature articles and
calendar listings for six weeks of local family events.
Your ad is viewed the whole month through; not
discarded after a day or a week.
We offer the lowest rates in our region (and discounts
for non-profits or ads running 3 months or more).
All of our advertisers also enjoy FREE: full color
printing; basic graphic design; preferred placement
options; monthly edits; and website exposure!
Contact us to spread the word in
print, online, and social media:
Patrice Vogel, Editor
David Vogel, Publisher
PO Box 6424
Los Osos, CA 93412
(805) 528-0440 Phone
(805) 439-0798 Fax

centralcoastfamily.com
ccfamilyad@gmail.com
CC F
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