WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

FOX CREEK
WRIA: 10.0608 - PUYALLUP RIVER 2005 - 2006

DESCRIPTION
Fox Creek joins the Puyallup River at RM 29.5. Fox is primarily surveyed for coho (above) in the fall and periodically for steelhead in the spring. Fox Creek flows within the Kapowsin tree farm (Hancock Forest Resource Group), where roads and timber harvesting have impacted several portions of the stream in the past. The lower mile of the creek has the most suitable River miles surveyed: 0.0 to 1.0 Dates surveyed: 10/6/05 to 5/17/06 habitat for adult spawners. Above RM 0.5, Fox is a moderate Species surveyed: Coho, Steelhead N/O gradient step-pool stream with good pool frequency and adequate conifer and hardwood riparian cover. There are Mile 0.6: Take Hwy. 162 through few mature conifers in this reach, although many young Orting. Turn South on Orville Rd. Cross over Puyallup River bridge, Grand firs have been planted as a restoration effort. From continue to Rainier Timber’s Bridge gate RM 0.5 to 0.3 the gradient decreases and the channel on Road 1. Bridge over Fox Creek is assumes a pool-riffle character with excellent spawning approximately .7 miles in. gravels. This middle reach often has the highest spawning Mile 0.0. Take the first available left inside Bridge gate and follow abandoned densities. From 0.3 to the confluence with the Puyallup, road to the creek. the stream meanders through a grassy area with little riparian cover and moderate amounts of fine material obscuring the gravelly substrate. A substantial amount of beaver activity exists throughout Fox Creek. Beaver dams, some up Fox Creek running through the center of the to six feet in height, often completely block and prevent fish from photo, enters the right migrating upstream. Dams located along the lower mile of the creek bank of the Puyallup are often breached during the beginning of the coho season to allow River. fish access to the spawning habitat above. Fox Creek is primarily a coho stream, with fish likely ascending as far up as the Kapowsin tree farm’s 6 Rd; however, the majority of spawning occurs within the first mile. Occasionally, chum and steelhead are observed in the creek as well. Extensive carcass sampling on coho for coded wire tags and fin clips, has revealed a large percentage of the adult spawners in Fox are Voights Creek hatchery origin fish. Most of these fish are likely and assumed to be the result of acclimation pond plants in the upper Puyallup.

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES
2005 - 2006 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD AND BULL TROUT REPORT.

71

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

2005 FOX CREEK COHO COUNTS
400 LIVE DEAD 350

300

NUMBER OBSERVED

250

200

150

100

50

0 10/6/05 10/13/05 10/21/05 11/3/05 11/14/05 11/22/05 12/5/05 12/16/05

DATE SURVEYED

FOX CREEK COHO SEASON COMPARISONS (1995 - 2005)
1400
1230

LIVE DEAD REDDS

1200
1054

1000

NUMBER OBSERVED

732

429

461

400

355

112

123

200

151

99

159

378

67

47

66

35

21

9

18 17

23

7

2

0

1995

1996

1

1997

1998

1999

9

2000
SEASON SURVEYED

2001

39

2002

2003

44

86

2004

2005

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES
2005 - 2006 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD AND BULL TROUT REPORT.

540

600

721

745

800

72

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

FOX CREEK COHO RUN TIMING (2001 - 2005)
500 2005 2004 450 2003 2002 400 2001

NUMBER OF COHO OBSERVED

350

300 250 200

150 100

50 0 Sept. 20-30 Oct. 1-10 Oct. 11-20 Oct. 21-31 Nov. 1-10 Nov. 11-20
DAT E

Nov. 21-30

Dec. 1-10

Dec. 11-20

Dec. 21-31

FOX CREEK COHO CARCASS SAMPLING (2002 - 2005)
800 721 700 CARCASSES SAMPLED CARCASS W ITH ADIPOSE FIN CLIP AND CW T (HATCHERY ORIGIN) CARCASS W ITH ADIPOSE FIN CLIP ONLY (HATCHERY ORIGIN) UNMARKED CARCASS (W ILD) 600
NUMBER OF COHO CARCASSES

540 500 461 460

400

300 240 203 200 195

277

173

100 44 18 0 2002 2003
SEASON SURVEY ED

42 2

66

90

2004

2005

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES
2005 - 2006 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD AND BULL TROUT REPORT.

73

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

FOX CREEK STEELHEAD SEASON COMPARISONS (1995 - 2006)
14 13

STEELHEAD REDDS

12

10

NUMBER OBSERVED

8

6

4

2 2 1 1

0

1995

1996

1997

1998

1999

2000

2001

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

SEASON SURVEYED

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES
2005 - 2006 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD AND BULL TROUT REPORT.

74

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

GREENWATER RIVER
WRIA: 10.0122 - WHITE RIVER
Greenwater River looking downstream from RM 0.6.

2005 - 2006

DESCRIPTION The Greenwater River is a right bank tributary to the upper mainstem White River. The Greenwater originates on Castle Mountain and meets the White river near the town of Greenwater at RM 46. It supports large runs of steelhead, chinook and River miles surveyed: 0.0 to 11.3 coho salmon. It is surveyed for both Chinook and Dates surveyed: 8/24/05 to 6/02/06 steelhead by the Washington Department of Fish and Species surveyed: Chinook, Steelhead Wildlife, but not for coho. The Greenwater River is one Access R.M. 0.0: Hwy 410 crosses the Greenwater of 7 index streams in the Puyallup watershed that are just above its mouth at the Town of surveyed by WDFW. The Greenwater is a medium sized, Greenwater. low gradient pool-riffle stream with abundant high quality R.M. 1.7: Approximately 1 mile upstream, a spawning gravel. Much of it flows through Forest Service spur to the right leads to a bridge over the creek. Many upstream access points are land and the riparian zone is primarily second growth available from the Forest Service 70 rd conifer and hardwoods. which follows it most of its length. Only limited amounts of LWD exist in the channel, and the average size reflects the surrounding forest and is small. What large wood exists is usually quite old. Significant tributaries to the Greenwater include Pyramid, Lost, Maggie, Slide, and Twentyeight Mile Creeks. As with all upper White River surveys; adult salmon and steelhead that spawn in the Greenwater River were captured at the USACE fish trap in Buckley, and transported above Mud Mountain dam. Since precise escapement numbers for the upper White River drainage are known, surveys are conducted to determine fish distribution and spawning success. The Upper White Rivers’ coho escapement is derived from Greenwater River counts made at the Army Corps of looking upstream Engineers’ Buckley trap. at RM 6.5.

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES
2005 - 2006 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD AND BULL TROUT REPORT.

75

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

2005 GREENWATER RIVER CHINOOK COUNTS
120

2005 Greenwater River chinook graphs were generated using survey data collected by WDFW.

LIVE DEAD REDDS

100

80
NUMBER OBSERVED

60

40

20

0 8/24/05 9/6/05 9/14/05 9/23/05 9/30/05 10/3/05 10/7/05 10/11/05

DATE SURVEYED

GREENWATER RIVER CHINOOK SEASON COMPARISONS (1999 - 2005)
450 AUC: ESCAPEMENT ESTIMATE LIVE 400
370 390

DEAD REDDS

350
318

300
NUMBER OBSERVED 249 244 236 212 219

250

200

192

150
122

127 107 80 91 73 49 26 63 44 29 101

100

50

42

0 1999 2000 2001 2002
SEASON SURVEYED

2003

2004

2005

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES
2005 - 2006 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD AND BULL TROUT REPORT.

76

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

GREENWATER RIVER STEELHEAD REDDS SEASON COMPARISONS (2001 - 2006)
80

70

Upper White River surveys show distribution, actual escapement totals are known from the USACE Buckley trap counts.

STEELHEAD REDDS

60

56 50

NUMBER OBSERVED

50 41 40 38

30

27

20

10

0 2001 2002 2003
SEASON SURVEYED

2004

2005

2006

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES
2005 - 2006 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD AND BULL TROUT REPORT.

77

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

2005 GREENWATER RIVER TEMPERATURE MEASURED AT THE HWY. 410 BRIDGE JULY 15 - OCTOBER 7
20

18

16

Chinook

Temperature (C*)

14

12

10

Spawning
8

6 8/5/2005 9/2/2005 7/15/2005 7/22/2005 7/29/2005 8/12/2005 8/19/2005 8/26/2005 9/9/2005 9/16/2005 9/23/2005 9/30/2005

DATE

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES
2005 - 2006 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD AND BULL TROUT REPORT.

78

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

HORSE HAVEN CREEK
WRIA: 10.0589 - PUYALLUP RIVER 2005 - 2006

The mouth of Horse Haven Creek looking upstream.

DESCRIPTION
Horse Haven Creek is a left bank tributary to the Puyallup River, the creek enters the Puyallup just North of the city of Orting at RM 20.2. Horse Haven flows for 3.3 miles from its spring fed source with three smaller tributaries feeding the stream along the way. Horse Haven Creek is not surveyed on a consistent basis due to the fact there is little adult salmon utilization, and issues regarding access to surveyable sections of the creek. Spot surveys have shown that an extremely limited number of coho and chum spawn in the creek, as well as a small tributary (10.0590) that enters around RM 1.0. However, the lower Typical habitat conditions in the mile of the creek does offer good overwintering conditions for lower part of Horse Haven Creek. juvenile coho. Most of Horse Haven Creek meanders through low lying private residences and agricultural land. The surrounding agricultural land use, which for many years has been mostly cattle, continues to impact channel conditions in Horse Haven Creek. Most of Horse Haven Creek is a narrow, confined, and incised channel, devoid of any quality woody debris, or varying flow and velocity regimes. Tremendous improvements to riparian conditions are possible but require willing land owners, technical expertise and funding. Despite its many habitat related shortcomings, Horse Haven Creek continues to support a small population of wild coho and chum. There are several limiting factors that are likely causes for such under-utilization such as, but not limited to; extremely low summer and fall flows, poor water quality and heavy siltation, agricultural and storm runoff, as well as direct agricultural discharge into the creek.

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES
2005 - 2006 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD AND BULL TROUT REPORT.

79

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

HUCKLEBERRY CREEK
WRIA: 10.0253 - WHITE RIVER 2005 - 2006

Huckleberry Creek is a tributary to the Upper White River. The creek originates from the Huckleberry basin along the North slope of Mt. Rainier and is non-glacial. The creek flows through the National park and Snoqualmie National Forest lands before meeting the West Fork of the White at RM 53.1. The lower 0.5 miles consists of a low gradient, occasionally braided channel with a large side channel complex breaking off around RM 0.3. The surrounding riparian is a mixture of conifers and deciduous trees. The spawning gravel is excellent in the first half mile reach, which consistently supports the highest densities of spring chinook, coho and pink spawners each season. Steelhead usage has also been documented in Huckleberry; however, steelhead Upper Spring chinook acclimation pond surveys have not been conducted for several years. The located at RM 5 on Huckleberry Creek. gradient increases slightly From RM 0.5 to 1.5, but the gravel quality remains excellent, although slightly larger and patchy in nature. The riparian corridor consists of old growth conifers upstream of the acclimation pond at RM 0.5, offering excellent LWD recruitment. In-stream LWD is moderate throughout the entire creek, creating several logjams, as well as, free and fixed channel spanning structure. Since 1994, the Puyallup tribe has operated two ponds used for acclimating spring chinook which are planted in March, and released in May or early June. The spring chinook plants are an integral part of the White River spring chinook recovery plan. The juvenile spring chinook originate from the Muckleshoot White River Hatchery and WDFW’s hatchery on Minter Creek. Production levels have been around 400,000 smolts; although, it fluctuates Spring chinook based on available brood stock. They have a production capacity acclimation pond of 837,000 zero age smolts. located at RM 0.5 As with all upper White River tributaries, adult salmon and on Huckleberry steelhead that spawn in Huckleberry Creek were captured at the Creek. USACE fish trap in Buckley, then transported and released approximatly 4 miles above Mud Mountain Dam. Since precise escapement numbers for the upper White River drainage are known, spawning surveys are conducted to determine fish distribution and spawning success. This is important regarding spring chinook, since adult production monitoring is part of the recovery plan.

DESCRIPTION

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES
2005 - 2006 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD AND BULL TROUT REPORT.

80

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

2005 HUCKLEBERRY CREEK CHINOOK COUNTS
45

40

Upper White River surveys show distribution and timing. Actual escapement totals are known from the USACE Buckley trap counts.

LIVE DEAD REDDS

35

30
NUMBER OBSERVED

25

20

15

10

5

0 8/17/05 8/26/05 9/6/05 9/15/05 9/22/05 9/29/05 10/7/05 10/17/05

DATE SURVEYED

HUCKLEBERRY CREEK CHINOOK SEASON COMPARISON (1999 - 2005)
100 AUC: ESCAPEMENT ESTIMATE LIVE 90
82

DEAD
84

89 82

REDDS

80

70
NUMBER OBSERVED

66 60

60
50

50

40
32

37

38 35 32 25 24 17 14 29

30

20

10
4 1

5

0 1999 2000 2001 2002
SEASON SURVEYED

2003

2004

2005

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES
2005 - 2006 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD AND BULL TROUT REPORT.

81

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

2005 HUCKLEBERRY CREEK COHO COUNTS
250 LIVE DEAD

200

NUMBER OBSERVED

150

100

50

0 9/22/05 9/29/05 10/6/05 10/17/05
DATE SURVEYED

10/26/05

11/8/05

11/16/05

2005 HUCKLEBERRY CREEK PINK COUNTS
450 LIVE DEAD

400

350

300
NUMBER OBSERVED

250

200

150

100

50

0 8/26/05 9/6/05 9/15/05 9/22/05
DAT E SURVEYED

9/29/05

10/7/05

10/17/05

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES
2005 - 2006 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD AND BULL TROUT REPORT.

82

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

HUCKLEBERRY CREEK SPRING CHINOOK ACCLIMATION POND PLANTS (1995 - 2006)
600,000
496,700

Spring Chinook Plan ted in Lower Pon d

The 2006 Spring Chinook were released from the ponds on May 31.
464,980 356,000

500,000

Spring Chinook Plan ted in Hu ck Aerial Pon d

NUMBER OF FISH PLANTED

400,000

300,000
218,631 217,450 189,720

175,650

182,440

243,000

200,000

121,460

145,900

254,550

100,000

0 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006

YEAR P LANT ED

Between 100,000 to 500,000+ Spring chinook from the WDFW Minter Creek and the Muckleshoot White River hatchery are transported to the Huckleberry Creek acclimation ponds in early spring, and released in late spring. All fish are mass marked with left or right ventral fin clips. Odd brood years are marked with left ventral clips, and even years with right ventral clips. These fish can later be identified when caught at the USACE fish trap in Buckley and passed above the Mud Mountain dam to spawn.

2005 Huckleberry Creek Temperatures (C*)
14

13

12

Chinook

11 Temperature (C*)

10

9

8

7

6

Spawning
7/15/05 7/22/05 7/29/05 8/12/05 8/19/05 8/26/05 9/16/05 9/23/05 9/30/05 10/7/05 8/5/05 9/2/05 9/9/05

5

DATE

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES
2005 - 2006 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD AND BULL TROUT REPORT.

82,450

107850

83

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

HYLEBOS CREEK
WRIA: 10.0006 - INDEPENDENT DRAINAGE 2005 - 2006
Hylebos Creek looking upstream above 373rd St. There is good spawning habitat both above and below this point. This 27-acre property was purchased in late 2004 by the Washington State Department of Transportation.

DESCRIPTION
Hylebos Creek is an independent drainage from the Puyallup/White River River miles surveyed: 0.1 to 0.3 system. Hylebos Creek flows directly into the Hylebos Dates surveyed: Limited surveys in 2005 Species surveyed: Chinook, Coho Waterway in Commencement Bay, Tacoma. Chinook, Chum, Pink chum, coho, pink salmon and steelhead have all been observed spawning within the surveyed areas of Hylebos Creek. Hylebos Creek also host a large population of West Fork of cutthroat trout. Currently, the Puyallup Tribe releases Hylebos Creek. between 10 to 20 thousand juvenile fall chinook into Hylebos Creek. Fish are planted in a large man-made pond located on the East fork of the creek. The stream channel above and below the bridge at 373rd St. is moderately low gradient and somewhat incised. The riparian flora consists of turf grass, reed canary grass and alder, with a section of bamboo along a landowners property. A split in the channel Mainstem of at approximately RM 0.3 marks Hylebos Creek the confluence of the north and below 373rd south forks of Hylebos Creek. The substrate is very compacted with large Street. amounts of fine material and some smaller gravel. The stream section most often surveyed extends from 373rd St., upstream to the Montessori school at Hwy. 99. Frequent channel dredging at 373rd St. is performed by the city of Federal Way in response to gravel deposition problems. The 27 acres above 373rd St. (top photo), known as the Spring Valley Ranch, was purchased by the Washington State Department of Transportation in 2004. Future restoration plans for this site are currently under discussion. For more information about Hylebos Creek, contact Friends of the Hylebos Wetlands at www.hylebos.org.

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES
2005 - 2006 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD AND BULL TROUT REPORT.

84

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

2005 HYLEBOS CREEK CHINOOK COUNTS
12 LIVE DEAD REDDS 10

8
NUMBER OBSEREVED

6

4

2

0 9/7/05 10/19/05
DAT E SURVEYED

10/27/05

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES
2005 - 2006 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD AND BULL TROUT REPORT.

85

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

HYLEBOS CREEK JUVENILE FALL CHINOOK PLANTS (2001 - 2005)
25,000 Fall Chinook

20,000

19,359

16,269 Number of fish planted 15,000

11,100 10,119 10,000

5,000

0 2001 2002 2003 Year Planted 2004 2005 2006

Fall Chinook Hatchery Production
Currently, the Puyallup Tribe releases between 10 to 20 thousand juvenile fall chinook into Hylebos Creek. Fish are planted in a large man-made pond located on the North Fork of the creek (See photo on previous page). Historically, fall chinook have been reared since 1980 with a variety of stocks, goals, and objectives.

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES
2005 - 2006 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD AND BULL TROUT REPORT.

86

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

IPSUT CREEK
WRIA: 10.0550 - CARBON RIVER 2005 - 2006

Ipsut creek looking downstream from the falls.

DESCRIPTION
Ipsut Creek is a moderate gradient left bank tributary to the Upper Carbon River. Ipsut is River miles surveyed: 0.0 to 0.7 pristine in many ways, it has approximately 0.7 miles Dates surveyed: NOT SURVEYED IN 2005 of anadromous habitat and is located entirely within Species surveyed: Chinook, Coho, Char Steelhead Mt. Rainier National Park. The riparian zone consists Access of old growth cedar, fir and hemlock which Mile 0.3: The Ipsut Creek campground is located contributes large amounts of woody debris and at the end of the road past the Carbon River entrance to Mt. Rainier National Park. A bridge diversity to the channel. There is a large falls located crosses the creek at the campground. at approximately RM 0.7, which is a barrier to any further upstream migration. Ipsut Creek campground is located along the lower stretch of the creek at RM 0.2. The Carbon River road bridge also Ipsut Creek looking upstream at the falls crosses the creek at the campground site. which is a barrier to any further upstream migration. Ipsut has been surveyed for chinook, coho, steelhead and char, yet no salmon or redds have been observed. However, Ipsut does host a population of cuthroat trout, as do many of the upper tributaries in the park. Reasons for the absence of anadromous fish are likely related to the stream’s location high within the basin, and the general lack of suitable spawning gravel. Much of the substrate within the lower fish accessible reach cosists of flat angular stones. Char usage has been documented by National Park Service biologists, but surveys conducted by PTF staff in 2000 and 2001 did not reveal any adult char spawning activity. Due to the creeks remote location, surveys are not conducted on a regular basis.

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES
2005 - 2006 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD AND BULL TROUT REPORT.

87

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

JOVITA CREEK
WRIA: 10.0033 - WHITE RIVER 2005 - 2006

Jovita Creek looking downstream towards Highway 167 from RM 0.2. River miles surveyed: 0.1 to 0.3 Dates surveyed: NOT SURVEYED IN 2005 Species surveyed: Coho, Chum

DESCRIPTION

Jovita Creek is a small urban stream flowing just West of Highway 167 and South of Pacific. Jovita Creek does not flow directly into the White River, Access yet rather it empties into a drainage ditch which Mile 0.2: Take the 8th Street exit off HYW. 167 travels along HYW. 167 South, for approximately and head West until the East Valley Highway. 3.4 miles until it reaches the White River. Chum There is a bridge crossing Jovita approximately 0.2 miles North of 8th Street. and coho have been observed in the past within the 0.2 mile survey segment of Jovita. However, the escapement numbers rarely warrants the effort to survey this creek with any regularity. Spot checks are made occasionally to determine if fish are present. In addition, much of the creek channel is difficult to observe due to the heavy growth of reed canary grass and salmonberry along its banks. The channel just above and below the East Valley bridge has little complexity and is moderately low gradient as well as somewhat incised. The riparian flora consists of reed canary grass, willow and alder, with a section of bamboo along a landowners property. There is some suitable spawning habitat for coho and chum, unfortunately most of the substrate is very compacted with large amounts of fine material and some smaller gravel. The creek passes through a culvert before reaching the drainage ditch. Above RM 0.3 the gradient increases as the creek runs along Jovita Blvd. for the next 0.6 miles, within this span the creek passes through three culverts where Jovita Blvd. intersects the creek channel.

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES
2005 - 2006 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD AND BULL TROUT REPORT.

88

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

KAPOWSIN CREEK
WRIA: 10.0600 - PUYALLUP RIVER
Chinook salmon spawning just upstream from the Orville Rd. bridge (2004).

2005 - 2006

DESCRIPTION
Kapowsin Creek originates from outlet of Kapowsin lake near Orville Rd, approximately 3.2 miles upstream from its confluence with the Puyallup River. The creek host several adult species including; chinook, coho, steelhead and occasionally a few chum. Chinook have not been observed beyond the top of Kapowsin Creek where it enters the lake. Significant numbers of coho, and occasionally a few steelhead move through Kapowsin lake into Ohop Creek to spawn. Many of the coho that spawn in Kapowsin are from the upper Puyallup acclimation ponds (Cowskull and Rushingwater) or are descendants of the netpen acclimation project in Kapowsin Lake. From 1993 River miles surveyed: 0.0 to 3.2 Dates surveyed: 8/22/05 to 6/13/06 to 1997, the Puyallup Tribe fisheries staff transported Species surveyed: Chinook, Coho,Steelhead juvenile coho from WDFW’s Voights Creek hatchery to four net-pens in Kapowsin lake to acclimate. Prior to Access this operation, few or no coho were observed in Mile 3.2: Take Hwy. 162 past Orting and turn right onto Orville Road (Crocker Kapowsin or Ohop Creeks. Grange). After crossing the Puyallup River, There is suitable spawning gravel throughout the continue another 4 miles to bridge. 3.2 mile survey reach of Kapowsin, although much of it is patchy in nature. An abundance of downed trees within the channel along with several sizable logjams creates complexity throughout most of the stream. Cattle have been allowed access to the stream channel at approximately RM 1.7. Homes and outbuilding are present within 20 to 40 feet of the banks along the creek between RM 0.5 and RM 2.0. Human-made rock structures, as well as sill logs, span the creek and alter the channel along this stretch. During the summer and fall when water levels are low, these structures often cause upstream migration issues for adult salmon. Most of the stream has a dense riparian zone consisting of firs, alders and salmonberries. Pierce County completed construction of the new Orville road bridge over the head of Kapowsin Creek in early 2006.

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES
2005 - 2006 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD AND BULL TROUT REPORT.

89

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

2005 KAPOWSIN CREEK CHINOOK COUNTS
LIVE 14 DEAD REDDS

12

10
NUMBER OBSERVED

8

6

4

2

0 8/22/05 8/30/05 9/8/05 9/16/05 9/26/05 10/7/05 10/13/05 10/24/05

DAT E SURVEYED

KAPOWSIN CREEK CHINOOK SEASON COMPARISONS (1993 - 2005)
60 LIVE DEAD 50 REDDS

NUMBER OBSERVED

28

30
26

36

22

26

38

40

17

20
17

19

20

15

15

17

20 12 8 5 7 10 4 5 4 2 3

10

10

9

7

10

4

4

0 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005
SEASON SURVEYED

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES
2005 - 2006 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD AND BULL TROUT REPORT.

2 2

2

12

90

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

2005 KAPOWSIN CREEK COHO COUNTS
250 LIVE DEAD

200

NUMBER OBSERVED

150

100

50

0 9/26/05 10/6/05 10/13/05 10/21/05 11/14/05 11/22/05 12/5/05 12/16/05

DAT E SURVEY ED

KAPOWSIN CREEK COHO SEASON COMPARISONS (1993 - 2005)
2500 LIVE DEAD
2023

REDDS

2000

NUMBER OBSERVED

1500

1000

521

491

446

498

410

319

210

265

140

153

268

368

500

442 439

139

110 136

121 11 75

115

29 93

129

138

446

55 31 34

62

46

33

0 1993 1994 1995

1996

1997

1998

1999
YEAR SURVEYED

18

2000

2001

2002

2003

21

2004

2005

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES
2005 - 2006 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD AND BULL TROUT REPORT.

77

91

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

KAPOWSIN CREEK COHO RUN TIMING (2002 - 2005)
900 2005 2004 800 2003 2002 700

NUMBER OF COHO OBSERVED

600

500

400

300

200

100

0 S ep t. 2 0 -3 0 O c t. 1 -1 0 O c t. 1 1 -2 0 O c t. 2 1 -3 1 N o v. 1 -1 0 N o v . 1 1 -2 0 N o v . 2 1 -3 0 D e c . 1 -1 0 D e c. 1 1 -2 0 D ec . 2 1 -3 1 DATE

KAPOWSIN CREEK COHO CARCASS SAMPLING (2002 - 2005)
500 450
439

CARCASSES SAM PLED CARCASS W ITH ADIPOSE FIN CLIP AND CW T (HATCHERY ORIGIN) CARCASS W ITH ADIPOSE FIN CLIP ONLY (HATCHERY ORIGIN) UNMARKED CARCASS (W ILD)

400 350
NUMBER OF ADULT COHO

300 250

277

200
145 138 113

150

100

77 44 17 21 3 18 2 23 25 9

50

0 2002 2003
SEASON SAMP LED

2004

2005

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES
2005 - 2006 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD AND BULL TROUT REPORT.

92

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

2006 KAPOWSIN CREEK STEELHEAD COUNTS
10 L IV E DEAD 9 REDDS

8

7

NUMBER OBSERVED

6

5

4

3

2

1

0 3 /21/06 4/4/06 4/13/06 4/2 4/0 6
D A TE SU R V EYED

5/5 /06

5 /17/06

6/12/06

KAPOWSIN CREEK STEELHEAD SEASON COMPARISONS (1995 - 2006)
20 STEELHEAD REDDS

18

16

14
NUMBER OBSERVED

12

11

10

9 8 8

8
6

6
4

4
2

3

2

1

0 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006
YEAR SURVEYED

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES
2005 - 2006 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD AND BULL TROUT REPORT.

93

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

KELLOG CREEK
WRIA: 10.0621 - PUYALLUP RIVER 2005 - 2006

Typical habitat found in the lower reach of Kellog Creek.

DESCRIPTION
Kellog Creek is a tributary to the upper Puyallup River, entering the Puyallup around RM 39.7. Anadromous usage extends from the mouth, up to RM 2.5 where the creek passes under the mainline road that runs through the Kapowsin tree farm (Hancock Forest Management). From the top of the survey at RM 2.5 to 1.6 the creek flows through a moderate gradient step-pool channel with patchy gravel. At River miles surveyed: 0.0 to 2.0/2.5 Dates surveyed: 3/15/06 to 5/11/06 approximately RM 0.9, the creek passes under PSE’s Species surveyed: Steelhead diversion flume. The riparian zone consists of a thin mature Access 2nd growth conifer buffer on both sides. There is a large Mile 2.0: The Kapowsin tree farm’s mainline crosses Kellog Creek at the 8 Rd. amount of wind-throw in the channel associated with this junction. To survey this reach and not buffer. Below this, the gradient eases and excellent spawning double walk you must cross the mainstem gravel is consistently available all the way to the confluence Puyallup at the Kellog confluence and with the Puyallup River. The point of convergence between walk downstream 0.5 miles and up 0.3 miles of LeDout Creek to the 62 Rd. Kellog Creek and the Puyallup River can change depending on the flow in the Puyallup. The Kellog Creek channel initially hits a side channel in the Puyallup River which is often dry. Kellog then flows down the Puyallup River side channel for approximately 0.5 miles before dumping into the main river channel. Steelhead and coho spawning activity is often seen in this stretch. The riparian area is more intact through the lower 1.5 miles, similar to above but no recent harvest activities have compromised it. Naturally returning coho were observed in Kellog Creek in 2004. These were the first natural spawners seen since adult and juvenile coho plants began in the upper Puyallup basin in 1997. Coho activity was observed as high as RM 1.4, whereas steelhead activity is often observed as high as RM 2.1. Due to the fact that Kellog Creek is downstream of the Electron diversion dam, and flows over the past century have often been high enough during late winter and spring to prevent the mainstem channel of the Puyallup River from being drawn dry, wild steelhead have continued to maintain a small foothold in Kellog.

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES
2005 - 2006 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD AND BULL TROUT REPORT.

94

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

2006 KELLOG CREEK STEELHEAD COUNTS
10 L IV E DEAD 9 REDDS

8

7

NUMBER OBSERVED

6

5

4

3

2

1

0 3 /15/06 3/2 8/0 6 4 /7/06
D ATE SU RVEYED

4/1 8/06

4/28/06

5 /11 /06

KELLOG CREEK STEELHEAD SEASON COMPARISONS (1995 - 2006)
35

STEELHEAD REDDS
31

30 27 25 25 22 NUMBER OBSERVED

20 17

15 13 12 10 10 10 10 10

6 5

0 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 SEASON SURVEYED

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES
2005 - 2006 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD AND BULL TROUT REPORT.

95

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

KLICKITAT CREEK
WRIA: 10.0357 - WHITE RIVER 2005 - 2006

Typical habitat throughout Klickitat Creek. The location in the photo is about 250 feet below the falls.

DESCRIPTION
Klickitat Creek is a small right bank tributary to the Upper White River. The creek is mainly surveyed for bull trout in September, although spot checks are made from October River miles surveyed: 0.1 to 0.3 through November for coho and pinks. However, the creeks Dates surveyed: 9/9/05 to 9/29/05 3300’ elevation is likely too high for most salmonids. Klickitat Species surveyed: Bull trout (Char) Creek is a phenomenal stream, originating from Ghost lake Access and surrounding runoff, it flows entirely within Mt. Rainier Mile 0.3: Turn onto the Sunrise rd off of HWY 410 in Mt. Rainier National National Park and is the source of drinking water for the Park. A bridge crosses Klickitat Creek NPS White River compound. Klickitat enters the White River in approximately 2 miles. north of Sunrise road at approximately RM 67.9. The creek is surrounded by old growth and is tempered by cold clean Bull trout (char) water year round. The only drawback is that there is only about 0.3 miles of anadromous usage. Klickitat provides exceptional habitat conditions for bull trout (char) and cutthroat rearing and spawning. The first 0.3 miles is low gradient with excellent spawning gravel and large amounts of LWD. Numerous deep pools and side channels provide excellent habitat for juvenile fish. A series of bedrock falls and cascades at RM 0.3 blocks any further upstream migration (right photo). Numerous surveys have been conducted above the falls; however, no fish or redds have been seen. Klickitat Creek has been surveyed since 1999, but no salmon or steelhead have been seen spawning in the creek. Bull trout from the mainstem White River are observed spawning in the creek early in the fall, and juvenile bull trout have been observed in the pools and lateral habitat during these surveys. During the 2002 through 2005 survey seasons, char floy tagged at the USACE trap in Buckley have been observed spawning in the creek. The char in the left photo were observed in 2004, the green floy tag is visible near the dorsal fin.

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES
2005 - 2006 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD AND BULL TROUT REPORT.

96

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

2005 KLICKITAT CREEK BULL TROUT COUNTS
10 9 LIVE DEAD REDDS

8 7
NUMBER OBSEREVED

6 5 4

3 2

1 0 9/9/05 9/16/05
DATE SURVEYED

9/21/05

9/29/05

KLICKITAT CREEK BULL TROUT SEASON COMPARISONS (2000 - 2005)
20
18

LIVE DEAD REDDS

18

16
14

14
NUMBER OBSERVED

12

11 10

10

8
6 5 4 3 5 4

7

6

4

4

2

1

0 2000 2001 2002
SEASON SURVEYED

2003

2004

2005

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES
2005 - 2006 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD AND BULL TROUT REPORT.

97

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

KLICKITAT CREEK BULL TROUT RUN TIMING 2001-2005
16 2001 2002 14 2003 2004 2005 12
NUMBER OF CHAR OBSERVED

10

8

6

4

2

0 Se pt 1-5 Se pt 6-10 Se pt 11-15
DAT E

Se pt 16-20

Se pt 21-25

Se pt 26-31

KLICKITAT CREEK WATER TEMPERATURE SEPTEMBER 2005
9 8.75 8.5 8.25 8 7.75 Temp (Celcius) 7.5 7.25 7 6.75 6.5 6.25 6 5.75 5.5 5.25 5
9/ 1/ 20 05 9/ 3/ 20 05 9/ 5/ 20 05 9/ 7/ 20 05 9/ 9/ 20 05 9/ 11 /2 00 5 9/ 13 /2 00 5 9/ 15 /2 00 5 9/ 17 /2 00 5 9/ 19 /2 00 5 9/ 21 /2 00 5 9/ 23 /2 00 5 9/ 25 /2 00 5 9/ 27 /2 00 5 9/ 29 /2 00 5

Bull Trout Spawning

Date

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES
2005 - 2006 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD AND BULL TROUT REPORT.

98

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

LEDOUT CREEK
WRIA: 10.0620 - PUYALLUP RIVER
The confluence of LeDout Creek and the Puyallup River. LeDout Creek runs along the left side of the photo, the

2005 - 2006

DESCRIPTION
LeDout Creek is a small tributary to the Upper Puyallup River, entering the main stem river channel at RM 39.2. This puts the mouth of LeDout River miles surveyed: 0.0 to 0.45 about 2.6 miles below the Electron diversion dam on the Dates surveyed: 3/15/06 to 5/11/06 Puyallup River. Since the creek is downstream of the Species surveyed: Steelhead Access Electron diversion dam, and river flows over the past century Mile 0.3: The 62 Rd. crosses LeDout have often been high enough during late winter and spring approximately 0.3 mile from the mouth. to prevent the mainstem channel of the Puyallup River from This stream is used a s a take out for the Kellog Creek survey. being drawn dry, wild steelhead have managed to maintain a small foothold in LeDout Creek. LeDout is a stream with moderate complexity, where limited numbers of coho and steelhead return to spawn each season. The substrate throughout most of LeDout consist of small and large cobble; yet, patches of good spawning gravels are frequent and the channel habitat consists mostly of low gradient pools and riffles. LeDout is often too shallow in late summer to allow chinook access to spawn. The creek contains a substantial The 62 Rd. crosses LeDout proportion of small and medium size woody debris, and the approximately surrounding riparian 0.45 miles from zone consist mostly of the mouth alder and Douglas fir. Although there has been logging activity near the creek in the past, a good buffer zone exist along the majority of the creek. A split in the channel and an increase in gradient at RM 0.45 often prevents adult fish from migrating further upstream. The 62 Rd. crosses LeDout Creek approximately 0.45 miles from its confluence with the Puyallup River (left photo).

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES
2005 - 2006 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD AND BULL TROUT REPORT.

99

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

LEDOUT CREEK COHO SEASON COMPARISONS (1999 - 2005)
30
27

LIVE DEAD REDDS

25

21

21

20
NUMBER OBSERVED

N O T S U R V E Y E D
2005

15

15

10
7 6 5 3 3 2 1

5

0 1999 2000 2001 2002
SEASON SURVEYED

2003

2004

LEDOUT CREEK STEELHEAD SEASON COMPARISONS (1995 - 2006)
12

STEELHEAD REDDS
10

10

8 NUMBER OBSERVED 8

8

6

4 4 3 2 2 1 1 2 2 3 3

0 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 SEASON SURVEY ED

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES
2005 - 2006 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD AND BULL TROUT REPORT.

100

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

MEADOW CREEK
WRIA: 10.0630 - PUYALLUP RIVER
Photo showing typical habitat in Meadow Creek. Abundant spawning gravel, wood, and canopy cover exist along the entire reach of the creek.

2005 - 2006

DESCRIPTION
Meadow Creek is a tributary to the Mowich River, entering the Mowich at RM 3.9. Meadow originates from Eunice Lake, deep within Mt. Rainier National Park. The creek flows through a high gradient, frequently confined channel for most of the its 4.6 mile length. Meadow Creek has one signifiRiver miles surveyed: 0.0 to 0.5 cant tributary, Hayden Creek, at RM 2.5. However, the Dates surveyed: April 21 lower mile of the creek has a low to moderate gradient, Species surveyed: Steelhead with a pool-riffle character, abundant spawning gravel, LWD, and riparian cover along the entire channel. Several pieces of LWD along with stable log jams have created remarkable stream complexity throughout the lower reach of the creek. Meadow Creek is pristine in may ways, but its location high in the watershed above the Electron diversion dam has prevented salmon and steelhead from accessing and utilizing this stream for over a century. The creek does; however, have a resident population of Old logging road bridge cutthroat trout. It is also suspected that char may be crossing present in the creek, since they are know to populate Meadow Creek the Mowich River, but no char have not been docuat RM 0.5. mented to date. Due to the absence of anadromous usage, Meadow Creek is only surveyed and snorkeled a couple times a year to determine if salmon or steelhead are repopulating the stream. Unfortunately, adult chinook and coho plants are not possible since there is no vehicle access within a half mile of the creek. Therefore, one of the Puyallup Tribes short term goals is to reintroduce chinook and possibly coho via remote site incubators (RSI). The obvious need for RSI’s is due to the limited accessibility to the creek. Upwards of 40,000 chinook and coho could be incubated and released into the creek annually; however, this has not been accomplished as of the printing of this report. Currently, there are no proposals for reintroducing steelhead into Meadow Creek or the Upper Puyallup system. Yet, the need for action is paramount due to the steeply declining stock of wild steelhead in the Puyallup Watershed.

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES
2005 - 2006 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD AND BULL TROUT REPORT.

101

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

MOWICH RIVER
WRIA: 10.0624 - PUYALLUP RIVER 2005 - 2006

DESCRIPTION

River miles surveyed: 0.0 to 6.0 The Mowich River converges with the Dates surveyed: 4/11/06 to 5/09/06 Puyallup River at RM 42.3, this is Species surveyed: Steelhead (None Observed) approximately 0.5 miles above the Electron Diversion Dam. The glacial headwaters of the Mowich River originate from the Edmunds, and the North and South Mowich glaciers on the west slope of Mt. Rainier. Significant tributaries to the Mowich include; Crater, Spray, Meadow and Rushingwater Creeks. The North and South Mowich forks flow though Mt. Rainier National Park and reach their confluence at RM 7.5 to form the main stem Mowich River. The upper 4-5 miles of the Mowich River consist of steep and moderate gradients, with a largely cobble and boulder substrate. There is little spawning habitat available, yet some suitable spawning conditions exists in the outlying side channels below RM 7.5. The active channels of the North and South Mowich are Looking dowstream bordered by large dense conifer at the mouth of the forests and mixed deciduous Mowich River. trees. From RM 6.5 to 3.1, the Mowich flows through the Snoqualmie National Forest where the river is comprised of more complex habitat. The gradient decreases along this

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES
2005 - 2006 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD AND BULL TROUT REPORT.

102

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED
reach, resulting in a more pool-riffle character where smaller spawning substrate is deposited and resting pools are available for upstream migrants. The lower three mile of the river flows through the Kapowsin tree farm (Hancock Forest Management). Most of the lower three miles of the channel becomes confined and narrowed by the steepening valley walls. Fotunately, much of the channel retains its complexity and spawning opportunities are abundant for both salmon and steelhead. Juvenile coho have been observed as high as RM 5.0, whereas adult and juvenile char have been documented as high as RM 7.5. Of special note is the first documented spawning of naturally returning chinook in the Mowich River in 97 years. Two females on separate redds were observed spawning in the lower reach (RM 1.0) on September 7, 2001. With the completion of the Electron Fish Ladder (RM 41.7) in the fall of 2000, anadromous fish passage was restored for the first time since 1904. Surplus chinook and coho salmon from Voights Creek Live adult Hatchery have been planted in the Mowich River (center left), coho plant. and Rushingwater Creek (see graph on following page) for the past several years in efforts to jump start the Upper Puyallup. One of two acclimation ponds used for reintroducing coho into a 30-mile reach of the Upper Puyallup River is located just off the main channel of Rushingwater Creek at RM 0.6. The pond holds 14,000 cu. ft. of water with a flow rate of 1-3 cfs., currently 40,000 to 100,000+ coho yearlings are imprinted and released from Rushingwater annually. Coho yearlings originate from Voights Creek Hatchery where they are adipose clipped and coded wire tagged. Fish are released at 20 fish per pound, for a total biomass of 10,000 pounds.There is also a natural acclimation pond on the Mowich (bottom) used for rearing fall chinook, located at RM 0.1. The Puyallup Tribe’s restoration goal is to rebuild depressed chinook stocks and remove them from ESA listing. Historically, fall chinook have been reared since 1980 with a variety of stocks, goals, and objectives. Using acclimation ponds, limiting harvest, and making substantial gains in habitat restoration, the tribe will be able to accomplish this task. Levee setbacks, oxbow reconnections both inter tidal and upland, Commencement Bay cleanup, and harvest cutbacks have already been initiated. Only the jump-starting of chinook in habitat areas devoid of fish is left. Acclimation ponds are a proven method in increasing fish numbers Natural acclimation pond used on the spawning grounds. for rearing fall chinook, located at RM 0.1. Acclimation ponds Hatchery rearing 200,000 are a proven method in increasing fish numbers on the fall chinook for spawning grounds. Hatchery acclimation ponds in the rearing 200,000 fall chinook for upper Puyallup River is a acclimation ponds in the upper Puyallup river is a key key components to commponent to restoration restoration goals.
goals.

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES
2005 - 2006 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD AND BULL TROUT REPORT.

103

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

ADULT CHINOOK AND COHO SURPLUS PLANTS IN MOWICH RIVER (1997 - 2005)
600

MALE COHO FEMALE COHO

500

490

MALE CHINOOK FEMALE CHINOOK

NUMBER OF FISH PLANTED

400
325 345

264

261 100 100

200

100

25

25

220

222

260 24

300

0 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001
YEAR PLANTED

2002

2003

21

2004

2005

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES
2005 - 2006 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD AND BULL TROUT REPORT.

104

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

NIESSON CREEK
WRIA: 10.0622 - PUYALLUP RIVER 2005 - 2006

Typical habitat in Niesson Creek. This photo was taken looking upstream at approximately RM 1.8.

DESCRIPTION
Niesson Creek is a tributary to the Upper Puyallup River. This medium sized stream varies between pool-riffle and forced pool-riffle in character and contains excellent spawning gravel throughout the 2.5 mile survey section. The riparian zone consists of conifers and alders with moderate amounts of large woody debris. Continued timber harvest activities have reduced the riparian zone to the state required minimum along several extended reaches of the lower creek. River miles surveyed: 0.0 to 2.5 This stream is only surveyed consistently for steelhead Dates surveyed: 3/15/06 to 5/11/06 Species surveyed: Steelhead and coho. Steelhead have been observed spawning as high Access as RM 2.2 near the abandoned 22 Rd. Naturally returning Mile 1.8: The Kapowsin tree farm’s 2 coho were observed for the first time in 2002. The natural rd. crosses Niesson Creek near Moose returns are a result of live adult plantings and juvenile Junction. Mile 2.2: A short distance past the 2 rd. acclimation projects conducted by Puyallup Tribal Fisheries bridge, the 21 rd turns to the right and Department. Puyallup Tribal again crosses Niesson in 0.2 miles. Fisheries staff have been transporting Niesson Creek at approximately live surplus adult coho from the RM 2.3. Voights Creek Hatchery since 1998; however, no fish were planted in 2004. Instead, naturally retuning adult coho were allowed to spawn without intervention from hatchery planted coho. Future live plants may be reduced or eliminated based on the number of naturally returning spawners. Like Kellog and Ledout Creek, Niesson Creek is just downstream of the Electron Diversion Dam. Flows over the past century have often been high enough during late winter and spring to prevent the mainstem channel of the Puyallup River from being drawn dry. The winter/spring flows have allowed wild steelhead to maintain a foothold in Niesson Creek. Unfortunately, escapement in Niesson has decreased significantly over the past couple of years.

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES
2005 - 2006 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD AND BULL TROUT REPORT.

105