WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

NIESSON CREEK
WRIA: 10.0622 - PUYALLUP RIVER 2005 - 2006

Typical habitat in Niesson Creek. This photo was taken looking upstream at approximately RM 1.8.

DESCRIPTION
Niesson Creek is a tributary to the Upper Puyallup River. This medium sized stream varies between pool-riffle and forced pool-riffle in character and contains excellent spawning gravel throughout the 2.5 mile survey section. The riparian zone consists of conifers and alders with moderate amounts of large woody debris. Continued timber harvest activities have reduced the riparian zone to the state required minimum along several extended reaches of the lower creek. River miles surveyed: 0.0 to 2.5 This stream is only surveyed consistently for steelhead Dates surveyed: 3/15/06 to 5/11/06 Species surveyed: Steelhead and coho. Steelhead have been observed spawning as high Access as RM 2.2 near the abandoned 22 Rd. Naturally returning Mile 1.8: The Kapowsin tree farm’s 2 coho were observed for the first time in 2002. The natural rd. crosses Niesson Creek near Moose returns are a result of live adult plantings and juvenile Junction. Mile 2.2: A short distance past the 2 rd. acclimation projects conducted by Puyallup Tribal Fisheries bridge, the 21 rd turns to the right and Department. Puyallup Tribal again crosses Niesson in 0.2 miles. Fisheries staff have been transporting Niesson Creek at approximately live surplus adult coho from the RM 2.3. Voights Creek Hatchery since 1998; however, no fish were planted in 2004. Instead, naturally retuning adult coho were allowed to spawn without intervention from hatchery planted coho. Future live plants may be reduced or eliminated based on the number of naturally returning spawners. Like Kellog and Ledout Creek, Niesson Creek is just downstream of the Electron Diversion Dam. Flows over the past century have often been high enough during late winter and spring to prevent the mainstem channel of the Puyallup River from being drawn dry. The winter/spring flows have allowed wild steelhead to maintain a foothold in Niesson Creek. Unfortunately, escapement in Niesson has decreased significantly over the past couple of years.

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES
2005 - 2006 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD AND BULL TROUT REPORT.

105

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

SURPLUS ADULT COHO PLANTS IN NIESSON CREEK (1998 - 2005)
500

Live adult surplus plants from WDFW Voights Creek hatchery.
MALE COHO
455

450

FEMALE COHO

400

350
NUMBER OF FISH PLANTED 299 261 257 236 188 188 243

300

250

150

100
76 74 64

0 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005
YEAR PLANTED

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES
2005 - 2006 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD AND BULL TROUT REPORT.

36

50

164

171

200

106

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

2006 NIESSON CREEK STEELHEAD COUNTS
10 L IV E DEAD 9 REDDS

8

7

NUMBER OBSERVED

6

5

4

3

2

1

0 3/15/06 3/28/06 4/7/06
DATE SURVEYED

4/18/06

4/28/06

5/11 /06

NIESSON CREEK STEELHEAD SEASON COMPARISONS (1995 - 2006)
60

STEELHEAD REDDS

50

49 45

49

40 NUMBER OBSERVED

37

30

29 27

22 20

17 14

16

15

10

9

0 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 YEAR SURVEYED

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES
2005 - 2006 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD AND BULL TROUT REPORT.

107

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

NO NAME CREEK
WRIA: 10.0364 - WHITE RIVER 2005-2006

Typical habitat found in the upper extent of No Name Creek.

Officially unnamed, this creek is referred to as No Name Creek (10.0364) by PTF staff, the NPS designation is W14-00a. No Name Creek is a small River miles surveyed: 0.0 to 0.71 left bank tributary to the upper White River and is Dates surveyed: 9/6/05 to 9/23/05 primarily surveyed for bull trout in September. However, Species surveyed: Bull Trout (Char) the creeks 3300’ elevation is likely too high for chinook, coho and pink salmon. No Name Creek, like Klickitat Creek, is pristine in many ways. Originating from slopes of the Sourdough Mountains near Sunrise Park, it flows entirely within Mt. Rainier National Park. No Name Creek enters the White River north of Sunrise road at approximately RM 68.1. No Name Creek provides exceptional habitat conditions for bull trout (char) rearing and spawning. The first 0.34 miles of the creek is low gradient and flows within the active White River channel (bottom). The habitat within this section is not conducive to spawning due to a primarily sandy substrate, however, pools and side channels provide excellent habitat for juvenile bull trout which are often observed in the pools and lateral habitat during adult spawning surveys. The next .12 miles flows through the edge of the forested area along the White River channel. At this point the channel gradient increases slightly, as well as, adult spawning opportunities. Although the substrate throughout this section is predominately sand, several pockets of suitable spawning gravel exist. Stream complexity increases due to some small debris jams and limited LWD. The surrounding riparian consists of primarily alder with some small to moderate sized Douglas Fir, although, solar exposure is still high through this portion of the creek. The final quarter mile of anadromous usage contains the best habitat. The channel contains several pieces of LWD and spawning gravels, as well as a heavy riparian zone consisting of fir and cedar. At approximately RM .71 the creek turns sharply and climbs up the valley wall preventing any further upstream migration. Bull trout have been observed spawning in the creek early in the fall, and juvenile bull trout have been observed in the pools and lateral habitat during these surveys (right).

DESCRIPTION

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES
2005 - 2006 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD AND BULL TROUT REPORT.

108

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

2005 NONAME CREEK BULL TROUT COUNTS
10 9 LIVE DEAD REDDS

8 7
NUMBER OBSERVED

6 5

4 3 2

1 0 9/9/05 9/16/05
DATE SURVEYED

9/21/05

9/29/05

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES
2005 - 2006 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD AND BULL TROUT REPORT.

109

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

OHOP CREEK
WRIA: 10.0600 - PUYALLUP RIVER 2005 - 2006

Several excellent spawning opportunities exist in the lower reach of Ohop.

DESCRIPTION
Ohop Creek is the main feeder steam to Lake Kapowsin. Ohop and Kapowsin Creek have the same WRIA designation (10.0600). Approximately the first 0.2 miles of Ohop Creek flows through a heavily vegetated (mostly reed canary grass), narrow and incised zone as it enters Lake Kapowsin. The lower surveyed section of the creek from RM 6.5 (Lake Kapowsin) to RM 7.0 is a low gradient pool-riffle system. This portion contains excellent spawning gravel, as well as several deep pools and moderate amounts of in-stream woody debris. The channel meanders and several small side channels fork out along the lower half mile. Cattle occasionally have access to the creek, but they have hade negligible impact. The overstory riparian consisting of cedar, fir, alder and maple is fairly dense along much of the lower 1.5 miles. The upper reaches of Ohop Creek extend well into the Kapowsin tree farm (Hancock Forest Resource Group) where logging roads and timber harvesting have impacted several portions of the stream. Coho are the only species surveyed for on a Upper consistent basis. Steelhead surveys have been reach of reduced to periodic spot checks during the the survey, spring since none have been observed for increased gradient several years. Chinook salmon have not and fewer been observed in Ohop Creek. Observations spawning made in Kapowsin Creek are often used to opportunities are determine the survey approach for Ohop.
available.

River miles surveyed: 6.5 to 7.5 Dates surveyed: 11/14/05 to 12/16/05 Species surveyed: Coho Access Mile 7.0: At the intersection of Orville Rd. and Kapowsin Hwy. follow Orville road for approximately two miles to a small turnout on the left. Follow the trail to the creek. The upper 0.5 miles must be double walked but it is possible to drop in just above RM 6.5 by crossing the railroad tracks and following a rough trail to the creek.

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES
2005 - 2006 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD AND BULL TROUT REPORT.

110

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

2005 OHOP CREEK COHO COUNTS
50 45 40 35
NUMBER OBSERVED

LIVE DEAD

30 25 20 15 10

5 0 11/14/05 11/22/05
DAT E SURVEY ED

12/5/05

12/16/05

OHOP CREEK COHO SEASON COMPARISONS (1995 - 2005)
600
537

LIVE DEAD REDDS

500

400
NUMBER OBSERVED

488

300

200
130 141 100 96

219

295

114

314

71

76

100

91

88

92

54

34

33

31

39

25

29

19

31

61 13 4 6

0 1995 1996 1997 1998

1999

2000
YEAR SURVEYED

2001

2002

2003

4

2004

9

2005

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES
2005 - 2006 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD AND BULL TROUT REPORT.

15

111

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

PINOCHLE CREEK
WRIA: 10.0198 - WHITE RIVER
Coho holding in a large resting pool in Pinochle Creek (RM 0.2).

2005 - 2006

DESCRIPTION
Pinochle Creek is a moderate sized tributary to the West Fork White River, located on the left bank at RM 6.8. Coho are the most abundant and common species observed in Pinochle Creek. Chinook, River miles surveyed: 0.0 to 0.5 pink (odd years) and sockeye salmon are also observed, Dates surveyed: 8/17/05 to 11/16/05 yet in relatively low abundance. A bedrock falls about 0.3 Species surveyed: Chinook, Coho, Pink miles upstream of the bridge over Pinochle Creek that Access Mile 0.4: Approximately 0.25 miles past blocks further upstream migration (lower right). Below the West fork of the White River bridge on this obstruction, to its confluence with the West fork of the Forest Service 74 Rd. there is a spur the White River, there exists excellent spawning and road to the right. This road crosses rearing habitat. The channel is low gradient, unconfined, Pinochle Creek. and pool-riffle in character with abundant woody debris from the surrounding old-growth forest. Wrong Creek and Cripple Creek are two small tributaries to Pinochle, entering near RM 0.2. Pinochle is generally only surveyed for chinook salmon, but this years report includes some coho observations. Large numbers of coho are observed each season holding in two large pools just below the confluence with Cripple and Wrong Creeks. Many of these coho will ascend Cripple and Wrong a couple of weeks after entering Pinochle. All adult salmon and steelhead that spawn in Pinochle Creek were captured at the USACE fish trap in Buckley, and transported above Mud Mountain dam. Since precise escapement numbers for the upper White River drainage are known, surveys are conducted to determine fish distribution and spawning success. There is an acclimation pond on nearby Cripple Creek and returning chinook are likely the result of this enhancement program. Much of the spawning activity takes Anadromous blockage place in the lower 0.2 miles of this stream located on Pinochle Creek at approximately which runs within the West Fork White’s RM 0.8 floodplain.

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES
2005 - 2006 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD AND BULL TROUT REPORT.

112

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

PINOCHLE CREEK CHINOOK COUNTS (2000 - 2005)
5 LIVE

4

Upper White River surveys show distribution, actual escapement totals are known from the USACE Buckley trap counts.

DEAD REDDS

4

3
NUMBER OBSERVED

3

2

2

1

1

0 8/17/05 8/30/05 9/9/05
DAT E SURVEYED

9/19/05

9/28/05

10/7/05

PINOCHLE CREEK CHINOOK SEASON COMPARISONS (1999 - 2005)
60
56

LIVE DEAD REDDS

50

48

40
NUMBER OBSERVED

30

30

20
15

10
3 1

7 4 2 2 1 2 1 2 4 1 2

0 1999 2000 2001 2002
SEASON SURVEY ED

2003

2004

2005

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES
2005 - 2006 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD AND BULL TROUT REPORT.

113

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

PINOCHLE CREEK COHO COUNTS (2000 - 2005)
100 90

Upper White River surveys show distribution, actual escapement totals are known from the USACE Buckley trap counts.

L IV E DEAD

80

70

NUMBER OBSERVED

60

50

40

30

20

10

0 9/19/05 9/28/05 10/7/05 10/17 /05
D ATE SU RV EYED

10/26/05

11/8/05

11/16/05

PINOCHLE CREEK COHO SEASON COMPARISONS (2000 - 2005)
400
LIVE DEAD REDDS

350

334

300

NUMBER OBSERVED

250

200
171

150
121

100

96

50
2 1 1 2 7 10

33 2

0 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005

SEASON SURVEYED

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES
2005 - 2006 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD AND BULL TROUT REPORT.

114

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

PUYALLUP RIVER
WRIA: 10.0021 - PUYALLUP RIVER 2005 - 2006

DESCRIPTION
The lowest section of the Puyallup River, from the confluence with the White River at RM 10.4 to Commencement Bay is confined by levees and the habitat lacks complexity. The small amount of suitable gravel present is often compacted and offers little spawning opportunity. Steelhead have been observed spawning just upstream from the White River confluence; the lowest documented spawning of any species in the river. From the White River to the confluence with the Carbon River at RM 17.4 and upstream to about RM 23 just above the town of Orting, the river is still tightly confined by levees on both sides with the expected lack of channel complexity. This reach is similar to the lower Puyallup but does The North support sporadic spawning by chum, Fork of the chinook and steelhead during their Puyallup respective seasons. Along Orville Rd., River. upstream of Orting, a levee setback project was completed in the summer of 1999. Approximately 2 miles of new levee was built back from the original levee adding over a hundred acres to the floodplain in this reach. Several high water events later, many side channels have formed and spawning gravel has been retained but no adult use has been documented. From RM 25.5 to 30.8 the channel is only partially

River miles surveyed: 10.5 to 45.7 Dates surveyed: LIMITED SURVYES Species surveyed: Steelhead, Chinook

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES
2005 - 2006 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD AND BULL TROUT REPORT.

115

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED
contained by levees and there are several setback accessable side channels. There is little project at RM 26.5. spawning activity within this reach due to New Levee the higher gradient and resulting increase can be in average substrate size. seen near Upstream from Puget Sound Energy’s county Electron powerhouse at RM 30.8 the river road and remnants flows through a deep, narrow canyon of old (center photo). There are many small levee are vertical drops and bedrock cascades within visible in this 6 mile canyon, all of which are the stream channel. passable to salmon and steelhead. There is frequent spawning opportunities in the tailouts of the many deep pools within this reach. From RM 41.3 downstream to the top of the canyon the river is moderately confined and provides several high quality spawning opportunities. The highest densities of steelhead spawning in the Puyallup River occur within this reach. With the completion of the Electron Fish Ladder (RM 41.7) in the fall of 2000, anadromous fish passage was restored for the first time since 1904. There are approximately 26+ miles of usable habitat Puyallup River canyon approximately RM 31. There above the diversion are many small vertical drops and bedrock cascades and surveys are within this 6 mile canyon, all of which are passable conducted to salmon and steelhead. There is frequent spawning opportunities in the tailouts of the many deep pools occasionally in
within this reach.

Levee

response to the Puyallup Tribes live surplus hauls each fall.

Planting adult surplus coho in the North Fork of the Puyallup River (2003).

Puyallup River approximately RM 40.

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES
2005 - 2006 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD AND BULL TROUT REPORT.

116

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

2006 UPPER PUYALLUP RIVER STEELHEAD COUNTS RIVER MILES 36 - 41.7
15 14 13 12 11 10
NUMBER OBSERVED 10 9

LIVE DEAD

High flows and poor visibility prevented any surveys after May 11.

REDDS

9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0
0 3 6 5

3/15/06

3/28/06

4/7/06
DAT E SURVEYED

4/18/06

4/28/06

5/11/06

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES
2005 - 2006 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD AND BULL TROUT REPORT.

117

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

Puyallup River Juvenile Salmonid Production Assessment Project 2005
Andrew Berger & Kristin Williamson
DESCRIPTION
In 2000, the Puyallup Tribal Fisheries Department started the Puyallup River Smolt Production Assessment Project to estimate juvenile production of native salmonids, with an emphasis on natural fall chinook salmon production and survival of hatchery and acclimation pond chinook. Since 2000, an E. G. Solutions’ 5-ft diameter rotary screw trap located on the lower Puyallup at RM 10.6, just upstream of the confluence with the White River, has been used to estimate juvenile production. As more data becomes available, juvenile production estimates may provide baseline information allowing managers to meet escapement objectives in the watershed, create a production

The rotary screw-trap used in this study consists of a rotary cone suspended within a steel structure on top of twin, 30-foot pontoons. The opening of the rotary cone is 5 feet in diameter, allowing for a sampling depth of 2.5 feet. The cone and livebox assembly are attached to a steel frame and may be raised or lowered by hand winches located at the front and rear of the assembly.

potential-based management strategy and accurately forecast future returns of hatchery and naturally produced adults. In addition, a basin spawner/recruit analysis will indicate stock productivity, helping to determine the overall health of the watershed and evaluate the contribution of enhancement projects. Trapping Gear and Operations The rotary screw-trap used in this study consists of a rotary cone suspended within a steel structure on top of twin, 30-foot pontoons. The opening of the rotary cone is 5 feet in diameter, allowing for a sampling depth of 2.5 feet. The cone and livebox assembly are attached to a steel frame and may be raised or lowered by hand winches located at the front and rear of the assembly. Two five-ton bow-mounted anchor winches with 3/8’’ steel cables were used to secure and adjust the direction of the trap and keep it in the thalweg. The Since 2000, an E. G. Solutions’ 5-ft diameter cables were secured to trees on opposite banks. An rotary screw trap located on the lower Puyallup additional rear cable was secured to a tree on the River at RM 10.6, just upstream of the confluence with the White River, has been used right bank along with an aluminum “stiff-arm” to
to estimate juvenile production.

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES
2005 - 2006 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD AND BULL TROUT REPORT.

118

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED
further stabilize the trap. Four 55-gallon containers filled with water were secured on the deck at the rear of the trap to compensate for the generation of force at the front of the trap during operation. The 5-ft diameter rotary screw trap was installed in the lower Puyallup River (R.M. 10.6) just above the confluence with the White River. Trap operation began on February 26th at 1130 and continued 24 hours a day, seven days a week until August 16th at 0730. The trap was checked for fish twice a day at dawn and dusk. In some instances, the trap was checked plus or minus two hours of dusk or dawn due to the availability of personnel. During hatchery releases and high flow events, personnel remained onsite through the night to clear the trap of debris and to keep fish from overcrowding. Revolutions per minute (rpm), water temperature, secchi depth(cm), turbidity (NTU), weather conditions, and stream flow (cfs) were described for each completed trap check. A cross sectional area of the river at the smolt trap was taken to monitor channel morphology at the site.

The trap was checked for fish twice a day at dawn and dusk. In some instances, the trap was checked plus or minus two hours of dusk or dawn due to the availability of personnel.

GOALS AND OBJECTIVES The goal of this project is to report production estimates, characterize juvenile migration timing, describe length distribution for all wild salmonid, out-migrants and fulfill the objectives of the Puyallup River fall chinook recovery plan. To reach these goals, this study will produce population estimates of out-migrating smolts, estimate species specific migration timing, compare natural versus hatchery production and run timing, analyze mean fork length of wild smolts and detail species composition of the sample population. The objectives of this project are to: 1. Estimate juvenile production for all salmonids in the Puyallup River and determine freshwater survival for unmarked juvenile chinook. 2. Estimate in-river mortality of hatchery and acclimation pond chinook. 3. Investigate physical factors such as, light (day vs.night), flow and turbidity and their importance to trap efficiency. In this report for the 2005 smolt out-migration season all stated objectives will be met for chinook salmon. Non-target species such as coho, pink, chum and steelhead will be addressed to a lesser extent. Sampling Procedures Smolts were anesthetized with MS-222 (tricaine methanesulfonate) for handling purposes and subsequently placed in a recovery bin of river water before release back to the river. Juveniles were

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES
2005 - 2006 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD AND BULL TROUT REPORT.

119

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED
identified as natural or hatchery origin as unmarked or marked respectively. Fork length (mm) was measured and recorded for unmarked fish. When possible, 50 chum, 50 pinks, 50 age1+ coho, 25 age 0+ coho, 25 age 0+ chinook, and 25 steelhead were measured per day. Scale samples were additionally taken on all wild steelhead smolts. Species were separated by size/age class. Coho were identified as fry, age 0+ (<70mm) or smolts, age 1+ (>70mm). Chinook smolts were separated by age 0+ (<150mm) or age 1+ (>150mm). All chum and pinks were identified as age 0+. Trout fry age 0+ (<60mm) were not differentiated to species. Hatchery origin fish were identified in three ways: 1) by visual inspection for adipose fin clips, 2) with a Northwest Marine Technology “wand” detector used for coded wire tag detection, and 3) with a Destron Fearing Portable Transceiver system for Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tagged fish. To receive a full copy of the 2005 report, contact the Puyallup Tribal Fisheries Department. Summary of Results For the 2005 migration season production estimates were completed for chinook, coho, steelhead and chum migrants. Natural chinook production was estimated at 62,933 migrants from a catch of 911 unmarked chinook. outmigration occurred between March 5st and July 22th, with a median migration date on May 30th. Chum production was estimated at 224,870 migrants passing the trap in 2005 from a catch of 2,586 chum fry. Chum outmigration progressed steadily for a three month period between March 6nd and June 2nd. A total of 1,160 wild coho smolts were captured in the screw trap between March 3th and July 9rd. Migration, as reflected by catch was unimodal with a median migration date on May 10th. Production estimates for wild coho for the 2005 smolt trap season was 55,972. Only 77 unmarked steelhead were caught in the smolt trap between March 28th and June 27nd. No production estimates were completed for steelhead migrants.

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES
2005 - 2006 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD AND BULL TROUT REPORT.

120

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

RANGER CREEK
WRIA: 10.0530 - CARBON RIVER 2005 - 2006
Ranger Creek looking upstream from the confluence with the Carbon River .

DESCRIPTION
Ranger Creek is a small left bank tributary of the Upper Carbon River. Ranger is an excellent salmonid stream in many ways, it has approximately 0.5 miles of anadromous habitat and is located entirely within Mt. Rainier National Park. The riparian zone consists of old growth cedar, fir and hemlock which contributes essential woody debris and diversity to the channel. The lower 0.4 miles are low gradient with several deep pools, small but plentiful gravel exists throughout the reach. Above 0.4 miles the gradient i n c r e a s e s significantly. The Carbon River road crosses the creek at approximately RM 0.35. The creek passes through a large culvert under the road bridge (right). The fall of 2000 was the first year any salmon spawning surveys were conducted and none were observed. Several redds were observed early in the spawning season but their small size and timing matched the char spawning documented in other headwater tributaries in the watershed. Due to the creeks remote location, surveys are not conducted on a regular basis.

River miles surveyed: 0.0 to 0.4 Dates surveyed: NOT SURVEYED IN 2005 Species surveyed: Chinook, Coho, Char Access Mile 0.1: The Carbon River road in Mount Rainier National Park crosses Ranger below the Ipsut Creek campground.

The lower 0.4 miles are very low gradient with several deep pools and small but plentiful gravel throughout the reach.

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES
2005 - 2006 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD AND BULL TROUT REPORT.

121

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

RODY CREEK
WRIA: 10.0028 - PUYALLUP RIVER 2005 - 2006
Rody Creek looking down stream from Pioneer Way.

DESCRIPTION
Rody Creek passes under Pioneer Way E. through a small, yet fish passable culvert at RM 0.5. Approximately 20 feet above the culvert the gradient increases considerably and the habitat is not conducive to spawning. A half mile downstream of Pioneer, Rody Creek dumps into Clarks Creek. There are several limiting factors to River miles surveyed: 0.4 to 0.5 salmon production in the lower half mile of Dates surveyed: 11/22/05 to 2/3/06 Rody Creek. Downstream of Pioneer, Rody Species surveyed: Chum flows through a channel that is best described Access as an incised and directed drainage ditch Mile 0.4: Pioneer Avenue crosses Rody Creek a short distance above it’s confluence with Clarks Creek. (bottom right), more than a natural channel. The habitat quality throughout most of Rody Creek is poor; much of the accessible channel has no gravel, and the riparian consist almost entirely of blackberry, turf grass, and reed canary grass. The reed canary grass is so overwhelming that it usually choke extended lengths of the channel, often trapping or preventing fish from migrating through. The channel becomes surveyable generally after the first freshet of the season. However, chum salmon are often Chum salmon spawning in Rody Creek observed spawning in the stream when the channel clears. Several chum spawn each season in a section of available habitat just below Pioneer. A extremely high water event in the January of 2006, redistributed a large quantity of gravel throughout the channel for approximately 300 feet just below Pioneer. A few coho are occasionally observed in the creek as well.

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES
2005 - 2006 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD AND BULL TROUT REPORT.

122

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

2005 RODY CREEK CHUM COUNTS
18 L IV E DEAD 16

14

12
NUMBER OBSERVED

10

8

6

4

2

0 11/22/05 12/1/05 12/12/0 5 1 2/22/05
D ATE SURVEYED

1/3/06

1/20/06

2/3/06

RODY CREEK CHUM SEASON COMPARISONS ( 1999 - 2005)
180 AUC: ESCAPEMENT ESTIMATE LIVE 160
155

DEAD

140

120
NUMBER OBSERVED

100
81

94

80

73

60 39
31

40

36
28 20 19

20 4 0 1999 2000 2001 2002
SEASON SURVEYED

8

2003

2004

2005

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES
2005 - 2006 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD AND BULL TROUT REPORT.

123

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

RUSHINGWATER CREEK
WRIA: 10.0625 - PUYALLUP RIVER
Lower reach of Rushingwater Creek (RM 0.3)

2005 - 2006

Rushingwater Creek originates from the Golden Lakes in Mt. Rainier National Park. Rushingwater flows over 5 miles to its confluence with the Mowich River at RM 0.6. Most of Rushingwater flows within the Rainier Timber - Kapowsin tree farm (Hancock Forest Resource Group), Upper reach of where roads and timber harvesting have impacted several portions of Rushingwater Creek (RM 3.1). the stream. The upper survey reach of the creek is mostly comprised of pools and glides, with fine and medium sized substrate. Abundant in-stream woody debris and a moderate to dense canopy cover extends through most of this reach. A considerable amount of beaver activity and structures are present in the upper reach, above RM 3.0, and lower down around RM 1.5. The lower reach (1.0 mile) of the creek consist of a more complex riffle - pool complex. The substrate is considerably larger, consisting of large gravel, cobble and boulders. Several windblown trees span the channel at RM 0.5. One of two acclimation ponds used for reintroducing coho into a 30-mile reach of the Upper Puyallup River is located just off the main channel of Rushingwater at RM 0.6. The pond holds 14,000 cu. ft. of water with a flow rate of 1-3 cfs., currently 40,000 to 100,000+ coho yearlings are imprinted and released from Rushingwater annually. Coho yearlings originate from Voights Creek Hatchery where they are adipose clipped and coded wire tagged (right photo). Fish are released at 20 fish per pound, for a total biomass of 10,000 pounds. In addition to the acclimation of juvenile coho, adult surplus coho and chinook from Voights Creek Hatchery have been planted in Rushingwater since 1997. Limited surveys were conducted in the past to determine how successful the adult plants were. However, no fish were planted in 2004. Instead, the first naturally retuning adult coho were allowed to spawn without intervention from hatchery planted coho. Future live plants may be reduced or eliminated based on the number of naturally returning spawners.

DESCRIPTION

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES
2005 - 2006 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD AND BULL TROUT REPORT.

124

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

RUSHINGWATER CREEK ADULT COHO PLANTS (1997 - 2005)
600 M ALE COHO FEM ALE COHO 500
486 312 371 237 169 170 177 127 119 50

NUMBER OF FISH PLANTED

400

300
259

200

100
50

0 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001
Y EAR P LAN T ED

106

2002

2003

124

2004

2005

RUSHINGWATER CREEK ACCLIMATION POND CHINOOK AND COHO PLANTS (1999 - 2006)
160,000
149,970

COHO CHINOOK

140,000

101,400

100,350

NUMBER OF FISH PLANTED

100,000

100,400

104,500

120,000

80,000
56,053

60,000

38,093

84,000

40,000

20,000

0 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003
YEAR P LANT ED

The 2006 coho were released from Rushingwater Creek pond on May 30.

2004

39,935

2005

2006

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES
2005 - 2006 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD AND BULL TROUT REPORT.

125

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

SALMON CREEK
WRIA: 10.0035 - WHITE RIVER 2005 - 2006

Lower Salmon Creek, looking upstream about 100 feet up from the mouth.

DESCRIPTION
Salmon Creek, also known as Strawberry Creek, runs just north of downtown Sumner. The creek channel is narrow and incised, especially along the lower 0.3 miles. Most of the creek flows River miles surveyed: 0.4 to 0.5 Dates surveyed: 10/14/05to1/23/06 through moderately developed private and commercial Species surveyed: Chinook, Coho properties before entering the White River at RM 2.1. In Chum 2004, the City of Sumner completed a large wetland Access Mile 0.3: 4309 East Valley Highway restoration project on Salmon Creek. The 11 acre site was crosses Salmon Creek. Salmon Creek the result of a mitigation settlement with Davis Properties is also referred to as Strawberry Creek. and Fred Myers. The riparian along portions of the creek Check-in with Sumner RV before consist of sparse stands of alder, fir and maple. However, surveys are conducted. large portions of the stream banks consist of nothing but blackberry, turf grass, and reed canary grass which provides little in the way of shade or LWD inputs. The substrate is largely fine sediment and undersized gravel, with limited areas of adequate spawning size gravel available. Most of the spawning habitat exists in the lower 0.5 miles of the creek. Due to the limited spawning habitat, several of the salmon observed are likely to be ascending to the spring fed tributary, Salmon tributary, which enters Salmon Creek at RM 0.5. Chum are the most abundant species present, a few coho are also observed yet their numbers continue to be low. Salmon Creek has not been regularly surveyed for chinook because they have rarely been observed in the past, yet a few carcasses have been seen over the last 10 years in the lower 300 feet of the creek during coho surveys. Chinook usage was significantly higher in 2005, with over 20 adults and 7 redds documented. Chinook in 2005 were observed spawning throughout the lower 0.5 miles of the creek. Other limiting factors impacting salmon production in Salmon Creek may include low summer and fall flows restricting access, high Salmon Creek looking upstream just above the conflusediment inputs, industrial discharge and lack of channel ence with Salmon Tributary. habitat.

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES
2005 - 2006 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD AND BULL TROUT REPORT.

126

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

2005 SALMON CREEK COHO COUNTS
10 9 LIVE DEAD

8 7
NUMBER OBSERVED

6 5

4 3

2 1

0 10/14/05 10/24/05 11/3/05 11/14/05
DATE SURVEYED

11/22/05

12/1/05

12/12/05

SALMON CREEK COHO SEASON COMPARISONS (1998 - 2005)
30 LIVE DEAD REDDS 25
27

20
NUMBER OBSERVED

15
11

10
6

9

5

5
3 1

4 3 2

4 3 2 0 2 2

4

0 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005

SEASON SURVEYED

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES
2005 - 2006 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD AND BULL TROUT REPORT.

127

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

2005 SALMON CREEK CHUM COUNTS
50 L IV E DEAD 45

40

35

NUMBER OBSERVED

30

25

20

15

10

5

0 1 1/ 14 / 0 5 11 / 2 2/ 05 1 2/ 1/ 05 12 / 1 2/ 05 1 2/ 22 / 0 5 1/3/05 1 / 1 3/ 06 1 / 23 / 0 6

D A T E SU RV EY ED

SALMON CREEK CHUM SEASON COMPARISONS (1991 - 2005)
160 AUC: ESCAPEMENT ESTIMATE LIVE
138

140

DEAD
129

120
109 NUMBER OBSERVED 93

100

80

78

61

70

82

60
51 44

49

44

47

57 42 23

40
31 25 27 28 29

20

18

14

12

2

0 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999
SEASON SURVEYED

2000

1 2

2001

2002

2003

13

20

17

2004

2005

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES
2005 - 2006 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD AND BULL TROUT REPORT.

19

128

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

SALMON TRIBUTARY
WRIA: 10.0036 - WHITE RIVER 2005 - 2006

Chum salmon working its way up Salmon Tributary.

DESCRIPTION
Salmon Tributary is a short run, spring-fed stream entering Salmon Creek At RM 0.5. The creek has approximately 0.13 miles of highly productive River miles surveyed: 0.0 to 0.13 low to moderate gradient habitat, with excellent spawning Dates surveyed: 10/14/05 to 1/23/06 Species surveyed: Chinook,Coho, Chum gavel available throughout the channel. Riparian along the lower surveyed stretch of the creek consists largely Access of alder and a few conifers. There are few pieces of inMile 0.3: 4309 East Valley Highway crosses Salmon Creek. Salmon Tributary enters stream woody debris, and recruitment is limited. Beyond Salmon Creek 0.1 miles upstream of the RM 0.13, the gradient increases substantially and the bridge. Check-in with Sumner RV (253)863channel narrows. The increase in gradient and flow is 5644 before surveys are conducted. mostly an impediment to chum which are the most prolific species to spawn in the creek. Coho are often observed spawning in the lower 250 feet of the creek; however, no chinook or steelhead usage has been documented. Small, low gradient pools at the mouth provide excellent habitat for young coho. Large numbers of newly emerged coho fry are often observed in January during chum surveys. Salmon Tributary often supports a large run of chum salmon for a stream of its size. The chum returns were exceptional in 2003 and 2004; however, like most of the Puyallup/White River system, the 2005 returns were significantly lower. Extremely heavy predation often accounts for many of the dead chum seen along Salmon Tributary.
The lower 150 feet of Salmon Tributary. The majority of spawning occures in this lower stretch of the creek.

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES
2005 - 2006 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD AND BULL TROUT REPORT.

129

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

2005 SALMON TRIBUTARY CHUM COUNTS
50 LIVE DEAD

45

40

35
NUMBER OBSERVED

30

25

20

15 10

5 0 11/14/05 11/22/05 12/1/05 12/12/05 12/22/05 1/3/05 1/13/06 1/23/06

DAT E SURVEYED

SALMON TRIBUTARY CHUM SEASON COMPARISONS (1993 - 2005)
600

AUC: ESCAPEMENT ESTIMATE LIVE DEAD

500

481

456 420

363

400 NUMBER OBSERVED

385

396

300 255 242 257 216 79 70 75

200 142

182

125

130

83

100

89

89

96

50 68

346

0

1993

1994

1995

1996

1997

1998

1999

2000

4

15

2001

2002

2003

2004

2005

SEASON SURVEYED

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES
2005 - 2006 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD AND BULL TROUT REPORT.

55

130

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

SILVER CREEK
WRIA: 10.0313 - WHITE RIVER 2005 - 2006

DESCRIPTION
Silver Creek is a right bank tributary located at the headwaters of the White River (RM 60.5), just outside of the Northern boundary of Mt. Rainier National Park. Silver Creek originates along the Crystal Mountain ridge within the Wantachee National Forest, and flows for over 7 miles through steep mountainous terrain, dropping nearly 3,000 feet from its source until it reaches the confluence with the White River just West of HYW 410. There are numerous small unnamed tributaries contributing flow to Silver Creek, with the exception of 4.4 mile Goat Creek (10.0314) which enters the right bank of Silver Creek 0.2 miles up from its mouth. Currently, in addition to Goat Creek, Silver Springs (10.0332A) flows into Silver Creek approximately 20 yards from its

River miles surveyed: 0.0 to 0.3 Dates surveyed: 10/8/05 to 11/19/05 Species surveyed: Coho Access Silver Creek runs under HYW 410 approximately 0.2 miles north of the enterance to the Silver Springs campground.

confluence with the White. The habitat in the lower 0.5 miles of Silver Creek consists of mostly moderate to high gradient cascades with shallow and moderately deep scour pools. The scour pools and some low energy pocket areas provide what little spawning habitat is available. The surrounding riparian zone consists of some oldgrowth conifers, and a mixture of younger coniferous and deciduous trees. The only salmon usage documented by PTF is coho, which are observed in the lower 0.3 miles of the creek. Bull Trout, which are often observed spawning in Silver Springs have not been surveyed for in Silver Creek, however, it is suspected that bull trout are present in the creek. Silver Creek is also the resting place of Henry C. Allen (right), a civil war veteran and purple hear recipient with the 16th Wisconsin Infantry who relocated to the region after the war. He was found frozen in the winter of 1898 near his trap lines and was buried on site.

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES
2005 - 2006 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD AND BULL TROUT REPORT.

131

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

SILVER SPRINGS CREEK
WRIA: 10.0332A - WHITE RIVER 2005 - 2006

DESCRIPTION
Silver Springs is a spring fed headwater tributary to the White River (RM 60.5). Currently, Silver Springs joins with Silver Creek just yards above Silvers River miles surveyed: 0.0 to 0.3 confluence with the White. Silver Springs flows through a Dates surveyed: 9/9/05 to 11/16/05 low gradient pool riffle channel with moderate amounts of Species surveyed: Chinook (N/O) Coho, Char, Pink in-stream woody debris. The riparian vegetation consists of large conifers with several hardwoods near its confluence Access with Silver Creek. There is excellent gravel throughout the The stream runs parallel to the White River between it and the Silver Springs reach although it is often obscured by fine sand. The creek campground on Hwy. 410 below the originates and runs directly though the Silver Springs Crystal Mountain Road. You can walk campground, located approximately 0.5 mile north of the Mt. upstream on Silver Creek to the highway Rainier National Park border. Several species including spring after looking at Silver Springs. chinook, coho, sockeye, pink salmon, and bull trout have been documented spawning in the creek over the past 5 seasons. Adult salmon that spawn in Silver Springs Creek were previously captured at the USACE fish trap in Buckley, and transported above Mud Mountain dam. Since precise escapement numbers are known, surveys are conducted to determine fish distribution and spawning success. Silver Springs is the highest point in which adult salmon are observed. Of special note is the documentation of bull trout spawning in September (bottom right) shortly before the coho appear. Chinook were observed for the first time spawning in 2001; however, no chinook have been observed over the past four seasons. Pink salmon were observed spawning in the creek in 2003 and 2005; as well as sockeye in 2003, 2004, and 2005.

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES
2005 - 2006 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD AND BULL TROUT REPORT.

132

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

2005 SILVER SPRINGS CREEK COHO COUNTS
180 LIVE

160

Upper White River surveys show distribution, actual escapement totals are known from the USACE Buckley trap counts.

DEAD

140

120
NUMBER OBSERVED

100

80

60

40

20

0 9/9/05 9/16/05 9/29/05 10/17/05
DAT E SURVEYED

10/26/05

11/7/05

11/16/05

SILVER SPRINGS CREEK COHO SEASONAL COMPARISONS (2000 - 2005)
400 LIVE 350
309

DEAD

345

300

296

NUMBER OBSERVED

250

200
161

150

125 95 74 52 70

100

50
23 18 22

0 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005

SEASON SURVEYED

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES
2005 - 2006 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD AND BULL TROUT REPORT.

133

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

SILVER SPRINGS CREEK BULL TROUT COUNTS (2001 - 2005)
10 9 LIVE DEAD REDDS

8 7
NUMBER OBSERVED

6 5

4 3 2

1 0 9/9/05 9/16/05 9/21/05
DAT E SURVEY ED

9/29/05

10/17/05

SILVER SPRINGS CREEK BULL TROUT SEASONAL COMPARISONS
(2001 - 2005)
10 9 8 7
NUMBER OBSERVED

LIVE RED D S

6
5

5
4

4 3
2 2

2
1 1

1 0 2001 2002 2003
SEA SON SU RVEY ED

2004

2005

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES
2005 - 2006 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD AND BULL TROUT REPORT.

134

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

SOUTH PRAIRIE CREEK
WRIA: 10.0429 - CARBON RIVER 2005 - 2006
Chum salmon spawning in the lower end (RM 0.5) of South Prairie Creek (2004).

South Prairie Creek is a major tributary of the Carbon River, entering the Carbon near RM 6. South Prairie Creek is considered one of the most productive streams in the Puyallup/ White River watershed and is one of the index streams in the Puyallup watershed surveyed for chinook, pink and steelhead by the Washington Department of Fish and River miles surveyed: 0.0 to 12.5 Wildlife. Puyallup Tribe Fisheries staff surveys the creek Dates surveyed: 8/24/05 to 6/22/06 in winter for chum. From RM 0.0 to RM 12.6 the stream Species surveyed: Chinook, Coho, Pink, is pool-riffle in character with many deep pools and a few Chum, Steelhead higher gradient cascades. Spawning gravel is excellent Access and plentiful throughout this stretch. Above river mile Mile 8.0: Follow Hwy. 162 to Lower 12.6, the stream is higher gradient and moderately to Burnett Road. Turn right and follow to extremely confined within a deep canyon. Upstream bridge over South Prairie. migration is blocked at approximately R.M. 15 by a large Mile 5.8: Hwy 162 bridge near fire station at outskirts of South Prairie. bedrock cascade. Spawning gravel becomes scarce in this Hwy 162 crosses South Prairie Creek. upper reach and many heavily scoured bedrock sections exist. Chinook spawning occurs primarily in the lower 8 miles, while coho show increased usage in the middle and South Prairie Creek at RM 7. upper sections of the anadromous reach. Chum utilize the lower 3 miles heavily but have been observed well above RM 10. Steelhead utilize the entire stream below the falls with reduced usage in the canyon reach below the falls. The riparian zone changes dramatically over the 15 miles of anadromous stream. The upper canyon reach flows through a commercial forest and streamside vegetation consists of second growth fir and alder. Buffer widths along recent harvest areas are generally wider than the state regulated minimum due to steep, potentially unstable slopes along the canyon. From there to RM 6.0 the riparian zone is relatively intact, consisting of mature hardwoods with some fir. Occasional residential development exists along this reach. Wilkeson Creek (10.0432), a major tributary to South Prairie, enters at approximately RM 6.7. Below this pont, to the confluence, there exists many diked reaches and streamside residential development is common. Much of the lower 6 miles flows through active agricultural land. Alder and cottonwood are the most common streamside tree species.

DESCRIPTION

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES
2005 - 2006 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD AND BULL TROUT REPORT.

135

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

2005 SOUTH PRAIRIE CREEK CHINOOK COUNTS
90 LIVE

80

2004 South Prairie Creek chinook graphs were generated using survey data collected by WDFW.

DEAD REDDS

70

60
NUMBER OBSERVED

50

40

30

20

10

0 8/24/05 9/2/05 9/9/05 9/16/05 9/26/05 10/4/05 10/13/05 10/25/05

DATE SURVEYED

SOUTH PRAIRIE CREEK CHINOOK SEASON COMPARISONS

(1998 - 2005)
1000
928

AUC: ESCAPEM ENT ESTIM ATE LIVE DEAD
838

900

REDD S

800
692 537 536

700
NUMBER OBSERVED

600

500
377 388

503

505

527

326

360

400

312

251

244

300

289

217

369 117 92 211 51

200
127

100

81

0 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005

SEASON SURVEY ED

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES
2005 - 2006 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD AND BULL TROUT REPORT.

27

136

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

2005 SOUTH PRAIRIE CREEK PINK COUNTS
1 4 0 ,0 0 0 L IV E

1 2 0 ,0 0 0

2004 South Prairie Creek pink graphs were generated using survey data collected by WDFW.

DEAD

1 0 0 ,0 0 0

NUMBER OBSERVED

8 0 ,0 0 0

6 0 ,0 0 0

4 0 ,0 0 0

2 0 ,0 0 0

0 8 / 2 4 /0 5 9 /2 / 0 5 9 /9 / 0 5 9 /1 6 /0 5 9 / 2 6 /0 5 10/4/05 1 0 /1 3 / 0 5 1 0 / 2 5 /0 5
D A TE S U R V E Y E D

SOUTH PRAIRIE CREEK PINK SEASON COMPARISONS

(1998 - 2005)
600,000 AUC: ESCAPEMENT ESTIMATE LIVE DEAD 500,000
433,524 554,083

400,000
NUMBER OBSERVED

300,000
235,270

200,000

100,000
23,004

5,787 1,475

18,794 3,814

11,356

0 1999 2001
SEASON SURVEYED

2003

2005

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES
2005 - 2006 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD AND BULL TROUT REPORT.

137

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

2005 SOUTH PRAIRIE CREEK CHUM COUNTS
450 L IV E DEAD 400

350

300
NUMBER OBSERVED

250

200

150

100

50

0 1 1 / 2 1 /0 5 1 2 /9 / 0 5
D A T E S U R V EY ED

1 2 / 1 4 /0 5

1 /4 / 0 5

SOUTH PRAIRIE CREEK CHUM SEASON COMPARISONS (1992 - 2005)
9,000 AUC: ESCAPEMENT ESTIMATE LIVE
7,309 7,711 2,986 4,231 1,032 1,110 1,336 265 816

DEAD 8,000

7,000

6,000
NUMBER OBSERVED

5,000
3,943 1,428 640 785 703 2,028 2,149 331 390 499 341 364 363 383 434

4,000

3,000

2,000

1,000
63 44

88

0

1992

1993

1994

1995

1996

1997

1998

1999

80

2000

2001

2002

2003

2004

2005

SEASON SURVEY ED

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES
2005 - 2006 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD AND BULL TROUT REPORT.

174

138

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

2006 SOUTH PRAIRIE CREEK STEELHEAD COUNTS
20 18

2006 South Prairie Creek steelhead graphs were generated using survey data collected by WDFW.

L IV E DEAD REDDS

16

14

NUMBER OBSERVED

12

10

8

6

4

2

0 4/5/06 5/2/06 3/10/06 3/20/06 3/21/06 3/28/06 3/29/06 4/12/06 4/19/06 4/20/06 4/26/06 4/27/06 5/3/06 5/10/06 5/11/06 5/18/06 5/24/06 6/20/06 6/22/06

D ATE SURVEYED

SOUTH PRAIRIE CREEK STEELHEAD REDDS SEASON COMPARISONS (1999 - 2006)
250 STEELHEAD REDDS

200

196 187

159 NUMBER OBSERVED

150

146 129 119

100

93

50
32

0 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006
Y EAR SURVEY ED

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES
2005 - 2006 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD AND BULL TROUT REPORT.

139