An Investigation of DEP Inspections  
at Farming Operations:  
A Continued Lack of Enforcement of  
Existing Laws and Regulations 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Conservation Pennsylvania 
Kimberly L. Snell­Zarcone, Esquire 
2707 Yale Avenue 
Camp Hill, PA  17011 
 
Executive Summary 
 
Conservation Pennsylvania’s investigation of information reported to EPA under the CBRAP 
grant clearly demonstrates that DEP inspections of farming operations were not thorough and 
did not lead to the enforcement of legal and regulatory requirements related to manure 
management and erosion and sedimentation. 
  
Key Findings 
● 45% of the inspections completed were at CAFOs, which are already required to be 
inspected under the NPDES program 
● Only 52% of the inspections were done at small, non­CAO farms 
● DEP reported 3 administrative file reviews as inspections 
● Farmers were present at 71% of the inspections, but documents related to nutrient 
management practices were not reviewed 58% of the time and documents related to Ag 
E&S were not reviewed 60% of the time 
● Inspectors rarely contacted the landowner regarding Ag E&S documents if a tenant 
farmer was unable to provide those plans 
● There was a vast difference between the compliance rate documented at farming 
operations in DEP inspection reports (60% compliance) and that determined by 
Conservation Pennsylvania (only 13% compliance) 
● DEP is routinely overlooking documentation violations 
● Conservation Pennsylvania found that 57% of the farms had a documentation related 
violation and 25% of farms had a water quality related violation 
● DEP is overlooking requirements that manure storage facilities be structurally sound, 
water­tight, and prevent pollution discharges 
● DEP is missing an opportunity to collect needed information about the installation and 
maintenance best management practices at farming operations 
Recommendations 
● DEP should focus on inspecting non­CAO farming operations under the CBRAP grant 
● Only thorough “boots on the ground” inspections should be reported by DEP as 
inspections 
● DEP should announce inspections which will allow farmers to make themselves and 
written documents available to DEP inspectors 
● DEP should sample water quality upstream and downstream of a farming operation 
during an inspection to scientifically ensure that water quality is not being adversely 
impacted 
● DEP should vigorously enforce all regulatory requirements, including documentation 
requirements, and utilize all available compliance tools 
● DEP should enforce all regulations related to preserving the structural integrity of a 
manure storage facility 
● DEP should enforce all regulations developed to prevent the discharge of manure to 
surface waters and groundwater of the Commonwealth 
● EPA should ensure that DEP inspections are consistent and thorough 
 
Pennsylvania’s Department of Environmental Protection (“DEP”) participates in the Chesapeake 
Bay Regulatory and Accountability Program (“CBRAP”) with the federal Environmental 
Protection Agency (“EPA”).  CBRAP is intended to “aid the states and the District of Columbia in 
implementing and expanding their States’ regulatory, accountability and enforcement capabilities, 
in support of reducing nitrogen, phosphorus and sediment loads delivered to the Bay.”   Under 
1
this program, DEP receives millions of dollars in grant funding to achieve the goals of the 
Pennsylvania Watershed Implementation Plan (“WIP”) and related two­year Milestones.   
 
DEP acknowledged within the WIPs that the practices of small farming operations have been 
often­overlooked and their pollution impact has not been completely recognized.  In order to 
achieve nutrient and sediment reductions within the Agricultural Sector, DEP chose to focus 
much of its attention toward the regulatory compliance of small farming operations including, but 
not limited to, compliance with the Manure Management Planning requirements, Agricultural 
Erosion and Sedimentation (“Ag E&S”) requirements, and Animal Heavy Use Areas (“AHUA”) 
requirements.  DEP correctly recognized that the only way to ensure that smaller farming 
operations came into compliance with these regulations that had existed for decades was to put 
boots on the ground.   
 
DEP committed to a five pronged outreach, compliance, and enforcement effort in its Agricultural 
Water Quality Initiative as part of the Pennsylvania Chesapeake Watershed Implementation Plan 
(Phase 1).   One prong of this Initiative was a “basin­wide component to achieve agricultural 
2
compliance with state regulatory requirements.”   DEP committed to achieving this goal by 
3
adding four new staff positions that would: 
 
provide regional compliance and inspection actions for Pennsylvania’s 
CAFO . . . and agriculture regulatory programs.  These positions will 
support increased field presence for additional inspections of non­CAFO 
agricultural operations.  These positions would also support increased 
compliance activities under Chapter 102 Erosion & Sediment Control 
regulations, [and] Chapter 91.36 relating to manure management. . . .  
4
 
Within the Phase I WIP, DEP committed to taking a strong enforcement stance at agricultural 
operations that it inspected.  DEP stated that inspection staff “will consider any and all 
compliance tools available including NOVs, field orders, compliance orders, CO&A’s, and 
requiring permit.  This approach, to apply any and all compliance tools available, is consistent 
1
 Jim Edward, ‘Chesapeake Bay Regulatory and Accountability Program Grants’, Chesapeake Bay 
Program, (published online March 23, 2010) 
<http://archive.chesapeakebay.net/pubs/calendar/45645_03­23­10_Presentation_6_10619.pdf>, accessed 9 
April 2014. 
2
 Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection, Pennsylvania Chesapeake Watershed 
Implementation Plan (January 11, 2011), pp. 92­105.  See also Pennsylvania Department of Environmental 
Protection, Pennsylvania Chesapeake Watershed Implementation Plan (March 20, 2012), pp. 26­35. 
3
 PA Phase I WIP, pp. 97­105. 
4
 PA Phase I WIP, p. 100. 
 
with existing compliance and enforcement procedures.”   DEP stated that these inspectors 
5
would complete 450 agricultural inspections annually and initiate 100 compliance actions per 
year.  
6
 
In order to help implement the above commitments, EPA granted DEP with $1,549,634 over five 
years.   DEP reported that it conducted 233 agricultural inspections, which led to 116 
7
compliance actions, from July 1, 2012 through December 21, 2012.   DEP noted that this 
8
included 102 Notice of Violations, four Consent Orders Assessed, and six Consent Assessment 
of Civil Penalties.   DEP also reported that their efforts resulted in $51,874 in fines or penalties.    
9 10
 
While these numbers clearly put DEP on track for meeting the deliverables of the CBRAP grant 
for 2012, Conservation Pennsylvania was interested in learning if the inspections were thorough, 
lead to the collection of information about best management practices that DEP said it was 
missing, and promoted the enforcement of regulatory requirements related to manure 
management and erosion and sedimentation.  Conservation Pennsylvania requested copies of 
the inspection reports for the Southcentral Regional Office that had been included in the 
reporting to EPA under the CBRAP grant for the period from July 1, 2012 through December 21, 
2012.  In short, this is a subset of the information reported to EPA and detailed above. 
Conservation Pennsylvania was interested in the Southcentral Regional Office because this 
region includes the largest number of agricultural operations and their staff is familiar with 
completing these types of inspections and enforcement actions.  Conservation Pennsylvania 
also asked for information that was at least a year old so that any enforcement actions would 
have likely come to a conclusion.  DEP employees Steve Taglang and Aaron Ward were both 
very helpful in securing the documents needed to complete this investigation.   
 
DEP initially indicated that 81 inspections were completed at 67 farms.  DEP provided 
Conservation Pennsylvania with 70 inspection reports or accounts of inspections for 60 of those 
farms and stated that it was unable to find documentation for the other 11 inspections at the 
remaining seven farms.  For purposes of this report, Conservation Pennsylvania is only 
considering the data from the 60 farms for which data was reported. 
 
Conservation Pennsylvania was struck that so many of the inspections completed by DEP under 
the CBRAP grant were at concentrated animal feeding operations (“CAFOs”).  Twenty­seven of 
the 60 inspections (45%) were completed at CAFOs, which are permitted under the National 
5
 PA Phase I WIP, p. 101. 
6
 PA Phase I WIP, p. 100.  See also PA Phase II WIP, pp. 31­32 and Pennsylvania Department of 
Environmental Protection, January 1, 2012 ­ December 31, 2013 Pennsylvania Programmatic Two­Year 
Milestones (January 9, 2012) , p. 2. 
7
 Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection, Chesapeake Bay Regulatory and Accountability 
Program Grant June 1, 2010­June 30, 2016: Revised Semi Annual Report (July 1, 2012­December 31, 2012), 
pp. 23­28. 
8
 CBRAP Grant 1: Revised Semi Annual Report (July 1, 2012­December 31, 2012), p. 25.   
9
 CBRAP Grant 1: Revised Semi Annual Report (July 1, 2012­December 31, 2012), p. 25. 
10
 CBRAP Grant 1: Revised Semi Annual Report (July 1, 2012­December 31, 2012), p. 25. 
 
Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (“NPDES”) and already required to be inspected.  While 
it is important to maintain compliance at all farming operations, DEP had consistently stated that 
small farming operations that were heretofore uninspected would be the focus for compliance 
efforts.  Thus, Conservation Pennsylvania was shocked that only slightly more than half of the 
inspections, 31 (52%), were done at small, non­concentrated animal operation (“non­CAO”) 
farms.  In fact, this number may have also been artificially inflated because DEP conducted a 
targeted watershed assessment in the Soft Run watershed that was included in the information 
reported to EPA.  If one does not include the farming operations from Mifflin County, the location 
of the Soft Run watershed, then a whopping 68% of the inspections were completed at CAFOs 
and a paltry 26% of the inspections were completed at non­CAOs.  Conservation Pennsylvania 
recommends that DEP focus on inspecting non­CAO farming operations under its CBRAP grant 
deliverables. 
 
Of the 70 inspections completed at the 60 farming operations, most consisted of “boots on the 
ground” inspections.  However, Conservation Pennsylvania was concerned that DEP reported 
three inspections under the CBRAP grant deliverables that were merely administrative file 
reviews by Department staff.  Clearly the intent of EPA in funding inspection staff was to get as 
many people as possible out in the field communicating with the farming community about their 
legal and regulatory requirements.  It is disingenuous for DEP staff to count administrative field 
reviews completed to verify information discussed at a “boots on the ground” inspections as 
additional inspections.  While this practice doesn’t seem to be the norm, these administrative 
inspections comprised 4% of the inspections reported under the CBRAP grant and could, over 
the long term, account for a large number of inspections that aren’t actually completed. 
Conservation Pennsylvania recommends that DEP should not report administrative file reviews 
as inspections under the CBRAP grant deliverables. 
 
Conservation Pennsylvania was interested in evaluating how many of the farm inspections were 
announced and whether this had any impact on: 1) the farmer’s participation in the inspection, 
and 2) the ability of inspectors to review documents critical to determining compliance with 
manure management and Ag E&S requirements.  Conservation Pennsylvania determined that 
inspections were announced in 34% of the cases that were evaluated.   Even given the high 
11
number of unannounced inspections, farmers were present at the inspection or talked with the 
inspector 71% of the time.  When CAFOs, whose inspections are always announced, are 
removed from the results, farmers still communicated with the inspector during the inspection 
63% of the time.   
 
While DEP inspectors were still able to gain access to farmers when inspections were 
unannounced, they clearly were not able to adequately review documents that would have 
helped determine whether the farmer and/or land owner were in compliance with manure 
management and Ag E&S requirements.  Documents related to nutrient management practices 
11
 Inspections were unannounced in 50% of the cases that were evaluated.  Conservation Pennsylvania was 
unable to determine whether the inspection was announced or not in 16% of the cases evaluated. 
 
were not reviewed at 58% of the farming operations.   Similarly, documents related to Ag E&S 
12
were not reviewed at 60% of the farms.   Ag E&S documents are not only required for the 
13
farmer.  The landowner also has a regulatory requirement to have and to implement such 
planning documents and the best management practices identified within the plans.  
14
Conservation Pennsylvania noted that rarely, if ever, did the inspector contact the landowner 
about Ag E&S documents if a tenant farmer was unable to provide those plans.  In one instance 
where an animal operation was renting land for the concentrated animal feeding operation and 
did not have management control of any associated farmland, the inspector did not demonstrate 
that any efforts were made to contact the landowner and investigate nutrient management or Ag 
E&S practices.   Inspectors can only get a full picture for what is happening at the farming 
15
operation when they are in communication with the farm owner and operator.  For this reason, 
Conservation Pennsylvania recommends announcing inspections to allow farmers to make 
themselves, and particularly written documentation, more available to DEP inspectors.  True 
compliance can only be determined when inspectors are given access to the farm, the farmer, 
required planning documents, and required record keeping documents.   
 
The most important, and interesting, information from the inspection reports was what DEP 
determined and held to be a violation and what it didn’t.  DEP found violations at 40% of the 
farms inspected.  Only one inspection report noted a violation resulting in a monetary penalty. 
Some may think that these finding are great, and a sign that small farming operations really are 
in compliance with manure management and Ag E&S requirements.  Unfortunately, that is not 
the case.  Conservation Pennsylvania’s review of the inspection reports reveals violations at a 
staggering 72% of the farms.  Additionally, there was insufficient information to determine 
violations at another 15% of farms.  This means that, in reality, only 13% of the farms were in 
compliance, not the 60% found to be without violation by DEP.   
 
Conservation Pennsylvania found that 57% of the farms had a violation related to documentation 
and 25% of the farms had a water quality violation.  The figures related to documentation may, in 
fact, be much higher as Conservation Pennsylvania was unable to determine compliance with 
documentation requirements at 25% of the farms from the inspection reports.   
 
The next logical questions become why is DEP overlooking so many violations and for which 
violations is DEP failing to act and initiate compliance actions.  DEP has stated at a number of 
public meetings that the Agency is focusing on water quality violations and not prosecuting 
documentation violations unless they are coupled with water quality violations.   Interestingly, 
16
12
 Nutrient management planning documents were reviewed at 32% of the farms.  Conservation Pennsylvania 
was unable to determine whether nutrient management documents were reviewed at 10% of the farms.  
13
 Ag E&S documents were reviewed at 27% of the farms.  Conservation Pennsylvania was unable to 
determine whether Ag E&S documents were reviewed at 13% of the farms. 
14
 25 Pa. Code § 102.4(a)(3). 
15
 Department of Environmental Protection, NPDES Compliance Inspection Report, Heckenluber Poultry 
Farm (September 4, 2012), p. 3. 
16
 See Andrea Blosser, ‘Targeted Agricultural Compliance Pilot Project’, Pennsylvania Department of 
Environmental Protection, (published online February 20, 2013) 
 
none of the inspection reports indicated that water samples were collected at farms during 
inspections.  Thus, DEP’s conclusions about water quality violations, or the lack thereof, resulted 
from observations of direct manure or silage discharges.  If DEP did not not see an active 
discharge, the Agency made a blanket assumption that water quality was not being adversely 
impacted by the farming operation and did not pursue violations associated with not having 
planning documents or other required documents, such as self­inspection reports.  Without 
collecting water samples, DEP cannot affirmatively state that water quality is not being impacted. 
Conservation Pennsylvania recommends that DEP should, as a matter of practice, sample 
water quality upstream and downstream of a farming operation during an inspection to 
scientifically ensure that water quality is not being adversely impacted. 
 
Conservation Pennsylvania recognizes that abating water quality violations should be the very 
first priority of DEP.  However, it is inappropriate for DEP to completely overlook its own 
documentation requirements.  Conservation Pennsylvania recommends that DEP vigorously 
enforce all regulatory requirements and utilize all compliance tools available.  DEP created the 
various planning and documentation requirements because it believed that they would lead to 
improvements in water quality.  Farming operations that utilize manure are required to plan for 
the land application of that manure by drafting written manure management or nutrient 
management plans.   For CAFOs, farmers must also maintain and sometimes submit to DEP 
17
records related to the land application of manure and process wastewaters.   By ignoring these 
18
planning and documentation requirements, the Department is not only risking adverse impacts 
for the surface and groundwaters of the Commonwealth but also risking an accumulation of 
certain nutrients within the soils that can lead to decreased crop yields for the farmers.  If 
nutrients accumulate to a significant extent in the soils, farmers are prohibited from land applying 
manure and have to seek alternate means for disposing of their animal waste.  
 
While DEP flagrantly ignored the planning and recordkeeping requirements of its own regulations 
generally, one farm requires additional discussion to make a larger point.  DEP completed an 
inspection where the report noted that the farmer did not have the required Ag E&S plan, but he 
“is on a waiting list at MCCD to receive assistance in obtaining a conservation plan.”  
19
Conservation Pennsylvania recommends that DEP require farm operators, and in some cases 
landowners, to do everything possible to secure needed planning documents in an expedited 
fashion.  These planning documents have been required of farming operations for decades. 
Merely taking a number in line at the local Natural Resources Conservation Service (“NRCS”) 
office or conservation district to have planning documents drafted is not enough.  The backlog of 
plans that need drafted by government officials has been estimated at some offices to equate to 
a wait of several years.  Pennsylvania has a number of private consulting companies that are 
<http://www.dep.state.pa.us/dep/subject/advcoun/ag/2013/Feb2013/KishAABPresentation2­2013.pdf>, 
accessed 17 April 2014. 
17
 25 Pa. Code § 91.36(b). 
18
 25 Pa. Code § 92.5a(f)(5). 
19
 Department of Environmental Protection, NPDES Compliance Inspection Report, Umpqua Feather 
Merchants, Inc./Seven Mountains Farms, LLC (September 17, 2012), pp. 2­3. 
 
ready and willing to draft nutrient management and Ag E&S plans for farming operations. 
Conservation Pennsylvania recommends that DEP should require farming operations that do not 
have proper planning documents to secure them in an expedited manner, utilizing private 
planners if necessary.  DEP’s efforts in the targeted watersheds shows that private planners are 
able to complete the required nutrient management and Ag E&S plans for a number of facilities 
in a short time frame.  This expectation of compliance with planning requirements should be the 
norm and universally implemented throughout Pennsylvania. 
 
Conservation Pennsylvania was particularly struck by another inspection in which DEP did not 
identify a violation for failure to maintain quarterly self­inspection reports and seemed to condone 
illegal activity for falsifying records.  The quarterly self­inspection reports record the results of 
weekly inspections of manure storage facilities, and note the quantity of manure exported or land 
applied.  The records and documents section of the inspection report contains a note by the 
inspector that the permittee “was unaware that, as a general permittee, quarterly self­inspection 
reports [were] to be completed.”   The inspection report states that the “[p]ermittee intends to 
20
complete quarterly self­inspection reports back to September 1, 2011.”   Thus, it appears that 
21
the farmer intends to complete approximately ten months of inspection reports after the fact and 
without actual information about dates of inspections, the level of freeboard, and the quantity of 
manure transported or land applied.  This would be in direct violation of the NPDES General 
Permit Part B, II, B which states, “[a]ny person who . . . knowingly makes false statements, 
representations, or certification in any record or other document submitted or required to be 
maintained under this permit (including monitoring reports or reports of compliance or 
noncompliance) is subject to a fine and/or imprisonment as set forth in 18 P.S. § 4904, 40 CFR. 
§ 122.41(j)(5) and (k)(2) and 40 CFR part 19.”  Similarly, inspection reports indicate the failure of 
at least five other farms to complete and maintain self­inspection documents.  The inspection 
reports also noted that two farming operations failed to submit annual reports to DEP as required 
by their NPDES permits.  DEP did not issue violations for any of these failures to maintain 
required records or documents.  Conservation Pennsylvania recommends that DEP enforce all 
records and documentation requirements, particularly for permitted facilities, and assess fines 
and penalties for falsification of documentation. 
 
While DEP is clearly overlooking documentation violations, particularly outside the watershed 
which was involved in the targeted enforcement project, the Department is also over looking a 
number of other types of violations.  Many of the issues overlooked by DEP inspectors involved 
manure storage facilities.  Regulations require manure storage facilities to be structurally sound, 
water­tight, and prevent pollution discharges.   The most egregious violation of this standard 
22
was at a farming operation where the inspection report noted that “several trees and other types 
20
 Department of Environmental Protection, NPDES Compliance Inspection Report, Gobblers Knob Farm 
(July 24, 2012), p. 4. 
21
 Gobblers Knob Farm Inspection Report, p. 1. 
22
 25 Pa. Code § 91.36(a). 
 
of vegetation are growing in the vicinity of the interior slope of the lagoon.”   The inspection 
23
report also noted that the structural earthen walls of the lagoon had damage from groundhogs 
digging holes.   DEP did not issue a violation for this compromised lagoon, but merely stated in 
24
the inspection report that “[v]egetation growing on the interior and exterior slopes of the earthen 
lagoon should be maintained to a height no greater than 12 inches.  All groundhog holes should 
be repaired around the perimeter of [the] lagoon.”   Similar violations were found at two other 
25
farming operation and DEP did not take compliance actions for those infractions either. 
Conservation Pennsylvania recommends that DEP enforce all regulations related to preserving 
the structural integrity of manure storage facilities. 
 
Another commonly overlooked violation by DEP inspectors was the failure to have or maintain 
measuring gauges at manure storage facilities.  Measuring gauges are required under the 
technical standards for manure storage facilities in the Pennsylvania Technical Guide published 
by NRCS, and as such are required under regulations related to animal manure storage 
facilities.   Inspection reports noted at least five farming operations that did not have measuring 
26
gauges at the manure storage facilities, putting them at risk of overtopping if the proper freeboard 
levels were not maintained.  DEP did not take compliance actions for any of these infractions. 
Given the increased number of severe weather events over the past few years, maintaining 
proper freeboard at manure storage facilities has become increasingly important to avoiding 
overtopping and pollution of surface waters and groundwaters of the Commonwealth. 
Conservation Pennsylvania recommends that DEP enforce all regulations developed to prevent 
the discharge of manure to surface waters and groundwater of the Commonwealth. 
 
Conservation Pennsylvania’s investigation of information reported to EPA under the CBRAP 
grant clearly demonstrates that DEP inspections of farming operations were not thorough and 
did not lead to the enforcement of regulatory requirements related to manure management and 
erosion and sedimentation.  The inspections were also inconsistent, particularly between Mifflin 
County in the Soft Run Watershed and the remainder of the Southcentral Region.  Conservation 
Pennsylvania concludes that DEP inspectors must ensure that farmers and landowners are 
available during inspections so that a proper discussion about farm requirements can be had. 
This may require DEP notifying farmers that an inspection is forthcoming, maybe a week in 
advance of the inspection.  This would not give farmers sufficient time to secure planning 
documents that they don’t have, but would allow them to locate and collect planning documents 
and reports that are maintained at the farm office.  When DEP inspectors meet with farm 
operators, they must impart upon them the importance that planning documents can play in not 
only preventing environmental pollution, but also in achieving optimal yields and managing 
resource constraints.  However, DEP inspectors must ultimately enforce existing regulations, 
23
 Department of Environmental Protection, NPDES Compliance Inspection Report, Blue Berry Hill Farm 
(September 30, 2012), p. 4. 
24
 Blue Berry Hill Farm Inspection Report, p. 3. 
25
 Blue Berry Hill Farm Inspection Report, p. 1. 
26
 25 Pa. Code § 91.36(a). 
 
including planning requirements, and initiate compliance actions in all situations where manure 
management and Ag E&S requirements are not being followed.   
 
A third purpose of Conservation Pennsylvania’s investigation was to determine if inspections 
were leading to the collection of missing information about best management practices at 
farming operations.  It is obvious that information about best management practices is not being 
collected on general inspections reports during inspections of non­NPDES farming operations. 
The general inspection reports do not include information about a standard set of management 
practices, such as manure storage facilities, conservation tillage, or the use of cover crops. 
Additionally, the reports do not answer questions about standard planning requirements for 
manure management and Ag E&S.  These reports relied upon the inspector to write a narrative, 
which generally only included information about whether the inspection was announced or not, 
whether the inspector spoke with the farmer or not, and whether there were any planning needs 
at the farming operation.  In short, DEP is missing a huge opportunity to collect information about 
smaller farming operations because of the vast differences between inspection reports and the 
data collected on NPDES and non­NPDES inspections.  Synergistically, DEP is missing the 
opportunity to build rapport and provide outreach to the regulated community about best 
management practices.   
 
Conservation Pennsylvania ultimately recommends that EPA engage DEP in a conversation 
about how inspections at farming operations can be better utilized to achieve multiple goals.  It is 
clear that DEP is going through motions to complete inspections of farming operations, but that 
these inspections may not be resulting in compliance with commitments made in the 
Pennsylvania WIPs, two­year milestones, or regulatory requirements.  DEP should commit to 
improving its inspection protocols immediately or the opportunity will pass for achieving 
Chesapeake Bay improvement goals.  EPA, as the holder of the purse strings, has the power to 
make sure that these inspection improvements happen particularly as future CBRAP grants are 
negotiated between EPA and DEP. 
 

Master your semester with Scribd & The New York Times

Special offer for students: Only $4.99/month.

Master your semester with Scribd & The New York Times

Cancel anytime.