REMINGTON’S INTERACTIVE MAGAZINE

J ULY 2014

®

$6. 95

E Z I N E

SPRIN G T IME
SHOTG U N
HUNTS

REMINGTON MODEL 870

WINGMASTER

®
®

PG

4

The growing use of
Silencers Pg 12
Inertia vs. Gas Pg 16

Remington Model 700

Charlie
Palmer’s
Food Storage
Tips PG
22

ULTimate
MUZZLE
LOADER
®

PG

30

Publisher/Executive Producer: Chris Dorsey
Senior VP Sales/Integrated Solutions: Shane Jones
Chief Financial Officer: Amy Dorsey
Post Production Supervisor: Fred Garcia
Chief of Videography: Larry Sletten
Creative Director: Peter Greenstone
Animation: Erik Tande
Archives: Jamie Keough
Senior Producer: Kevin Fay
Writers: Thomas McIntyre, Patrick Kleinen
Still Photography: Marcos Furer, Dusan Smetana
Research: Kelly McLear, Kristen Edwards
Orion Entertainment is the largest producer of
outdoor adventure programming and content
in the world with dozens of series airing on
nine national television networks. With a
30,000 hour global HD footage library, an
archive of thousands of photographic images,
and a team of the most knowledgeable
outdoor and media experts in North America,
Orion is the industry’s only full service
marketing solutions company delivering
best-in-class content and intelligence on
all existing and emerging platforms.

COVER PHOTO: Remington INSIDE COVER PHOTO: Dusan Smetana

Art Director: Chuck Cole

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TABL E

Hunting for All Seasons 4

The Ultimate Muzzleloader® 30

Shotgun season isn’t just for fall anymore.
Hunting with the Model 870® is a year-round
proposition, with some unusual quarries.

Remington comes full circle from its
beginnings 200 years ago and reinvents the
art and science of muzzle loading with its
cutting-edge rifle.

Silencers: The Silent Preyer 12

OF
CONTENTS

Legal to own, legal to hunt with across most
of the country, today’s silencers provide safety,
comfort, increased accuracy, and greater
hunting opportunities.
Inertia vs. Gas 16

A century old, semi-auto shotguns came of
age in ’63 and underwent their biggest
revolution a few years ago, thanks to
Remington’s engineers.

Live and in Color: Remington Country 34

Remington Country brings the spirit
and traditions of America’s firearms-andammunition company, and the hunting
lifestyle, to outdoorsmen’s homes.
Remington Rifle Team Update 38

Remington’s champion shooting teams are
ready to face the challenge of a summer filled
with the country’s most competitive shooting
matches.

Keeping it Fresh: Charlie Palmer’s Food
Storage Tips 22

Remington’s bull cook, Charlie Palmer, offers
his expert advice on how to keep game meat
perfectly preserved and ready for oven or grill.

E Z I N E

Mission Statement: Remington Country eZine is the ultimate media zone
for sportsmen around the globe seeking the latest information and insights
from the world’s leading outdoor brand. Remington Country eZine combines the
best in writing, photography, and video to create the next generation of media
experience for hunters and shooters seeking the most credible information to
help them transform their outdoor and shooting enjoyment.

©Copyright Remington Arms Company, LLC; 2014 All Rights Reserved

CLICK HERE to sign up to receive your free
subscription to Remington Country eZine.

3

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REMINGTON MODEL
SPRINGTIME SHOTGUN HUNTS

4

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870 WINGMASTER
®

Tom
McIntyre

®

T

he place to start is a pecan grove.

Pecans are one of the favorite foods of the common crow–actually the American crow,
Corvus brachyrhynchos; and the crow is one of the biggest depredators with which
commercial pecan growers have to contend, creating some great shooting opportunities.

Some years ago I hunted crows Down South in a grove of pecans with a guide, decoys, a
blind, crow calls, and my Remington Model 870® Wingmaster®. Most crow hunters rely on
recreating a fighting situation, in which a mob, or murder (you can look it up), of crows flocks in to
swarm some mortal enemy, such as an owl. Hunters will use an owl decoy (there was a time past
when a live owl was used) and fighting calls, which can bring in a furious but brief blizzard of birds,
and some fast shooting. In the pecans we wanted the crows to come in a few at a time, intending
to land among a spread of crow decoys on the ground, responding to attention and confidence calls.
Hunted this way, the crows arrived in twos and threes, maple leafing down through the trees like
greenheads dropping into flooded timber, giving us a full morning of steady shooting without having
to change positions. It was also wild wingshooting we could do a good month after almost all the
other bird-hunting seasons had closed.
Continued on page 8

5

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CONSUMER PROMOTION
PROMOTION DATES: JUNE 1 - AUGUST 31, 2014. MUST BE POSTMARKED BY SEPTEMBER 27, 2014.

PURCHASE ANY

PARA 1911 45 CALIBER PISTOL
®

RECEIVE

200 ROUNDS

(4 BOXES OF 50 ROUNDS)

OF REMINGTON® HTP™ 45 AUTO AMMUNITION BACK BY MAIL
PURCHASES OF NON-45 CALIBER PISTOLS WILL RECEIVE $100 CASH BACK BY MAIL

RAMAC 21468

NON-45 CALIBERS AND PURCHASES FROM THE FOLLOWING STATES ARE INELIGIBLE TO RECEIVE AMMUNITION: AK, CA, CT, D.C., IL, HI, MA, NY, NJ. THESE CUSTOMERS WILL
RECEIVE $100.00 CASH BACK BY MAIL. THIS PROMOTION IS OPEN ONLY TO RESIDENTS OF THE UNITED STATES AGE 21 OR OLDER WHO ARE LEGALLY ABLE TO PURCHASE
AMMUNITION IN THEIR STATE OR LOCALE. PROOF OF AGE REQUIRED. SEE OFFICIAL ENTRY FORM FOR DETAILS.

Promotion: 56085

PARA-USA.COM/PROMO

Residents of California, Connecticut, District of Columbia, Illinois, Massachusetts, New York, New Jersey, Hawaii and Alaska are not eligible for ammunition offer. Residents of these states and non-45 caliber purchases will
receive $100.00 back by mail. This Promotion is open only to residents of the United States age 21 or older who are legally able to purchase ammunition in their state or locale. Proof of age required. Void where prohibited.
Promotion valid on new (not previously owned) Para® 1911 pistol purchases made 6/1/14 – 8/31/14. Must be postmarked by 9/27/14. Complete the Redemption Form available at your local retailer or online at www.para-usa.
com/rebates and submit all required information. Allow 10 - 12 weeks for processing. Offer void where prohibited, taxed or restricted by law. This offer is valid for end-users only. Offer limited to product in stock during time
of promotion. No rain checks. For complete terms and conditions, please see the Redemption Form available at your local participating retailer or online at www.para-usa.com/promo.
©PARA USA

J U L Y

For too many hunters, shotgun hunting subdivides into
doves in September, pheasants in October, ducks and geese
in November, and bobwhites in December. Then the guns go
back in the safe until it’s time to shoot clays in the summer with
the likes of the Remington Model 870® Wingmaster®
Classic Trap. In fact, it doesn’t take very much looking
around to discover that there is game to be pursued well into
the spring, if a hunter will expand his or her horizons, and not
even as far as crows.

One option, of course, is preserve hunting. Many
preserves remain open at least through March, and some
beyond, so a hunter can shake off some of that winter rust or
show a new dog a generous number of pheasants and chukars,
or maybe quail. Some preserves even offer the end-of-season
chance to clean up, at a good price, on the birds left over from
the season’s hunts.

For wild birds, the number of late-season goose hunts
are growing from east to west and north to south. California
has a goose season, including Canadas, going into March, while
across the country in New York there is hunting for Canada
geese into March as well, with snow-goose seasons running
into April. Head up to South Dakota and you can hunt snows,
blues, and Rosses into May; and Louisiana has hunting for light
geese in March. C. J. Brown, founder of Remington Country
Outfitters (www.remingtoncountryoutfitters.com)
recommends a hunt, that can be viewed at Arkansas Ducks
and Snows, where you can use your Remington Model
870® Express® Super Mag Waterfowl Camo for
geese well into April.

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Mexico has late-season hunting for snow geese on the
Central Flyway, and for black brant on the Pacific side of the
Baja Peninsula, while in March on the Yucatan Peninsula, the
teal hunting is considered exceptional. For a hunter willing to
put in some air miles, there is also wingshootng to be found in
South America during our spring and summer, in countries such
as Argentina and Uruguay. For doves this is the best time of
year in Argentina, and the duck season opens in April, when a
hunter could hunt dove and duck.

Another kind of wingshooting to look at is for nongame species such as rock pigeons and Eurasian collared doves.
Everything listed above is edible, even crow (marinate the
breasts in Dale’s Seasoning and grill). Feral pigeons and doves,
though, especially if they have been feeding on seeds and
grains, have the added benefit of actually being good to eat,
and in many areas there is no closed season on either or a bag
limit. Check your regulations.

Not everything that a hunter may point his Remington
Model 870® at this time of year has to have wings. Now, in
Maine (CLICK HERE), is a great season for hunting snowshoe
hares with dogs. Snowshoe, or “varying,” hares are found
along the northern tier of the continental United States and up
into Canada. A large hare, females being bigger than males,
might reach four pounds and leap more than 10 feet in a single
bound. They get their name from their oversized rear feet, for
going over snow, and the white color they turn in the winter.

Hunting for hares and rabbits in general is open widely
all across the country, whether you use dogs (beagles being the
dog of choice, of course) or simply still-hunt them. There are

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also several open squirrel seasons of which to take advantage;
and hunting with dogs–especially traditional fice dogs–is another
variation on squirrels. For this kind of hunting, with a lot of
chasing after dogs or simply walking the woods, a nice light
20-gauge, like the 26-inch-barreled Model 870® Express®
at 6¼ pounds, would be in order.

For all the exceptional wingshooting we may do in the
fall and winter, there is something in this off-season hunting that
speaks to our roots in small game and finding what opportunities
might lie in our own backyards. Which can only bring to mind
that gun with which so many of us started out.

In continuous production for to more than 60 years, with
more than 12 million turned out, the Remington Model 870®,
while applying the advancements in technology, has maintained
the same standards as it followed in 1950. It is still made in Ilion,
New York, and is “born” in the words of Michael Vrooman (VROman), Remington’s product manager for shotguns, out of a single,
nine-pound steel billet, from which the receiver is machined, just
as it always has been.

To honor that legacy, and to “celebrate the history of the
Model 870®,” says Vrooman–Remington has introduced, new
for 2014, a classically styled Remington Model 870®–along
with the a newly vintage Remington Model 1100™.

Built in 12 and 20 gauges, the new gun brings forward
the style of the Model 870® of more than a generation ago,
while upgrading beyond what was standard for the time. So
the wood is handsome B-grade walnut. Gold-filled machine-cut
engraving of hunting scenes lies on each side of the receiver.
White spacing returns to the line around the recoil pad, which

is the well-remembered orange, ventilated style; and a white
diamond is back on the grip cap of the stock. Retro high-polish
blue finish completes the nostalgic look.

This makes the classic Remington Model 870®
something of a time machine for when we happily hunted what
we had for every season. We can know, though, that we now
have a gun that looks and
shoots as well as the ones we
remember from back then,
and likely does both even
better.

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Remington
Model

870

®

Wood

One of the features of the new
Remington Model 870® is the fine
walnut used in the stock. Wood is graded
according to the amount of “figuring”–
an attractive patterning in the wood
that in some trees can result, ironically,
from infestations of parasites, such
as fungus and insects, in the wood
when it was alive. The more figuring
throughout the blank from which the
stock is fashioned, the higher the grade.
The B-grade walnut used in the Model
870® would be a high mid-range.
How Remington obtained this
quality wood came about
through a partnering
with MidwayUSA.
Remington offered to make
a substantial donation to a
gun cause, in response to
which, Midway supplied
Remington with the
walnut it needed to
stock its new Model
870®.

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T H E G R OW I N G U S E O F S I L E N C E R S I N H U N T I N G

he growing
plague of feral
hogs across the
land has led to
a broadening of
hunting regulations in order to
combat it, including the increasing use of
silencers. There are parts of the country

12

where hogs can legally be hunted at night
and even from aircraft, and the silencer
is the perfect adjunct to those hunting
situations. Imagine a herd of destructive
pigs rooting up a beet or other crop field.
Now, a hunter at night, with his nightvision optics and a silencer, can selectively
take out one pig after another, each shot
barely disturbing the rest of the herd as

the shooter goes about his business. With
a silencer, a hog has neither the sound
nor the flash of the shot to locate on, and
so really doesn’t know where to go to
escape, and probably doesn’t understand
what has happened to the fellow pig that
has fallen beside it, allowing the hunter
to make multiple kills out of a band of
depredating hogs, in order to try to keep

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It may be a hog’s worst friend.

them in check. The advantages of a
silencer in hunting don’t end there, either.

What is a silencer? We think
we know. In many of our minds, it is
one of those tools we associate with the
tradecraft of espionage, usually screwed
onto the muzzle of a Makarov pistol in the
hands of a SMERSH agent, who steps out
from a darkened doorway to phutt-phutt

his unfortunate target. A silencer, though
(and the other term for it is a “sound
suppressor” or a “can” to some, because
of its shape), is nothing more sinister than
a device that functions essentially like a
muffler on an automobile.

The silencer, patented in 1908
by Hiram Percy Maxim, son of the
great firearms innovator of the 19th

century, works by providing a controlled
environment that allows the gases of a
gunshot to expand and cool before exiting
into the air, creating less energy and noise.
The lessening of energy is about the blast
and not about the propellant power of the
powder driving the bullet from the barrel.
A silencer does not decrease the velocity
of a bullet. In fact, in its way, it creates
Continued on page 28

13

CONSUMER PROMOTION

PROMOTION DATES: JUNE 1 - AUGUST 31, 2014. MUST BE POSTMARKED BY SEPTEMBER 27, 2014.

RECEIVE

200 ROUNDS

(4 BOXES OF 50 ROUNDS)

OF REMINGTON® HTP™ 45 AUTO AMMUNITION BACK BY MAIL

NON-45 CALIBERS AND PURCHASES FROM THE FOLLOWING STATES ARE INELIGIBLE TO RECEIVE AMMUNITION: AK, CA, CT, D.C., IL, HI, MA, NY, NJ. THESE CUSTOMERS WILL
RECEIVE $100.00 CASH BACK BY MAIL. THIS PROMOTION IS OPEN ONLY TO RESIDENTS OF THE UNITED STATES AGE 21 OR OLDER WHO ARE LEGALLY ABLE TO PURCHASE
AMMUNITION IN THEIR STATE OR LOCALE. PROOF OF AGE REQUIRED. SEE OFFICIAL ENTRY FORM FOR DETAILS.

RAMAC 21468

WITH PURCHASE OF ANY

REMINGTON 1911 R1™ 45 CALIBER PISTOL.
®

PURCHASES OF NON-45 CALIBER PISTOLS WILL RECEIVE $100 CASH BACK BY MAIL

PROMOTION: 56084

REMINGTON.COM/REBATES

Residents of California, Connecticut, District of Columbia, Illinois, Massachusetts, New York, New Jersey, Hawaii and Alaska are not eligible for ammunition offer. Residents of these states and
non-45 caliber purchases will receive $100.00 back by mail. This Promotion is open only to residents of the United States age 21 or older who are legally able to purchase ammunition in their
state or locale. Proof of age required. Void where prohibited. Promotion valid on new (not previously owned) Remington® 1911 R1™ handgun purchases made 6/1/14 – 8/31/14. Must be
postmarked by 9/27/14. Complete the Redemption Form available at your local retailer or online at www.remington.com/rebates and submit all required information. Allow 10 - 12 weeks for
processing. Offer void where prohibited, taxed or restricted by law. This offer is valid for end-users only. Offer limited to product in stock during time of promotion. No rain checks. For complete
terms and conditions, please see the Redemption Form available at your local participating retailer or online at www.remington.com/rebates.
©2014 REMINGTON ARMS COMPANY, LLC

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INERTIA VS. GAS
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Inertia is a polite
way of saying
recoil. The effort
to create a firearm
action that could
fire, eject, reload,
and recock with
each pull of the
trigger (and this
needs to be
differentiated
from the fully
automatic action
used in machine
guns that fire as
long as the trigger
is depressed, and
the magazine
does not run out
of ammunition)
goes back to the
late 1800s, mostly
focusing on pistols
and rifles.

A

semi-auto fires
manually, and
loads automatically,
which sometimes
leads to its being
called an “autoloading” firearm,
while an automatic firearm continues to
fire, unload, reload, and fire again, after
a single pull of the trigger. For more
than one hundred years, the semi-automatic actions of shotguns operated on
a system that used the entire recoil of
the firearm when it was fired to cycle the
action. It was a matter of brute force,
with all the mechanical elegance of a
hammer on an anvil.

The earliest semi-auto action in
shotguns is known as the “long-recoil
action.” The system operates with
the barrel and bolt remaining locked
together and moving backward when
the gun is fired (seen in slow motion, the
bolt and barrel move a few inches during

recoil and the bolt locks at the rear,
while springs compressed in the process
push the barrel back forward, the bolt
unlocking when the barrel returns to is
original position). When a long-recoil
action operates, all of the energy goes
into the movement of the firearm, so
there is no net reduction of the kick.
What you shoot is what you get.

This recoil-action was state
of the art in semi-autos for half a
century. Then in 1963 came a change in
autoloading shotguns that was a night
and day advance over inertia. That was
the year of the introduction of the gasoperated Remington® Autoloading
Model 1100™, which has gone on
to be the largest selling autoloader in
shotgun history, an estimated 4 million
having been purchased. Gas-operated
guns bleed off some of the high-pressure
gas from the burning of the powder in
the cartridge. Directed through ports
into a chamber, the gas drives an “action
Continued on next page

Versa Max® at the NRA Convention
17

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sleeve” to open the bolt, and to complete
all the steps of unloading, cocking, and
reloading.

The 1100 became famed for
its reliability and durability, as embodied
in the use of a machined-steel receiver
and steel parts in the action (rather than
aluminum and plastic used in some other
systems), which do add weight, though
that is not as much of a deficiency as
might be imagined. The weight of the
steel helped to dampen the recoil, on
what is already a milder-shooting action
than the inertia.

For all the revolutionary, for the
time, features of the 1100, it still faced
the question of how different shotshells
worked in it. This was nothing new
over the inertia action; and though gasoperated systems are major improvements
over recoil, the first ones could still have
problems accepting varied cartridges.

Semi-auto pistols and rifles had
the advantage of operating on a standard
cartridge, and so could be purpose built,
whether the M1 Garand for the 3006 Springfield or the Model 1911 (the
Remington® Model 1911 R1™ one
of the newest versions of that classic
pistol) for the 45 Auto. A semi-auto

shotgun, though, had to be able to accept
charges and payloads from light target
loads (such as ¾ of an ounce of No. 7½
shot in the Remington® Premier®
Nitro Gold Sporting Clays Target
Loads) to heavy pheasant (like 1 ³/8
ounces of No. 4s in Remington® Nitro
Pheasant® Loads) or waterfowl
cartridges (such as 1¼ ounces of BBs in
Remington® Waterfowl Loads). In
the gas-operated system, this involved a
relief valve so that excess pressure could
be bled off.

Two decades after the Model
1100 came a significant advance in semiauto technology in the Remington®
Autoloading Model 11-87™.
The 11-87 was self-compensating–to a
greater degree than seen on the Model
1100 upon which it is based–allowing
for the use of both 2¾- and 3-inch shells
without having to make any adjustments
to the gun. It provided true dependability,
permitting a shooter and hunter to use it
one day at the trap and skeet range, and
the next in the duck blind or quail field,
just by changing the cartridges to suit the
conditions. And the gas operation, as on
the Model 1100, provided a reduction
in recoil, allowing the hunter or target

2 0 1 4

shooter to shoot more comfortably,
longer.

The biggest breakthrough in gasoperated actions, rivaling the magnitude
of the change from inertia actions,
occurred in 2010 with the introduction
of the Remington® Autoloading
VERSA MAX® shotgun. The Versa
Max® carried the concept of the selfcompensating semi-auto action to a new
level.

In its way, the system is
ingeniously simple. The self-cleaning
Versaport® gas-piston system uses seven
ports to power itself, and the length of
the shell to regulate the action. With a
2¾-inch shell, all of the ports come into
play to drive the action. Move up to the
higher powered 3-inch shell, and the
cartridge length engages only four of the
ports. Then with 3½-inch loads, just three
of the ports come into play, to move twin
pistons only ³/8 of an inch.

The result of this is, for the
shooter, an action that cycles at a
comparable rate from shell length to shell
length, and a felt recoil that also remains
relatively the same. No longer does a
shooter have to expect that moving from
a target to a magnum hunting load is
Continued on page 20

18

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REMINGTON® VERSA MAX.® ANY LOAD. ANYWHERE. EVERY TIME.

Any perceived advantage of an inertia-driven autoloader dies the
instant you shoulder a VERSA MAX®. Its new VersaPort ® gas system
cycles every load, from light 2 ¾" to heavy 3 ½" magnums, with
flawless consistency, dramatically less recoil and less maintenance
than any other autoloader out there.
For a devastating combination,
choose Hypersonic Steel.®
At 1,700 fps, it’s the world’s
fastest, hardest-hitting steel.

Made in the USA
by American workers

©2013 REMINGTON ARMS COMPANY, LLC.

19

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going to result in a concomitant increase
in recoil. Nor does he have to worry
about different shells bringing about
jamming or short chucking, the Versa
Max® affording predictably similarly
cycling whatever is fed into it.

The Versa Max® offers other
very definite advantages over previous
gas-operated systems, and certainly
over recoil actions. Other semi-autos
did, in some cases, make provisions for
different length shells, but required their
being partially disassembled and toggles
thrown between shells. With the Versa
Max®, simply loading the shell, whether
2¾ or 3½, makes the adjustment by
itself. The Versa Max® is self-cleaning,
meaning that a shooter does not need
to fixate on maintenance for fear of
malfunctioning, with routine care
enough. And the recoil is certainly softer,

the 12 gauge feeling like a 20 against
the shoulder. Plus, gases relieved off the
pistons after cycling are vented upward,
helping to modify muzzle rise, and so
letting the shooter remain on target for
any follow-up.

With the Versa Max® a hunter
may now begin at the range with target
loads, then move to the field, with light
dove loads, for the early season, then
moving up to Remington® ShurShot®
Heavy Dove Loads for later, higherflying birds, without experiencing any
appreciable change in recoil or cycling.
Or simply hand a Versa Max® to a fellow
hunter in a duck blind and let him try it
with Remington® Waterfowl Loads and
find that the effect is far different from
other gas-operated semi-auto actions or
the old sledgehammer performance of
inertia operated. Not to mention much

2 0 1 4

more pleasurable.

Think about it, starting off the
waterfowl hunting with steel No. 4s in
2¾ shells for teal, then moving up to No.
2 3 inch as the big ducks begin putting
on more fat and feathers and start to
become decoy shy. Finally, at the end
of the year, or when the geese arrive,
loading 3½-inch BBs, all in the same
gun without any noticeable difference in
recoil or cycling, fulfilling the promise of
one semi-auto shotgun for all seasons.

Like the Boy Scout motto, a
hunter can be prepared for whatever
conditions he finds in the field with just
one gun and some different shells in each
pocket of his game vest. Just don’t have
lead where you are only supposed to
have steel.

AMMUNITION

The great advantage of the Versa Max® is that it can be used in any season, fall or spring, and even summer or winter. Take it out to
the clays course and it will function with target loads in 2¾-inch shells all day, and the same length for doves, then later in the year it
can be loaded with 3-inch pheasant loads for those birds that get up 30 or 40 yards ahead. Finally, there are 3½-inch Remington®
Premier® High-Velocity Magnum Copper-Plated Buffered Turkey Loads for the spring for wild turkeys, or
Remington® Hypersonic Steel® 3- and 3½-inch for waterfowl in the autumn. The ultra high-velocity of the Hypersonic shells is
the product of special powders and the unique features of the Remington Xelerator® Wad®. The first is a two-stage ignition system
in which a chamber in the wad rests over the primer, so that at ignition, wad and shot column move forward in the chamber before
the main load of powder ignites. This starts the shot with less pressure and creates more room for the powder to burn, so it has more
power. The result is 1700 feet-per-second muzzle velocity, the fastest there is, meaning a half-body-length lead advantage on a duck
over conventional steel-shot loads.

A mallard can fly at 60 miles per hour, while a teal, thought to
be the fastest duck, only reaches about 30. A canvasback was
once clocked at 72.
20

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COMING JULY, 2014 ON OUTDOOR CHANNEL
Wed 2:30 PM Wed 8:30 PM Thu 2:00 AM
All Times Eastern

deer expert
russ maclennan

waterfowl expert
doug larsen

big game expert
dan harrison

www.Remington.com

21

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FOOD STORAGE TIPS
FROM CHARLIE PALMER

W

hen you get it, you want
to keep it. That’s how
the old mountain men
and Native Americans
felt about the game they
hunted. From the beginning, hunters have looked
for ways of preserving and storing the meat they could not consume at the site of a kill; and that consumption could be considerable, an Indian hunter reported to have been capable of eating 20
pounds of fresh buffalo at one time. Drying and smoking were two
of the most basic methods of saving food; and the beaded, rawhide
parfleche was the original food-storage bag. Davy Crockett’s fame
as a bear hunter grew out of his need to stockpile meat for winter,
which he did by literally “salting away” the scores of black bear he
took each year.

Drying, smoking, and salting have been vastly improved
upon by the use of freezing and vacuum packing. The key to those
methods start, though, with the proper handling of the game
from the moment of the kill. Charlie Palmer, for example, is an
unshakeable believer in eviscerating wild birds and packing them
in ice as soon as possible after they are retrieved, to chill them
down. (A good tool for cleaning birds is the Remington Heritage
870™ Series R-11 Upland knife, by the way.)

Charlie Palmer is, of course, the famed, award-winning
chef, as well as a restaurateur (including New York’s landmark
Aureole), hotelier, television personality, and author of
numerous cookbooks, such as Great American Food and
Charlie Palmer’s Practical Guide to the New American
Kitchen, and his latest, the 272-page Remington

22

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The key is the proper handling of
the game from the moment of the kill.
– Charlie Palmer, Award Winning Chef

Camp Cooking with more than a hundred tested recipes
out of, and for, the hunting and fishing camp, along with
40 classic full-color illustrations from the Remington Arms
Company Art Collection.

Palmer, who describes his cooking style as
“Progressive American” cuisine, is an avid hunter and angler
dating back to his days chasing rabbits with dogs as a boy
in Smyrna, New York; and he is as capable of navigating a
campfire as a cooking range. He’s pursued deer and other big
game since he was 14, and is profoundly aware of the care
and respect a carcass is due, especially if a hunter hopes to
create something delicious out of that carcass and put it on
the table. Palmer’s message about how to handle wild birds
is essentially the same for all game, big and small. And the
added message is that there are a lot of
misconceptions about the proper ways to
handle meat.

Take the idea that hanging
a carcass with the hide on in normal
temperatures will help “age” the meat.
According to Palmer, this is simply “the
most unsanitary way to handle game.”
After skinning (most easily accomplished
while the animal still retains its natural
body heat), washing, wiping, and drying
the chest cavity, and quartering the
carcass, the meat may be hung in a cool
or refrigerated room and chilled down–40˚
F is generally considered the threshold
for keeping meat. Doing otherwise is an

invitation to bacteria growth.

The cooling process can begin even before big game
is brought in from the field. The first step is to dress the
animal (and a knife like the Remington Heritage 700™
Series RH-21 Big-Game Drop Point is a good choice for the
job), opening it the full length of the body up to the windpipe
(if there are no plans to take the head skin for a taxidermied
mount, and removing all the intestines. If the weather is
warm), gallon storage bags or empty plastic milk jugs, filled
with water and frozen solid, can be placed inside the body
cavity to chill the carcass down without creating an excessive
amount of meltwater.

Once chilled, the next step would be to package the
meat. For decades the best product for that was freezer paper,
Continued page 26

Tips For Packing Spices

23

J U L Y

Enjoy Charlie Palmer’s Practical
Guide to the New American
Kitchen, and his latest, the
272-page Remington Camp
Cooking with more than 100
tested recipes out of, and for,
the hunting and fishing camp,
along with 40 classic full-color
illustrations from the Remington
Arms Company Art Collection.

24

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Woodducks by Beecham from the Remington Arms Company Art Collection

25

Continued from page 23

then plastic wrap. Those have now been replaced, in terms of greatest effectiveness, by the
several vacuum food-storage systems on the market.

We may need oxygen to survive; but without proper protection against oxygen, meat
can, like iron, and because of the iron in it, oxidize and begin to break down microbiologically,
turning rancid. Even when frozen, or especially so, and in a non-airtight package, the exposed
meat will oxidize and dehydrate and turn that lovely shade and texture of gray leather. Freezer
burn is not toxic, just disgusting.

The best thing to do with any game meat is to eat it without freezing it. A limit
of breasted doves, in many hunters’s humble opinions, should never be put in a freezer but
cooked within a few days of being killed. If a hunter, though, has a three-day possession limit
of pheasants or ducks, or a deer or pronghorn, and certainly an elk, then there is nothing to
be done but to freeze the amount that cannot be eaten in the first few days after the hunt.
And with the modern home-storage systems available on the market today, an excellent job of
preserving game meat can be achieved.

Charlie Palmer feels that only if something is going to be cooked whole, like a bird
or small game, should it be frozen whole. Even with birds and small game, a hunter should
think about how he is going to use the carcass and break it down accordingly. That may mean
taking the breasts and packaging them together to freeze, and freezing the legs in another
package–the legs benefiting from different cooking methods from the breasts, like being brined
and slow braised, for instance. Or with a rabbit or hare, removing the saddle and deboning it
before freezing for future pan frying; or using the meat from the front quarters for pasta sauce
or chili. The remaining bones from birds and small game can be frozen for later use in making
stock or a sauce or gravy or end up in something like a jambalaya.

Palmer recalls someone’s once having given him a whole rack of antelope loin.
Unfortunately, the rib ends had perforated the freezer wrap, allowing the meat to burn. If
the loin had first been removed from the bones and trussed and frozen, it could have been
defrosted without any freezer burn and cooked whole. Or it might have been cut into boneless
chops and sealed up in the correct number for the people it would be serving, maybe two or
four chops per package.

Breaking down and butchering game before freezing also gives a hunter the chance to
inspect the carcass and trim away the tallowy fat from deer meat or all the bloodshot portions
or wiping any loose hairs that can leave a “gamey” taste. With birds, he can pick out as much
of the shot as he can, along with all those little feathers that get stuck through the skin by
the shot. By preparing cuts or grinding the meat or packaging it for stews or chilis, a hunter is
more likely to use the game before it spends too long in the freezer (and there is a limit to how
long meat should be kept frozen before cooking, generally no more than six months, if it is truly
airtight).

Once vacuum-wrapped meat has been placed in the freezer and frozen, it is better not
to disturb it too much afterward before taking it out, because ice crystals inside the packaging
can pierce the plastic bag and let drying air in. And it is always a good idea to label the
package with the type, cut of meat, and the date it was put into the freezer, to separate the
sheep from the goats. Or the whitetail from the mule deer.
26

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Try Charlie’s Wild
Turkey Schnitzel and
Napa Cabbage Slaw
recipes on page 42

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name America trusts. Remington.®
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by American workers

©2013 REMINGTON ARMS COMPANY, LLC.

J U L Y

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Continued from page 13

necessary federal
Form 4s that must
THE GROWING USE OF SILENCERS IN HUNTING be completed in
the finest target crown a firearm can
duplicate. Then with the signature of
have, increasing accuracy, as well
your chief of police, sheriff, or other
has suppressing the muzzle flash,
like law-enforcement official on the
concealing the source of the shot.
backs of the forms verifying your clean

The mythology of the
record, two sets of fingerprint cards,
silencer as a somehow clandestine
passport photos affixed to the forms,
and criminal device arises out of the
and the all-important one-time (per
federal government’s decision to
silencer) $200 transfer-tax check,
include it under the National Firearms
submit it all to the Department of
Act of 1934 that grew out of the era
the Treasury and be prepared to wait
of John Dillinger and Public Enemies
60 to 120 days for approval (go to
and regulated the sale and possession
silencer manufacturer Advanced
of automatic weapons. Some may
Armament Corporation’s AAC
not realize that the 1934 act never
CanU site for full details of the
outlawed the purchase and possession
purchase process). Once you have your
of “machine guns,” nor of silencers. It
silencer, carry a copy of the paperwork
merely created a licensing system for
with you and you can use your silencer
owning them. Today in 39 states, it is
in your state, and any other where
legal to have a licensed silencer. It is
possession and use is legal.
also legal in 30 of those states to hunt

Some people believe that by
big game with a silencer, and varmintsowning a silencer, they are opening
only in two others (the American
themselves up to unannounced
Suppressor Association has a
appearances of the BATFE at their
list of states that permit possession of,
door. There is nothing in owning
and hunting with, silencers, or click on
a silencer, though, that supersedes
“Gun Laws” at the NRA).
anyone’s protections against unlawful

The process for obtaining
search and seizure. It doesn’t put
a silencer, contrary to some popular
you on anyone’s radar, anymore than
opinion, is fairly straightforward, if
owning a car makes you a target of the
not immediate. To own a silencer
DMV.
in one of the 39 states where it is

Out of all the dark
legal, you must be 21 or older, a legal
associations swirling around silencers,
resident of the United States, and be
the question arises, why would you
eligible to purchase a firearm. Next,
own one? To which the other question
you need to locate a Class 3 firearms
may be asked, why wouldn’t you?
dealer who trades in silencers. He

Let’s speak of the first benefit
should be able to supply you with the
of a silencer, if you are still able to
28

hear me. Many of us, alas, grew up
in an era before most people thought
about the permanent damage being
done to their hearing by muzzle blast.
All those tiny hairs, or “cilia,” that
detect sound for our ears are broken if
exposed to unmuffled loud noises and
do not regenerate (most unsilenced
gunshots are louder than nearby
thunder); perhaps worse, those broken
hairs swimming around in our ears
are a cause of tinnitus, that constant
ringing that probably some of you are
experiencing right now. Every raw shot
we are exposed to takes away a little
bit more of our hearing. So we must
wear hearing protection whenever
we are shooting; at the range, in the
bird field, and even while hunting
big game. Yet how many of us do?
A silencer on a firearm is a fail-safe
hearing protection device for the
shooter and those around him.

Many muzzle brakes only
worsen the effects of gunshots on
our hearing. The silencer, though,
not only takes down the noise, but
reduces the amplitude of the recoil
better than most brakes. With less
recoil and less muzzle jump, a shooter
can concentrate better on his shot and
reacquire his target more quickly for a
second one, if necessary. As mentioned
above, silencers also suppress muzzle
flash, and they make firearms more
accurate by improving the “harmonic
stabilization” of the barrel and
reducing the jet effect of the gases
exiting the muzzle that can destabilize
the bullet. Finally, with more and more

J U L Y

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hunting opportunities cropping
up in suburban areas with the
exploding populations of hogs and
whitetails, a silencer, which reduces
the noise of a firearm to the action
working (on a semi-auto), the
bullet breaking the sound barrier,
if subsonic ammunition isn’t being
used, and sound of the impact,
allows us to hunt without drawing
attention or complaints from
neighbors or the public.

A good example of a
top-quality silencer is Advanced
Armament’s
Cyclone™.
Twenty-two
ounces in
weight,
and built
for the 308
Winchester caliber, it
adds 8¾-inches to the length
of the barrel when threaded
onto the muzzle, and eliminates
approximately 95 percent of the
report of the rifle. Remington offers
its Remington Model 700®
SPS™ Tactical with a threaded
muzzle, requiring no custom work.
For silenced rimfire shooting, there
is the Remington Model 597™
AAC-SD, also with a threaded
muzzle. And Advanced Armament
offers an array of rimfire silencers
to be found in their catalog.
Centerfire or rimfire, there are more
opportunities than ever to prey
silently.

SILENCER MAINTENANCE
Upkeep on a silencer is about what you would put into maintaining your firearm,
or less. It does depend on whether you are using a rimfire or a centerfire silencer.
Extreme buildup of carbon and lead in a silencer can ultimately “choke” the
projectile. Rimfire leaves more residue than a centerfire, so Advance Armament’s 22
silencers can be taken apart and the internal baffles cleaned with a non-ammonia
solvent. (Some baffles are aluminum, so ammonia-based cleaners can be hard on
them.) As often as you clean your gun, the interior of the silencer can be brushed
down with Remington Rem® Oil, as an example, the excess wiped away, and
the silencer reassembled and put back into use. Centerfire silencers, because the
powders used in the cartridges burn hotter and cleaner, require even less cleaning–
they don’t disassemble, so just cleaning where the “can” is mated to the muzzle is
all that is needed.

Bread toasters, it is estimated, have been
involved in more crimes than legal silencers.
As little as 85 decibels of sound can cause
permanent hearing damage over time. An
unsilenced gunshot can be between 140 and 190
decibels, capable of causing instant damage.
29

J U L Y

Remington Model 700

®

2 0 1 4

ULTimate
MUZZLE LOA
30

J U L Y

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T

he story of the newest product in the Remington firearms line is one of coming full circle. Looking back almost
200 years, America’s oldest existing manufacturing company began with the desire of a young man to have a
muzzleloading rifle. When Eliphalet Remington II, could not convince his father to give him the money to buy
a new flintlock, the 20-something went to the forge in the family blacksmith shop in central New York and
fabricated a barrel. He then is said to have set out on foot to Utica to have a gunsmith ream and rifle the barrel.
That gunsmith supposedly praised the quality of Remington’s work before Remington hiked back home and
completed the building of his long gun. The finished firearm caught the eye of his neighbors, who were soon
pestering Remington to build rifles for them, giving birth to the Remington Arms Company.

Now, Remington has returned to the making of muzzleloaders with the Remington® Model 700® Ultimate
Muzzleloader®, a rifle as likely to draw attention as that first Remington rifle.

The progress of muzzleloaders has been about ignition systems. Start with the first trigger mechanism, the matchlock,
which began as a simple lever to bring a slow match–a burning cord–held in a serpentine–a curved clamp–into contact with the
powder in the flash pan, thus letting the shooter continue to hold the musket in both hands and aim, or at least point, it as he
fired. Further advancements included the wheellock which worked like the sparking device on a cigarette lighter; the snaphance,
which can be referred to as “rocklock” because it uses a stone to strike a plate and produce sparks and the flintlock. Then in the
early 1800s, with the previous discovery of explosive fulminates, the Scots minister the Rev. A. J. Forsyth patented the percussion
cap which would work in all weather conditions, wet or dry, and eliminated the
“flash in the pan” that could spook birds on the wing.
For more than 150 years the percussion system was the state of the art in
muzzleloader ignition. Then in the 1980s came the development of in-line firing
mechanisms. Now a percussion cap on a nipple, over the powder charge inside
the barrel, was struck by a hammer that
traveled in a straight line, rather than in
the circular motion of a “cock,” making
ignition faster and surer.
A hunter still had that knobbed end of the in-line hammer sticking back in his face, so the next logical step was
to employ a bolt action to fire the percussion cap, making an entirely closed system which led to the use of primers, such as the
those for shotgun cartridges, rather than percussion caps, to ignite the powder. In-lines gave a hunter reliable killing ranges out to
150 yards, especially when the primer and percussion cap were combined with a saboted jacketed large-caliber pistol bullet. Now
Remington has gone beyond that to create the ultimate in muzzleloaders.

Remington’s Director of Product Management for rifles, John Fink, has been hunting with the Model 700® Ultimate
Muzzleloader® a good bit and has so far taken almost a dozen whitetail from his treestand in North Carolina, including eight, nine,
and 11 pointers, all of them clean one-shot kills, some as far out as one-hundred-eightyyards. A hundred-eighty is, though, just
scratching the surface for the Ultimate Muzzleloader®.

Along with deer, Fink has taken coyote and groundhogs, where things get truly interesting, because some of those
“hogs” have been at ranges out to 300 yards. This is what you might expect to get out of a centerfire rifle, but is unheard of in
muzzleloaders.

On the Remington rifle everything goes back to the ignition system. Not only is it built on the the time-tested
Remington® Bolt Action Model 700® bolt and receiver, but it incorporates a patented “Ultimate Muzzleloader Ignition

ADER

®

Continued on page 33

31

CONSUMER PROMOTION
A P R I L

2 0 1 4

PROMOTION DATES: MAY 1 - AUGUST 31, 2014. MUST BE POSTMARKED BY SEPTEMBER 27, 2014.

PURCHASE ANY

BUSHMASTER 223 / 5.56 MODERN SPORTING RIFLE
Revised BFI Logo 04/2013

®

100 ROUNDS

RECEIVE
(2 BOXES OF 50 RDS)
®
®
OF REMINGTON UMC 223 AMMUNITION BACK BY MAIL
THE FOLLOWING STATES ARE INELIGIBLE TO RECEIVE AMMUNITION: AK, CA, CT, D.C., IL, HI, MA, NY, NJ.
CUSTOMER ENTRIES FROM THESE STATES WILL RECEIVE $50.00 CASH BACK BY MAIL.

BONUS OFFER
RECEIVE A 25% DISCOUNT FOR
SHOPREMINGTONCOUNTRY.COM
RAMAC 23966

CUSTOMER WILL PAY $5.00 SHIPPING & HANDLING FEE FOR AMMUNITION. SEE OFFICIAL ENTRY FORM FOR DETAILS.
PROMOTION: 55800

BUSHMASTER.COM/PROMOTIONS

Eligible consumers must pay $5.00 shipping/handling fee via check or money order. Do NOT send cash. Residents of California, Connecticut, District of Columbia, Illinois, Massachusetts, New York, New Jersey, Hawaii
and Alaska are not eligible for ammunition offer. Residents of these states will receive $50.00 back by mail. 25% discount expires 12/31/15. This Promotion is open only to residents of the United States age 21 or
older who are legally able to purchase ammunition in their state or locale. Proof of age required. Void where prohibited. Promotion valid on new (not previously owned) Bushmaster® 223/5.56 Modern Sporting Rifle
purchases made 5/1/14 – 8/31/14. Must be postmarked by 9/27/14. Complete the Redemption Form available at your local retailer or online at www.bushmaster.com/promotions and submit all required information.
Continued on page 20
Allow 10 - 12 weeks for processing. Offer void where prohibited, taxed or restricted by law. This offer is valid for end-users only. Offer limited to product in stock during time of promotion. No rain checks. For complete
terms and conditions, please see the Redemption Form available at your local participating retailer or online at www.bushmaster.com.
©2014 Bushmaster Firearms, International

32

A P R I L

2 0 1 4

System”. This utilizes a brass case primed with a Remington No. 9½ large magnum rifle primer. The case fits completely over a
chamfered nozzle in the breechplug, seating the primer above a funnel into the powder charge. With the primer and brass case
locked under the face of the bolt action, a gas-tight seal is made to send, when the trigger is
pulled, a jet of flame into the propellant. The results are, frankly, outstanding.
Maximum powder loads in muzzleloaders have, up till now, topped off at 150
In the Ultimate
grains, often with a lot of that powder blowing unburnt out of the muzzle. In the Ultimate
Muzzleloader®, Muzzleloader®, charges of 200 grains (four 50-grain pellets of Hodgdon® Triple Seven®
propellant–“Triple Seven” a registered trademark of Hodgdon Powder Company), ignited by the
9½ primer, burn efficiently and cleanly. The result is a 250-grain Barnes® Spit-Fire T-EZ™
charges of 200
(“Spit-Fire T-EZ” a trademark of Barnes Bullets, LLC) leaving the rifle at over 2400 feet per
second, which is reaching 338 Winchester Magnum territory, giving the muzzleloader genuine
grains ignited
300-yard capability, the projectile still traveling at more than 1,300 feet per second at that
range.
by the 9½

This opens an entirely new world for the muzzleloader hunter. There is now no game
beyond his reach, whether mountain sheep or grizzly bear. Or any of the classic plains game
primer, burn
of Africa. A list of the muzzleloader seasons and regulations in the United States can be found
at muzzleloading seasons by state, though it is simpler just to list the states that do
efficiently and
not permit the use of “closed” ignitions, such as that on the Ultmate Muzzleloader®. Those
states the three Northwestern ones of Oregon, Washington, and Idaho. Everywhere else, the
cleanly.
revolutionary Model 700® frontloader is allowed.

Along with its extreme range, velocity, and energy, the Remington Ultimate
Muzzleloader® is built to withstand the elements with a 26-inch fluted stainless-steel barrel
and a Bell and Carlson composite stock. For added accuracy, the rifle uses the X-Mark
Pro Adjustable Trigger found on the regular Model 700® rifles, the trigger adjustable to
between 2½ and 5 pounds.

The Ultimate Muzzleloader® comes either with iron sights or is tapped and drilled for scope mounts, ready to carry
“blackpowder” hunting into the 21st Century, and maybe beyond.

AMMUNITION

For almost a 1000 years, the formula for gunpowder, or blackpowder, was a mixture of potassium nitrate, charcoal, and sulphur. This
burned quickly but rather inefficiently, leaving behind a great deal of fouling residue in the barrel, meaning swabbing between shots,
and promoting corrosion if not cleaned after shooting. The late 1970s saw the introduction of Pyrodex® (“Pyrodex” is a registered
trademark of Hodgdon Powder Company), a blackpowder substitute, composed similarly to blackpowder with added ingredients, that
burns cleaner and more efficiently than blackpowder. The next step, and today’s state of the art, was Triple Seven, a sulphurless, hotter,
higher-velocity alternative to blackpowder, which in pellet form gives precisely measured loads. The pellet includes a center channel,
so it burns from the rear, the outside in, and the inside out, producing more energy and less “ejecta,” or residue. Triple Seven pellets
are the choice of propellant for the 250-grain 451-diameter Barnes® Spit-Fire T-EZ™. A 100-percent copper with a polymer tip, the
flat bottomed bullet is easier load with a sabot in tighter bores, and provides cutting, penetrating expansion at both short and long
ranges. This is all a far cry from the patched roundballs and blackpowder Eliphalet Remington, II hunted with. But they do speak to
the future of muzzleloading hunting.
33

ORION ENTERTAINMENT

Dan Harrison just flew in from
across the ocean and hemispheres. With
more than a quarter-century of guiding
experience, and today known
as a co-host of Remington
Country, the television show of
the Remington Arms Company,
Harrison spent two weeks this
spring, the fall down there,
hunting in the game-rich island nation of
New Zealand and had left with the job
partially unfinished. After scaling cliffs more
rugged and treacherous than any he had
ever chased game on before, he had not
taken a Himalayan tahr, one of the most
prized trophies in New Zealand, and hunted

Remington Country Trailer
34

BEHIND THE SCENES

TV

elsewhere only in Nepal. That was all right,
though, because even without taking a tahr,
he still had one of the most exciting hunting
trips of his life in the land of the kiwis, and
one he was looking forward to sharing with
viewers in a series of shows. Besides, he
now had a perfect excuse for returning to
New Zealand and completing his quest.

This is just one of the adventures
Harrison, and his fellow hosts, will
present on this season’s slate of episodes.
Remington Country is not about showcasing
Remington products, or body counts, as
much as it is about portraying the way of life
that is centered around hunting. Airing on
the Outdoor Channel–twice on Wednesdays
and once on Thursdays, from July to
December–it is a program whose theme is
the passion and enthusiasm veteran hunters
carry with them into the field, along with
their firearms and ammunition.

Remington Country is a major
undertaking for the show’s producer, Orion
Entertainment, the leading maker of
outdoor entertainment in the world today. It
begins with three hosts and two producers.
An even dozen veteran camera people work
in the field to capture all the action, drama,
human interest, and scenic beauty of each
Continued on next page

E N T E R TA I N M E N T

35

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Outdoor Channel reaches 39 million households.
Orion’s roster of network clients include Outdoor Channel, History,
Discovery, National Geographic, NatGeo Wild, HGTV, Spike, Travel
Channel, DIY, GAC, Destination America, Velocity, NBC Sports, ESPN
and others.

show, the series covering 16 separate
hunting locations. Although state-of-theart technology goes into the making of
Remington Country, it maintains the feel
and look of classic cinema.

Even with excursions
to New Zealand, at the heart of
Remington Country lies the tradition
of North American hunting. If you
know the way a lot of outdoor
TV gets made, the process is
often one of beginning with a
destination and then working
backward to the host–making
that host fit the hunt, rather than
drawing on his expertise to obtain
the most from the hunt. In Remington
Country, the concept has been one of
starting with a trio of hosts who are not
only experts in the areas of game that
appeal to them most, but bring decades
of their own guiding backgrounds to the
production. This makes for an unrivaled
insight into hunting, especially because
36

the three focus on their own individual
pursuits.

Begin with Harrison, who in
Colorado guides for elk, deer, antelope,
bear, and more, and who himself hunts
for it all across North America.
Then there is the renowned
waterfowl expert, and likewise
guide, Doug Larsen, who, if
you ask him, will not be able to
tell you how long he has been
hunting ducks and geese, but that
he cannot genuinely remember
when he was not. Finally, there
is Russell MacLennan, a
man enthralled by deer and the
owner of The Bluffs wingshooting lodge,
who offers hunters some of the finest bird
hunting to be found in eastern Colorado.
It is from these three men’s perspectives
and senses of adventure that the shows
unfold.

Beginning with their chosen
game and destinations, the hosts operate

from the standpoint, expressed by
Harrison, that what “brings us to the
outdoors is a lot more than pulling the
trigger on an animal.” An added twist to
the shows is that the hosts, after decades
of guiding hundreds if not thousands of
hunters, now find the positions reversed,
the guide becoming the guided. That
can be a challenge, of course, as they try
not to second guess the guides they are
following, who were in any case chosen
because they are the best around.

One more aspect of the show is
that the hosts will also be following their
chosen professions and guiding other
hunters in their territories from time to
time, such as Harrison taking a father
and son after Colorado elk, while Russell
MacLennan, the resident expert in deer
and antelope out on the plains, will be
guiding for mule deer in Nebraska.

There will be opportunities in
the show to look at the technological
breakthroughs and the history of

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W I T H RI

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Mountain is committed to providing responsible citizens the highest-quality solutions for
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J U L Y

Remington, as it approaches its 200th
year. As well, the show will provide
insights into the way hunting is today.
Take Doug Larsen as an example. Having
begun waterfowling in a time of restricted
bag limits and hunting days, Larsen is not
a little astounded to have enjoyed year
after year of liberal bags and long seasons
as populations seem constantly to defy
expectations. What he sees, though, is
birds adapting quicker to being hunted
and more wary of the setups hunters are
using. It’s a challenge he addresses in
the shows, which in no way means he
does not have excellent hunting, because
he knows how to work to get it. He also
draws attention to the improvements
in waterfowling gear, even beyond
Remington’s advancements in shotguns
and loads, including something as simple
as warm neoprene waders versus rubber,
and how all this contributes to the safety
of duck hunting compared to years ago.
There’s also a greater opportunity these
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days to follow the migration down the
continent from Canada to the South, as
Larsen does.

Something else that will be
different about Remington Country is
that it will not be the place to look for
celebrities being ushered around the field
and pointed at game to shoot. The soul
of the show is family and friends, those
fathers and sons, or on the New Zealand
shows, Harrison introducing the daughter
of a late friend to international hunting.
For Larsen, the shows present a chance
to hunt not only with some of the people
close to him, but as importantly, even with
his own dogs.

From new locales (Harrison in
one show hunts New Mexico for the
very first time, even though he has lived
his entire life just across the state line in
Colorado) to intimately known territories
(MacLennan will be guiding on his own
family-owned The Bluffs), the hosts will be
dealing with the natural conditions, such

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as the vagaries of weather that can shut
things down for days, to trying to line up a
shot under real-world conditions, and not
from a benchrest in a shooting house.

You can add a list of destinations
besides New Zealand, New Mexico, and
Colorado that includes Texas, Manitoba,
Nebraska, Oklahoma, and Mississippi.
These are in keeping with the deeply
American roots of Remington. They also
represent possible dreams for the average
hunter, not impossible ones, helping him
to identify with the production.

For 30 minutes per show,
Remington presents a vision of hunting
the way it truly is and how it should
genuinely be. This is only to be expected
from a company with the reputation
of a Remington, which is a reputation
held by none other in the firearms and
ammunition industry. And there is always
an invitation being made to the viewer to
come along, there’s room for one more on
the hunt.

GANDER

J U L Y

S P E C I A L

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R E P O R T

REMINGTON RIFLE
TEAM UPDATE

T

on target

here’s the saying
about grace under
pressure, and one
of the truest tests
of the reliability

and performance of firearms and
ammunition comes in the heat of
competition. Summer is the height
of the competitive season and Remington is fielding teams in virtually
every discipline across the next few
months. Here is a list of the teams
and the events. Remington, with a
track record of consistent victories,
will be out to win, so follow along
to see how well its teams do.

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Bushmaster 3
Gun Team:
Rob Tate, Aaron Reed, Ravin Perry
May 24 – Bushmaster®-Tarheel 3
Gun Monthly Match in New Hill, NC
May 31 – Remington® Versa Max®Tarheel 3 Gun Quarterly Match in New
Hill, NC
June 21 – Freedom Munitions 3 Gun
in Clinton, SC
June 28 - Bushmaster®-Tarheel 3
Gun Monthly Match in New Hill, NC
July 12 – Remington® Versa Max®Tarheel 3 Gun Quarterly Match in New
Hill, NC
July 19 - Bushmaster®-Tarheel 3
Gun Monthly Match in New Hill, NC

Remington Sporting
Clays Team:
Wendell Cherry, Brad Kidd, Jr., Gebben
Miles, David Radulovich, Diane
Sorantino, Ashleigh Hafley, Bill McGuire,
Annabelle Ayres, Mike Wilgus
June 2-8 US Open Sporting Clays
Championships in Columbus, KS

August 13-17 North Central
Regional Sporting Clays Championships
in Hainesville, IL
 

Remington Trap Team:
Harlan Campbell, Jr., Kay Ohye,
Dennis Bringelson, Chris Vendel, Sean
Hawley, Deb Ohye-Neilson, Dave Kelly,
Stacey Bringelson, Mike Jordan, Hardy
Musselman, Sam Foppe, Rob Taylor
June 2-8 Kansas State Trap
Championships in Wichita, KS
June 10-15 Illinois State Trap
Championships in Bunker Hill, IL
June 17-22 Ohio State Trap
Championships in Marengo, OH
July 8-13 Minnesota State Trap
Championships in Alexandria, MN
July 15-20 Wisconsin State Trap
Championships in Waukeshaw, WI
July 22-27 Iowa State Trap
Championship in Cedar Fall, IA
August 6-16 Grand Falls American
World Trapshooting Championships in
Sparta, IL
 

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Top row, standing, from left: Frank Adelson, Nate Guernsey, Joe Hendricks, Sr. (Asst. Team
Captain), Carl Bernosky, Mark Laramie, Gary Hendricks, Hugo Adelson Second row, from
left: Phillip “Mick” McCotter, Joe Hendricks, Jr., Ken Roxburgh (Team Captain), Alex Arietta,
Dwight “Tiny” Briggs (Team Armorer) Seated in front: Sara Rozanski

Remington Skeet Team:
Todd Bender, Paul Giambrone, Jr., Robert Paxton
Sept 26-Oct 3 World Skeet Championships in San Antonio, TX
 

Remington Rifle Team:
Ken Roxburgh, Carl Bernosky, Gary Hendricks, Joe Hendricks, Sr. Joe Hendricks, Jr., Tom Rider, Mark Laramie, Nate Guernsey, Fritz
Hemplemann, Donald Trump, Jr., Dwight Briggs
May 29-June 1 Remington® Long Range Regional in State College, PA
June 6-8 Remington® High Power Classic in State College, PA
June 20-23 High Power Match in New Holland, PA
June 28-29 Long Range Match in State College, PA
July 14-Aug 2 Remington®/NRA National Matches in Camp Perry, OH

41

J U L Y

Wild Turkey Schnitzel
Extra-Virgin Olive Oil
Vegetable Oil
Salt And Pepper
4
Wild Turkey Breasts, Boneless
4 Large Eggs
1 Tablespoon
Dijon Mustard
3 Cups
All-Purpose Flour
¼ Tsp Each
Salt And Pepper
1 ½ Cups
Panko Breadcrumbs
1 ½ Cups
Dried Bread Crumbs

Caper Vinaigrette
3 Tablespoons
¼ Cup
1 Cup
1

Unsalted Butter
Capers, Drained
Italian Parsley Leaves, Chopped
Lemon, Segmented

Napa Cabbage Slaw
1 Large Head
Napa Cabbage, Cored, Shredded
2 Each
Carrots, Finely Julienne
1/2 -Bunch
Scallion, Chiffonade
1/2 -Bunch
Cilantro, Chiffonade
Slaw Vinaigrette

Slaw Vinaigrette
1/2 Cup
Natural Rice Wine Vinegar
1/4 Cup Water
1 Tablespoon
Sugar
1/2 Teaspoons
Ginger, Grated
1/2 Cloves
Garlic, Grated

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SERVES

4

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J U L Y

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Turkey Schnitzel Directions

Place a 12-inch square of plastic wrap on a sturdy work surface. Drizzle about 1 teaspoon of oil onto the plastic and set a portion of
turkey directly on it, then drizzle on another spoonful of oil and cover the meat with a second piece of plastic wrap.
Gently pound the turkey breast with a wooden mallet until it is about ¼ inch thick all over. Flip the breast over halfway through the
process to produce an even thickness. Repeat with remaining breasts. Season turkey breasts with salt and pepper.
Whisk together the eggs and mustard in a bowl. Put the flour in a bowl and the breadcrumbs in a shallow dish. Line them up; flour,
then egg, then crumbs. Dip a seasoned turkey breast in the flour, pat off any excess, and then dip it in the egg, coating it completely.
Pick up the breast by one edge and hold it over the dish for a few seconds so any excess egg drips off, then dredge the breast in
breadcrumbs. Repeat with the remaining turkey breasts. Refrigerate turkey until ready to cook.
Pour about ½ inch of oil into a large sauté pan and heat over medium-high heat until it registers 320°F on a deep-fat thermometer, or
until breadcrumbs flicked into the oil sizzle right up instead of sinking.
One by one, fry the turkey breasts crisp, cooking them about 2 minutes per side. If the breading browns too quickly, or starts turning
blotchy instead of an even golden brown, the oil is too hot, reduce the heat and wait for it to cool a bit before continuing. Transfer the
turkey breasts to a platter or pan lined with paper towels and keep warm in a 200°F oven. Don’t stack the cooked breasts or they’ll
get steamy and lose that all-important crispness.
When the last breast is fried, melt the butter in a medium sauté pan and cook until golden, swirling the pan as the butter colors
(otherwise the milk solids will fall to the bottom of the pan and burn). Sprinkle in the capers and sizzle them around for just a minute.
Add the lemon segments and toss just until heated through–too much cooking and they’ll fall apart.
Remove the pan from the heat and season with a few cracks of pepper; stir in the parsley, which will wilt on contact. Spoon warm
caper vinaigrette over turkey schnitzel and serve Napa cabbage coleslaw along side.

Cabbage Slaw Directions
Toss shredded cabbage, carrots, scallions and cilantro together in bowl. Place shredded slaw mixture in the refrigerator while you
prepare vinaigrette. Add all vinaigrette ingredients into a stainless steel bowl and whisk to combine. Set vinaigrette in the refrigerator
to chill for a least one hour. Toss cabbage slaw with vinaigrette and serve immediately.

After unearthing a steppe bison frozen in
Alaskan tundra for 36,000 years, zoologists
celebrated with a pot of neck-meat stew.
Canning food began with Napoleon’s
armies, but the can opener did not appear
for another 50 years.
43

PURCHASE ANY

DPMS® 223 / 5.56 MODERN SPORTING RIFLE

RECEIVE

100
ROUNDS

(2 BOXES OF 50 RDS)

OF REMINGTON UMC 223 AMMUNITION BACK BY MAIL
®

®

THE FOLLOWING STATES ARE INELIGIBLE TO RECEIVE AMMUNITION: AK, CA, CT, D.C., IL, HI, MA, NY, NJ.
CUSTOMER ENTRIES FROM THESE STATES WILL RECEIVE $50.00 CASH BACK BY MAIL.

BONUS OFFER

25%

RAMAC 23966

DISCOUNT FOR DPMS®
ONLINE PARTS STORE

CUSTOMER WILL PAY $5.00 SHIPPING & HANDLING FEE FOR AMMUNITION. SEE OFFICIAL ENTRY FORM FOR DETAILS.
PROMOTION: 55801

DPMSINC.COM/PROMO

Eligible consumers must pay $5.00 shipping/handling fee via check or money order. Do NOT send cash. Residents of California, Connecticut, District of Columbia, Illinois, Massachusetts, New York, New Jersey, Hawaii
and Alaska are not eligible for ammunition offer. Residents of these states will receive $50.00 back by mail. 25% discount expires 12/31/15. This Promotion is open only to residents of the United States age 21 or older
who are legally able to purchase ammunition in their state or locale. Proof of age required. Void where prohibited. Promotion valid on new (not previously owned) DPMS® 223/5.56 Modern Sporting Rifle purchases made
5/1/14 – 8/31/14. Must be postmarked by 9/27/14. Complete the Redemption Form available at your local retailer or online at www.dpmsinc.com/promo and submit all required information. Allow 10 - 12 weeks for
processing. Offer void where prohibited, taxed or restricted by law. This offer is valid for end-users only. Offer limited to product in stock during time of promotion. No rain checks. For complete terms and conditions,
please see the Redemption Form available at your local participating retailer or online at www.dpmsinc.com.
©2014 DPMS Panther Arms

J U L Y

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REMINGTON® PREMIER® AMMUNITION.

Our R&D staff is tirelessly perfecting the science behind

the one-shot kill, for you. Proudly crafting the most accurate, most lethal family of big-game ammunition
available today. Premier ® ammunition, by the name America trusts. Remington.®

PREMIER ®
ACCUTIP™

PREMIER ®
CORE-LOKT™

PREMIER ®
SCIROCCO™

PREMIER ®
A-FRAME™

Made in the USA
by American workers

©2013 REMINGTON ARMS COMPANY, LLC.

45

J U L Y

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E Z I N E

Remington Arms Company, LLC
870 Remington Drive
P.O. Box 700
Madison, NC 27025-0700
TEL: 1-800-243-9700

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