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Printing

:
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And did you notice we made
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Master, and delete them
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Naturalistic
Teaching
Strategies
Heather Brownfield
References
Charlop-Christy, M. H., & Carpenter, M. H. (2000).
Modified incidental teaching sessions: A procedure
for parents to increase spontaneous speech in their
children with autism.
Journal of Positive Behavior Interventions, 2(2), 98-
112.


Dunst, C. J., Raab, M., & Trivette, C. M. (2011).
Characteristics of naturalistic language
intervention strategies.
Journal of Speech-Language Pathology and Applied
Behavior Analysis, 5(1-3), 8-16.

Hancock, T. B., & Kaiser, A. P. (2002).
The effects of trainer-implemented enhanced
milieu teaching on the social communication of
children with autism.
Topics in Early Childhood Special Education, 22(1),
39-54

Harjusola-Webb, S. (2013).
Naturalistic strategies for promoting the
communication of infants and toddlers.
Presentation given 2013, October 3

Hemmeter, M. L., & Kaiser, A. P. (1994). Enhanced
milieu teaching:
Effects of parent-implemented language
intervention.
Journal of Early Intervention, (3), 269-289.

Trent, J. A., Kaiser, A. P., & Wolery, M. (2005).
The use of responsive interaction strategies by
siblings.
Topics in Early Childhood Special Education, 25(2),
107-118.

Peterson, P. (2004). Naturalistic language teaching
procedures for children at risk for language delays.
The Behavior Analyst Today, 5(4), 404-424.

Picture retrieved from:
http://voxxi.com/2012/12/18/ipad-educational-tool-
for-children/

Responsive
Interaction/Teaching
• Nonverbal mirroring: Imitate
child’s nonverbal behaviors
(manipulate separate, but
similar toys as the child in the
same way)
o This can occur with or
without accompanying
verbalization
o Must occur simultaneously or
in a turn immediately
following the behavior of the
child
• Verbal responding: Either
repeat verbalization of the
child or describe the activities
in which you are participating
o Respond to all verbal
utterances of the child
(intelligible/unintelligible)
-> Repeat any part of what
they say
-> Expand by repeating what
they said and adding to it
-> Describe the activities in
which you are participating
o Pause after each verbal turn
to give the child an
opportunity to respond

Printing:
Your printer might not print
the same way our printers
do, so make sure to try a
couple of test prints. If things
aren’t aligning quite right,
experiment with the Scale to
Fit Paper setting. It’s located
in the Print dialog – just click
Full Page Slides to get to it.
And did you notice we made
fold marks for you? They are
really light, but if you don’t
like them showing on your
brochure, click View, Slide
Master, and delete them
before you print.
Customizing the
Content:
The placeholders in this
brochure are formatted for
you. If you want to add or
remove bullet points from
text, just click the Bullets
button on the Home tab.
If you need more
placeholders for titles,
subtitles or body text, just
make a copy of what you
need and drag it into place.
PowerPoint’s Smart Guides
will help you align it with
everything else.
Want to use your own
pictures instead of ours? No
problem! Just click a picture,
press the Delete key, then
click the icon to add your
picture.
If you replace a photo with
your own and it’s not a
flawless fit for the space, you
can crop it to fit in almost no
time. Just select the picture
and then, on the Picture tools
Format tab, in the Size
group, click Crop.
Incidental Teaching
Enhanced Milieu
Teaching
• Level 1 prompt: 30-second
delay when a child displays
an interest in a specific
object
• Level 2 prompt: Adult
prompts child to ask for
the desired object
• Level 3 prompt: More
elaborate request by adult-
Adult shows the object to
the child and asks “What is
this?”
• Level 4 prompt: Correct
response modeled by the
adult and the child is
prompted to imitate the
response
*Lowest level of prompt
should be used that would
encourage the correct
response from the child

• Environmental
arrangement (putting
items out of reach of
child to require
requests)
• Child makes a request
(Points and says, “ba”)
• Prompt the child by
using modeling or
time-delay (“You want
the ball?” –wait for
response)
• Expand on the child’s
utterance (Child says,
“ba.” Adult says, “Ball,
please”)
• End with positive
feedback (give child
the item requested)

Time-Delay
• Adult identifies a situation in
which the child wants an object or
help and then waits for the child to
make a response
• If the child does not respond
appropriately, another delay is
used
• If time-delay is still unsuccessful,
modeling of the correct response is
used
• If the child does respond
appropriately, they receive the
desired object or help
Example:
John points to his cup on the kitchen
counter. I ask “You want your cup?”
and wait for John to make a response.
John says, “cup.” I give John the cup.
Mand-Model
• Adult observes the focus of the
child’s interest (a toy car)
• Adults mands a response from the
child (“Tell me what you want”)
• If the child makes an incorrect
response (“Train”), the adult
models the correct response (“Say
car”)
• If the child makes a correct
response, the adult praises the
child and gives them the object of
interest
*Similar to incidental teaching, but
the adult initiates the communication
instead of the child