CUSD LAUNCHES COMMON CORE WITH NEW TEXTBOOKS /PAGE 5

Friday, August 1, 2014 u One dollar
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our er i
Claremont
claremont-courier.com
LETTERS/ PAGE 2, 7
CALENDAR/ PAGE 16
Is there more to Claremont than
water? Visit claremont-courier.com.
POLICE BLOTTER/ PAGE 4
OBITS/ PAGE 12
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Wave of residents join
Claremont FLOW to fight
for local water control/
COURIER photos/Steven Felschundneff
California’s state mascot, the Golden Bear, hugs 6-year-old Kylie Cheetwood, left, and 9-year-old Emma Humphries during
Monday night’s concert in the park. The bear made a stop at Claremont’s Memorial Park to help promote a statewide com-
petition called the CoolCalifornia City Challenge, where citizens cut energy use to gain points for their city. With its 359 par-
ticipants, Claremont is currently in first place, after edging out the city of Riverside on Thursday afternoon.
Bear
HUG
PAGE 14
PAGE 3
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Petition signature removal
Dear Editor:
I thought people might like to know
that they can remove their name from a
ballot initiative petition very simply. All
they need to do is write a note to the
Claremont City Clerk asking that it be
removed.
The request for removal can be mailed
in or dropped off in person at City Hall,
207 Harvard Ave., Claremont, CA 91711.
It is important that the letter contain your
signature just like you signed the petition.
The request must get to the City Clerk be-
fore the petition is actually filed.
You can call the clerk at (909) 399-
5460 if you have questions, and you can
go to claremontflow.org to print out a
form to use if you like.
Barbara Miller
Claremont
MOU is presumptious
Dear Editor:
The Memorandum of Understanding
between Golden State Water and Clare-
mont Affordable Water Advocates
(CAWA) is presumptious regarding ap-
proval by all in the city. Who made
CAWA the decider regarding control of
water in Claremont?
I support the Claremont City Coun-
cil’s position to control water manage-
ment.
Bill E. Beck
Claremont
City tree-watering
Dear Editor:
The letter titled, “City trees are city
trees” seems a somewhat narrow and
short-sighted perspective, and ignores two
significant points. First, the city is us, not
some unattached entity. Whenever the
city council—elected by voters—makes a
decision, it is a democratic reflection of
Claremont residents. Secondly, Clare-
mont’s trees are an incontestable asset to
the community as a whole. Not only do
they provide beauty and enhance property
values, they also positively affect the
physical and emotional environment
within which we all live.
Admittedly, and in hindsight, some of
the types of trees that have been selected
to grace our streets have been a poor
choice. This error has been recognized
and is being rectified. Furthermore, the
letter-writer’s perspective might have
had some basis if they were transitory
residents without concern for the future
of the community, or perhaps struggling
to meet basic necessities and needing
outside assistance just to get by.
However, for most Claremont resi-
dents, the monthly cost of summer wa-
tering of a “city” tree or two is
reasonable, probably less than the cost of
dining out at one of our restaurants once
a month, and the long-term benefit to the
community is decidedly greater.
John Roseman
Claremont
Something to hide
Dear Editor:
Councilmembers talk a good game
about transparency but their actions
demonstrate a lack of confidence and re-
spect for residents. Why else would they
oppose a local initiative whose sole pur-
pose is to ensure residents vote on $135
million in proposed debt to seize the
water system. If the deal is so good, pub-
lic support shouldn’t be a problem.
The city hasn’t provided any details to
support a $135 million plan, and their
$55 million election is misleading. The
council, without discussion, appropriated
another $1 million from the general fund
last week and has allocated more than
$2.5 million for consultants and lawyers.
Instead of facts, we get promises. It’s a
repeat of the Felton experience, which
resulted in 30 years of higher property
taxes and 71 percent rate increases. A
Claremont economist projected the same
consequences here, which explains why
government isn’t disclosing information.
Give residents details and let them vote.
Why would the city oppose that unless
they had something to hide?
Claremont Affordable Water Advo-
cates supports the compromise agree-
ment with Golden State Water to lower
water bills and give residents local con-
trol without $135 million in debt we will
repay through a water surcharge for 30
years.
Donna Lowe
Claremont Affordable Water Advocates
[Editor’s note: The $2.5 million figure noted
here should include the approval of the $1
million, and is not in addition to. Regarding
the statement “without discussion,” the item
was placed on the City Council’s July 22
agenda, allowing residents to provide public
comment to the council before the vote. Three
residents addressed the council, all of whom
support the city’s effort to acquire the water
system. —KD]
READERS’ COMMENTS
Claremont COURIER/Friday, August 1, 2014 2
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Blvd., Suite 205B, Claremont, California 91711-5003. The Courier is a newspaper of general circulation as defined by the political code of the state of
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one hundred and sixth year, number 30
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Agendas for city meetings are avail-
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GOVERNING
OURSELVES
The Claremont City Council and all
commissions are in summer recess.
Meetings will resume in September.
Follow the news
Wherever the Claremont news takes us, the COURIER will be there.
C
our er i
Claremont
claremont-courier.com
Here are headlines straight from COURIER pages:
• Claremont and Golden State still miles apart on water issues
• Canvassers caught on home surveillance video
• City reaches out for feedback on Wilderness Park’s future
• Don’t let ad from CAWA pull the wool over your eyes
• Chinese students get SLICE of Claremont, US culture
• Is the city’s new sign ordinance going to hurt local business?
• Local entrepreneurs think ink with opening of tat shop
Claremont COURIER/Friday, August 1, 2014 3
CITY NEWS
FLOW calls for Claremonters to take stand against Golden State
A
s the battle over Clare-
mont water begins to
boil, a new group has
sprung up to add its voice to
the conversation. Say hello to
Claremont FLOW—Friends of
Locally Owned Water.
Uncomfortable with the thought of a
life necessity being in the hands of a
for-profit company, Claremont FLOW
is calling on the citizens of Claremont
to take a stand against Golden State
Water Company (GSW).
With the support of local organiza-
tions such as Claremont Outrage, the
League of Women Voters and Sustain-
able Claremont, this grassroots group is
interested in gaining local control of the
water system and supporting the city in
that quest.
Their reasons for this are numerous.
According to FLOW, there are many
benefits to local control. They believe
city-owned water would eliminate the
need to make a profit, allow residents to
be involved in rate setting rather than
the California Public Utilities Commis-
sion (CPUC) and would eradicate re-
gional rates that subsidize population
growth in distant desert communities.
The ownership change would allow the
water system to be managed in the
city’s best interest, not the interest of
shareholders or highly-paid executives
running, according to FLOW members.
“We’ve done our research and we’re
interested in getting out correct facts,
distinguishing between what’s reality
and what isn’t,” says Freeman Allen,
director for sustainability with the
League of Women Voters of the Clare-
mont Area and a member of Claremont
FLOW.
Mr. Allen was referring to the infor-
mation put forth by Claremont Afford-
able Water Advocates (CAWA), a
grassroots organization financially sup-
ported by Golden State Water that
popped up in June when the group in-
troduced a Memorandum of Under-
standing that they negotiated with GSW
and was later rejected by city council.
Members of FLOW are unimpressed
by the proposed 20-point MOU be-
tween Golden State Water Company
and CAWA.
“To me, the MOU is almost mean-
ingless,” says Mr. Allen. “It doesn’t
offer anything substantial, which are
the real issues. It seems like smoke and
mirrors with numbers. With every point
you read, there is nothing definite. I’m
not at all surprised the city rejected it.”
Claremont FLOW is also interested
in getting to the truth behind the water
revenue bond ballot measure slated for
the November election. In mailers,
CAWA has regularly called the bond
measure a “tax,” a statement of misin-
formation according to FLOW.
“W
e don’t know
why they keep
calling it a
tax,” says Mr. Allen. “Revenue
bonds are repaid using the
money raised by the utility. It
will not affect the city’s ability
to borrow and it will not take
money away from our schools.
We’re heavily focused on the
facts and we want people to
know that those ads coming
out from CAWA, those claims,
are lies.”
He also points to a canvasser who re-
cently came to his home, in hopes that
he would sign their petition.
“I asked who was supporting her and
she said ‘Donna Lowe’ (CAWA
founder). She then added, ‘Did you
know that the city was thinking of pay-
ing $135 million for the water system?’
When I asked what she meant by that,
she then turned over a whole sheet of
legalese and couldn’t explain it. These
people obviously don’t know what
they’re talking about.”
Section 104 of the Voting Code al-
lows for registered voters who have un-
wittingly signed a ballot measure
petition to have their name removed.
The request should include the name
and address of the voter, as well as the
signature in the same form it was
signed on the initiative. FLOW organiz-
ers recommend written requests be
mailed as soon as possible to the Clare-
mont City Clerk at 207 Harvard Ave.,
Claremont, CA 91711. The written doc-
ument may also be dropped off at City
Hall. For more information, contact the
City Clerk’s Office at (909) 399-5460.
Unlike CAWA, which receives the
bulk of its funding from GSW, Clare-
mont FLOW is totally funded by dona-
tions from Claremont residents who,
according to the group’s website, are
“tired of being run over roughshod by
Golden State Water.”
At a recent fundraiser launching the
group’s efforts, 50-plus supporters
gathered with many opening up their
wallets to offer their financial support.
“We had a pretty good turn-out with
limited space available and we received
a reasonable amount of donations, al-
though nothing like the million dollars
Golden State Water (GSW) is putting
into this,” Mr. Allen said.
As Claremont FLOW continues to
grow, its members urge those in agree-
ment with the issuance of revenue
bonds to visit www.claremontflow.org
to find out more about what they can do
to support the potential acquisition of
the Claremont water system.
“I’m more interested in the long-
range future than the immediate cost of
my water bill,” says Mr. Allen. “It is
such a hot international commodity,
some international company will buy
out Golden State Water or their parent
company American States Water and
we would lose even more control. Peo-
ple need to focus on the long-term and
how critical water is going to be, and
decide whether or not you want to have
a say on a monopoly that could be
bought by a cartel.”
—Angela Bailey
news@claremont-courier.com
COURIER photos/Steven Felschundneff
Attendees at last week’s launch meeting for Claremont Friends of Locally Owned Water, Claremont FLOW, raise their hands
to indicate their interest in taking the steps needed to take over the water company.
Councilmember Larry Schroeder gave a presentation about the city’s proposed
bond measure during the launch meeting for Claremont FLOW last week at Wal-
ter’s Restaurant in the Claremont Village.
Tuesday, July 23
A skater hanging 10 became the vic-
tim of a five-finger discount. At the
Claremont skatepark around 4:15 p.m.,
a 12-year-old boy left his black Apple
iPhone unattended on a wall while he
skated off with his friend. An unknown
thief rolled up and snatched the $400
phone, then took off northbound on In-
dian Hill Boulevard. There are no sus-
pects at this time.
Thursday, July 24
A Claremont man under the influ-
ence of prescription meds popped a tire
and then got popped by police.
Jonathan Sharp was making a U-turn in
the Walgreens parking lot on Towne
and Foothill Boulevard when he rolled
up onto a curb, puncturing the right
front tire on his vehicle. Officers wit-
nessed the suspect drive westbound on
Foothill for half a mile before pulling
him over around 3:45 p.m. According
to Lieutenant Mike Ciszek, the 21-year-
old was sweating profusely, his actions
were slow and lethargic and he was un-
aware the vehicle he was driving had a
flat tire. Mr. Sharp underwent a series
of field sobriety tests before he was ar-
rested and released on $5,000 bail.
* * * *
An unlocked VW with a set of keys
inside made the crime of grand theft
auto pretty easy for one thief. Around
10 p.m., the unknown suspects entered
an unlocked garage door of a home on
the 2000 block of Cape Cod Court and
stole the unlocked, white 2012 VW
Jetta right out of the garage. The good
news for this car owner is Das Auto
was recovered the next day when it was
discovered parked illegally in a nearby
alley, in perfect condition. There are no
suspects.
* * * *
While some hotel guests in Clare-
mont help themselves to complimen-
tary toiletries, other guests help them-
selves to whatever isn’t nailed down.
An unknown female guest checked in
to Hotel Claremont around 2 p.m. and
left with $653 in hotel amenities before
checking out the next day. Items miss-
ing from the room include a 32-inch
LED television, a Time Warner cable
box, a clock radio, a coffee maker, a
Sunbeam iron, queen size bed sheet,
queen size blanket and a queen size pil-
low. Although the hotel clerk told po-
lice he could identify the suspect, she
has yet to be apprehended.
Friday, July 25
He may have deserved a break today
but, instead, a Pomona man got arrested
after passing out in his car while in a
McDonald’s drive-thru. Around 11:45
p.m., police spotted Joe Santacruz
asleep in his running vehicle on the 800
block of South Indian Hill Boulevard.
According to Lieutenant Ciszek, offi-
cers awoke Mr. Santacruz, who was
waiting in line at the fast food restau-
rant with his car in drive and his foot on
the brake. The 23-year-old exhibited
signs of intoxication, and sobriety tests
concluded he was just over the legal
limit. He was arrested for DUI and later
released on $5,000 bail.
Sunday, July 27
A motorcycle crash on Foothill
Boulevard resulted in the driver being
airlifted to USC Medical Center.
Around 10 a.m., the rider of a Harley
Davidson traveling northbound on
Claremont Boulevard began a right
hand turn onto Foothill Boulevard
when he lost control of his bike and
collided with the center median. The
biker was ejected from the motorcyle
and landed on the number one east-
bound lane on Foothill Boulevard. He
complained of pain to his left shoulder
and suffered abrasions to his right arm.
Los Angeles County Fire arrived on
scene and transferred the victim to USC
Medical for medical treatment. He was
wearing a helmet.
—Angela Bailey
news@claremont-courier.com
Claremont COURIER/Friday, August 1, 2014 4
POLICE BLOTTER
CITY NEWS
Fate of old Claremont oak tree hangs in limbo
O
ne of Claremont’s old-
est residents suffered a
major setback this
week. A heritage live oak tree
estimated to be more than 100
years old lost one of its two
primary branches on Sunday,
leaving behind a large wound
and the fate of the tree’s future
in question.
Claremont police received a call
around 11:45 a.m. that the eastern
branch of the heritage tree had fallen,
knocking down cable lines and imped-
ing traffic. The on-call staff at Clare-
mont’s city yard, as well as the LA
County Fire Department, responded to
the scene and spent roughly six hours
working together to remove the fallen
limb.
Paul Cranmer, community services
manager and certified arborist with the
city of Claremont, says that although
the exterior of the live oak appeared to
be in good health, the interior was an-
other story.
“We’ve had four arborists in addition
to myself assess the tree and the
wound,” explained Mr. Cranmer. “In
this case, there was small separation in
the crotch of the tree, a small crack, and
because of water and debris accumula-
tion, some decay went down inside it.”
Trees in general respond to an injury
in two ways: compartmentalization and
the development of barrier zones. They
do not “heal” from the inside out.
Eventually, the tree covers the opening
by forming specialized “callus” tissue
around the edges of the wound. After
injury, new wood growing around the
wound forms a protective boundary
preventing the infection or decay from
spreading into the new tissue. Thus, the
tree responds to the injury by “compart-
mentalizing” or isolating the older, in-
jured tissue with the gradual growth of
new, healthy tissue.
Unfortunately, because of the size of
the wound on the heritage oak, the
city’s arborist says the tree may not
ever recover from the loss of the limb.
“Compartmentalization works well
on smaller breaks but this wound is
about four feet; it will probably never
be able to do that,” says Mr. Cranmer.
Depending on the extent of the
decay, a determination will be made as
to whether the tree can be saved. Ac-
cording to Mr. Cranmer, the city is still
awaiting the final reports from the con-
sulting arborists, but every effort will
be made to save the tree.
“I don’t see an immediate hazard
with the tree. If it’s out of balance, we
will have some problems. Let’s take a
couple of days and evaluate it and go
from there.”
—Angela Bailey
news@claremont-courier.com
COURIER photo/Steven Felschundneff
Seventh Street resident Erin Hicks inspects a 100-year-old oak tree on her street Monday after the tree dropped a large limb
the day before. It took work crews six hours to clear the limb, which took out cable television access in the neighborhood.
Five arborists, including the city of Claremont’s tree specialist, have assessed the tree and will know soon if the tree can be
saved.
EDUCATION
Claremont COURIER/Friday, August 1, 2014 5
COURIER photo/Peter Weinberger
Southern’s Kaitlyn McCarthy from Cary, North Carolina, went on to win as the number-1 singles seed
to give her team a tight 4-3 team victory over the Midwest team on Tuesday. The tournament was held
at the Claremont Club this week and included some of the top girl’s tennis players in the country.
L
ocal elementary school students are
poised to embark on a new math
curriculum this fall, written to sup-
port the Common Core State Standards.
The Claremont school board will vote on whether or
not to approve the adoption of Houghton Mifflin Har-
court’s “California GO Math!” series at its next meet-
ing, held Thursday, August 7 at 6:30 p.m.
CUSD parents and residents are welcome to attend
the gathering, held at the Richard S. Kirkendall Educa-
tion Center (170 W. San Jose Ave. in
Claremont), to share their thoughts on
the K-6 math books during the public
comment portion of the agenda item.
In the meantime, you are welcome to stop by the
basement level of the Kirkendall Center during business
hours and check out samples of “California GO Math!”
textbooks and support materials for each of the elemen-
tary school grades. Cards have been provided so that
visitors can provide written feedback.
Sumner Elementary School teacher Joe Tonan, who
will teach sixth grade this fall, said he is satisfied with
the process through which the district selected the K-6
textbook series as its number-one option.
“The decision-making was left in the hands of the
teachers,” he said.
In an email he sent last month to Superintendent Jim
Elsasser and the school board, he had particular praise
for CUSD’s assistant superintendent of student services:
“I am so pleased to report that Dr. Bonnie Bell con-
ducted the most fair and transparent, open, in-depth and
complete textbook adoption process that I have ever
seen.”
The district initially looked at five publishers whose
offerings had been vetted by the state as being Common
Core-compatible. Two of these were eliminated early
on, according to Ms. Bell, one because the company
was unresponsive to queries and another because the
publisher was unable to ship books by this fall.
Next, the 23-member K-6 Math Textbook Adoption
Committee convened from June 24 through June 25.
The committee featured representatives from every ele-
mentary school in the district, 90 percent of them teach-
ers. They were tasked with determining which of the
three remaining textbook choices is most in keeping
with the principles of the Common Core.
One of the most salient characteristics of the Com-
mon Core math standards is that fewer concepts are in-
troduced. Those concepts that remain are delved into
more deeply in order to avoid the “mile-wide, inch-
deep” brand of education Common Core proponents
say has prevailed for far too long.
“Focus means doing fewer things at any given grade
so that students have more time to internalize, practice
and learn what is being done in that grade,” explained
Common Core math standards writer Jason Zimbra on a
video posted on the Teaching Channel website.
The new curriculum also encourages students to
move beyond simply giving answers, instead showing
their thinking process using tables, drawings, diagrams
and discussion. In the case of the “California GO
Math!” textbooks, students are often asked to illustrate
problems through shapes, blocks, number trains such as
circular cardboard counters.
Another criterion when selecting a new math series
was whether it provides sufficient technological support
for students who—although they will be using print edi-
tions of the math books this year—will undertake state
testing on iPads, using the Smarter Balanced assessment
program.
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt’s math books, which are
accompanied by digital quizzes students can take on
tablets, fit the bill.
“The teachers opted unanimously to choose this se-
ries,” Ms. Bell said. “There was a total consensus.”
Mr. Tonan, who served on the K-6 Math Textbook
Adoption Committee, is eager to jettison the “Everyday
Mathematics” textbooks with which he was previously
saddled.
“The series we currently have is the worst math series
I have ever taught with in 28 years of teaching,” he said.
“It didn’t require mastery at any level, and it sometimes
had 15 different concepts taught in one day’s lesson.
“For instance, when the book was introducing two-
digit times three-digit multiplication, it would present
three different ways of how to do it in the initial lesson,”
he continued. “Kids were like, ‘What’s the way to do
it?’ I think every teacher who is on the committee felt
this is an upgrade.”
Should the board approve the books, the Claremont
Unified School District will embark on a $300,000 con-
tract with the publisher, Houghton Mifflin Harcourt.
The contract will entitle the district to two years of print
editions and eight year’s worth of digital editions.
The print editions are consumable, meaning that kids
write in the books, discarding them at the end of the
year. The price tag is equivalent with what the district
has typically paid for textbooks, according to Ms. Bell.
At the conclusion of the 2014-2015 school year, the
district will begin to craft a digital implementation plan,
exploring how it might partially or completely phase out
the print versions of the math books.
“We’d ultimately like to move towards e-books, but
we first want to familiarize ourselves with the parts and
pieces of the new curriculum, Ms. Bell noted.
The district must also make sure that it is compliant
with the Williams Act, meaning that all students have
access to the necessary hardware and software both at
school and at home. Thus far, results of a yearly CUSD
questionnaire administered to families has been promis-
ing, with between 95 and 98 percent of students report-
ing they have Internet access at home. If after two years
has passed, CUSD opts to receive hard copies of “Cali-
fornia GO Math!,” the print contract can be renewed at
a price of $30,000 per year.
A number of individual teachers and principals have
received training on the Common Core math standards,
according to Ms. Bell. Mr. Tonan, however, said that the
district as a whole has received very little training in the
math component of the Common Core, having placed
more emphasis this past year on the English Language
Arts portion of the new standards.
Still, he is happy that all CUSD elementary school
teachers will participate in an in-service on Common
Core and the new math series on August 25.
“There’s going to need to be ongoing training, but
this is a good first step,” he said. “We’ve never had a
full-day in-service on a new math curriculum coming
in.” —Sarah Torribio
storribio@claremont-courier.com
CUSD set for new textbooks, delves further into Common Core
COMMON
CORE
T
he top two-seeded teams advanced to Tuesday’s final
of the USTA Girls’ 18s National Team Champi-
onships being played at the Claremont Club in Clare-
mont. The top-seeded team from the USTA Midwest Section
eliminated No. 3 Southern California in one semifinal, 4-2,
and No. 2 Southern downed No. 4 Florida, 5-2.
Led by one of the nation’s top players in Courtney Dole-
hide, Midwest will face Southern in a 2 p.m. final on Tuesday
during the last day of the tournament. At 10 a.m., SoCal will
face Florida for third place. A fifth- and sixth-place match will
also take place at that time. Other consolation matches at the
Biszantz Tennis Center will also be contested.
“It’s really been a great tournament and we have the top five
girls in the country competing,” tournament director and Clare-
mont Club director of tennis Barry Friedman said. “The sports-
manship has been great and we’re looking forward to a great
final on Tuesday.”
Because the team format is the same as the one used in col-
lege, Friedman said the tournament has had many college
coaches on-site scouting future players.
Gabby Andrews and Ena Shibahara defeated Caroline Dole-
hide and Brienne Minor, 8-5, at the No. 1 doubles spot, but
Midwest took the overall doubles point with wins at No. 2 and
3 positions.
Southern California got nice wins at the No. 3 and 4 singles
spots thanks to Jada Hart and Kayla Day, but couldn’t over-
come the strong play of the Midwest team. In SoCal’s second
match on Sunday, the squad went up against a tough USTA In-
termountain squad led by USC recruit Gabby Smith and Kim-
berly Yee. SoCal prevailed 4-3 with wins in singles by
Shibahara (No. 1), Hart (No. 3) and Day (No. 4) and the all-
crucial doubles point.
—Steve Pratt
Claremont Club hosts tennis team championships
W
hen Claremont’s Sustainable
City Plan was adopted in 2008
it included the concept of es-
tablishing a community organization to
work closely with the city on education
and implementation. More than 50 re-
sponsibilities were delegated to that pro-
posed organization, which was
incorporated in 2009 as Sustainable Clare-
mont.
Sustainable Claremont has done quite well. Among
accomplishments are the annual Claremont Earth Day
celebration, a water action group that played a signifi-
cant role in the Colleges’ planning for a water recla-
mation plant, the creation of the Claremont Home
Energy Retrofit Project (CHERP) that is now being
replicated in other cities throughout California and
beyond. In addition, Sustainable Claremont has a very
active group working with the Claremont public
schools and the school district to establish gardens at
school sites to be used as teaching laboratories and to
introduce sustainability into the curriculum. Also, our
Claremont Garden Club, which meets on the second
Wednesday of most months at 7 p.m. in the Napier
Center at Pilgrim Place, emphasizes water-wise land-
scaping appropriate for our area There are also
monthly Demystifying Sustainability articles, such as
this one, along with Sustainability Dialog presenta-
tions and discussions in partnership with Pomona
College and jointly planned with the League of
Women Voters and the Interfaith Sustainability Coun-
cil.
Sustainable Claremont also maintains a robust
website, monthly e-newsletters and regular updates
on social media. But there is much more. Sustainable
Claremont was recognized as the Outstanding Com-
munity Organization of the year by the 2012 Inde-
pendence Day Committee.
Now, Sustainable Claremont is moving to a new
level by opening a Sustainability Resource Center
that will help support sustainability initiatives
throughout the city. The resource center will further
sustainability efforts in Claremont by providing infor-
mation, answering questions, making referrals, facili-
tating public outreach, interacting with other
sustainability-oriented entities and providing support
for Sustainable Claremont’s programs.
Space for the center is being donated by Rancho
Santa Ana Botanic Garden and will initially be staffed
half-time under an agreement with the city of Clare-
mont, which has provided financial support for the
new center in its 2015 and 2016 budgets.
Although the center will be staffed part-time at
first, we hope this position will be attractive to some-
one with a keen interest in sustainability who would
enjoy helping plan and build the future of Sustainable
Claremont—and of sustainability in Claremont.
Applicants to the position should have good organi-
zational skills, an ability to interact effectively with
the public, a bachelor’s degree, interests related to
sustainability, media and computer skills that include
proficiency with MSWord and Excel. Responsibilities
will include preparing and managing outreach and
public interest information, responding to public in-
quiries, supporting Sustainable Claremont activities
and fundraising experience.
Applications will be accepted until August 8 and
should include a resume and cover letter sent to Sus-
tainable Claremont, PO Box 1502, Claremont, CA
91711. For further information, contact Freeman
Allen by email at cf1allen@aol.com.
Demystifying Sustainability is a project of Sustainable
Claremont (sustainableclaremont.org), email address
info@sustainableclaremont.org. Follow them on Facebook
at facebook.com/sustainableclaremont and on Twitter
#GreenClaremont, and consider becoming a member.
Claremont COURIER/Friday, August 1, 2014 6
Demystifying
SUSTAINABILITY
A new resource and an opportunity
Claremont COURIER/Friday, August 1, 2014 7
T
he issue of whether
Claremont should es-
tablish a municipal
water system has been dis-
cussed, studied and evaluated
for more than 20 years. Today,
we former Claremont council
members stand in support of
the residents calling for the ac-
quisition of the Claremont
water system, and ask the com-
munity to support the water
revenue bond on the Novem-
ber 4 ballot.
As an investor-owned company,
Golden State Water (GSW) has histori-
cally paid its stockholders dividends
and offset water system infrastructure
taxes on the backs of Claremont
ratepayers. In short, Claremont’s water
has been monetized for profit.
The result has been skyrocketing
rates—much higher than our municipal
neighbors—with absolutely no local ac-
countability.
The time has come to secure rate
fairness and guarantee that every deci-
sion made regarding water rates in
Claremont is made locally and in full
view of the public.
Given past practices by GSW, it is
clear they have failed to respond to the
community’s rate concerns and have in-
stead blatantly leveraged our water as a
money-making enterprise.
In 2011, Claremont residents began
actively fighting GSW’s increases.
Hundreds of community members, led
by Hal Hargrave and Randy Scott,
banded together to create Claremont
Outrage—a group whose sole purpose
is to combat water rate hikes. Since
then, city and PUC hearings to gather
testimony about exorbitant water bills
have been known to attract more than
700 residents.
But even with this community-wide
outrage, GSW has continued to raise
rates. In 2013, GSW got the PUC to ap-
prove a 16 percent rate increase. And,
even as the community is discussing
acquisition as a last resort, GSW is
looking for additional increases.
A “yes” vote on the water revenue
bond, which will be on the November 4
ballot, will provide a financing mecha-
nism for the acquisition of the water
system, allowing it to be locally owned.
The city’s expert team has deter-
mined that the system’s existing rev-
enue can support a purchase price up to
$80 million. While the city is battling to
keep the purchase cost low, the ballot
measure would ask voters to approve
$55 million to be used only if a judge
determines that the purchase price ex-
ceeds $80 million.
Will this acquisition immediately
drop water rates? Probably not. Like
any bond measure, the purchase cost is
an investment that must be covered.
But by establishing a municipal water
system, our water will be entirely
owned by the community, with deci-
sions about rates made under the public
scrutiny of open meetings, and without
GSW’s dividend or WRAM fees.
It should also be noted that the city
has developed a cooperative agreement
with the city of La Verne, an estab-
lished municipal water purveyor, which
is posted on the city’s website. If the
water bond passes, this agreement
would lay the groundwork for a service
implementation plan that will ensure
the transition from GSW to a Clare-
mont municipal system is seamless.
Having had the privilege to serve the
residents of Claremont, we understand
firsthand the many issues that are in-
volved with the acquisition of Clare-
mont's water system. We are clear:
owning our own water system will not
only benefit today’s residents, but also
future generations.
Indeed the time has come for Clare-
mont to acquire the water system.
Richard Newton Diann Ring
Karen Rosenthal Suzan Smith
Sandy Baldonado Paul Held
Ellen Taylor Peter Yao
Linda Elderkin
Claremont mayors, retired
Frank Hungerford Gene Block
Claire McDonald
Claremont councilmembers, retired
READERS’ COMMENTS
Send readers’ comments via email to editor@claremont-courier.com or by mail or
hand-delivery to 1420 N. Claremont Blvd. Ste. 205B, Claremont, CA 91711. The dead-
line for submission is Tuesday at 5 p.m. Letters are the opinion of the writer, not a re-
flection of the COURIER. We reserve the right to edit letters. Letters should not exceed
250 words Viewpoints should not exceed 650 words. We cannot guarantee publication
of every letter. Letters and viewpoints will be published at the discretion of the editor.
Now is the time to acquire the water system
Former Claremont council members express support
VIEWPOINT
Fair market value
Dear Editor:
It is becoming obvious that the de-
bate on the water system takeover has
deteriorated into a predictable ex-
change of rhetoric, and that the people
of Claremont will be no better in-
formed by November. I would like to
see whichever side is misleading us be
held accountable.
Here’s my solution: Golden State
agrees to sell the water system to the
city at twice today’s book value. In ex-
change, it will have the first right of re-
fusal, say during the next 20 years, to
repurchase the water system at 90 per-
cent of the then-current book value.
The November election will determine
whether or not Claremont residents
want the city to buy the water system.
Twice today’s book value is an easily
determinable figure and is likely lower
than the fair market value to which
Golden State is entitled. But, both sides
will save millions of dollars in legal
fees and publicity needed for the fight
over the water system’s actual fair mar-
ket value.
When we vote in November on the
bond measure, we will know exactly
what the water system will cost us, in-
stead of today’s wide range of specu-
lated values that will be ultimately
decided years down the road by a third
party.
Should the city and other takeover
proponents be correctly advising us, we
will have acquired the water system
earlier and at a lower cost. Golden
State will have lost its right to do busi-
ness in Claremont and likely some of
the value it may have otherwise re-
ceived from a lengthy legal battle.
Should Golden State and the oppo-
nents of the takeover (e.g., me) be
right, water costs will climb more rap-
idly in the coming years (we’ll always
have Golden State’s Region 3 rates for
comparison) or water service will no-
ticeably deteriorate, resulting in a new
public outcry. Golden State will then
have the opportunity to re-acquire its
water system at a bargain rate, while
we cut our losses.
Gaming by either side should be mit-
igated under this plan. If the city does
what it is telling us it can do, we will
applaud the proponents of the take-
over for their leadership, and we’ll be
rid of Golden State forever. On the
other hand, if water rates become unaf-
fordable or if the city allows the water
system to deteriorate (out of misman-
agement or in order to keep water costs
down), water service will suffer and
we’ll clamor for more responsible
ownership.
Golden State may choose not to ex-
ercise its right to re-acquire the water
system (even at a fraction of the initial
sales price) if the water system is al-
lowed to deteriorate too much or if the
city over-builds (or over-pays for) in-
frastructure improvements during its
regime (due to the inflated price that 90
percent of book value would then pro-
duce). In those cases, at-large bids for
sale of the water system could then be
solicited.
Dan Dell’Osa
Claremont
READERS’ COMMENTS
Claremont COURIER/Friday, August 1, 2014 8
Screening of documentary
‘Lloyd & Marion’ at CST
The Claremont School of Theology will host a
screening of the documentary film Lloyd & Marion,
including a Q&A session with the film’s subjects,
Lloyd and Marion Wake, as well as filmmaker
Amelia Chua.
The screening will take place on Sunday, August 10
at 4 p.m. at Mudd Theater, located on the CST campus.
A reception will take place immediately afterwards.
Lloyd & Marion depicts the story of Lloyd and
Marion Wake—a Japanese American couple whose
relationship blossomed following their experiences in
internment camps located in the American west dur-
ing World War II.
Rev. Wake enjoyed a long and distinguished career
as an ordained elder in the United Methodist Church.
He became recognized as a theologian and activist as
a founding member of the Pacific Asian-American
Center for Theology and Strategies in Berkeley.
While Rev. Wake answered the call to pastoral
ministry and civil rights activism, Ms. Wake devoted
her life to serving ethnic minorities as a mental health
counselor. Ms. Wake’s effort to expand mental health
services to ethnic minorities led to the founding of
Richmond Area Multi-Service Center in San Fran-
cisco.
The film follows Lloyd and Marion’s journey
building a life together from the ground up as they
struggle for justice and equality for all.
“I made this documentary to weave the Japanese-
American strand into the American story,” Amelia
Chua, the director and producer of Lloyd & Marion,
said. “Lloyd and Marion will challenge Asian Ameri-
cans stereotypes. They speak out, they’re funny, they
show their emotions and they’re on the forefront of so-
cial justice work. This is not your typical love story.”
To learn more about Lloyd & Marion and to
watch a trailer visit lloydandmarion.com
No need to sit at home in the
heat; visit a local cooling center
The city of Claremont offers several “cool zones”
for residents to visit and get out of the heat. In ex-
treme heat conditions—two or more consecutive days
of temperatures over 100 degrees—the Human Serv-
ices Department may extend the operational hours to
include weekend hours beyond the normal operating
hours. Call the Hughes Community Center at (909)
399-5490 for further details. The following locations
are designated as “cool zones” and are open the hours
listed below:
Hughes Community Center, 1700 Danbury Rd.
Hours: Monday through Thursday, 7:30 a.m. to 9 p.m.;
Friday, 7:30 a.m. to 6 p.m.; Saturday, 8 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Joslyn Senior Center, 660 N. Mountain Ave. Hours:
Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Blaisdell Center, 440 S. College Ave. Hours: Mon-
day through Friday, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Claremont Library, 208 Harvard Ave. During regu-
lar library hours.
Shop at Vons and support
Special Olympics athletes
Beginning today, Friday, August 1, Vons shoppers
will be given the chance to donate to their local Spe-
cial Olympics athletes either at checkout or by round-
ing up their grocery bill.
This year’s campaign kicks off at the Vons in
Claremont, 550 E. Base Line Rd. To add some fun,
Special Olympics invites shoppers to visit their fa-
vorite store, take a “selfie” with a favorite product,
then post on SOSC’s Twitter or Instagram (@SOSo-
cal) to enter themselves in a contest for the best
photo. Photos will be judged and selected every Fri-
day in the month of August by a Special Olympics
athlete. More information can be found in stores.
Special Olympics Southern California was founded
in 1969 and offers opportunities for individuals with
disabilities to participate in year-round sports training
and competition. More than 17,500 athletes take part
in 12 Olympic-style sports. For more information,
visit www.sosc.org.
OUR TOWN
The life story of Marion Wake, left, and her husband
Rev. Lloyd Wake will be explored in the documentary
“Lloyd & Marion,” to be screened Sunday, August 10
at the Claremont School of Theology.
Claremont COURIER/Friday, August 1, 2014 9
P
reserving the natural re-
sources of the San
Gabriel foothills while
advocating for passive recre-
ational use of these areas is a
mission the Claremont Wild-
lands Conservancy (CWC)
takes seriously.
The grassroots organization with its
extensive local support is one of several
working directly with the city and its
consultants to help design a cohesive
master plan for the Claremont Hills
Wilderness Park.
The CWC has completed an 11-page
provisional position statement, outlining
the primary goals the conservancy would
like to see implemented into the master
plan. The position statement was circu-
lated to members of the Claremont City
Council, city staff, and MIG earlier this
week and the highlights are provided
below.
With five areas of focus that include
preservation, access, safety, park culture
and sustainable funding, the CWC be-
lieves an effective master plan will
emerge only if there is full stakeholder
participation with the goal of finding cre-
ative solutions to the challenges sur-
rounding the growth of the park.
Managing resources
The conservancy believes the key to
achieving their goal of preservation is a
strong resource management plan which
includes cataloging and classifying the
existing flora and fauna found in the
park, preserving historical, cultural and
natural features of the park and drawing
on community resources for preserving
and managing the park.
In addition, the preservation efforts
also include park expansion. The CWC
supports the efforts to secure additional
open space for the park in order to pre-
serve the integrity of ecosystems, main-
tain a continuous wilderness corridor
along the San Gabriel foothills and pro-
tect the watershed. They believe this is
possible to achieve by making all rea-
sonable efforts to secure additional
parcels of hillside land, proactively en-
courage the purchase and maintenance of
hillside properties and to open publicly
held hillside properties for passive recre-
ational use.
These efforts would require the cre-
ation of a full or part-time position on the
city’s administrative staff to oversee the
expansion of the park.
Access
With the mass appeal of the Claremont
Hills Wilderness Park, the conservancy
believes the park belongs not only to the
residents of Claremont, but to the larger
public as well and should be marketed as
such. However, since Claremont resi-
dents pay taxes to support the CHWP
and the surrounding streets, they also be-
lieve Claremonters should enjoy special
parking privileges. Although they are op-
posed to the raising of parking fees dur-
ing peak periods as a tactic to divert
visitors, thus discriminating against low-
income visitors, they support parking re-
strictions that are limited to the minimum
level necessary to achieve their objec-
tives.
In its effort to tackle the congestion,
the CWC supports parking restrictions,
but cautions against setting a city wide
precedent that may spill over to other
congested areas of the city including the
Village, churches, schools and parks.
One of their solutions would be to ex-
pand parking in the north and south park-
ing lots of the CHWP although they
suggest this expansion should be treated
as overflow and made available only as
needed. In addition, they proposed link-
ing the Padua Sports Park with a path to
the CHWP Mills entrance.
A park entrance fee which would
eliminate the need for parking fees is un-
appealing to the CWC because of high
administrative cost, the difficulty to en-
force due to multiple park entry points
and may encourage elicit entry which
would damage the environment and un-
dermine the recommendations for
preservation and conservation.
In stark contradiction to past resident
viewpoints, the conservancy believes the
preliminary evidence suggests that num-
ber of current park users even at peak pe-
riods is not having a significant negative
impact on the goal of park preservation.
Making safety a priority
Threat of fire is a constant danger in
the park and the CWC believes first re-
sponders such as rangers, police and fire
personnel should jointly be trained on
rapid evacuation procedures.
Equally as important to the safety of
those who use the park is knowledge of
safe trail behavior. The conservancy sug-
gests offering guidelines such as “Keep
to the Right,” bicyclists warning hikers
when overtaking them on a trail and re-
ducing downhill speeds on blind corners,
leashing dogs at all times and alerting
hikers to the hazards of wearing earbuds
while using park trails.
Park users should also be educated on
the practice of leaving no trace – pack-
ing out what you pack into the park.
Another suggestion is the implemen-
tation of self-composting toilets installed
at or near the midpoint of the Loop Trial
and the construction of a full restroom
with drinking fountains near the Mills
entrance.
Too keep everyone safe, the CWC
would like to see trained and uniformed
park rangers empowered to issue warn-
ings and citations to users who violate
park rules.
Park culture
Education by park rangers and volun-
teers can create a culture in which people
treat nature and one another with respect
and care. The CWC holds the belief that
the master plan should seek a way to cre-
ate a culture of stewardship among the
parks many visitors. In order to educate
those who use the park, the conservancy
suggests informational brochures be
made available at the Mills entrance
which would include park trail maps, es-
timated walking and running times, in-
formation on flora and fauna and rules
for safety and etiquette.
Sustainable funding
The Claremont Hills Wilderness Park
is currently funded by a variety of
sources including the state of California,
Los Angeles County, the LA County Fire
Department, Claremont Wildlands Con-
servancy, Claremont citizens, non-profit
agencies, Pomona College and parking
fees paid by Claremont and non-Clare-
mont residents. Ongoing funding will be
necessary for future land acquisitions
and to implement the various provisions
of the master plan.
The CWC recommends the city coun-
cil develop a budget and establish sus-
tainable funding to support the
implementation of the master plan.
It is also recommended that the ranger
program be significantly expanded to ad-
dress the goals and a city administrator
with adequate time and resources assume
responsibility to the CHWP.
Assistant City Manager Colin Tudor
welcomes the thoughtful input of the
CWC and recognizes the value in their
suggestions. “The city appreciates the
perspective of the Wildlands Conser-
vancy and the many points outlined in
their provisional position paper. The goal
of the Master Plan is to gather and ana-
lyze the input of all the community
groups with a stake in the future of the
park. The success of the Master Plan is
dependent on addressing the concerns of
organizations like the Wildlands Conser-
vancy and working with them to develop
a long range plan that preserves the area
while allowing for recreational activi-
ties.”   
For more information on the Clare-
mont Wildlands Conservancy and their
Provisional Position Statement, log on to
www.claremontwildlands.org.
—Angela Bailey
news@claremont-courier.com
Master plan critical for long term care of Wilderness Park
I
n May of 2000, the unthinkable hap-
pened. A young woman ran a stop sign
and broadsided Celeste Palmer’s SUV,
causing it to roll. The accident left her, at
age 50, bereft of a lifetime of memories.
Ms. Palmer sustained a traumatic brain injury, which
left her with anterograde as well as retrograde amnesia.
Not only is she unable to recall her pre-accident past,
she has difficulty making new memories.
She didn’t recognize her three children and—as
someone who no longer remembered how many times
a day to brush her teeth—had to consciously relearn her
mothering skills in order to care for her 13-year-old son.
Ms. Palmer had run her own consulting firm, spe-
cializing in accounting and database management. Sud-
denly, she was unable to do simple calculations, in large
part because she had lost her grasp of the number 4. She
was also faced with chronic pain, limited mobility and
poor balance, which worsened after she was involved in
a second car crash in 2003.
It’s enough to make the most optimistic person give
up. Instead, Ms. Palmer decided to start over.
“At some point during my journey, I decided to
sculpt a personality for myself because I couldn’t re-
member my character traits from before the accident,”
Ms. Palmer shared in the 2014 anthology, Chicken
Soup for the Soul: Recovering from Traumatic
Brain Injuries. Hers is just one of 101 stories of “hope,
healing and hard work” highlighted in the book.
“Based on observing others, I realized that if I be-
came known as a happy person, people would want to
be around me,” she continued. “From then on, becom-
ing happy in spite of my circumstances became my
mission. It became what I call my Happiness Project.”
In many ways, Ms. Palmer’s situation is as strange as
fiction.
As is the case for the protagonist of the 2000 thriller
Memento, notes and journals substitute for her short-
term memory. And if you thought the romantic comedy
50 First Dates, in which a woman wakes each morn-
ing with no memory of the previous day, is far-fetched,
Ms. Palmer begs to differ.
“Welcome to my world,” she said.
Nonetheless, Ms. Palmer has persevered at her Hap-
piness Project, determined to overcome setbacks, look
for the positive and enjoy life on a moment-by-moment
basis.
Ms. Palmer learned pretty quickly she is not alone.
Nearly 1.7 million people sustain a traumatic brain in-
jury (TBI) each year in the United States alone.
There are many soldiers returning from Afghanistan
and Iraq with TBIs and post-traumatic stress syndrome,
another invisible disability that makes it hard for a per-
son to cope the way they once did. Increasing attention
is also being paid to the detrimental effects of concus-
sions and other head injuries incurred during athletic
events, so more people are being diagnosed with TBIs.
With all that she learned through her own struggles,
Ms. Palmer has become a writer, speaker and coach.
Her aim, she writes in the Chicken Soup book, is to
“empower people to break through self-imposed barri-
ers, implement new strategies and achieve successful
outcomes, just as I have.”
Ms. Palmer has also founded a nonprofit organization,
Bridging the Gap: Connecting Traumatic Brain Injury
Survivors (www.tbibridge.org). On the site, she shares
myriad resources for those with TBI and PTSD and for
their families. These include lists of support groups, help-
Claremont COURIER/Friday, August 1, 2014 10
BRIDGING THE GAP/continues on the next page
Claremont resident survives, thrives in spite of brain injury
COURIER photo/Steven Felschundneff
Celeste Palmer congratulates James Farmer during a support group meeting for people with traumatic brain
injuries on Tuesday at the Claremont Club. Mr. Farmer, who was injured in a skiing accident, had announced
his graduation from community college.
ful books and websites, medical facilities
and treatment centers. There are posts and
videos relating the stories of TBI sur-
vivors and forums where visitors can ex-
plore topics such as what sort of therapies
have helped them relax and heal. For in-
stance, some local TBI survivors have
found relief from “brain fog” through hy-
perbaric oxygen therapy.
Ms. Palmer is more than happy to
share the activities and treatments from
which she has benefited. She makes use
of a smorgasbord of therapies, and gives
special thanks to Claremont chiropractor
Martin McLeod, local massage therapist
Lorena Cowle and Pomona Valley Hos-
pital Medical Center (PVHMC) physical
therapist Amy Newmork.
Two other activities that have proved
invaluable are walking meditation at the
Rancho Santa Ana Botanic Garden and
community engagement, including vol-
unteering for the PVHMC auxiliary.
“Volunteering, helping others, keeps
your focus on others and not on your
own pain or problems,” she said.
Ms. Palmer is a realist. On Tuesday
evening, she was one of the 20 or so peo-
ple who attended the Brain Injury Sup-
port Group, founded in 2005 by local
psychologist Karen Salter-Moss and held
at the Claremont Club. Ms. Palmer urged
fellow members, including Brian
Keyner, a former police officer sidelined
by an on-the-job accident, to embrace
how they are now.
But despite her acknowledgement that
TBI is characterized by limitations, Ms.
Palmer encourages people with brain in-
juries to ignore some of the well-inten-
tioned messages delivered by medical
personnel. It’s common practice for doc-
tors to give TBI patients a two-year win-
dow in which their brains can heal. In
fact, people with TBIs continue to im-
prove in ways that should be honored,
often years after the injury occurs.
Adapting to life changes
Sometimes, as in the case of Baldy
resident James Farmer, the improve-
ments merit a full-scale celebration. In
2007, Mr. Farmer—a competitive
skier—was injured as the result of an
ambitious jump gone wrong. He was in
a coma for some time and doctors were
unsure whether he would make it. In the
aftermath, Mr. Farmer has found himself
unable to think and move as easily as he
once did.
His grandmother, Mary Lou Young
has been deeply inspired by his story,
even penning a book called James
Please Awake. The title comes from a
line in a poem James’ 13-year-old sister
wrote as he fought for his life.
Ms. Salter-Moss will often give the
book, along with essentials like a tooth-
brush and toothpaste, to relatives who find
themselves in the hospital, praying for the
recovery of a loved one with a TBI.
On Tuesday, Mr. Farmer returned to
the Claremont Club support group after a
long absence. He had been attending San
Joaquin Valley Community College, and
he recently earned an associate’s degree
in construction management.
Ms. Young brought a cake to the gath-
ering in order to mark the occasion. Also
cheering him on were his grandfather,
Paul Young, and his fiancé, Liza Via.
Staying upbeat has been tough for
James because, unlike Ms. Palmer, he re-
members his fast-paced, pre-injury life.
While he still rides his dirt bike from
time to time, Mr. Farmer misses
whizzing down the ski slopes, his only
concern being to top his last trick.
“He has to work through everything
slower—everything comes at a slower
pace,” Mr. Young said. “All we can do is
encourage.”
Mr. Farmer isn’t sure what he will do
next, but his family says he has already
done plenty.
“We’re proud as punch,” Mr. Young
said. “To see him go from lying there,
not able to do anything, not even swal-
low, to doing something like this is
amazing.”
James is just one of the many TBI sur-
vivors pushing past mental and physical
blocks by tapping into the philosophy of
Bridging the Gap: Be patient. Be posi-
tive. Never give up.
“My life now is rich with close
friends, family and activities I enjoy, in
addition to my nonprofit work,” Ms.
Palmer wrote in her Chicken Soup for
the Soul entry. “I don’t know what my
life was like before the accident, but all
that matters is that I’m happy now. Atti-
tude truly is everything!”
You can by the book, Chicken Soup
for the Soul: Recovering from Trau-
matic Brain Injuries: 101 Stories of
Hope, Healing and Hard Work, by
calling Ms. Palmer at (909) 260-0890 or
emailing her at info@tbibridge.org. The
cost is $15 plus shipping and handling,
with proceeds going toward the Bridg-
ing the Gap foundation.
—Sarah Torribio
storribio@claremont-courier.com
Claremont COURIER/Friday, August 1, 2014 11
BRIDGING THE GAP/
continued from the previous page
COURIER photos/Steven Felschundneff
Celeste Palmer tells her story during a support
group meeting for people with traumatic brain in-
juries at the Claremont Club. Ms. Palmer was injured
in a traffic collision that resulted in total amnesia.
She has started the nonprofit Bridging the Gap to
help others with their recovery from brain injury.
Brian Keyner, a former police officer, expresses his frustration with the numb-
ness in his side which prevents him from participating in activities he loves. Mr.
Keyner was chasing a suspect on foot when a vehicle struck him.
Claremont COURIER/Friday, August 1, 2014 12
MIKE F. O’BRIEN
Attorney at Law
212 Yale Avenue
Claremont, CA 91711
(909) 626-9999
www.mikefobrien.com
Specialist in personal injury and
wrongful death cases.
Se habla español
BUXBAUM & CHAKMAK
A Law Corporation
414 Yale Avenue, Suite K
Claremont, CA 91711
(909) 621-4707
41 years experience in: Business Law,
Probate, Family Law, Estate Planning,
Real Estate Law, Civil Litigation, Bankruptcy.
architect
WHEELER & WHEELER
A.I.A. Architects, Inc.
133 South Spring Street
Claremont, CA 91711
(909) 624-5095
www.wheelerarchitects.com
Building a better Claremont
since 1985
attorney
attorney
attorney
WILKINSON &
WILKINSON
341 W. First Street
Claremont, CA 91711
(909) 482-1555
Certified Specialists in Trusts, Probate
and Estate Planning. Litigation of same
attorney
Christiansen Accounting
Corina L. Christiansen, CPA
140 W. Foothill Blvd., Suite E
Claremont, CA 91711
(909) 447-6802
www.christiansenaccounting.com
www.facebook.com/christiansenaccountingcpa
Specialize in small business accounting
and tax planning since 1962.
accounting
Kendall & Gkikas LLP
Attorneys at Law
134 Harvard Avenue, 2nd Floor
Claremont, CA 91711
(909) 482-1422
Specializing in Family Law in Claremont
since 1994: Divorce, Custody, Visitation
with Children, Property Division, Alimony,
Child Support
PROFESSIONAL
CRESTVIEW CADILLAC
2700 EAST GARVEY SOUTH,
WEST COVINA
(626) 966-7441
NEW AND CERTIFIED PRE-OWNED SALES
LEASING • PARTS • BODY SHOP
ROMERO HYUNDAI
ONTARIO AUTO CENTER
(866) 232-4092
NEW AND PRE-OWNED SALES
LEASING • SERVICE • PARTS
15 FREEWAY, EXIT JURUPA AVE.
WWW.ROMEROHYUNDAI.COM
ROMERO MAZDA
ONTARIO AUTO CENTER
(866) 232-4092
NEW AND PRE-OWNED SALES
LEASING • SERVICE • PARTS
SERVING YOUR NEEDS OVER 35 YEARS
15 FREEWAY, EXIT JURUPA AVE.
WWW.ROMEROMAZDA.COM
EMPIRE NISSAN
ONTARIO AUTO CENTER
(866) 234-2544
15 FREEWAY, EXIT JURUPA AVE.
NEW AND PRE-OWNED SALES
LEASING • SERVICE • PARTS
WWW.EMPIRENISSAN.COM
EXCLUSIVELY VOLVO
1300 AUTO CENTER DR., ONTARIO
CALL: SAM NASRI (909) 605-5700
WWW.EXCLUSIVELYVOLVOCARS.COM
GOING ABROAD? CALL ABOUT
“EUROPEAN DELIVERY”
EXCLUSIVELY VOLKSWAGEN
1300 AUTO CENTER DR., ONTARIO
CALL CHRIS OR DON (909) 605-8843
WWW.EXCLUSIVELYVW.COM
WE REFUSE TO BE UNDERSOLD
cadillac
hyundai
mazda nissan
volvo
volkswagen
CLAREMONT TOYOTA
601 AUTO CENTER DR., CLAREMONT
(909) 625-1500
SALES • SERVICE • PARTS
toyota
FIAT OF ONTARIO
ONTARIO AUTO CENTER
1201 AUTO CENTER DR.
800-BUY-FIAT • 800-289-3428
WWW.FIATOFONTARIO.COM
fiat
HARTMANBALDWIN
DESIGN/BUILD
100 West Foothill Blvd.
Claremont, CA 91711
(909) 670-1344
www.hartmanbaldwin.com
Since 1984
Residential remodeling, historic
restorations, and custom home building
architect/contractor
To be included in the professional service directory, call Mary Rose at (909) 621-4761.
counseling
JOHN B. REID, PhD
(909) 646-0798
Individual and relationship
counseling.
Grief recovery issues.
www.stmcounseling.com
real estate broker
Geoff T. Hamill
Broker Associate, ABR. CRS. GRI,
E-PRO, SRES, D.R.E. #00997900
Wheeler Steffen Sotheby’s International Realty
Phone: (909) 621-0500
Geoff@GeoffHamill.com
#1 in Claremont sales & listings since 1988
Best Possible Price Achieved, Every Time
Meticulous attention to detail
tax preparation/EA
D. PROFFITT, EA
Claremont, CA 91711
Phone: (909) 445-1379
dee@dproffittea.com
Visit my website at
www.dproffittea.com
Income Tax Specialist since 1981
Payroll Service • Accounting
SRS GENERAL
CONTRACTOR, INC.
909-621-1559
www.srsgeneralcontractor.com
Practical design, tastefully executed.
• Residential Remodel
• Restoration of Unique & Vintage
homes • Room additions.
design/build
PETER T. IGLER, D.D.S.
D. INGRID ROJAS, D.D.S.
Cosmetic & General Dentistry
615 W. Foothill Blvd.
Claremont, CA 91711
(909) 624-6815
1 Hour In-Office Bleaching, Veneers,
White Fillings, Dental Implants, Dentures.
LIGHTFOOT • RALLS
& LIGHTFOOT LLP
Certified Public Accountants
675 W. Foothill Blvd., Suite 300
Claremont, CA 91711
(909) 626-2623
Tax Planning & Preparation • Accounting
c.p.a. financial consultants
SUZANNE H. CHRISTIAN
CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNER®
Professional Securities offered through
LPL Financial
Member of FINRA/SIPC
419 Yale Ave. Claremont
(909) 625-1052
“Your financial security is my priority”
Ann M. Johannsen, O.D.
Brad A. Baggarly, O.D.
OPTOMETRY
695 W. Foothill Blvd.
Established 1972
(909) 625-7861
www.claremontoptometry.com
Eyemed - VSP - MES - Medicare
chiropractor
DR. MARTIN S. McLEOD
411 N. Indian Hill Blvd.
Claremont, CA 91711
(909) 621-1208
• Joint & Muscle Pain • Headache
• Sciatica • Pinched nerve
• Most Insurance accepted
• Personal injury
optometry
dentist
NEW CAR GUIDE
SERVICE DIRECTORY
Don McDonald, Pharmacist
Health insurance
333 N. Indian Hill Blvd., Claremont
(909) 635-8933
RXDonald@gmail.com
New to the Golden Age? New to the area?
Leaving your employer or union coverage?
Need extra help paying for prescriptions?
We focus on your health and your healthcare
healthcare
Helen Carlson of Pomona died on
Sunday, July 27, 2014. She was 99.
She was born on May 29, 1915, the
oldest of four children born to Costi
and Mary Mandrean. She was raised
and graduated from high school in War-
ren, Ohio, where she also attended
business college.
Mrs. Carlson moved to California,
where she married Lonnie Westlake.
After he died, she met and married
Arnold Carlson, with whom she shared
many traveling experiences, including
trips to Israel, Africa and Europe, in-
cluding the Scandinavian countries, as
well as many excursions around the
United States.
Mrs. Carlson worked as a waitress at
the U & I restaurant in Pomona and at
Walter’s Coffee Shop in Claremont.
She was a very active member of the
Oak Park Community Church of God,
Claremont. Her church involvement
gave her much joy as she was sur-
rounded by many compassionate, car-
ing friends.
Mrs. Carlson gave generously of her
time and resources to her favorite chari-
ties, especially missionary-based proj-
ects. She helped collect, box and
distribute over 135,000 books to chil-
dren of third world countries. Various
thrift stores also benefited from her
weekly help. Eating at Mrs. Carlson’s
house was always a treat, as she was a
marvelous cook and baker. Many
friends and relatives were fortunate
enough to have their wedding cake
made by her.
“Helen will be sorely missed by
those of us left,” family shared, “but we
rejoice as we know she is in the arms of
Jesus, where she has yearned to be for
such a long time.”
Mrs. Carlson is survived by a sister,
Mary McDonald, and by several nieces
and nephews. She was preceded in
death by her husband, Arnold Carlson,
her brother, Costi Mandrean Jr., and her
sister, Libby Rose.
Services will be held on Tuesday,
August 12 at 10 a.m. at Todd Memorial
Chapel, 570 N. Garey Ave. in Pomona.
Interment will be at the Pomona Ceme-
tery and Mausoleum.
It was Mrs. Carlson’s request that, in
lieu of flowers, donations be made ei-
ther to Simpson University (2211 Col-
lege View Drive, Redding, CA 96003)
to the Christian and Missionary Al-
liance (PO Box 35000, Colorado
Springs, CO 80935).
Claremont COURIER/Friday, August 1, 2014 13
Anne (Lacy) Thompson, a longtime
Claremont resident, died on June 30,
2014 after a brief illness. She was 60.
She was born in Barnett, Hertford-
shire, England on November 17, 1953.
In 1956 her family immigrated to Mon-
treal, Canada. In 1961, the family immi-
grated to Pomona, California before
settling in Claremont in 1962.
Ms. Thompson attended Claremont
schools through high school and gradu-
ated from Claremont High in 1971. She
went on to graduate from Cal Poly
Pomona in 1980 with a bachelor’s de-
gree in computer science and became a
US citizen in 1981.
In high school, she worked at the
Claremont Laundry on Indian Hill. In her
professional career, she worked for many
years at Hughes and Lockheed Martin as
a computer programmer. Most recently,
she found her niche in care-giving for
people who were homebound or in need
of extra assistance.
Anne was an optimist, always looking
for the good in others, and she liked a
good laugh. Her circle of friends was
small but enduring. She especially en-
joyed her daily phone conversations with
her brother, Rick.
She traveled some, returning to Eng-
land a few times over the years exploring
the old castles and ruins and stuff. She
was happiest, however, when curled up
with a good book with her beloved dog
by her side. Mysteries, self-improve-
ment and historical fiction and nonfiction
were among her favorite genres.
Ms. Thompson was a computer whiz,
but she had a creative side as well. She
enjoyed flower arranging and during
Christmas, her favorite holiday, she
prided herself on her artful gift-wrap-
ping. She will be deeply missed.
She leaves her parents, Garry and
Dorothy Lacy; her brother, Rick Lacy; a
nephew, Seth Lacy, and two nieces, Eliz-
abeth and Emilie Lacy.
Anne Thompson
Booklover, beloved daughter and sister
OBITUARIES
Helen Carlson
World traveler, volunteer, woman of faith
Claremont COURIER/Friday, August 1, 2014 14
Claremont regains top spot in ‘cool’ city challenge
A
s of Thursday, July 31, Claremon-
ters taking in the CoolCalifornia
City Challenge have accumulated
1,190,193 points compared to Riverside’s
1,158,847 points.
Earlier this week, the City of Trees had slipped into
second place behind Riverside, but Claremont’s 359
participants in the conservation contest responded to
the setback by logging on and updating their points.
In just four days, residents have logged more than
45,000 points to put Claremont back in the lead.
Claremont has traded the top spot with Riverside,
which has 774 registrants, several times over the
course of the challenge, despite the fact that Riverside
has almost twice the number of residents participating
in the program.
The CoolCalifornia City Challenge was created to
encourage voluntary carbon footprint reductions
throughout the state and to track household green-
house gas emissions reductions from city to city.
Since April 1, participating households have been en-
couraged to track their household energy use and ve-
hicle emissions and join EcoTeams, groups of
households working together to reduce their carbon
footprints, and earn points in the program.
The contest continues though August 31, with
Claremont eligible to win a large chunk of the
$50,000 to be distributed between cities based on the
number of points.
According to the program website, the city with the
most points at the end of the five-month challenge pe-
riod will be crowned the “Coolest California City” for
2014 at an awards ceremony at the Air Resources
Board meeting in October. In addition, two runner-up
cities will each earn the title of “Cool California
City,” and be awarded second- and third-place prizes.
All cities will receive prize money based on the per-
centage of overall points earned by participants in
their city during the competition.
For details on how to earn points, log on to:
https://coolclimate.berkeley. edu/challenge/how-do-we-
calculate-points-for-the-challenge.
—Angela Bailey
news@claremont-courier.com
COURIER photos/Steven Felschundneff
California’s Golden Bear takes a load off, to the delight of concert-goers at Memorial Park. The bear was a big hit with visitors to the park as he helped promote Clare-
mont’s effort to win the CoolCalifornia City Challenge.
Riley Zitar
and Lily
Miller help
organize the
CoolCalifor-
nia chal-
lenge booth
on Monday
during the
concert in
Memorial
Park.
Claremont COURIER/Friday, August 1, 2014 15
California’s Golden Bear regales concert-goers by pretending to look for food in the garbage bin during the concert at Memorial Park. The bear paid a visit to Clare-
mont as part of Energy Upgrade California’s CoolCalifornia Challenge, in which cities compete to lower their energy use.
Nelson Wang, as the
California Bear, dances
with the band Kulayd as
they sing “Under the
Boardwalk” on Monday
in Memorial Park. The
bear, who visited Clare-
mont as part of the
CoolCalifornia City
Challenge, entertained
the crowd throughout
the evening.
COURIER photos/
Steven Felschundneff
Claremont COURIER/Friday, August 1, 2014 16
CALENDAR
Art Walk
Claremont galleries open their doors
for artist receptions on Friday.
Page 19
Friday, August 1 through Saturday, August 9
ART WALK Visit Claremont art gal-
leries between 6 and 9 p.m. for artist re-
ceptions, refreshments and live music.
See a listing of participants on page 19.
FRIDAY NIGHTS LIVE Stroll
through the Village and listen to free,
live music from 6 to 9 p.m. This
week’s concerts include Dynamite
Dawson (soft rock) at the Public
Plaza, Timothy Rotolo (piano) at the
chamber and Jackson Family
(folk/blues) at city hall.
BUTTERFLY PAVILION The But-
terfly Pavilion combines science ed-
ucation with interactive fun to teach
visitors about California native but-
terflies and conservation. 10 a.m. to 3
p.m. Rancho Santa Ana Botanic Gar-
den, 1500 N. College Ave., Clare-
mont. (909) 625-8767.
AUTHOR READING Author Kevin
Moffett will share excerpts from his
latest collaborative novel, The Silent
History, at Rhino Records. 1 p.m.
235 Yale Ave., Claremont.
FILM SCREENING LA County pre-
miere of Urban Fruit with eco-de-
signer Larry Santoyo and farm tour. 5
to 9:30 p.m. Pomona College’s Organic
Farm, 130 Amherst Ave., Claremont.
UPSCYLE “The Sculptures of LT Mus-
tardseed.” LT Mustardseed is a full-time
working designer and sculptor native to
Los Angeles. She has successfully cre-
ated numerous public and private art
commissions. LT’s sculptures will be on
display throughout Garden grounds.
Sculptures range from a gigantic, 20-foot
dragonfly to a 6-foot hummingbird,
larger-than-life “Harley Bird,” mechan-
ical passion flowers, fire-breathing
pitcher plants, whimsical animals and
fanciful creations. Rancho Santa Ana
Botanic Garden, 1500 N. College Ave.,
Claremont. (909) 625-8767.
LIVE JAZZ performance on the Blue
Fin patio at 2 p.m. 665 E. Foothill
YOUR WEEK IN 9 DAYS
9-DAY CALENDAR
continues on the next page
Nightlife
Brandon Bernstein to perform
at Hotel Casa 425 this week.
Page 20
August
Friday 1
August
Saturday 2
August
Sunday 3
COURIER photo/Steven Felschundneff
A bee feeds recently in a flowerbed planted along the First Street median between
Yale and Harvard in the Claremont Village. The dog days of summer have arrived in
the Inland Valley, with a nearly week-long heat wave that is expected to continue
through the weekend. Tired of the heat? The first day of fall is only 53 days away.
Claremont COURIER/Friday, August 1, 2014 17
Blvd., Claremont. (909) 946-1398.
COMIC BOOK SHOW Browse
comic book collectibles, art, graphic
novels and collections. 10 a.m. to 5
p.m. Claremont Packing House, 532
W. First St., Claremont.
FATHER-DAUGHTER LUAU
DANCE Come out for a Hawaiian-
themed evening of dancing, photo
booth and fun. $8 per person. 5 to 9
p.m. Granite Creek Community
Church, 1580 N. Claremont Blvd.,
Claremont. (909) 625-4455.
CONCERTS IN THE PARK Up-
stream performs reggae at Memorial
Park from 7 to 8:30 p.m. Free. 840 N.
Indian Hill Blvd., Claremont.
MOVIES IN THE PARK The Clare-
mont Police Department presents The
Lego Movie at Griffith Park at 7:30
p.m. Celebrate National Night Out with
In-N-Out available at the park.
BLUE STAR MUSEUM DAYS
Free admission for active military
personnel, their family members (mil-
itary ID holder and up to five imme-
diate family members) and veterans
(admission fees apply to accompany-
ing family members). Memorial Day
through Labor Day. Rancho Santa
Ana Botanic Garden, 1500 N. College
Ave., Claremont. (909) 625-8767.
LIVE MUSIC Come in for dinner
specials and listen to the Baldy Moun-
tain Jazz Band. 8:30 to 10:30 p.m.
The Press Restaurant, 129 Harvard
Ave., Claremont. (909) 625-4808.
SPONTANEOUS CREATIVE
WRITING Dust off your writing proj-
ects and join in for two ten-minute writ-
ing prompts and an additional hour of
writing. Open to creative people working
on stories, memoirs and poetry. Facili-
tated by Judy Kohnen. For ages 17 or
older. $5. Buddhamouse Emporium, 134
Yale Ave., Claremont. (909) 626-3322.
FRIDAY NIGHTS LIVE Stroll
through the Village and listen to free,
live music from 6 to 9 p.m. This week’s
concerts include Harmony Sisters
(swing) at the Public Plaza, Marc
Weller Trio (jazz) at the chamber and
Vinyl Number (rock) at city hall.
AUTHOR READING Daily Bulletin
reporter and author David Allen will be
reading from his new book Pomona
A-Z. 1 p.m. Rhino Records, 235 Yale
Ave., Claremont.
9-DAY CALENDAR
continued from the previous page
CANDLELIGHT PAVILION: 455
W. Foothill Blvd., Claremont. Thurs-
day, Friday and Saturday evening
shows: dinner at 6 p.m., performance
at 8:15 p.m.; Sunday evening shows:
dinner at 5 p.m., performance at 7:15
p.m.; Saturday and Sunday matinees:
lunch at 11 a.m., performance at
12:45 p.m. (909) 626-1254, ext.1 or
candlelightpavilion.com.
—August 1 through 31: Smokey Joe’s
Café. This show is a feel-good, high-
energy event that’s filled with classic
rock ‘n’ roll tunes from the ‘50s and
‘60s—a time when all you needed for
a great night was a penny in your
loafers, a sweetheart on your arm and
a song to set your toes a-tapping.
—August 6 and 7: The Tokens, doo-
wop greatest hits. Tickets are $20
each. Doors open at 6:45 p.m. with
7:30 p.m. curtain for this perform-
ance. Show only performance. No
meal is included, but desserts and
beverages are available for purchase.
—August 13 and 14: Smooth: The
Sounds of Santana. Tickets are $20
each. Doors open at 6:45 p.m. with
7:30 p.m. curtain for this perform-
ance. Show only performance. No
meal is included, but desserts and
beverages are available for purchase.
—August 20 and 21: Led Zepagain,
Led Zeppelin tribute. Tickets are $20
each. Doors open at 6:45 p.m. with
7:30 p.m. curtain for this perform-
ance. Show only performance. No
meal is included, but desserts and
beverages are available for purchase.
—August 27 and 28: Rocky Moun-
tain High, John Denver tribute. Tick-
ets are $20 each. Doors open at 6:45
p.m. with 7:30 p.m. curtain for this
performance. Show only perform-
ance. No meal is included, but
desserts and beverages are available
for purchase.
—September 5 through 14: The Long
Run present Dark Desert Highway,
a fully produced concert celebrating
the music and influence of The Ea-
gles. Performed on an atmospheric
stage and set to visual media, this
show shares the stories behind the
songs and delivers The Eagles’ great-
est hits with unparalleled musical ac-
curacy and The Long Run’s
engaging, live concert personality.
PERFORMING ARTS
August
Monday 4
August
Tuesday 5
August
Wednesday 6
August
Thursday 7
August
Friday 8
August
Saturday 9
Claremont COURIER/Friday, August 1, 2014 18
AMOCA MUSEUM: 399 N. Garey Ave., Pomona.
865-3146. Wednesday through Sunday, noon to 5 p.m.
General admission is $7, students and seniors admis-
sion is $5 and members and children 12 and under may
enter for free. Visit amoca.org or call (909) 865-3146.
—Through August 13: “Large as Life: Betty Dav-
enport Ford, Elaine Katzer, Lisa Reinertson.” This
exhibition includes three female artists whose
sculptural work—figures, torsos and animals—is
unified through their similar approaches to clay.
The exhibition also presents photographs and other
ephemera to accent the careers of these exceptional
artists whose large-scale practice is both admirable
and ambitious.
BUDDHAMOUSE EMPORIUM: 134 Yale Ave.,
Claremont. Open daily from 10:30 a.m. to 6:30 p.m.
buddhamouse.com. (909) 626-3322.
—Through August 31: “Sacred Geometry - Encaustic
and Encaustic Mixed Media” by Karen Karlsson.
Drawing inspiration from nature’s kaleidoscopic
palette, Ms. Karlsson’s monoprints, pastels and en-
caustic paintings often evoke a sense of serenity and
contemplation. Her more recent work dips into ab-
straction, structure and function, revealing a world
built on mathematical shapes that, regardless of ab-
solutes, never quite feels defined. Opening reception:
Friday, August 1 from 6 to 8 p.m. featuring art, wine,
food and the music of Steven Rushingwind and
Thomas Matranga.
BUNNY GUNNER GALLERY: 254 W. Bonita
Ave., Claremont. Tuesday through Friday, 10 a.m. to
6 p.m. Saturday, noon to 6 p.m. (909) 624-7238.
—Friday, August 1: “White Sky-lounger,” an exhi-
bition by Kate Mueller. From 6 to 9 p.m.
CLAREMONT COMMUNITY FOUNDATION
ART GALLERY: 205 Yale Ave., Claremont Cham-
ber of Commerce. Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to
4 p.m. (909) 398-1060.
—Through August 21: “Cathy Garcia: Mosaics.”
Opening reception: Friday, August 1 from 6 to 8 p.m.
CLAREMONT FORUM BOOKSHOP &
GALLERY: 586 W. First St., Claremont Packing
House. Tuesday through Thursday, noon to 7 p.m.;
Friday and Saturday, noon to 9 p.m.; and Sunday,
noon to 7 p.m. (909) 626-3066.
—Through August 31: In “Primordial Dreams,” Mar-
tin Madzarevic uses pastel, charcoal and mixed
media to recreate the art of our ancient ancestors. In-
spired by the prehistoric cave paintings of Europe, as
well as the various wisdom traditions of indigenous
people around the world, Mr. Madzarevi uses his art
as a tool to spark interest in nature and the past. Mr.
Madzarevi’s art refocuses our collective memory on
a lost world whose wisdom is much needed today in
creating a more equitable and environmentally sus-
tainable future. Opening reception: Friday, August 1
from 6 to 8 p.m. Refreshments will be served.
THE COLONY AT LOFT 204: 532 W. First St.,
#204, Claremont Packing House. Open Wednesday
through Saturday, 1 to 7 p.m. Extended hours on the
first Friday of the month for Claremont Art Walk until
9 p.m. Visit loft204.com. Email info@loft204.com
for information about purchasing monthly wall space
for artwork display or to inquire about event rental of
gallery space. Call Vicki at (626) 224-7915 or (626)
963-4238 for one-on-one art instruction for junior
high and high school age students.
—August 1 through 31: “Eclectic Beauty” by Dallas
Palmer. As a Trader Joe’s artist, Ms. Palmer has been
able to incorporate some of her whimsical themes and
detail into this collection. She utilizes a variety of
mixed media, incorporating either watercolor or
acrylic paint with ink into her paintings. She is in-
spired by old Victorian-era paintings and styles, her
love for animals and graphic novels. Opening recep-
tion: Friday, August 1 from 6 to 9 p.m. featuring re-
freshments and live music by Sunburst.
FIRST STREET GALLERY ART CENTER: 250
W. First St., Suite 120, Claremont. Monday through
Friday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. (909) 626-5455.
—Through October 3: “Tile Show 2014 Featuring
Vicente Siso.” The 24th Annual Tile Show contin-
ues to build on the traditions of community ex-
change and inclusion that have made the Tile Show
such a unique and successful event. This year’s it-
eration features new ceramic sculpture by Vicente
Siso, a native of Argentina who creates whimsical
vessels adorned with animals and flowers. His
paintings and drawings will also be for sale in the
studio. Opening reception: Friday, August 1 from
6 to 8 p.m. A silent auction will be held.
GALERIA DE PÉROLAS: 532 W. First St. #211,
Claremont Packing House. Open by appointment.
—Tuesdays: “Tribe Tuesday,” an open studio ses-
sion for artists to share the space and work on their
pieces. Open to artists of all levels from 7 to 9:30
p.m. Space is limited to 10 people per session. Visit
facebook.com/galeriadeperolas or call (909) 236-
1562.
—Friday, August 1: A showcase of “new and up-
coming artists from all over southern California.”
8 to 10 p.m.
MALOOF FOUNDATION FOR ARTS & CRAFTS:
5131 Carnelian St., Alta Loma. (909) 980-0412,
info@malooffoundation.org or malooffoundation.org.
—Tours: Docent-led tours are offered on Thursdays
and Saturdays at 1, 2 and 3 p.m. and feature Sam
Maloof’s handmade home, furniture and the exten-
sive Maloof collection of arts and crafts. Due to lim-
ited capacity, advance reservations are strongly
recommended for all tours. Admission is $10 for
adults, $8 for seniors and $5 for students. The Dis-
covery Garden is open to visitors on Thursdays and
Saturdays between noon and 4 p.m. at no charge.
Check in at the Foundation Bookstore. The garden
features drought-tolerant plants native to California
and other parts of the world.
PETTERSON MUSEUM OF INTERCUL-
TURAL ART: 730 Plymouth Rd., Pilgrim Place. Fri-
day, Saturday and Sunday, 2 to 4 p.m. Contains
collections of international fine art, folk art and mate-
rial culture from 10,000 BCE to the present, con-
tributed by Pilgrim Place residents and community
friends, covering every continent. (909) 399-5544.
—Through August 24: “Lifestyles of the Rich and
Famous: Chinese Luxury Goods of the Ming and
Qing Dynasties.” Drawing on the Petterson Mu-
seum’s extensive collection of Chinese art and ar-
tifacts, they will highlight prestige items used by
the nobility and wealthy civil servants during
China’s last two dynasties, spanning the years be-
tween 1368-1912. The exhibit will include silk
robes, jewelry and costume accessories, paintings,
ivory, ceramic, lacquer and metal artifacts once
used by the ruling elite of China.
SQUARE i GALLERY: 110 Harvard Ave.,
Claremont. Tuesday through Saturday, 10 a.m. to
6 p.m., or by appointment. Square i is an annex of
the Artist Trait Gallery. Exhibits rotate approxi-
mately every six weeks. Call (909) 621-9091 or
email info@squareigallery.com.
—Through August 31: Growing up, Susan Zenger
was educated in art at Claremont High School and
the Claremont Colleges and spent her junior year
in Rome. She later returned to Europe and lived
there for five years. Ms. Zenger typically works
with black and white and focuses on the human fig-
ure, but in this exhibition she faces the challenge
of going out of her comfort zone by working with
color and landscapes. Opening reception: Satur-
day, August 2 from 6 to 8 p.m.
GALLERIES
Claremont COURIER/Friday, August 1, 2014 19
RESTAURANT ROW
CALL MARY TODAY: 621-4761
First Street
Second Street
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Claremont Art Walk:
Friday, August 1
Claremont Art Walk takes place the first Friday of each
month between 6 and 9 p.m. and exhibits studio and fine
art. Use this walking tour map as a guide to this monthʼs
participating galleries.
1. Buddhamouse Emporium
6 to 8 p.m. 134 Yale Ave., Claremont
“Sacred Geometry—Encaustic and Encaustic
Mixed Media” by Karen Karlsson featuring a re-
ception with art, wine, food and the music of
Steven Rushingwind and Thomas Matranga.
2. Bunny Gunner Gallery
6 to 9 p.m. 254 W. Bonita Ave., Claremont
“White Sky-lounger,” an exhibition by Kate Mueller.
3. Claremont Community Foundation
6 to 8 p.m. 205 Yale Ave., Claremont
“Cathy Garcia: Mosaics.”
4. Claremont Forum Bookshop & Gallery
6 to 8 p.m. 586 W. First St.,
Claremont Packing House
In “Primordial Dreams,” Martin Madzarevic uses
pastel, charcoal and mixed-media to recreate the
art of ancient ancestors. Refreshments served.
5. The Colony at Loft 204
6 to 9 p.m. 532 W. First St., #204,
Claremont Packing House
“Eclectic Beauty” featuring whimsical paintings
by Dallas Palmer. Live music by Sunburst. Re-
freshments will be served.
6. First Street Gallery Art Center
6 to 8 p.m. 250 W. First St., #120, Claremont
“Title Show 2014 Featuring Vicente Siso.” A silent
auction will be held.
7. Galeria de Pérolas
7 to 10 p.m. 532 W. First St., #211,
Claremont Packing House
A showcase of “new and upcoming artists from
all over southern California.”
Claremont COURIER/Friday, August 1, 2014 20
CASA DE SALSA: 415 W. Foothill Blvd. This is
a restaurant that offers weekly live entertainment.
(909) 445-1200.
—Thursdays: Michael Ryan and Friends. 6 to 9 p.m.
—Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays: Romantic gui-
tarist Vicente Victoria. 5 p.m.
—Sundays: Mariachi San Pedro. Brunch. 10 a.m. to
2 p.m.
EUREKA CLAREMONT: 580 W. First St., Clare-
mont. Open from 11 a.m. to midnight Sunday through
Thursday; closes at 1 a.m. Friday and Saturday.
“Hoppy” Hour daily from 2 to 6 p.m. (909) 445-8875.
—Mondays: Local Mondays featuring $3 Dale Bros.
Brewery pints.
—Tuesdays: 50 percent off all wines by the glass.
—Wednesdays: Steal-the-Glass craft beer of the
week. Meet the brewer first Wednesday of every
month.
—Thursdays: All Tito’s Vodka drinks $2 off and Eu-
reka Thursday Night Music.
THE FOLK MUSIC CENTER: 220 Yale Ave.,
Claremont Village.
—Open mic night, the last Sunday of every month.
Sign-up begins at 6 p.m.; performances run from 6:30
to 9 p.m. Admission is $1. (909) 624-2928 or folk‐
musiccenter.com.
—Saturday, August 2: Ooks of Hazzard. Doors open
at 7 p.m. Show begins at 7:30 p.m. $12.
FLAPPERS COMEDY: 540 W. First St., Clare-
mont Packing House. 18 and over. Show times: Fri-
day at 8 and 10 p.m., Saturday at 7 and 9:30 p.m. and
Sunday at 7 p.m. Tickets can be purchased online or
at the door.
—Friday, August 1: Paul Morrissey from Craig Fer-
guson. 7 and 9:30 p.m.
—Saturday, August 2: Paul Morrissey from Craig
Ferguson. 7 and 9:30 p.m.
—Sunday, August 3: Two Milk Minimum at 4:30
p.m. and First Timer Funnies with Alex Ortiz at 7
p.m.
—Thursday, August 7: Flappers University Student
Showcase. 8 p.m.
—Friday, August 8: Guy Branum from Chelsea
Lately. 7 and 9:30 p.m.
—Saturday, August 9: Guy Branum from Chelsea
Lately. 7 and 9:30 p.m.
HIP KITTY JAZZ & FONDUE: 502 W. First St.,
Claremont Packing House. Tuesday through Sun-
day, 5:30 p.m. to 2 a.m. Live jazz every night. Ad-
mission: Two-drink minimum. Info: (909)
447-6700 or hipkittyjazz.com.
—Friday, August 1: Solid Ray Woods. 8 p.m. $5
cover charge.
—Saturday, August 2: The Mighty Mojo Prophets. 8
p.m. $5 cover charge.
—Sunday, August 3: Groove Session. 7 p.m.
—Tuesday, August 5: Beat Cinema. 9 p.m.
—Wednesday, August 6: Jam Night with The Clare-
mont Voodoo Society. 8 p.m.
—Thursday, August 7: Organizm. 7 p.m.
—Friday, August 8: The Get Down Boys. 8 p.m. $5
cover charge.
—Saturday, August 9: Switchblade 3. 8 p.m. $5 cover
charge.
HOTEL CASA 425: 425 W. First St., Claremont.
Call (909) 624-2272 or visit casa425.com.
—Wednesday, August 6: Brandon Bernstein. 6 to 9
p.m.
—Wednesday, August 13: Lorenzo Grassi. 6 to 9 p.m.
—Wednesday, August 20: Joe LoPiccolo. 6 to 9 p.m.
—Wednesday, August 27: Chomsky Jazz. 6 to 9 p.m.
THE PRESS RESTAURANT: 129 Harvard Ave.,
Claremont Village. Thursday through Saturday until
2 a.m. Live DJ every Thursday at 11 p.m. 21 and over
after 9 p.m. Standing room only after 9:30 p.m. No
cover. (909) 625-4808.
—Friday, August 1: Coleslaw. 10 p.m.
—Saturday, August 2: Blue Highway. 10 p.m.
—Sunday, August 3: Piano Sunday at 6 p.m. and Super
Awesome Open Mic. Night with Drew at 9:30 p.m.
—Tuesday, August 5: King Trivia Night. 9:30 p.m.
—Wednesday, August 6: Wine Wednesday with
music by Joe Atman on piano at 9:30 p.m.
—Thursday, August 7: Baldy Mountain Jazz Band
(jazz) at 8:30 p.m. followed by KSPC DJ Junior
Francis at 11 p.m.
—Friday, August 8: Migraine Season. 10 p.m.
—Saturday, August 9: Lovey Dove and Technicolor
Hearts. 10 p.m.
PIANO PIANO: 555 W. Foothill Blvd., Claremont.
Live dueling piano show times: Wednesday and
Thursday, 9 p.m. to 1 a.m.; Friday and Saturday, 8
p.m. to 1 a.m. 21 and over. $5 cover charge on Fri-
days and Saturdays after 8 p.m. (no cover charge with
student ID). (909) 547-4266.
—Tuesdays: Taco Tuesday with $1 tacos, $2 Coronas
and $3 margaritas. Rock the mic or jam with the
band.
—Wednesdays: “Rockstar Karaoke.” Rock the mic
or jam with the band. $2 Bud Lights and $4 Vodka
Rockstars. 9 p.m.
WALTER’S RESTAURANT: 310 Yale Ave., Clare-
mont. VIP and fire pit lounge open from 7 to 10 p.m.
Happy hour specials are only valid in the bar and
lounge areas. (909) 767-2255.
—Margarita Mondays: $5 margaritas, $5 house
wine, $5 Jacaranda Rye, $5 Tandoori chicken wings.
—Tequila Tuesdays: $5 house tequila, $5 house wine,
$5 Double Dude IPA and $5 nachos.
—Whiskey Wednesdays: $5 whiskey, $5 house wine,
$5 Dale Bros. Black Beer and $5 bruschetta.
—Thirsty Thursdays: $5 beers, half-off wine bottles
and appetizers (not specials).
—Finest Fridays: $5 house vodka, $5 house wine, $5
Claremont Craft Double Dude IPA, $5 Walter’s
Honey Blonde, $5 Dale Bros. Pomona Queen, $5 na-
chos and $7 classic burger and fries.
—Saturdays and Sundays: $4 Bloody Marys, $4 mi-
mosas, $5 Fireball shots, $5 Afghan fries and $5
Stone Pale Ale, all day and night.
NIGHTLIFE
COURIER CROSSWORD
Across
1. Willie Wonka's favorite tree?
6. Mexican friend
11. "Far out!"
14. African antelope
15. Buckwheat cereal
16. Defensive followers
17. One of the honored citizens
at the Claremont Fourth of
July 2014
19. Cave dweller
20. Direction
21. Little picture
22. Scolding syllable
23. Gadget
26. Grow incisors and molars!
29. Kind of tide
30. Used car salesman concern
32. Big hit
34. Proposed "fifth taste," which
means "savory" in Japanese
35. Backrub response
38. Person of interest in a gossip blog
40. System that connects
computers (Abbr.)
41. Doctrine
44. Muzzleloader accessory
47. One of the grand marshals at
the Claremont 2014 Fourth
of July event
49. Nile bird
51. Support on the sides
52. Two-footer
54. Assist
55. Dramatize
59. Juiced
61. "Gosh!"
62. Uncouthness
65. Kettle and Parker
66. One-eighth of a cup
67. Pilgrimage destination
68. Blasting material
69. Rose oil
70. Kind of mouth or boat
Down
1. Sin followers, honest!
2. Beside
3. Milk protein
4. Florida blackbird
5. Poetic paean
6. Like, with "to"
7. Einstein's m
8. Capri or Crete
9. "In the ___": Elvis number
10. Rowboat mover
11. Debate feature
12. Curse
13. Banned pesticide
18. Film
22. Be rife (with)
24. Sink
25. Equinox mo.
27. Bird that doesn't fly
28. One of the Waltons
30. Water pots
31. To have a opinion
33. "Frasier" actress Gilpin
35. #1 position
36. Speech of old Syria
37. Most sage tasting?
39. Buys off
42. Group of two
43. Hold title to
45. Jedi in Star Wars, first name
46. Fall
48. Scrape together
50. Blue-ribbon
53. "Saturday Night Fever" music
56. Pen, with blanc
57. Shamu, for one
58. Level
60. Pre-revolution ruler
61. BBC clock setting
62. Scarf
63. Express thoughtful hesitation
64. "The One" (Matrix)
Crossword by Myles
Mellor. Puzzle #274
Answers to last weekʼs puzzle #273
Jenelle Rensch covers the calendar, arts and entertain-
ment. Deadline: Thursday at 5 p.m., one week before
publication. Include date, time, address, a contact
phone number and fee for admission (if applicable).
Email: calendar@claremont-courier.com. Phone: 621-
4761. Fax: 621-4072. Address: 1420 N. Claremont
Blvd., Suite 205-B, Claremont, 91711. There is NO
guarantee that items submitted will be published.
RENTALS
Office Space For Rent
VILLAGE office. Exceptional
building. Utilities, waiting room,
parking. 419 Yale Ave. Week-
days from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
EXECUTIVE office. Conven-
ient Claremont address. Newly
remodeled interior/exterior.
Fully furnished. 24/7 access.
Conference room. Phone/in-
ternet. Reserved parking. 909-
670-0600 ext.121.
Studio For Rent
MT. Baldy studio for rent. Pri-
vate bathroom. Utilities in-
cluded. Laundry on premises.
No pets. $925 monthly. Lease
and security deposit. Available
August 1. cdevux@gmail.com.
Townhome For Rent
THREE bedrooms, 2.5 bath-
rooms, two-car garage. Pool,
spa. Chaparral Elementary.
Available August 15. $2050.
213-435-9479.
VILLAGE Walk end-unit,
three bedrooms plus den,
two-and-a-half bathrooms,
two-car garage. $2200
monthly. 310-210-7719.
Vacation Rental
LAGUNA Shores-August 24-
29. Ocean front. $750 or
$175 daily. Studio, microwave,
refrigerator, pool, Jacuzzi,
parking. 909-625-1052.
REAL ESTATE
Condo For Sale
$235,000-Two bedroom, two
bathroom condo is located
on the top floor. Claremont
schools! Upgrades include
wood laminate floors, gran-
ite counters and newer cus-
tom cabinetry in kitchen and
bathrooms. Kitchen appli-
ances including refrigerator.
Geoffhamill.com, 909-621-
0500.
REAL ESTATE
Land For Sale
THIRTY-SIX acre wilderness
ranch, $194 monthly. Secluded
northern Arizona wilderness at
cool clear 6000 ft elevation.
Quiet and peaceful with sweep-
ing overlook views from prime
cabin sites along evergreen
wooded ridge top. Rock forma-
tions and grassy meadows
below. Prime groundwater
area, garden loam soil, near
small town services and na-
tional forest lakes. RV’s ok
$22,500. $2250 down. Guar-
anteed seller financing. Pic-
tures, maps, weather, area
information, 1st United 800-
966-6690. sierrahighland-
sranch.com. (Cal-SCAN)
VACANT land for sale in these
areas: Oak Hills, 2.27 acres,
$80,000; Lucern Valley, 1.94
acres, $42,500; Lucern Valley,
10.20 acres, $111,600; Lan-
ders, one acre, $20,000;
Desert Hot Springs, 77.54
acres, $199,000. CBTC, 909-
621-6761.
EMPLOYMENT
Domestic Help
EXPERIENCED pet-sitter
available. Five plus years car-
ing for animals of all varieties.
Yard care, mail pickup and
dog walking also available.
Call Kristen 909-261-3099.
Help Wanted
DRIVERS: Start with our
training or continue your solid
career. You have options!
Company drivers, lease pur-
chase or owner operators
needed! 877-369-7091. cen-
t ral t ruckdri vi ngj obs. com.
(Cal-SCAN)
TRUCK drivers, obtain Class
A-CDL in two-and-a-half
weeks. Company sponsored
training. Also hiring recent
truck school graduates, expe-
rienced drivers. Must be 21 or
older. Call 866-275-2349.
(Cal-SCAN)
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
LOOKING for professional
massage therapist or healer
to rent shared space. Clare-
mont Healing Arts Center.
909-946-9098.
Student Ads
HELP with yard work, organi-
zation, pet/house/baby sit-
ting, party clean-up and other
odd jobs. $5-$10 per hour.
Call 909-643-7111.
RESPONSIBLE babysitter or
errand girl, licensed with a ve-
hicle, able to handle tasks.
Lauren, 909-694-7988.
EXPERIENCED babysitter/
housesitter available for the
summer. Outgoing and respon-
sible. Natalee, 909-455-2557.
RESPONSIBLE CHS senior.
Experienced, has transporta-
tion and references. All-
around helper with emphasis
on babysitting and pet care.
Chynna, 909-764-9088, 909-
621-3929.
RESPONSIBLE CHS junior
willing to babysit, housesit,
petsit, dog walk and tutor.
Contact Shea at claremont
babysitter@gmail.com.
MARKETPLACE
Announcements
DID you know that not only
does newspaper media reach
a huge audience, they also
reach an engaged audience?
Discover the power of news-
paper advertising. For a free
brochure call 916-288-6011
or email cecelia@cnpa.com.
(Cal-SCAN)
DID you know seven in 10
Americans or 158 million US
adults read content from
newspaper media each week?
Discover the power of news-
paper advertising. For a free
brochure call 916-288-6011 or
email cecelia@cnpa.com.
(Cal-SCAN)
rentals..............21
services...........24
legels..............22
real estate.......27
CLASSIFIEDS
Friday 08-01-14
909.621.4761
CONTACT US
1420 N Claremont Blvd. Suite 205B Claremont, CA 91711
Ph: 909.621.4761 • Fax: 909.621.4072
classified@claremont-courier.com
Business Hours: Monday-Friday 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Claremont COURIER Classifieds 21
PRICING
Classified:
1-16 words $20.00,
each additional word $1.25
Display Ad:
$9.50 per column/inch,
3 column minimum
Service Ad:
Please call for pricing.
All new accounts and
Garage Sale ads must be
prepaid. Payment by
cash, check. Credit cards
now accepted.
Sorry no refunds.
DEADLINES
Classified:
Monday & Thursday
by 3:00 pm
Real Estate:
Wednesday by 3:00 pm
Service Pages:
Monday by 3:00 pm
Rates and deadlines are subject to change without notice.
The publisher reserves the right to edit, reclassify, revise or
reject any classified advertisement. Please report any error
that may be in your ad immediately. The Courier is not re-
sponsible for any unreported errors after the first publica-
tion. It is the advertiser’s obligation to verify the accuracy
of his/her ad.
AUTOS
MARKETPLACE
REAL ESTATE
It's a Zoe TeBeau Estate Sale!
Estate of Wendy Losh
August 2-3 from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m.
1628 Finecroft Drive, Claremont
Beautiful decor! Art glass, art pottery, paintings, weav-
ings, batik linens and clothing by Kathryn Herrman,
beautiful ladies clothing and accessories. Artisan style
jewelry, costume and period pieces of jewelry, sterling
silver flatware, shelves of books, CDs, DVDs and
more. Ethnographical items from her travels. We will
ask you to wear booties while in the home which will be
provided at the front door. As always refer to terms and
conditions, they will explain how procedurally we do
things. For pictures go to:
www.EstateSales.NET/estate-sales/CA/
Claremont/91711/695295
REALTORS!
Place your ads in the
most widely read
real estate section
in the area.
CALL JESSICA
AT 621-4761
2005 white Ford Mustang with beige convertible top. Two-door,
automatic, V6 engine, 55,000 miles. Good condition. Seller in
Claremont. $12,000. Many additional features. (909) 921-3403.
Claremont COURIER Classifieds/Friday, August 1, 2014 22
Trustee Sale No. 14-521007 INC Title Order No.
1609433 APN 8673-035-035 NOTICE OF
TRUSTEE’S SALE YOU ARE IN DEFAULT
UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED 11/01/07.
UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT
YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A
PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLA-
NATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PRO-
CEEDINGS AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD
CONTACT A LAWYER. On 08/21/14 at 9:00
am, Aztec Foreclosure Corporation as the duly
appointed Trustee under and pursuant to the
power of sale contained in that certain Deed of
Trust executed by Eldon Heaston and Sharon
Heaston, husband and wife as joint tenants, as
Trustor(s), in favor of First Federal Bank of Cal-
ifornia, as Beneficiary, Recorded on 11/13/07 in
Instrument No. 20072531747 of official records
in the Office of the county recorder of LOS AN-
GELES County, California; OneWest Bank N.A.
as purchaser of certain assets of First Federal
Bank of California from The Federal Deposit In-
surance Corporation, as receiver, F/K/AOneWest
Bank, FSB, as the current Beneficiary, WILL
SELL AT PUBLIC AUCTION TO THE HIGH-
EST BIDDER FOR CASH (payable at time of
sale in lawful money of the United States, by
cash, a cashier’s check drawn by a state or na-
tional bank, a check drawn by a state or federal
credit union, or a check drawn by a state or fed-
eral savings and loan association, savings associ-
ation, or savings bank specified in section 5102
of the Financial Code and authorized to do busi-
ness in this state), Behind the fountain located in
Civic Center Plaza, 400 Civic Center Plaza,
Pomona, CA, all right, title and interest conveyed
to and now held by it under said Deed of Trust in
the property situated in said County, California
described as: 3822 NEWARK COURT, CLARE-
MONT, CA 91711 The property heretofore de-
scribed is being sold “as is”. The undersigned
Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrect-
ness of the street address and other common des-
ignation, if any, shown herein. Said sale will be
made, but without covenant or warranty, ex-
pressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or
encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal
sum of the note(s) secured by said Deed of Trust,
with interest thereon, as provided in said note(s),
advances, if any, under the terms of the Deed of
Trust, estimated fees, charges and expenses of the
Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of
Trust, to-wit: $1,342,412.46 (Estimated good
through 8/1/14) Accrued interest and additional
advances, if any, will increase this figure prior to
sale. The undersigned caused said Notice of De-
fault and Election to Sell to be recorded in the
county where the real property is located and
more than three months have elapsed since such
recordation. DATE: July 28, 2014 Elaine Malone
Assistant Secretary & Assistant Vice President
Aztec Foreclosure Corporation 20 Pacifica, Suite
1460 Irvine, CA92618 Phone: (877) 257-0717 or
(602) 638-5700 Fax: (602) 638-5748 www.aztec-
trustee.com NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BID-
DERS: If you are considering bidding on this
property lien, you should understand that there are
risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You
will be bidding on a lien, not on the property it-
self. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction
does not automatically entitle you to free and
clear ownership of the property. You should also
be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be
a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the
auction, you are or may be responsible for pay-
ing off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned
off, before you can receive clear title to the prop-
erty. You are encouraged to investigate the exis-
tence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that
may exist on this property by contacting the
county recorder’s office or a title insurance com-
pany, either of which may charge you a fee for
this information. If you consult either of these re-
sources, you should be aware that the same lender
may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust
on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY
OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of
sale may be postponed one or more times by the
mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pur-
suant to Section 2924g of the California Civil
Code. The law requires that information about
trustee sale postponements be made available to
you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not
present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether
your sale date has been postponed, and, if appli-
cable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale
of this property, you may call or visit the Internet
Web site, using the file number assigned to this
case 14-521007. Information about postpone-
ments that are very short in duration or that occur
close in time to the scheduled sale may not im-
mediately be reflected in the telephone informa-
tion or on the Internet Web site. The best way to
verify postponement information is to attend
the scheduled sale. Call 714-573-1965
http://www.Priorityposting.com Or Aztec Fore-
closure Corporation (877) 257-0717 www.aztec-
trustee.com P1105901 8/1, 8/8, 08/15/2014
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
File No. 2014200688
The following person(s) is (are) doing business as
BUILDING BLOCKS THERAPY 4 KIDS,
2061 Wright Ave., Ste. A7, Los Angeles, CA91750.
Mailing address: 14375 Tony Court, Los Angeles,
CA 92880. Registrant(s): BUILDING BLOCKS
THERAPY 4 KIDS, LLC, 14375 Tony Court, Los
Angeles, CA92880.
This business is conducted by a Limited Liability
Company.
Registrant has not yet commenced to transact busi-
ness under the fictitious business name or names
listed herein.
I declare that all information in this statement is true
and correct.
/s/ Charles H. Robinson IV Title: CEO
This statement was filed with the Registrar-
Recorder/County Clerk of Los Angeles County on
07/24/14.
NOTICE- In Accordance with subdivision (a) of
section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement gener-
ally expires at the end of five (5) years from the date
on which it was filed in the office of the County
Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of sec-
tion 17920, where it expires 40 days after any
change in the facts set forth in the statement pur-
suant to section 17913 other than a change in the
residence address of a registered owner. Anew Fic-
titious Business Name Statement must be filed be-
fore the expiration. Effective January 1, 2014, the
Fictitious Business Name Statement must be ac-
companied by the Affidavit Of Identity Form.
The filing of this statement does not of itself au-
thorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business
Name in violation of the rights of another under
federal, state, or common law (see Section 14411
et seq., Business and Professions Code).
PUBLISH: August 1, 8, 15 and 22, 2014
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
File No. 2014188909
The following person(s) is (are) doing business as
WOOTTON + HARDYMAN ARCHITEC-
TURE, 595 Clarion Court, Claremont, CA 91711.
Registrant(s): Reuben Alfred Wootton, 595 Clarion
Court, Claremont, CA91711. Kevin Hardyman, 5622
Jasper Street, Alta Loma, CA91701.
This business is conducted by a General Partnership.
Registrant commenced to transact business under the
fictitious name or names listed above on 10/1/2013.
I declare that all information in this statement is true
and correct.
/s/ Reuben Alfred Wootton Title: Partner
This statement was filed with the Registrar-
Recorder/County Clerk of Los Angeles County on
07/14/14.
NOTICE- In Accordance with subdivision (a) of sec-
tion 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally ex-
pires at the end of five (5) years from the date on which
it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except,
as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where
it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth
in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than
a change in the residence address of a registered
owner. Anew Fictitious Business Name Statement
must be filed before the expiration. Effective January
1, 2014, the Fictitious Business Name Statement must
be accompanied by the Affidavit Of Identity Form.
The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize
the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in vi-
olation of the rights of another under federal, state, or
common law (see Section 14411 et seq., Business and
Professions Code).
PUBLISH: August 1, 8, 15 and 22, 2014
NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER
ESTATE OF OLAMAE MILLER
A/K/AOLAMAE PORTER
CASE NO. BP154159
To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent
creditors, and persons who may otherwise be in-
terested in the will or estate, or both, of: OLA
MAE MILLER A/K/A OLA MAE PORTER
A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by
FLORENTINE BUTLER SHIRLEY in the Su-
perior Court of California, County of LOS AN-
GELES.
THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests that
FLORENTINE BUTLER SHIRLEY be ap-
pointed as personal representative to administer
the estate of the decedent.
THE PETITION requests the decedent's WILL
and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The
will and any codicils are available for examina-
tion in the file kept by the court.
THE PETITION requests authority to administer
the estate under the Independent Administration of
Estates Act with full authority . (This authority will
allow the personal representative to take many ac-
tions without obtaining court approval. Before tak-
ing certain very important actions, however, the
personal representative will be required to give no-
tice to interested persons unless they have waived
notice or consented to the proposed action.) The in-
dependent administration authority will be granted
unless an interested person files an objection to the
petition and shows good cause why the court should
not grant the authority.
A HEARING on the petition will be held on
08/25/2014 at 8:30 in Dept. 9 Room No: 244 lo-
cated at 111 N. HILL ST. LOS ANGELES CA
90012 CENTRAL.
IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition,
you should appear at the hearing and state your
objections or file written objections with the court
before the hearing. Your appearance may be in
person or by your attorney.
IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent
creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim
with the court and mail a copy to the personal rep-
resentative appointed by the court within the later
of either (1) four months from the date of first is-
suance of letters to a general personal representa-
tive, as defined in section 58(b) of the California
Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of
mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice
under section 9052 of the California Probate
Code. Other California statutes and legal author-
ity may affect your rights as a creditor. You may
want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable
in California law.
YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court.
If you are a person interested in the estate, you
may file with the court a formal Request for Spe-
cial Notice (DE-154) of the filing of an inventory
and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or
account as provided in Probate Code section
1250. A Request for Special Notice form is avail-
able from the court clerk.
Attorney for Petitioner:
JAMES DALOISIO
SBN 145827
7205 SEBASTIAN AVE.
JURUPA VALLEY, CA 92509
8/1, 8/8, 8/15/14
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Claremont COURIER Classifieds/Friday, August 1, 2014 23
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
File No. 2014179710
The following person(s) is (are) doing business as
EDGE FOUNDATION, 1515 Bates Place, Clare-
mont, CA 91711. Registrant(s): The Sylvia Boze-
man And Rhonda Hughes Edge, 1515 Bates Place,
Claremont, CA91711.
This business is conducted by a Corporation.
Registrant commenced to transact business under the
fictitious name or names listed above on 06/18/2014.
I declare that all information in this statement is true
and correct.
/s/ Talithia Williams Title: Secretary/Treasurer
This statement was filed with the Registrar-
Recorder/County Clerk of Los Angeles County
on 07/03/14.
NOTICE- In Accordance with subdivision (a) of section
17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires at
the end of five (5) years from the date on which it was
filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as pro-
vided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it ex-
pires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the
statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change
in the residence address of a registered owner. Anew
Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed be-
fore the expiration. Effective January 1, 2014, the Ficti-
tious Business Name Statement must be accompanied
by the Affidavit Of Identity Form.
Thefilingof thisstatement doesnot of itself authorizethe
use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in viola-
tion of the rights of another under federal, state, or com-
mon law (see Section 14411 et seq., Business and
Professions Code).
PUBLISH: July 11, 18, 25 and August 1, 2014
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
File No. 2014162150
The following person(s) is (are) doing business
as SCHERER & ASSOCIATES, 1108 East Mi-
ramar Avenue, Claremont, CA 91711. Regis-
trant(s): Nelson D. Scherer, 1108 East Miramar
Avenue, Claremont, CA 91711.
This business is conducted by an Individual.
Registrant commenced to transact business under
the fictitious name or names listed above on
06/01/2014.
I declare that all information in this statement is
true and correct.
/s/ Nelson D. Scherer Title: Owner
This statement was filed with the Registrar-
Recorder/County Clerk of Los Angeles County on
06/16/14.
NOTICE- In Accordance with subdivision (a) of sec-
tion 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally
expires at the end of five (5) years from the date on
which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk,
except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section
17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in
the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to sec-
tion 17913 other than a change in the residence ad-
dress of a registered owner. A new Fictitious
Business Name Statement must be filed before the
expiration. Effective January 1, 2014, the Fictitious
Business Name Statement must be accompanied by
the Affidavit Of Identity Form.
The filing of this statement does not of itself author-
ize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name
in violation of the rights of another under federal,
state, or common law (see Section 14411 et seq.,
Business and Professions Code).
PUBLISH: July 11, 18, 25 and August 1, 2014
SUMMONS (Family Law)
CITACIÓN (Derecho familiar)
CASE NUMBER (NÚMERO DE CASO):
KD089339
NOTICE TO RESPONDENT (Name): AVISO
AL DEMANDADO (Nombre):
JUAN PENA
You have been sued. Read the information below
and on the next page.
Lo han demandado. Lea la información a contin-
uación y en la página siguiente.
Petitioner’s name is: Nombre del demandante:
DEBRAMARTY
You have 30 calendar days after this Summons and
Petition are served on you to file a Response (form
FL-120 or FL-123) at the court and have a copy
served on the petitioner. Aletter, phone call, or court
appearance will not protect you.
If you do not file your Response on time, the court
may make orders affecting your marriage or do-
mestic partnership, your property, and custody of
your children. You may be ordered to pay support
and attorney fees and costs.
For legal advice, contact a lawyer immediately. Get
help finding a lawyer at the California Courts On-
line Self-Help Center (www.courts.ca.gov/selfhelp),
at the California Legal Services website
(www.lawhelpca.org), or by contacting your local
county bar association.
Tiene 30 días de calendario después de haber
recibido la entrega legal de esta Citación y Petición
para presentar una Respuesta (formulario FL-120
o FL-123) ante la corte y efectuar la entrega legal
de una copia al demandante. Una carta o llamada
telefónica o una audiencia de la corte no basta para
protegerlo.
Si no presenta su Respuesta a tiempo, la corte puede
dar órdenes que afecten su matrimonio o pareja de
hecho, sus bienes y la custodia de sus hijos. La corte
también le puede ordenar que pague manutención, y
honorarios y costos legales.
Para asesoramiento legal, póngase en contacto de in-
mediato con un abogado. Puede obtener información
para encontrar un abogado en el Centro de Ayuda de
las Cortes de California (www.sucorte.ca.gov), en el
sitio web de los Servicios Legales de California
(www.lawhelpca.org) o poniéndose en contacto con
el colegio de abogados de su condado.
NOTICE—RESTRAINING ORDERS ARE ON
PAGE 2:
These restraining orders are effective against both
spouses or domestic partners until the petition is dis-
missed, a judgment is entered, or the court makes
further orders. They are enforceable anywhere in Cal-
ifornia by any law enforcement officer who has
received or seen a copy of them.
AVISO—LAS ÓRDENES DE RESTRICCIÓN SE
ENCUENTRAN EN LAPÁGINA2: Las órdenes de
restricción están en vigencia en cuanto a ambos
cónyuges o miembros de la pareja de hechohasta que se
despida la petición, se emita un fallo o la corte dé otras
órdenes. Cualquier agencia del orden público que haya
recibido o visto una copia de estas órdenes puede hac-
erlas acatar en cualquier lugar de California.
FEE WAIVER: If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask
the clerk for a fee waiver form. The court may order
you to pay back all or part of the fees and costs that
the court waived for you or the other party.
EXENCIÓN DE CUOTAS: Si no puede pagar la
cuota de presentación, pida al secretario un for-
mulario de exención de cuotas. La corte puede or-
denar que usted pague, ya sea en parte o por
completo, las cuotas y costos de la corte previa-
mente exentos a petición de usted o de la otra parte.
The name and address of the court are (El nombre
y dirección de la corte son):
Superior Court Of California
400 Civic Center Plaza
Pomona, CA91766
The name, address, and telephone number of the
petitioner’s attorney, or the petitioner without an
attorney, are: (El nombre, dirección y número de
teléfono del abogado del demandante, o del
demandante si no tiene abogado, son):
Debra Marty, In Pro Per
6965 Wheeler Ave.
La Verne, CA91750
Phone: 909-392-4962
Date (Fecha): March 28, 2014
Sherri R. Carter, Executive Officer/Clerk by (Sec-
retario, por) O. Navarro , Deputy (Asistente)
STANDARD FAMILY LAW RESTRAINING
ORDERS (page 2)
Starting immediately, you and your spouse or
domestic partner are restrained from:
1. removing the minor children of the parties from
the state or applying for a new or replacement
passport for those minor children without the
prior written consent of the other party or an order
of the court;
2. cashing, borrowing against, canceling, trans-
ferring, disposing of, or changing the beneficiar-
ies of any insurance or other coverage, including
life, health, automobile, and disability, held for
the benefit of the parties and their minor children;
3. transferring, encumbering, hypothecating, con-
cealing, or in any way disposing of any property,
real or personal, whether community, quasi-com-
munity, or separate, without the written consent
of the other party or an order of the court, except
in the usual course of business or for the necessi-
ties of life; and
4. creating a nonprobate transfer or modifying a
nonprobate transfer in a manner that affects the
disposition of property subject to the transfer,
without the written consent of the other party or
an order of the court. Before revocation of a non-
probate transfer can take effect or a right of sur-
vivorship to property can be eliminated, notice of
the change must be filed and served on the other
party.
You must notify each other of any proposed ex-
traordinary expenditures at least five business
days prior to incurring these extraordinary ex-
penditures and account to the court for all ex-
traordinary expenditures made after these
restraining orders are effective. However, you
may use community property, quasi-community
property, or your own separate property to pay an
attorney to help you or to pay court costs.
ÓRDENES DE RESTRICCIÓN ESTÁNDAR
DE DERECHO FAMILIAR
En forma inmediata, usted y su cónyuge o
pareja de hecho tienen prohibido:
1. llevarse del estado de California a los hijos
menores de las partes, o solicitar un pasaporte
nuevo o de repuesto para los hijos menores, sin el
consentimiento previo por escrito de la otra parte
o sin una orden de la corte;
2. cobrar, pedir prestado, cancelar, transferir, de-
shacerse o cambiar el nombre de los beneficiar-
ios de cualquier seguro u otro tipo de cobertura,
como de vida, salud, vehículo y discapacidad, que
tenga como beneficiario(s) a las partes y su(s)
hijo(s) menor(es);
3. transferir, gravar, hipotecar, ocultar o deshac-
erse de cualquier manera de cualquier propiedad,
inmueble o personal, ya sea comunitaria, cuasi-
comunitaria o separada, sin el consentimiento es-
crito de la otra parte o una orden de la corte,
excepto en el curso habitual de actividades per-
sonales y comerciales o para satisfacer las
necesidades de la vida; y
4. crear o modificar una transferencia no testa-
mentaria de manera que afecte la asignación de
una propiedad sujeta a transferencia, sin el con-
sentimiento por escrito de la otra parte o una
orden de la corte. Antes de que se pueda eliminar
la revocación de una transferencia no testamen-
taria, se debe presentar ante la corte un aviso del
cambio y hacer una entrega legal de dicho aviso
a la otra parte.
Cada parte tiene que notificar a la otra sobre
cualquier gasto extraordinario propuesto por lo
menos cinco días hábiles antes de realizarlo, y
rendir cuenta a la corte de todos los gastos ex-
traordinarios realizados después de que estas ór-
denes de restricción hayan entrado en vigencia.
No obstante, puede usar propiedad comunitaria,
cuasicomunitaria o suya separada para pagar a
un abogado que lo ayude o para pagar los costos
de la corte.
NOTICE—ACCESS TO AFFORDABLE
HEALTH INSURANCE:
Do you or someone in your household need af-
fordable health insurance? If so, you should apply
for Covered California. Covered California can
help reduce the cost you pay towards high quality
affordable health care. For more information, visit
www.coveredca.com. Or call Covered California
at 1-800-300-1506.
AVISO—ACCESO A SEGURO DE SALUD
MÁS ECONÓMICO:
¿Necesita seguro de salud a un costo asequible,
ya sea para usted o alguien en su hogar? Si es así,
puede presentar una solicitud con Covered Cali-
fornia. Covered California lo puede ayudar a re-
ducir el costo que paga por seguro de salud
asequible y de alta calidad. Para obtener más in-
formación, visite www.coveredca.com. O llame a
Covered California al 1-800-300-0213.
WARNING—IMPORTANT INFORMATION
California law provides that, for purposes of
division of property upon dissolution of a mar-
riage or domestic partnership or upon legal
separation, property acquired by the parties
during marriage or domestic partnership in
joint form is presumed to be community prop-
erty. If either party to this action should die be-
fore the jointly held community property is
divided, the language in the deed that charac-
terizes how title is held (i.e., joint tenancy, ten-
ants in common, or community property) will
be controlling, and not the community prop-
erty presumption. You should consult your at-
torney if you want the community property
presumption to be written into the recorded
title to the property.
ADVERTENCIA—IMFORMACIÓN IMPOR-
TANTE
De acuerdo a la ley de California, las
propiedades adquiridas por las partes durante
su matrimonio o pareja de hecho en forma con-
junta se consideran propiedad comunitaria para
fines de la división de bienes que ocurre cuando
se produce una disolución o separación legal del
matrimonio o pareja de hecho. Si cualquiera de
las partes de este caso llega a fallecer antes de
que se divida la propiedad comunitaria de tenen-
cia conjunta, el destino de la misma quedará de-
terminado por las cláusulas de la escritura
correspondiente que describen su tenencia (por
ej., tenencia conjunta, tenencia en común o
propiedad comunitaria) y no por la presunción
de propiedad comunitaria. Si quiere que la pre-
sunción comunitaria quede registrada en la es-
critura de la propiedad, debería consultar con
un abogado.
Publish: July 18, 25, August 1 and 8, 2014
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
File No. 2014177892
The following person(s) is (are) doing
business as LOTUS STUDIO 38, 655
West Arrow Highway, Suite 38, San
Dimas, CA 91773. Registrant(s): Candice
Caryn Morris, 759 N. Bradish Ave., San
Dimas, CA 91773.
This business is conducted by an Indi-
vidual.
Registrant commenced to transact business
under the fictitious name or names listed
above on 06/26/2014.
I declare that all information in this state-
ment is true and correct.
/s/ Candice Caryn Morris Title: Owner
This statement was filed with the Registrar-
Recorder/County Clerk of Los Angeles
County on 07/01/14.
NOTICE- In Accordance with subdivision (a)
of section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement
generally expires at the end of five (5) years
from the date on which it was filed in the of-
fice of the County Clerk, except, as provided
in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it
expires 40 days after any change in the facts
set forth in the statement pursuant to section
17913 other than a change in the residence ad-
dress of a registered owner. A new Fictitious
Business Name Statement must be filed before
the expiration. Effective January 1, 2014, the
Fictitious Business Name Statement must be
accompanied by the Affidavit Of Identity
Form.
The filing of this statement does not of itself
authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious
Business Name in violation of the rights of an-
other under federal, state, or common law (see
Section 14411 et seq., Business and Profes-
sions Code).
PUBLISH: July 18, 25, August 1 and 8, 2014
NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE T.S No.
1383441-37 APN: 8706-003-008 TRA:
010010 LOAN NO: Xxxxxx4315 REF: Sycip,
Pierre IMPORTANT NOTICE TO PROP-
ERTY OWNER: YOU ARE IN DEFAULT
UNDER A DEED OF TRUST, DATED May
26, 1993. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO
PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE
SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED
AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF
THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU
SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. On Au-
gust 14, 2014, at 9:00am, Cal-western Recon-
veyance Llc, as duly appointed trustee under
and pursuant to Deed of Trust recorded June
01, 1993, as Inst. No. 93 1029280 in book XX,
page XX of Official Records in the office of
the County Recorder of Los Angeles County,
State of California, executed by Pierre Sycip,
A Single Man, will sell at public auction to
highest bidder for cash, cashier’s check drawn
on a state or national bank, a check drawn by
a state or federal credit union, or a check
drawn by a state or federal savings and loan
association, savings association, or savings
bank specified in section 5102 of the financial
code and authorized to do business in this
state: Behind the fountain located in civic cen-
ter plaza, 400 civic Center Plaza Pomona, Cal-
ifornia, all right, title and interest conveyed to
and now held by it under said Deed of Trust
in the property situated in said County and
State described as: Completely described in
said deed of trust The street address and other
common designation, if any, of the real prop-
erty described above is purported to be: 23621
Sunset Crossing Road Diamond Bar CA
91765 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any
liability for any incorrectness of the street ad-
dress and other common designation, if any,
shown herein. Said sale will be held, but with-
out covenant or warranty, express or implied,
regarding title, possession, condition or en-
cumbrances, including fees, charges and ex-
penses of the Trustee and of the trusts created
by said Deed of Trust, to pay the remaining
principal sums of the note(s) secured by said
Deed of Trust. The total amount of the unpaid
balance of the obligation secured by the prop-
erty to be sold and reasonable estimated costs,
expenses and advances at the time of the ini-
tial publication of the Notice of Sale is:
$72,434.96. If the Trustee is unable to convey
title for any reason, the successful bidder's sole
and exclusive remedy shall be the return of
monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful
bidder shall have no further recourse. The ben-
eficiary under said Deed of Trust heretofore
executed and delivered to the undersigned a
written declaration of Default and Demand for
Sale, and a written Notice of Default and Elec-
tion to Sell. The undersigned caused said No-
tice of Default and Election to Sell to be
recorded in the county where the real property
is located. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BID-
DERS: If you are considering bidding on this
property lien, you should understand that there
are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auc-
tion. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the
property itself. Placing the highest bid at a
trustee auction does not automatically entitle
you to free and clear ownership of the prop-
erty. You should also be aware that the lien
being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If
you are the highest bidder at the auction, you
are or may be responsible for paying off all
liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, be-
fore you can receive clear title to the property.
You are encouraged to investigate the exis-
tence, priority, and size of outstanding liens
that may exist on this property by contacting
the county recorder's office or a title insurance
company, either of which may charge you a
fee for this information. If you consult either
of these resources, you should be aware that
the same lender may hold more than one mort-
gage or deed of trust on the property. NO-
TICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale
date shown on this notice of sale may be post-
poned one or more times by the mortgagee,
beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to sec-
tion 2924g of the California Civil Code. The
law requires that information about trustee
sale postponements be made available to you
and to the public, as a courtesy to those not
present at the sale. If you wish to learn
whether your sale date has been postponed,
and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and
date for the sale of this property, you may call
(619)590-1221 or visit the internet website
www.dlppllc.com, using the file number as-
signed to this case 1383441-37. Information
about postponements that are very short in du-
ration or that occur close in time to the sched-
uled sale may not immediately be reflected in
the telephone information or on the Internet
Web Site. The best way to verify postpone-
ment information is to attend the scheduled
sale. For sales information:(619)590-1221.
Cal-Western Reconveyance LLC, 525 East
Main Street, P.O. Box 22004, El Cajon, CA
92022-9004 Dated: July 07, 2014. (DLPP-
438894 07/25/14, 08/01/14, 08/08/14)
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
CASE NUMBER: KS018183
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner: PENELOPE PIA MORIARTY
Filed a petition with this court for a decree chang-
ing names as follows:
Present name:
PENELOPE PIA MORIARTY
to Proposed name:
PIA MORIARTY
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons inter-
ested in this matter appear before this court at the
hearing indicated below to show cause, if any,
why the petition for change of name should not
be granted. Any person objecting to the name
changes described above must file a written ob-
jection that includes the reasons for the objection
at least two court days before the matter is sched-
uled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to
show cause why the petition should not be
granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the
court may grant the petition without a hearing.
NOTICE OF HEARING
Date: August 29, 2014 Time: 8:30 a.m. Dept.: O
Room: 543,
Superior Court of California,
County of Los Angeles,
400 Civic Center Plaza,
Pomona, CA 91766
Pomona Courthouse South
A copy of this Order to Show Cause shall be pub-
lished at least once each week for four successive
weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the pe-
tition in the following newspaper of general cir-
culation, printed in this county:
CLAREMONT COURIER,
1420 N. Claremont Blvd., Suite 205B
Claremont, CA 91711
/s/ Robert A. Dukes, Dated: July 21, 2014
Judge of the Superior Court
Petitioner:
Penelope Pia Moriarty, In Pro Per
725 Mayflower Road
Claremont, CA 91711
Tel.: 909-971-3762
PUBLISH: 07/25/14, 08/01/14, 08/08/14,
08/15/14
APN: 8717-024-052 TS No: CA08002424-14-1
TO No: 95304747 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S
SALE YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A
DEED OF TRUST DATED January 5, 2006.
UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT
YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A
PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLA-
NATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PRO-
CEEDINGS AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD
CONTACT A LAWYER. On August 27, 2014 at
09:00 AM, behind the fountain located in Civic
Center Plaza, 400 Civic Center Plaza, Pomona
CA 91766, MTC Financial Inc. dba Trustee
Corps, as the duly Appointed Trustee, under and
pursuant to the power of sale contained in that
certain Deed of Trust recorded on January 26,
2006, as Instrument No. 06 0191146, of official
records in the Office of the Recorder of Los An-
geles County, California, executed by KESHA
HOUSTON, A SINGLE WOMAN, as Trustor(s),
in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REG-
ISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. as nominee for
WEGER MORTGAGE CORPORATION as
Beneficiary, WILL SELL AT PUBLIC AUC-
TION TO THE HIGHEST BIDDER, in lawful
money of the United States, all payable at the time
of sale, that certain property situated in said
County, California describing the land therein as:
AS MORE FULLY DESCRIBED IN SAID
DEED OF TRUST The property heretofore de-
scribed is being sold “as is”. The street address
and other common designation, if any, of the real
property described above is purported to be:
22857 HILTON HEAD DRIVE NO. 192, DIA-
MOND BAR, CA 91765- The undersigned
Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrect-
ness of the street address and other common des-
ignation, if any, shown herein. Said sale will be
made without covenant or warranty, express or
implied, regarding title, possession, or encum-
brances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the
Note(s) secured by said Deed of Trust, with in-
terest thereon, as provided in said Note(s), ad-
vances if any, under the terms of the Deed of
Trust, estimated fees, charges and expenses of the
Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of
Trust. The total amount of the unpaid balance of
the obligations secured by the property to be sold
and reasonable estimated costs, expenses and ad-
vances at the time of the initial publication of this
Notice of Trustee’s Sale is estimated to be
$500,601.87 (Estimated). However, prepayment
premiums, accrued interest and advances will in-
crease this figure prior to sale. Beneficiary’s bid
at said sale may include all or part of said amount.
In addition to cash, the Trustee will accept a
cashier’s check drawn on a state or national bank,
a check drawn by a state or federal credit union or
a check drawn by a state or federal savings and
loan association, savings association or savings
bank specified in Section 5102 of the California
Financial Code and authorized to do business in
California, or other such funds as may be accept-
able to the Trustee. In the event tender other than
cash is accepted, the Trustee may withhold the is-
suance of the Trustee’s Deed Upon Sale until
funds become available to the payee or endorsee
as a matter of right. The property offered for sale
excludes all funds held on account by the prop-
erty receiver, if applicable. If the Trustee is un-
able to convey title for any reason, the successful
bidder’s sole and exclusive remedy shall be the
return of monies paid to the Trustee and the suc-
cessful bidder shall have no further recourse. No-
tice to Potential Bidders If you are considering
bidding on this property lien, you should under-
stand that there are risks involved in bidding at a
Trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien,
not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid
at a Trustee auction does not automatically entitle
you to free and clear ownership of the property.
You should also be aware that the lien being auc-
tioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the
highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be
responsible for paying off all liens senior to the
lien being auctioned off, before you can receive
clear title to the property. You are encouraged to
investigate the existence, priority, and size of out-
standing liens that may exist on this property by
contacting the county recorder's office or a title
insurance company, either of which may charge
you a fee for this information. If you consult ei-
ther of these resources, you should be aware that
the same Lender may hold more than one mort-
gage or Deed of Trust on the property. Notice to
Property Owner The sale date shown on this No-
tice of Sale may be postponed one or more times
by the Mortgagee, Beneficiary, Trustee, or a
court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the Califor-
nia Civil Code. The law requires that informa-
tion about Trustee Sale postponements be made
available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to
those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn
whether your sale date has been postponed, and,
if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for
the sale of this property, you may call Priority
Posting and Publishing at 714-573-1965 for in-
formation regarding the Trustee's Sale or visit the
Internet Web site address listed below for infor-
mation regarding the sale of this property, using
the file number assigned to this case,
CA08002424-14-1. Information about postpone-
ments that are very short in duration or that occur
close in time to the scheduled sale may not im-
mediately be reflected in the telephone informa-
tion or on the Internet Web site. The best way to
verify postponement information is to attend the
scheduled sale. Date: July 25, 2014 MTC Fi-
nancial Inc. dba Trustee Corps TS No.
CA08002424-14-1 17100 Gillette Ave Irvine, CA
92614 949-252-8300 Joseph Barragan, Author-
ized Signatory SALE INFORMATION CAN BE
OBTAINED ON LINE AT www.prioritypost-
ing.com FOR AUTOMATED SALES INFOR-
MATION PLEASE CALL: Priority Posting and
Publishing AT 714-573-1965 MTC Financial Inc.
dba Trustee Corps MAY BE ACTING AS A
DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COL-
LECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OB-
TAINED MAY BE USED FOR THAT
PURPOSE. P1105544 8/1, 8/8, 08/15/2014
legalads@claremont-courier.com 909.621.4761
LEGAL TENDER
Claremont COURIER Classifieds 24
SERVICES
Friday 08-01-14
CONTACT US
1420 N Claremont Blvd. Suite 205B Claremont, CA 91711
Ph: 909.621.4761 • Fax: 909.621.4072
classified@claremont-courier.com
Business Hours: Monday-Friday 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Acoustical
QUALITY Interiors. Acousti-
cal contractor, specializing in
acoustic removal, texture,
painting, acoustic re-spray
and drywall repairs.
Lic.602916. 909-624-8177.
AC/Heating
STEVE’S HEATING
& Air Conditioning
Serving your area for over
25 years. Repairs all
makes/models. Free
service call with repair.
Free estimate on new units.
MC/Visa. 100 percent
financing. Senior discounts.
Lic.744873
909-985-5254
SAME DAY SERVICE
Free Service Call with Repair
Only $69.50 diagnostic fee
without repair
•We repair all brands
•SCE Quality Installation
Approved
•Great Prices
•Friendly Service
909-398-1208
www.novellcustom.com
Lic.958830
Bathroom Remodeling
A Bath-Brite
authorized dealer.
Bathtubs and sinks.
Showers, tile, countertops.
Refinish - Reglaze - Restore
Porcelain, ceramic,
fiberglass.
Quick and affordable.
Please call 909-945-7775.
www.bath-brite.com
Carpentry
SEMI-RETIRED rough to
finish remodeler. Kitchens,
porches, doors, decks, fences,
painting. Lots more! Paul,
909-919-3315.
Cabinet Refacing
Custom Cabinets-
Entertainment Centers-
Fireplace Mantles-
Molding and more.
Lic#900656.
References available.
Free estimates.
909-262-3144
Carpet Service
ANDERSON Carpet Service.
Claremont resident serving
Claremont since 1985. Power-
ful truck mounted cleaning
units. Expert carpet repairs
and stretching. Senior dis-
counts. 24-hour emergency
water damage service. Please
call 909-621-1182.
Carpet Service
ED EY The Carpet Guy. Car-
pet repairs and re-stretching.
Claremont resident. Free es-
timates. 909-621-1867.
Childcare
YEAR-ROUND program. In-
fant to 12 years. Meals pro-
vided. Monday through Fri-
day, 7 a.m. to 6:30 p.m.
Lic.198017727. 909-477-0930.
Chimney Sweep
Quality Fireplace
& BBQ
Chimney sweeping.
Complete fireplace,
woodstove installation,
service and repair.
Spark arrestor supply
and installation.
Call 909-920-6600
392 N. 2nd Ave., Upland
Gash Chimney Sweep
Dust free chimney
cleaning. Repairs, chimney
covers, spark arrestors,
masonry and dampers.
BBB. Please call
909-467-9212.
Concrete
JDC CONCRETE
909-624-9000
Driveways/walkways, block
walls, pavers, bricks,
stone veneer,
concrete staining, drainage.
Lic.894245 C8, C29.
ADVANCED
DON DAVIES
Veteran, Mt. Sac, Cal Poly
Stamped, broom,
color finishes.
Slate, flagstone, planters,
walls and walkways.
Call 909-599-9530 now
Cell 626-428-1691
Claremont area
30 years!
Lic.323243
Contractor
ADVANCED
DON DAVIES
Veteran
New and repairs.
909-599-9530
Serving Claremont
for 30 years!
Lic.323243
PPS General Contractor.
Kitchen and bathroom remod-
eling. Flooring, windows, elec-
trical and plumbing. Serving
Claremont for 25 years.
Lic.846995. 951-237-1547.
Garage, yard, home,
moving!
909-599-9530
Heath and Healing
"HOUSE Calls for Healing"
are offered by Joanne Dins-
more, owner of the American
Institute of the Healing Arts,
author of Pathways to the
Healing Arts, hypnotherapist
and certified arthritis exercise
instructor by the Arthritis
Foundation. Please visit our
website: American Institute of
the Healing Arts.com for in-
formation on this health pro-
gram and other services or
call 909-946-9098.
House Cleaning
ROSIE'S Spic Span Cleaning
Service. Residential, commer-
cial, vacant homes, apart-
ments, offices. Free estimate.
Licensed. 909-986-8009.
20 YEARS experience. Free
estimates. Excellent refer-
ences. Tailored to your indi-
vidual needs. Senior care,
day or night. Call Lupe, 909-
452-1086.
House Cleaning
Established, upbeat,
licensed house cleaning
service. Specializing in
larger homes. Organic
cleaning supplies used.
26 years of experience.
Jeanette 909-224-1180,
909-946-7475.
CAROUSEL Quality Cleaning.
Family owned for 25 years. Li-
censed. Bonded. Senior rates.
Trained professional services
including: baseboards, ovens,
windows. Hauling. Move in/out.
In home care. House/pet sit-
ting. 10 percent discount to
Claremont College faculty.
Robyn, 909-621-3929.
Shirley's Cleaning Service
28 years in business.
Office/residential
No job too small.
Free estimates.
We do spring cleaning!
909-730-8564
Irrigation
Hayden’s Services Inc.
Since 1978
Bonded * Insured
No job too big or small!
24-hour emergency
service.
909-982-8910
* Senior discount *
Lic.359145
SPRINKLER SYSTEMS
INSTALLATIONS
EXPERT REPAIRS
DRIP SYSTEM
SPECIALISTS
C.F.PRIVETT, LIC.557151
909-621-5388
ADVANCED
DON DAVIES
Veteran, Mt. Sac, Cal Poly
New, repairs. Professional.
All sprinkler repairs.
Call 909-599-9530 Now
Cell: 626-428-1691
Expert Repairs
Retrofit Experts
Ask us how to save water.
Allen Cantrall Landscape
909-224-3327
Lic.861685
Serving the Area
Since 1983
Landscaping
Dale's Tree &
Landscape Services
Pruning, removal, planting,
irrigation and yard cleanup.
909-982-5794
Lic#753381
GREENWOOD
LANDSCAPING CO.
Landscaping contractor for
complete landscaping,
irrigation, drainage,
designing and gardening.
Lic.520496
909-621-7770
Drought Tolerant and Cali-
fornia Native Design
Water Conserving Irrigation
Lighting and Maintenance
Allen Cantrall Landscape
909-224-3327
Lic.861685
Serving the Area
Since 1983
Landscaping
ADVANCED DON DAVIES
Mt. Sac, Cal Poly
New, refurbish or repair.
Design, drainage, concrete,
slate, flagstone, lighting, irri-
gation, decomposed granite.
909-599-9530
Cell: 626-428-1691
Claremont area 30 years!
Lic.323243
DLS Landscaping and Design.
Claremont native specializing
in drought tolerant landscap-
ing, drip systems and lighting.
Artistic solutions for the future.
Over 35 years experience. Call:
909-225-8855, 909-982-5965.
Lic.585007.
DANS GARDENING
SERVICE
Sprinklers installed, re-
paired. Clean-up, hauling.
Sod, seed, planting,
lighting, drainage.
Free written estimates.
Insured. References.
Since 1977. Lic.508671.
Please call 909-989-1515
Eco-friendly landscaping.
We will get you a $3000
grant to remove your lawn!
Why mow when you can
grow? From the creators of
The Pomona College
Organic Farm.
Specializing in native
and edible landscapes.
909-398-1235
www.naturalearthla.com
Lic.919825
*$1.50 sq. ft. rebate*
Learn Chinese
Fun and Easy
All Levels
Small Groups
School age children
Afternoon and Summer
Classes
Claremont
909-254-7084
Learn Japanese
TAUGHT by Sumi Ohtani at
the Claremont Forum in the
Packing House. Monday,
Tuesday, Wednesday after-
noons/evenings. All levels
welcome. Excellent brain exer-
cise for seniors! 909-626-3066.
Painting
ACE SEVIER PAINTING
Interior/Exterior
BONDED and INSURED
Many references.
Claremont resident.
35 years experience.
Lic.315050
Please call: 909-624-5080,
909-596-4095.
Painting
D&D Custom Painting.
Bonded. Lic.423346. Resi-
dential, commercial. Interior
or exterior. Free estimates.
909-982-8024.
RESIDENTIAL/Commercial.
Quality work at reasonable
prices. Free estimates.
Lic.541469. 909-622-7994.
KPW PAINTING
Older couple painting,
40 years experience!
Competitive rates.
Small repairs.
No job too small.
References available.
We work our own jobs.
Carrie or Ron
909-615-4858
Lic.778506
COLLINS Painting & Con-
struction Company, LLC. In-
terior, exterior. Residential
and commercial. Contractors
Lic.384597. 909-985-8484.
STEVE LOPEZ
PAINTING
Extensive preparation.
Indoor, outdoor, cabinets.
Offering odorless green
solution. 33-year master.
Lic.542552
Please call
909-989-9786
AFFORDABLE. Traditional or
green options. Custom work.
No job too big or too small. 20
years of Claremont resident
referrals. Free estimates.
Lic.721041. 909-228-4256.
www.vjpaint.com.
Patio & Decks
ADVANCED DON DAVIES
New, refurbish and repair.
Concrete, masonry, lighting,
planters and retaining walls.
909-599-9530
Cell: 626-428-1691
Claremont area 30 years!
Lic.323243
Pet Care
CANINE Wellness Therapeu-
tics. Therapeutic, immune-
enhancing canine massage.
Canine athletes, arthritic
seniors, postsurgical healing,
anxiety issues. Certified therapist.
massagefordogs@yahoo.com.
626-825-1662.
Plastering & Stucco
PLASTERING by Thomas.
Stucco and drywall repair
specialist. Licensed home
improvement. Contractor
Lic.614648. 909-984-6161.
www.wall-doctor.com.
Pools
Carr Pools
Family owned/operated
Claremont natives
Over 10 years experience
Dependable • Timely • Efficient
Tablets/filter
cleans included.
909-624-5648
Plumbing
RENES Plumbing and AC. All
types residential repairs,
HVAC, new installation, re-
pairs. Prices to fit the working
family’s budget. Lic.454443.
Insured professional service.
909-593-1175.
EXCEL PLUMBING
Family owned and operated.
30 plus years experience.
Expert plumbing repairs and
drain cleaning. Water
heaters, faucets, sinks,
toilets, disposals,
under slab lead detection,
sewer video inspection.
Licensed, bonded and
insured. Lic.917874.
909-945-1995
STEVE’S PLUMBING
24-hour service* Low cost!
Free estimates.
All plumbing repairs.
Complete drain cleaning,
leak detection,
water heaters.
Your local plumber
for over 25 years.
Senior discounts.
Insured, Lic.744873.
* 909-985-5254 *
Hayden’s Services Inc.
Since 1978
Bonded * Insured
NO JOB TOO BIG
OR SMALL!
24-hour emergency service.
909-982-8910
* Senior discount *
Lic.359145
Roofing
GORDON Perry Roofing.
Reroofing, repairs of all types.
Free estimates. Quality work.
Lic.C39588976. 909-944-3884.
DOMINICS Roofing. Resi-
dential roofing and repairs.
Free estimates. Lic.732789.
Call Dominic, 951-212-9384.
Sprinklers & Repair
ADVANCED
DON DAVIES
Veteran
Mt. Sac, Cal Poly
New, repairs. Professional.
All sprinkler repairs.
Call 909-599-9530 now
Cell: 626-428-1691
DURUSSEL Sprinklers. Install,
repair, automate. Since 1982.
Free estimates. Lic.540042.
Call 909-982-1604.
WASTING WATER?
Poor Coverage?
Sprinkler repair.
Installations
and modifications.
C.F. Privett
909-621-5388
Lic.557151
Tile
MASTER tile layer. Quick and
clean. Stone and granite work.
Residential, commercial.
Lic.830249. Ray, 909-731-3511.
Regrout, clean, seal, color
grout. 909-880-9719, 1-888-
764-7688.
Tree Care
BAUER TREE CARE
40 plus years
in Claremont.
Pruning of your small
and medium perennials.
909-624-8238
www.bauertreecare.com
Dale's Tree Service
Certified arborist. Pruning
and removals. Landscaping,
corrective and restoration
trimming and yard clean up.
909-982-5794
Lic#753381
MGT Professional Tree Care.
Providing prompt, dependable
service for all your tree care
needs. Certified arborist.
Lic.#836027. Matt Gray-Trask.
Call 946-7444.
TOM Day Tree Service. Fine
pruning of all trees since
1974. Free estimate. 909-
629-6960.
Johnny's Tree Service
Tree trimming
and demolition.
Certified arborist.
Lic.270275, insured.
Please call:
909-946-1123
951-522-0992
Upholstery
PINK UPHOLSTERY
48 years of experience. Up to
30 percent discount on fabric.
Free pickup and delivery.
Please call 909-597-6613.
Weed Abatement
JOHNNY'S Tree Service.
Weed abatement/land clear-
ing. Disking and mowing.
Please call 909-946-1123,
951-522-0992. Lic.270275.
TIRED of dealing with weed
problems on your lot or field?
Help control the problem in
an environmentally safe
manner. To receive loads of
quality wood chips. Please
call 909-214-6773. Tom Day
Tree Service.
ADVANCED
DON DAVIES
Veteran
Weed eating, mowing,
tractor fields,
manual slopes, hauling.
909-599-9530
Cell: 626-428-1691
Window Washing
NACHOS Window Cleaning.
For window washing, call na-
cho, 909-816-2435. Free es-
timates, satisfaction guaran-
teed. Number one in LA
County.
25
Claremont COURIER Classifieds
SERVICES
Friday 08-01-14
tax help • antiques • house cleaning • landscaping
pet care • roofing • elder care • computer services
Although paid advertisements may appear in Claremont COURIER publications in print, online or in other electronic formats, the
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Claremont COURIER Classifieds 26
909-621-5626
CONTACT US
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Ph: 909.621.4761 • Fax: 909.621.4072
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1420 N. Claremont Blvd., Claremont, CA 91711 (909) 621-4761
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(909) 981-0319
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Claremont COURIER Classifieds 27
REAL ESTATE
909.621.4761
Friday 08-01-14
CONTACT US
1420 N Claremont Blvd. Suite 205B Claremont, CA 91711
Ph: 909.621.4761 • Fax: 909.621.4072
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REAL ESTATE
goritz.et@verizon.net
Ellie Goritz
REAL ESTATE BROKER Lic. #00466987
2261 Marietta Ave., Claremont
OPEN HOUSE SUNDAY 2-5 PM 1034 Cascade Pl., Claremont
(North of Foothill between Mountain and Towne, south of Scripps)
Lovely two-story home with over 2100 sq. ft. on park-like grounds, located on a quiet
cul-de-sac. Versatile floor plan with a downstairs bedroom. Updated kitchen with loads
of cabinets. Top quality dual-paned windows. CAC plus whole house fan. Award-win-
ning Condit Elementary School locale. $579,000.
OPEN HOUSE DIRECTORY
SUNDAY, AUGUST 3
1-4 p.m. 2141 Villa Maria, Claremont. Coldwell Banker Town & Country.
1-4 p.m. 1728 Ukiah Way, Upland. Curtis Real Estate.
2-5 p.m. 1034 Cascade Pl., Claremont. Goritz Real Estate.
2-5 p.m. 147 E. Blue Mountain Way, Claremont. Wheeler Steffen Sothebyʼs International Realty.
REAL ESTATE
(909) 626-1261
www.curtisrealestate.com
Visit www.curtisrealestate.com for MLS, community info and more!
Carol Curtis, Broker
Sales Associates: Craig Beauvais, Maureen Mills,
Nancy & Bob Schreiber, Patricia Simmons, Corinna Soiles, Carol Wiese
Continuing the family tradition in the Claremont Village since 1947
107 N. Harvard, Claremont CA 91711
(909) 626-1261 www.curtisrealestate.com
1728 UKIAH WAY, UPLAND
Listing Agent: Carol Wiese
2783 sq. ft., 4 bedroom, 2.5 bathroom
custom Nick Gula home. Remodeled
and professionally decorated in 2002.
Formal living and dining rooms plus
breakfast room. Spacious master
suite, hardwood floors and kitchen with
pass-through granite counters to patio.
Resort-like yard on a spacious 15,390
sq. ft. lot featuring large pool, patio ar-
eas, fountain and stainless steel BBQ.
3-car garage. $865,000. (U1728)
OPEN HOUSE SUNDAY 1-4 P.M.
AFFORDABLE CLAREMONT
Recently updated 2 bedroom, 1
3/4 bathroom unit in Claremont
West Arms, conveniently located
to MetroLink, schools, parks and
colleges. Private patio, 2-car at-
tached carport and community
pool. $249,500. (I633)
SELLING, BUYING OR RENTING? Advertise in the
Claremont COURIER! Call Jessica at 621-4761.
147 E. Blue Mountain Way, Claremont
B
ring your large or extended family to this north Claremont pool and spa
home in the award winning Chaparral Elementary School District. The
master bedroom suite is downstairs, one of the most sought after amenities of
buyers. Other amenities include gazebo, fire pit, fireplace in the living room and
a family room upstairs. View of the mountains. Three-car garage and plenty of
other parking. Many fruit trees. All this priced to sell for under $600K!
www.callMadhu.com
500 West Foothill Boulevard Claremont
Madhu Sengupta
909.260.5560
BRE#00979814
OPEN HOUSE Sunday 2-5 PM
Claremont COURIER Classifieds/Friday, August 1, 2014 28
REALTORS!
Place your ads in the most
widely read real estate
section in the area.
Claremont COURIER
Classifieds
CALL JESSICA
AT 621-4761
Your trusted resource as you
transition through the new
stage in your life...
Pamela Bergman-Swartz
REALTOR®, Transition Living Consultant,
Seniors Real Estate & Certified Probate Specialist
250 W.
First St. Suite 100, Claremont
pamelabergman@ymail.com
(909) 636-2744
BRE#01899295
Claremont COURIER Classifieds/Friday, August 1, 2014 29
BRE# 01326104 & 01733616
CARLOS, 909-964-7631
PAT, 909-214-1002
www.SamuelsonRealEstate.com
We represent buyers and sellers with expertise, profession-
alism, technology and personal service. Neighborhood
knowledge is a top factor for successful sales. We know
and serve Claremont and the Foothill Communities.
Residential – Investment – Historical – Green – Short Sales
Check out
our reviews!
MALKA RINDE
Broker - Owner
Celebrating Over 25 Years
Selling Real Estate in the Area
Bus: 909-625-2407 Fax: 909-621-2842
www.malkarinde.com
EXPERIENCE MATTERS...
M MALKA RINDE REAL ESTATE ALKA RINDE REAL ESTATE
1876 Morgan Avenue, Claremont CA 91711
BRE# 00545647


Mason Prophet, Voted Top Local Realtor
in the COURIER’s Best of the Best Contest
Broker Associate, CRS, GRI, ABR, e-PRO, SRES
909.447.7708 • Mason@MasonProphet.com
www.MasonProphet.com DRE# 01714034
Read what my clients are saying. Visit www.MasonProphet.com
and click on "Testimonials," or find me on www.Yelp.com.
Mason is an excellent realtor. We commend him
for his diligence throughout the entire process of
selecting and purchasing our new property. We're
sure with his thoughtfulness and kindness he will
do very well in his chosen field of endeavor.
—Garry & Dorothy L.
GEOFF T. HAMILL
GEOFF IS #1 IN CLAREMONT SALES & LISTINGS SINCE 1988
BROKER ASSOCIATE, ABR, CRS, E-PRO, GRI, SRES
Celebrating over 25 years of service 1988-2014!
For more information, photos and virtual tours, please visit www.GeoffHamill.com or call 909.621.0500
MID-CENTURY INDIAN HILL ESTATES - $575,000
Coveted north Claremont location in award winning
Condit School locale, convenient to K-12 schools
plus Cahuilla Park. Unique home quality built with
lathe and plaster construction. Features walls of
glass providing a bright and airy one-level open floor
plan boasting over 2000 sq. ft. with four bedrooms
and two-and-a-half bathrooms. Formal living room
with fireplace plus dining room with custom built-ins.
Sunny kitchen with dining area. Central air and heat.
Indoor laundry room with sink. Spacious nearly ¼
acre lot offers a secluded peaceful backyard with ma-
jestic trees and patio area. (B512)
PRIME CLAREMONT ESTATE - $3,800 monthly
Coveted, quiet, cul-de-sac locale. Leaded glass entry
door opens to hardwood floors, high ceilings, crown
moldings, gourmet kitchen with center island, wet bar
with wine refrigerators. Nearly one acre lot with
mountain views. Rear yard will remain in current state
to save on water and yard care costs. Tenant to pay
all utilities except city/trash fees. To move in: $3,800
first month rent plus $7,600 security deposit; owner to
approve tenant's application, credit report, financial
abilities. Tenant to carry renters insurance during
lease term. One small pet may be considered. No
smoking on property. (C1037)
NORTHEAST CLAREMONT VACANT
ESTATE HOME LOT - $695,000
One of the few lots left to build your custom dream
home in prestigious north Claremont near the
foothills and Wilderness Park. Nearly one rural
acre provides plenty of room to build a large home,
pool, spa, guest house, multi-car garage, sports
court and more. Block walls are already in place on
all three sides of the site. Utilities are already
brought to the street. Most coveted locale with
panoramic mountain views, surrounded by million
and multi-million dollar estates. (P3808)
NORTH CLAREMONT CLUB
GALERIE HOME - $595,000
One-story Monet model plan. Quality built by Crow-
ell/Leventhal in 1985. Convenient to the Claremont
Club, Chaparral Elementary School, park, trails and
shopping. Three bedrooms (potential fourth bed-
room) and two bathrooms, approximately 2,200 sq.
ft. High ceilings in living and dining rooms, family
game room, kitchen with tile counters and eating
area. Master bedroom with walk-in closet and luxu-
rious bathroom. Indoor laundry room with sink. At-
tached three-car garage. Nearly ¼ acre lot with
beautiful lush gardens. (S528)
LUXURY PENTHOUSE CONDO IN CLAREMONT
SCHOOL DISTRICT - $235,000
This spacious two bedroom, two bathroom condo
is located on the top floor (no neighbor above
and no common walls with other units) overlook-
ing the community pool and spa plus mountain
views. Upgrades include wood laminate floors,
smooth ceilings, ceiling fans, granite counters
and newer custom cabinetry in kitchen and bath-
rooms plus clean steel kitchen appliances includ-
ing refrigerator. Indoor community laundry room.
One shared garage and one reserved gated
parking space. (S3636)
CLARABOYA TOP OF HILL VIEWS - $975,000
Mid-Century, one-story residence. Professionally
decorated, light and airy with neutral decor. Situat-
ed on a quiet cul-de-sac street offering picturesque
valley, city lights and hillside vistas! Open floor
plan with three fireplaces, perfect for entertaining
and family living. Updated kitchen opens to eating
area and garden views. Family great room looks
out to twinkling lights. Professional sound system
and multiple built-ins. Manicured grounds exude
privacy, featuring a 13 ft. circular spa, covered pa-
tio and grassy yard. (V794)
"Best Possible
Price Achieved,
Every Time!"
D.R.E. #00997900
Tell a Friend...
COMING SOON:
• Newly Built North Claremont Estate - $1,650,000
• Claremont Village Colonial - $1,100,000
• Classic Henderson Home North Claremont
- $750,000
• Claremont Club One-Story Galerie Home
- $595,000
• Padua Hills Artist's Home with Views - $575,000
• Charming Claremont Cottage - $439,500
FOR LEASE:
• Claremont Village Walk - $2,350 monthly
SELLERS:
I have motivated and qualified buyers look-
ing for a Claremont home. Please call today
for a FREE complimentary market analysis
of your property. Thank you!
909.621.0500
Geoff@GeoffHamill.com
FOR LEASE!
NEW LISTING!
NEW LISTING!
JUST SOLD! NEW PRICE!
VACANT LOT!
Your Local
Real Estate Resource
SPECTACULAR VIEWS
Take in the rolling hills and stunning valley vistas by day and city light views by night in this one-
of-a-kind Claraboya estate. This visually exciting residence is a rare combination of refined ele-
gance, an exceptionally dramatic setting and impressive architectural features. Warm and
inviting, this home is lovingly remodeled and updated to create a flowing and functional floorplan
for entertaining as well as wonderful family living. You will fall in love with the decorator touches
throughout from the gleaming floors to custom cabinetry and designer paint and wall coverings.
Enjoy breathtaking views while relaxing on the back patio bordered by its lush lawn and mature
landscaping: the perfect enclave after a long day or to enjoy with family and friends. This home
is nestled in the Claraboya hillside where you can escape to a serene sanctuary while still being
minutes from downtown Claremont Village. $1,185,000. (M2558)
WORLD CLASS RESIDENCE
Experience the majestic presence of this enchanting northeast Claremont custom estate, beauti-
fully laid out on one level. Masterful design unfolds from the elegant entry to the spacious formal
living and dining rooms. Exciting options abound in this spacious floor plan where there is an en-
tire wing that could serve as guest quarters or a home office space without ever needing to access
the main part of the house. The generous family/game room features a fireplace, wet bar and room
for a game or pool table in addition to entertaining space. Feel the ambiance of distinction in the
elegantly paneled library. Outdoors you will find a quiet and serene setting under the newly con-
structed patio that provides the perfect place to enjoy a cool beverage on hot summer days. With
plenty of room for outdoor entertaining, the backyard is a great place to enjoy gatherings with fam-
ily and friends. Hurry, this won't last! $1,485,000. (B1010)
TRANQUIL PARADISE
Custom home nestled in the foothills, secluded
behind lush foliage and private gates. Sprawl-
ing single-story offers plenty of room with five
bedrooms plus an office or gym. Floor-to-ceil-
ing fireplace situated in the spacious family
room with wood beamed ceiling. Over one-half
acre features sparkling pool and spa, mature
landscaping plus plenty of extra room for RV
parking, in addition to a versatile flat pad.
$735,000 . (E2504)
CHANTECLAIR ESTATE
European-style estate on a quiet cul-de-sac
with mountain views. The foyer overlooks the
living and formal dining rooms with sweeping
staircase. Six bedrooms, six bathrooms plus
bonus room. Kitchen offers two islands with
granite counters and adjoining family room with
cozy fireplace. Master suite includes retreat
area. 2/3-acre yard features a full basketball
court. $1,588,888. (N4238)
ELEGANT VICTORIAN ESTATE
The Charles E. Harwood house was constructed in 1890 in the Victorian Shingle-style tradition for
the father of Upland, Charles E. Harwood. A grand lawn with circular drive gives the residence an
impressive approach from prestigious Euclid Ave. Magnificent rich woodwork and period architec-
tural detailing has been lovingly maintained in this unique, beautiful residence. Find the spacious
parlor entry graced with a handsome staircase and fireplace, there are several fireplaces through-
out including the dining room, living room and master suite. A family room is located at the top of
the stairs and an adjacent library overlooks the front garden. The back garden and patio is acces-
sible through the den/office. The manicured grounds include a newer saltwater pool and spa,
gazebo, mature trees and a shared north/south tennis court. Call today on this very special prop-
erty. $1,998,000. (E1509)
INCREDIBLE TOWNHOME
Lovely home located within walking distance
to Victoria Gardens. Designer wood flooring
and neutral décor throughout. Gleaming
kitchen offers plenty of work space and opens
to the family room with fireplace and access
to the patio. In the master suite find a double
sink, oval tub and large walk-in closet. There
is an upstairs balcony, a study that can be
used as an additional bedroom and a two-car
attached garage. $404,500. (C7720)
YOUR OWN PRIVATE RESORT
Relax in luxurious and contemporary style in
this impeccably renovated home! Kitchen with
cherry wood custom cabinetry, professional
grade appliances, custom range hood, farm-
house sink and gleaming granite counters.
Spacious master suite showcases a master
bathroom. Resort-like yard with pool, spa, wa-
terfall, putting green, patios, fireplace and
Viking kitchen. $1,385,000. (E1862)
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Take the circular drive to the Porte Cochere to find this fully renovated estate, the kitchen featuring
rare Brazilian quartizite counters to the master suite and bathroom boasting Walker Zanger tile and
Calcutta marble. Entertain guests in the spacious family room that is open to the kitchen and also
adjacent to a separate game room. Create gourmet delights in the stunning kitchen that contains all
professional-grade appliances, large center island and carefully crafted custom cabinetry. Step out-
doors to enjoy the California lifestyle: an outdoor living space that includes a lanai and generous
covered living area fully equipped with relaxing fireplace, TV and built-in BBQ. Architectural pillars and
arches lead you from the living space to gorgeous, lush grounds artfully arranged around the tran-
quil pool and spa. There is a four-car side loading garage and an ample gated parking area. Call today
for your own private tour of this one-of-a-kind residence. $1,728,000. (P887)
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www. c bt c s oc al . c om
The Real Estate Company
2 5 0 We s t Fi r s t St re e t , Sui t e 100 , Cl are mont , CA 1 - 8 7 7 - 3 3 2 - 4 4 4 2
UPLANDBeautifully remodeled three bedroom, two bathroom home located in Upland. Six-
car driveway leads to RV parking and a three-car garage. The front landscaping includes a
lush garden of gardenias, roses and a shaded entryway. A double-door entry leads to an
open floor plan, illuminated with natural light shining through multiple double-pane windows.
New paint, new carpet and engineered wood throughout the bottom floor. Kitchen has new
granite counter tops. Backyard includes newly resurfaced and tiled spa along with a built-in
fire pit. More to offer. $650,000. (O1721)
Each Office is Independently Owned and Operated
TOP
Listers
Tea Robertson & Cristina Cira
July
2014
CLAREMONT Village Walk condo in downtown Claremont. Three
bedrooms, two-and-a-half bathrooms. Built in 2007 with 1527 sq. ft.,
per assessor. Upgraded with wood laminate floors. Spacious
living/dining room. Large open kitchen with granite counters, breakfast
bar, pantry and stainless steel appliances. Second story features
master bedroom suite with a balcony, walk-in closet, adjacent full
bathroom with granite counters, oval tub and separate shower. Two
additional spacious bedrooms. Laundry room. Two-car garage.
Community pool, spa, BBQ and playground. $525,000. (A614)
MENIFEE This six bedroom (plus loft), four bathroom, corner lot
home is located in the Marigold community in Menifee. Large kitchen
complete with island, breakfast bar, pantry, five-burner stove top and
built-in microwave. Downstairs has its own bedroom and full bath-
room, laundry room and direct access to the three-car garage. Up-
stairs has an enormous loft area, additional five bedrooms and three
bathrooms. These include a master bedroom with two closets, dual
sinks, separate over-sized tub and shower. The remaining three bed-
rooms share two large full bathrooms. The rear yard includes multi-
ple fruit trees, grape vines and cactus. There is a well manicured park
and views of the mountains nearby. $324,900. (W30154)
2141 VILLA MARIA, CLAREMONT Magnificent north Claremont five bedroom, three bathroom, 2614 sq. ft.
pool home in the prestigious Los Olivos Estates. The entry opens to spacious living room with cozy fireplace. For-
mal dining area with a pond in the courtyard. Dual-pane windows and sliding doors throughout the house. The
kitchen has been upgraded with granite counter tops and it opens to the casual dining/family room. Permitted in-
law suite built with loft, counted as fifth bedroom. New $24,000 roof by Ridgeline Roofing was completed in July
2014. The pool has a new solar heating system. The building exterior was just professionally painted. Indoor
laundry. Two-car attached garage. Private backyard, perfect for entertaining. Walking distance to parks and trails.
Close to downtown, shops, restaurants and Colleges. $649,000. (V2141)
CLAREMONT Beautiful PUD located in in the prestigious community of Griswold's. End-unit with
private, gated patio entry. Lovely three bedroom, two-and-a-half bathroom home. Built in 1979 with ap-
proximately 2312 sq. ft., per title. Spacious living room/dining room with vaulted ceilings, built-in book-
cases and a sliding door to back patio. Kitchen features eating area, tiled counters and floors, gas stove
and dishwasher. Spacious loft upstairs. Master bathroom has double sinks, sunken tub, separate
shower and plenty of built-in drawers. FAC/CAC system. Back patio is fully fenced and has automatic
sprinklers. Two-car garage with storage and direct access to home. Gated community with pool, two
spas and guest parking. $579,500. (S1420)
Property Management from a name you already trust.
Call us today for a free market evaluation.
877-332-4442
TOP
Producers
Charlene Bolton
&
Collette Albanese
July
2014
SALE PENDING
CLAREMONT North Claremont home on a corner lot. Four
bedroom, 1.75 bathroom home. Built in 1966 with 2019 sq. ft., per
assessor. Bright living room with custom shelves and brick fire-
place. Formal dining room with wainscoting. Kitchen features café
doors, double oven and eat-at-counter. Spacious master bedroom
with two closets, sitting area plus a sliding door to patio. Forced air
heating and central air conditioning system. Upgraded with dual-
windows and doors, new carpeting, freshly painted interior and all
refinished ceilings. Two-car garage. 11,532 sq. ft. lot, per asses-
sor. Fully fenced backyard with patio and mature trees in front and
back. $589,900. (R447)
OPEN HOUSE SUNDAY 1 - 4 PM

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