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Name: _____________________________________________ Date _______________

Final Assessment: Trial


For a final unit assessment, we will conduct a series of trials. Like the witch trials, you
will assume roles in the case. You will play a juror, a judge, a lawyer, a defendant, or a witness.
First, as a class, you must determine two crimes to be put to trial in the classroom. With
that you must create a narrative explaining the circumstances of the crime. Everyone should
come with ideas on the due date assigned and the class will vote.
After choosing the crimes, prepare. You will research lawsspecifically those relevant
to your crimeas well as possible sentences. This must be done collaboratively. You must find
and some sort of online resource to share your findings. Available tools for the collaborative
efforts can be a shared dropbox folder, a diigo account, another blog, or something else of your
own choosing.
Together you will prepare a narrative and self-assign roles. Please do not script the trial,
but a general outline would probably help you a lot. Judges and jurors from one group will be
researchers for the other so they can remain impartial.

Final Reflection: You have now experienced a court case from one perspective. Re-examine
one of the crimes tried in court. Consider the sources of ethical codes (religious, political, and
psychological) that manifested yesterday that took part in the final decision for it. Now, write
the courts decision in the form of a case law document that is really your own reflection.
You will write from the perspective of one member of a judge panel. You must present the
findings of the court (a.k.a. the verdict), take a position on whether or not the ruling was fair,
explain why you believe, and relate to the case of Hester Prynne using her case as precedent for
comparison. You can present her case and subsequent punishment in a negative light, i.e. that
the sentence was unfair, or in a positive light, i.e. that it fit the crime. Use her case as a lens to
reexamine the case of your ruling.
For those who take the position of a dissenting judge, please offer what you think to be a more
fitting ruling and/or sentence.

You can use this adapted form of a court case ruling:
In the case of:
The English Classroom
Vs.
Criminal (Crime)
Name: _____________________________________________ Date _______________

This court has found that _______________ is guilty/innocent. (If guilty) S/he is hereby
sentenced to _________.
Present the situation around the crime.
State your opinion on the ruling (for/against)
Reflect on why you believe the ruling was fair or unfair on the basis of law, psychology and/or
religion.
Relate to the case of Hester Prynne.

Your preparation for this assignment will mostly take place after we have finished the text.
Assignment Calendar:
Friday: Appoint roles/determine research groups
Monday: Half day in class to consider relevant laws and outline a narrative for case one
Tuesday: Half day in class to finish case one; consider relevant laws and iron out a
narrative for case two
Wednesday: Full day in class to finish up everything; review roles, research, and
Thursday: Trial one
Friday: Trial two
Name: _____________________________________________ Date _______________

Trial Rubric:
4 Advanced 3 Proficient 2 Developing 1 Novice
SL.11-12.4 Present
information, findings, and
supporting evidence, conveying
a clear and distinct perspective,
such that listeners can follow
the line of reasoning, alternative
or opposing perspectives are
addressed, and the
organization, development,
substance, and style are
appropriate to purpose,
audience, and a range of formal
and informal tasks.
Presents information with
supportive evidence.
Conveys a clear perspective
in the role. Makes it easy
for listeners to follow
reasoning through
organization. All opposing
perspectives are addressed.
Stays on topic throughout
the whole event
Presents information with
supportive evidence.
Conveys a clear perspective
in the role. Listeners can
follow reasoning for the
most part. All opposing
perspectives are
mentioned. Stays on topic
through most of the event.
Present information with
some supportive evidence.
Loses characters
perspective in the role.
Listener can follow some
reasoning. All opposing
perspectives may not be
mentioned. Sometimes
gets off topic.
Presents little information
with or lacks supportive
evidence. Loses characters
perspective in the role
frequently. Reasoning
cannot be followed.
Opposing perspectives are
not mentioned. Gets off
topic frequently.
SL.11-12.6 Adapt speech
to a variety of contexts and
tasks, demonstrating a
command of formal English
when indicated or appropriate
Uses formal language
throughout trial.
Uses formal language
throughout most of the
trial.
Uses formal language
inconsistently through the
trial.
Does not use formal
language during the trial.
2. Communication and
collaboration: Students use
digital media and environments
to communicate and work
collaboratively, including at a
distance, to support individual
learning and contribute to the
learning of others.
Student contribution to
research and narrative
creation clear, original, and
substantive.
Student contribution to
research and narrative
creation clear, repetitive of
what has already been
shared, and adequate.
Student contribution to
research and narrative
creation inconsistent,
repetitive of what has
already been shared, and
minimal.
Student contribution to
research and narrative
creation irrelevant,
repetitive of what has
already been shared, and
minimal.
3. Research and
information fluency: Students
apply digital tools to gather,
evaluate, and use information.
b. Locate, organize,
analyze, evaluate, synthesize,
and ethically use information
from a variety of sources and
media
Student uses the internet to
research for their role. Has
more than three sources.
Gathers a variety of digital
resources and synthesize
findings into role and
reflection in a clear and
compelling matter.
Student uses the internet to
research for their role. Has
at least three sources.
Gathers a variety of digital
resources and synthesize
findings into role and
reflection in a clear and
focused way.
Student uses the internet to
research for their role. Has
at least three sources.
Gathers a variety of digital
resources and synthesize
findings into role and
reflection but may lack
some clarity.
Student does not use the
internet to research for
their role or uses less than
three sources. Digital
resources are not clearly
synthesized into role and
reflection.
Name: _____________________________________________ Date _______________

Reflection/Court Ruling Rubric:
4 Advanced 3 Proficient 2 Developing 1 Novice
-W.11-12.2 Write
informative/explanatory
texts to examine and convey
complex ideas, concepts,
and information clearly and
accurately through the
effective selection,
organization, and analysis of
content.
Reflection reviews case as
well as

-2.a Introduce a topic;
organize complex ideas,
concepts, and information
so that each new element
builds on that which
precedes it to create a
unified whole; include
formatting (e.g., headings)
when useful to aiding
comprehension.

-2.b Develop the topic
thoroughly by selecting the
most significant and
relevant facts, extended
definitions, concrete
details, quotations, or
other information and
examples appropriate to
the audience's knowledge
of the topic.

-2.c Use appropriate
and varied transitions and
syntax to link the major
sections of the text, create
cohesion, and clarify the
relationships among

Name: _____________________________________________ Date _______________

complex ideas and
concepts.
-2.f Provide a
concluding statement or
section that follows from
and supports the
information or explanation
presented (e.g.,
articulating implications or
the significance of the
topic).