PA Environment Digest 

An Update On Environmental Issues In PA 
Edited By: David E. Hess, Crisci Associates 
 
Winner 2009 PAEE Business Partner Of The Year Award 
                                                                                                                                                         
Harrisburg, Pa                                                                                                     August 4, 2014 
 
DCNR To Open 15 Day Comment Period On Loyalsock State Forest Drilling Plan 
 
Department of Conservation and Natural Resources Secretary Ellen 
Ferretti Wednesday announced the department will seek public 
comment once a draft Surface Development Management Agreement 
has been negotiated to protect the natural and recreational resources of 
a 25,000­acre tract known as the Clarence Moore lands in the 
Loyalsock State Forest, Lycoming County. 
The state does not own the subsurface rights to this land. Anadarko and 
Southwest Energy Company each own or lease 50 percent of the 
subsurface rights and have requested access to extract natural gas. 
At present there is no known date for the comment period as all parties are still in discussions 
and no development plan has been submitted for department review. 
“For about a year now, DCNR has been meeting with a small group of stakeholders to inform 
them of the progress of talks between Anadarko and Southwestern Energy Company,” Ferretti said at a 
meeting of the department’s Natural Gas  Advisory Committee in State College. “From previous public 
input we understand that there is a unique interest in this particular tract of land and that we needed a 
much broader way to communicate with the public.” 
“To that end, although we have not reached an agreement, the department is committing to a 
process that will involve sharing the final draft agreement with the public for comment, once that draft is 
in place.”  
Public Comment/Notice  
Ferretti noted that DCNR will allow 15 days for public comment on the document, which will 
then be reviewed and considered before an agreement would be finalized. A timeframe has not been 
determined for completion of the final draft. 
DCNR will publish notice of the comment period in the Pennsylvania Bulletin and issue a news 
release at that time to make sure all interested parties are informed.  
A copy of the agreement and development plan will be posted on the DCNR website for 
review. 
Members of the public currently can submit written comments on this issue to DCNR by email 
to: loyalsock@pa.gov. 
DCNR Use Agreements 
DCNR uses agreements to manage oil and gas activity on state forest lands where it does not 
own the subsurface rights. The Surface Development Management Agreement will protect 
Commonwealth assets on the surface while outlining reasonable infrastructure development to extract 
natural gas. It will include a development plan for the entire 25,000 acres. 
Unlike a permit decision, there is no law or regulation that outlines or requires any process or 
timeframe for talks or agreements where the subsurface rights are held privately. 
DCNR’s priorities in protecting the natural resources and recreational opportunities on the 
Clarence Moore lands include:  
— Minimizing surface disturbance to the greatest extent possible; 
— Limiting impacts on trail users on the 27­mile Old Logger’s Path trail that circles the lands or relocate 
trail if necessary; 
— Reducing fragmentation from pipelines, right­of­ways and roads; 
— Avoiding or minimizing activity in wetland areas and important habitat for threatened or endangered 
species; 
— Avoiding or minimizing development in the headwaters of the Rock Run  
waterway; and 
— Mitigating noise impacts from compressor stations. 
“Our main interest is protecting this resource. That is our mission. It’s our job to balance the 
protection of habitat and recreational resources such as the Old Logger’s Path with the various uses of 
the state forest, including gas extraction. Our multi­disciplined team of professionals is working diligently 
to that end,” Ferretti said. 
Any development by the subsurface owners would also be subject to the required 
environmental reviews and permitting process with the Department of Environmental Protection. 
For more information about possible gas development on the Loyalsock State Forest, Click 
Here for a fact sheet.  For more information generally about natural gas developments and state forests, 
Click Here. 
Reaction 
Rep. Rick Mirabito (D­Lycoming) said he is pleased the Department of Conservation and 
Natural Resources announced it will seek public comment on an agreement to expand natural gas 
drilling in Loyalsock State Forest, but he has some concerns. 
“The people spoke and DCNR finally listened,” Rep. Mirabito said. “It is clear that the voices 
of the over 100 people who packed the Mary Lindsay Welch Honors Hall at Lycoming College on 
Monday led the department to seek public input.”  
Mirabito said that while he is pleased DCNR is accepting public comments on the drilling 
proposal, the proposed 15­day comment period is too short. 
To ensure that as many people can respond to the plan as possible, the comment period should 
be at least 30 days, he said. 
He also suggested that DCNR should hold at least one public hearing on its proposed draft plan 
and environmental statement where the public has the opportunity to ask questions and give input. 
"This announcement is a victory for the citizens of Pennsylvania," Rep. Mirabito said. "DCNR 
has realized that it cannot expand natural gas drilling in state forests without public input. The public 
deserves a voice in what happens on state lands." 
In response to the DCNR announcement, the Save the Loyalsock Coalition issued the letter 
below, thanking the Department for acknowledging the Coalition's repeated request for greater public 
participation, but also expressing concern that a 15­day public comment period is too short to provide 
an adequate opportunity for public involvement.  
In the letter, the Coalition sets forth the specific elements of a meaningful public participation 
process and respectfully requests that DCNR follow such a process for the Loyalsock.  The text of the 
letter follows. 
Dear Secretary Ferretti: 
We write concerning the recent announcement that the Department will conduct a 15­day public 
comment period on the final draft Surface Disturbance Management Agreement (“SDMA”) between 
the Department and Anadarko Petroleum Corporation and Southwestern Energy Production Company 
(collectively, “Companies”) for the Clarence Moore lands in the Loyalsock State Forest 
            We understand that the SDMA will include the Companies’ proposed development plan as an 
exhibit. 
First, we thank the Department for acknowledging and responding to our repeated requests for 
public involvement in these development plans.  However, while we appreciate the opportunity to 
comment, we also believe that the Department’s proposed 15­day comment period will be entirely 
inadequate for the public to review, understand, and comment on documentation that we assume will be 
100 pages or more in length.   
This is especially true if the documentation includes the Department’s environmental reviews and 
other impact assessments concerning the Companies’ proposed development.  We believe strongly that 
these assessments must be included for the public to be able to evaluate the final draft SDMA. 
By way of comparison, when the Department proposes a transfer or exchange of State Forest 
land–no matter how small the area–it advertises the proposal in the Pennsylvania Bulletin and local 
newspapers for at least 60 days and accepts comments for 30 days. See 17 Pa. Code § 25.2.   
Under Pennsylvania law, thirty­day comment periods are standard for many permitting matters 
and proposed transactions or programmatic changes.  Even a simple change in Pennsylvania’s 
Smallmouth Bass “Catch and Release” Program requires a 30­day comment period.  
Given the ecological and recreational importance of the Clarence Moore lands, as well as the 
volume and complexity of the information at issue, we believe that the public comment period on any 
final draft SMDA and proposed development plan should be sixty (60) days, and should include at least 
three (3) public hearings. 
Of course, given the Commonwealth Court’s decision in Clarence Moore v. DER, 566 A.2d 
905 (Pa. Cmwlth. 1989),  we continue to believe that an SDMA is the wrong legal instrument for the 
DCNR to be negotiating at all–that the Companies need a right­of­way from the DCNR to use the 
18,870­acre “yellow tract” area because, assuming that the Companies have good title to the oil and 
gas under the Clarence Moore lands, under Clarence Moore the DCNR has exclusive control of the 
surface of that area.   
We have stated these concerns before, and will reiterate them during the formal comment 
period.  Meanwhile, we respectfully request that the Department’s public comment process for the 
Clarence Moore lands include the following elements: 
­­ A 60­day public comment period following publication in the Pennsylvania Bulletin; 
­­ Three public hearings, including one in the Williamsport area, with publication in the Pennsylvania 
Bulletin and one newspaper of general circulation; 
­­ Public disclosure on the Department’s website of all environmental reviews and other impact 
assessments (e.g., recreational impact assessments) by the Department and third parties; 
­­ Recording and collection of the public comments; and 
­­ Preparation of a comment and response document by the Department. 
Please provide written confirmation at your earliest convenience that the Department’s public 
process will include these elements. 
Thank you. We look forward to hearing from you soon.  
Sincerely, on behalf of all members of the Save the Loyalsock Coalition, 
Mark Szybist, Staff Attorney, PennFuture 
Joanne Kilgour, Director, Sierra Club PA Chapter 
NewsClips: 
Public Will Get To Weigh In On Loyalsock Forest Drilling 
State To Seek Comments On Drilling  Below Loyalsock Forest 
DCNR Defines Allowable Drilling Activities On Public Lands 
House Bill Would Require Hearings On Leasing DCNR Lands 
Lt. Gov. Candidate Rues Lack Of Severance Tax 
Senate GOP Looks To McCord On Corbett Vetoes 
 
More Details Released On DCNR Non­Surface Disturbance Natural Gas Leasing 
 
On Wednesday, the Department of Conservation and Natural 
Resources released more details on how it plans to go about leasing 
additional State Forest and State Park lands for “non­surface 
disturbance” natural gas development. 
Draft leasing criteria and a draft text for a lease were given to 
the Natural Gas  Advisory Committee for discussion.  These 
documents are designed to implement Gov. Corbett’s Executive 
Order 2014­3 outlining the general ground rules for additional natural 
gas leasing. 
In the draft leasing criteria, DCNR provided definitions for two key terms­­ 
­­ Surface Disturbance: The long­term conversion of the park or forest to a non­park or forest use. 
Examples include creating or increasing the footprint of infrastructure such as roads, pipelines and well 
pads.  This definition shall be used for purposes of evaluating whether a non­surface disturbance leasing 
proposal would result in “additional surface disturbance.” 
­­ Temporary Disturbance: Impacts to the park or forest itself, the surface or vegetation that are 
short­term in nature and will allow the resource to be restored to its normal state naturaly.  Examples 
include seismic activity and air and noise impacts associated with an increase in truck traffic. 
DCNR said four principles will guide natural gas development generally­­ 
­­ Avoid impacting critical natural and ecological resources through early and comprehensive planning 
and the utilization of existing disturbances; 
­­ Minimize potential impacts by apply appropriate buffers, timing restrictions or construction 
techniques; 
­­ Mitigate any adverse impacts by restoring sites to park or forest conditions, enhancing wildlife 
habitat, recreation facilities or removing invasive species infestations; and 
­­ Monitor to track activities, detect changes, report findings and modify practices where applicable­­ 
practicing adaptive management. 
DCNR also outlined review criteria for additional leasing proposals so it can properly assess the 
ecological, recreational and landscape­level resource impacts.  DCNR will also use its existing 
Guidelines for Administering Oil and Gas Activity on State Forest Lands as a guide to reviewing 
proposals. 
DCNR has asked Committee members to comment on the documents. 
Unfortunately, none of the documents or the agenda or location of the July 30 meeting of 
DCNR’s Natural Gas  Advisory Committee were posted on the agency’s website. 
On July 18 an agreement was announced by parties to the PA Environmental Defense Fund v. 
Commonwealth challenge to the transfer of monies from the Oil and Gas Fund prohibiting DCNR from 
actually entering into additional natural gas leases until Commonwealth Court rules on the issue.  It does 
not prohibit DCNR from developing the process for leasing additional State Forest and State Park land 
for natural gas development. 
The FY 2014­15 state budget counts on $95 million of revenue from additional non­surface 
impact drilling in State Forests and Parks to remain in balance. 
For more general information, visit DCNR’s Natural Gas Development and State Forests 
webpage. 
NewsClips: 
DCNR Defines Allowable Drilling Activities On Public Lands 
Public Will Get To Weigh In On Loyalsock Forest Drilling 
State To Seek Comments On Drilling  Below Loyalsock Forest 
House Bill Would Require Hearings On Leasing DCNR Lands 
Lt. Gov. Candidate Rues Lack Of Severance Tax 
Senate GOP Looks To McCord On Corbett Vetoes 
 
Save The Date: PEC Hosts Pennsylvania Environmental Policy Conference Sept. 17 
 
The Pennsylvania Environmental Council will be hosting a one day policy conference on September 17 
in Harrisburg featuring dialog on key environmental issues in the Commonwealth. 
Featured panel discussions include— 
— PEC has invited the four Chairs of the Senate and House Environmental Resources and Energy 
Committees— Rep. Ron Miller (R­York), House Majority Chair and Sen. John Yudichak 
(D­Luzerne), Senate Minority Chair, have confirmed. 
— Shale Gas ­ Present and Future Management 
— Climate Change and Pennsylvania’s pending Section 111(d) Plan 
— Water Issues, including stormwater and abandoned mine drainage. 
Panels will include representatives from environmental organizations, industry and regulators.  In 
addition, the gubernatorial campaigns of Tom Corbett and Tom Wolf have been invited to provide 
remarks at the Conference. 
The Conference will be held at the Harrisburg Hilton from 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. 
Registration for the Conference and more details will soon be available on PEC’s website. 
 
Add Us To Your Google+ Circle 
 
PA Environment Digest now has a Google+ Circle called Green Works In PA.  Just go to your 
Google+ page and search for DHess@CrisciAssociates.com, the email for the Digest Editor David 
Hess,  and let us join your Circle. 
Google+ now combines all the news you now get through the PA Environment Digest, Weekly, 
Blog, Twitter and Video sites into one resource. 
You’ll receive as­it­happens postings on Pennsylvania environmental news, daily NewsClips 
and links to the weekly Digest and videos.   
 
Also take advantage of these related services from Crisci Associates­­ 
 
PA Environment Digest Twitter Feed:  On Twitter, sign up to receive instant updates from: 
PAEnviroDigest. 
 
PA Environment Daily Blog: provides daily environmental NewsClips and significant stories and 
announcements on environmental topics in Pennsylvania of immediate value.  Sign up and receive as 
they are posted updates through your favorite RSS reader.  You can also sign up for a once daily email 
alerting you to new items posted on this blog. 
 
PA Capitol Digest Daily Blog to get updates every day on Pennsylvania State Government, including 
NewsClips, coverage of key press conferences and more. Sign up and receive as they are posted 
updates through your favorite RSS reader.  You can also sign up for a once daily email alerting you to 
new items posted on this blog. 
 
PA Capitol Digest Twitter Feed: Don't forget to sign up to receive the PA Capitol Digest Twitter feed 
to get instant updates on other news from in and around the Pennsylvania State Capitol. 
 
Senate/House Agenda/Session Schedule(Updated)/Bills Introduced 
 
Here are the Senate and House Calendars and Committee meetings showing bills of interest as well as a 
list of new environmental bills introduced­­ 
 
Bill Calendars 
 
House (September 15): House Bill 202 (Harper­R­Montgomery) prohibiting standby water service 
charges for fire companies; House Bill 1684 (Everett­R­Lycoming) which seeks to clarify a minimum 
royalty payment in state law; House Bill 2104 (Godshall­R­Montgomery) further providing for 
consumer protections in variable rate electric supplier contracts; House Resolution 249 
(Swanger­R­Lebanon) supporting increased development and delivery of oil from North American oil 
reserves­ sponsor summary; Senate Bill 771 (Gordner­R­Columbia) establishing the State Geospatial 
Coordinating Board. <> Click Here for full House Bill Calendar. 
 
Senate (September 15): All bills on the Senate Calendar were Tabled as per the Senate procedure 
for a summer break. <> Click Here for full Senate Bill Calendar. 
 
Committee Meeting Agendas This Week 
 
House:   <>  Click Here for full House Committee Schedule. 
 
Senate:   <>  Click Here for full Senate Committee Schedule. 
 
Bills Pending In Key Committees 
 
Here are links to key Standing Committees in the House and Senate and the bills pending in each­­ 
 
House 
Appropriations 
Education 
Environmental Resources and Energy 
Consumer Affairs 
Gaming Oversight 
Human Services 
Judiciary 
Liquor Control 
Transportation 
Links for all other Standing House Committees 
 
Senate 
Appropriations 
Environmental Resources and Energy 
Consumer Protection and Professional Licensure 
Community, Economic and Recreational Development 
Education 
Judiciary 
Law and Justice 
Public Health and Welfare 
Transportation 
Links for all other Standing Senate Committees 
 
Bills Introduced 
 
The following bills of interest were introduced this week­­ 
 
Decommissioning Water Wells: House Bill 2422 (McCarter­D­Montgomery) requiring the 
decommissioning of water wells near natural gas drilling sites­ sponsor summary. 
 
Water Well Standards: Senate Bill 1461 (Vance­R­Cumberland) requiring the Environmental Quality 
Board to develop water well construction standards­ sponsor summary. 
 
Session Schedule (Updated) 
 
Here is the latest voting session schedule for the Senate and House­­ 
 
House (Updated) 
September 15, 16, 17, 22, 23, 24 
October 6, 7, 8, 14, 15 
November 12 
 
Senate 
September 15, 16, 22, 23, 24 
October 6, 7, 8, 14, 15 
November 12 
 
News From The Capitol                                                                                     
 
House GOP: See You In September For Pensions, Philly School Cigarette Tax 
 
Speaker of the House Sam Smith (R­Jefferson) and House Majority Leader Mike Turzai (R­Allegheny) 
Thursday cancelled voting session set for August 4, 5 and 6 in the House saying public pension reform 
and a bill dealing primarily with the Philadelphia school district will be voted in September. 
They also asked Gov. Tom Corbett to advance the School District of Philadelphia education 
funding to allow schools to open on time. 
Gov. Corbett expressed his disappointment in the lack of House action, saying, “Let me make it 
clear: I believe that bill ought to run and it ought to run clean. Just the tax authorization.” 
Corbett also said he is planning to have a sit­down meeting with Republican legislative leaders 
Monday, his first since the line item veto of legislative funding initiatives in the Fiscal Code bill passed 
with the budget in July. 
The original purpose of next week’s session was to take up the Senate­amended House Bill 
1177 (Lucas­R­ Crawford) which would authorize Philadelphia to adopt a $2/pack tax on cigarettes, 
the same Philadelphia cigarette tax the House removed from the Fiscal Code bill earlier. 
The Senate amended the bill before adjourning for the summer sending it back to the House on 
July 8.  House Republicans had been making noises about restoring the original language. 
"We were prepared to come into session next week to vote once again for the enabling 
legislation for the Philadelphia schools," Rep. Smith said. "We worked hard to reach consensus on the 
additional public policy questions presented in the Senate­passed version of House Bill 1177, namely 
expansion in hotel taxes and the city redevelopment program. 
"We are working with the Senate and governor to ensure Philadelphia has the resources it needs 
to keep the schools open. As we work out details of the legislation, we have requested the governor 
advance the Philadelphia School District funds necessary to ensure schools open on time in the city." 
The hotel tax increases and City Revitalization and Improvement Zone (CRIZ) expansions 
require a more in­depth policy discussion, including House committees and the entire House, Rep. 
Smith said. The issues have not been vetted sufficiently in the House to get just an up­or­down vote. 
"After conversations with Republican and Democratic House leadership teams, we will plan on 
taking up legislation dealing with education in Philadelphia when we return in September," Rep. Turzai 
said. "We are focused on quality education for the children of Philadelphia which includes some new, 
dedicated funding and the charter application and appeal process reform. We are also focused on 
needed public pension reform, which for Philadelphia, skyrockets up to $193 million next year." 
According to school district officials, the enabling legislation would generate $1.6 million per 
week, meaning, if the cigarette tax had passed the General Assembly, been signed by the governor and 
fully implemented by July 1, 2014, $20.8 million would be collected for the School District of 
Philadelphia by the end of September. The district's budget totals $2.8 billion, of which nearly 45 
percent are state funds. 
Advancing the state dollars is nothing new. In fact, the governor transferred $400 million in 
payments to the School District of Philadelphia earlier than scheduled from the Department of Education 
in the 2013­14 fiscal year. 
Both Rep. Smith and Rep. Turzai noted that last year, the General Assembly acted to lift the 
expiration of the 1 percent Sales and Use Tax for Philadelphia to dedicate up to $120 million of 
proceeds to the school district. Philadelphia City Council refused to enact the needed enabling 
legislation for almost a year. 
On pensions, Gov. Corbett has been criss­crossing the state since the Senate and House 
adjourned in July trying to get the public to put pressure on members to do something on “meaningful” 
on pension reform and “stand up to unions.” 
Both the Senate and House have been working, they say, on proposals, but gathering the 
necessary votes has been unsuccessful so far. 
Sen. Scarnati put out a statement Monday explaining the Senate unanimously passed Senate Bill 
922 (Brubaker­R­Lancaster) in July which takes an important first step to move all elected officials, 
including members of the General Assembly, out of a defined benefit public pension plan to remove this 
financial burden from taxpayers. 
Another effort by the House to solve the state’s pension crisis cleared a significant hurdle 
Wednesday when the actuarial note on an amendment by Rep. Glen Grell (R­Cumberland) to House 
Bill 1353 was approved by the Public Employee Retirement Commission. 
NewsClips: 
House GOP Cancels Next Week’s House Session 
House Cancels Monday Session 
Cigarette Tax For Philly Schools Officially Smoked 
Philly Cigarette School Tax Hits A Legislative Roadblock 
House Leadership Delays Vote On Cigarette Tax 
Cigarette Tax Vote Hits PA Legislative Roadblock 
Corbett, Senate, House Leaders To Meet On Cigarette Tax 
Editorial: Cig Tax Imperiled Again Because House Can’t Bother 
Corbett Is Not Switching Horses In Pension Debate So Far 
Senate Hires Lawyer, Considers Suing Corbett 
Senate GOP Looks To McCord On Corbett Vetoes 
 
Senate Republican Leaders Explore Options For Challenging Line Item Vetoes 
 
Senate Republican leaders this week began exploring their options for challenging the line item vetoes of 
legislative initiatives in the Fiscal Code bill they say may violate the state’s constitution. 
Last week Senate Republicans retained former Senate Republican Counsel Steve MacNett to 
review the vetoes and explore different potential alternatives and remedies. 
This week Senate President Pro Tempore Joe Scarnati (R­Jefferson) and Senate Majority 
Leader Dominic Pileggi (R­Delaware) wrote a letter to State Treasurer Rob McCord asking his opinion 
on the vetoes. 
The State Treasurer is given authority to pay legitimate state appropriations, however, if they are 
considered unconstitutional the Treasurer can refuse to pay. 
The plot, as they say, thickens. 
NewsClips: 
Senate GOP Looks To McCord On Corbett Vetoes 
Senate Hires Lawyer, Considers Suing Corbett 
Corbett, Senate, House Leaders To Meet On Cigarette Tax 
 
July State Revenue Hits $2.2 Billion, More Than The $1.9 Billion In 2013 
 
Pennsylvania collected $2.2 billion in General Fund revenue in July, the first month of the 2014­15 fiscal 
year, Secretary of Revenue Daniel Meuser reported Friday. 
Although the Department of Revenue did not provide comparisons to revenue estimates 
because those estimates have not been completed yet, in July 2013 the state collected $1.9 billion. 
Sales tax receipts totaled $862 million, personal income tax revenue was $835.9 million and 
corporation tax revenue was $80.8 million for July. 
General Fund revenue figures for July included $76 million in inheritance tax and $41.4 million in 
realty transfer tax. 
Other General Fund revenue, including cigarette, malt beverage and liquor and table games 
taxes totaled $98.6 million for the month. 
Non­tax revenue totaled $251.6 million for the month. 
In addition to the General Fund collections, the Motor License Fund received $242.4 million for 
the month, which includes the commonly known gas and diesel taxes, as well as other license, fine and 
fee revenues. 
 
July Environmental Synopsis Now Available From Joint Conservation Committee 
 
The July edition of the Environmental Synopsis newsletter is now available from the Joint Legislative Air 
and Water Pollution Control and Conservation Committee. 
This month’s newsletter features stories on: Pennsylvania’s growing bald eagle population, 
potential hazards from lead in aviation fuels, California’s vehicle replacement program, Atlantic coast 
wind power projects, Colorado recommendation on flood prevention related to oil and gas drilling, and 
much more. 
Environmental Issues Forums 
The next scheduled Environmental Issues Forums will be held­­ 
­­ September 22: Pennsylvania’s abandoned Turnpike, a 13­mile stretch of the original Turnpike in 
Bedford and Fulton counties and plans to turn it into a scenic, recreational biking trail.  Room 8E­A 
East Wing.  11:00. 
­­ October 6: Keep PA Beautiful will present its recommendations for significantly reducing illegal 
dumping in Pennsylvania. Room 8E­A East Wing.  Noon. 
Sen. Scott Hutchinson (R­Venango) serves as Chair of the Joint Conservation Committee. 
 
News From Around The State                                                                           
 
Fish Commission Asks EPA Help Identifying Factors In Poor Susquehanna River Health 
 
The Executive Director of the Fish and Boat Commission Monday 
called on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to help identify 
the factors contributing to the poor health of the Susquehanna River 
and begin taking steps to improve the river’s condition “before it 
becomes too late to repair the damage.” 
In a July 28 letter to EPA Administrator Shawn Garvin, Executive Director John Arway said the 
agency supports the EPA’s recent decision to increase oversight of pollutants from the agricultural 
sector in Pennsylvania’s portion of the Chesapeake Bay, but said more needs to be done. 
“While large strides have been made in other sectors, the agricultural sector has been more 
complicated to understand and subsequently account for in regulatory improvements,” Arway said. 
“Further investigation into the agricultural contribution will be challenging but one that is much needed 
and long overdue.” 
In particular, Arway urged the EPA to establish thresholds for reducing the amount of dissolved 
phosphorus, which he said is “plaguing the water quality” of the Susquehanna River and the Chesapeake 
Bay. 
“While target parameters such as total nitrogen and total phosphorus are important in estuarine 
management, I strongly recommend that EPA’s upcoming focus include targets specifically for the 
Susquehanna River, a riverine environment that’s the bay’s largest tributary,” he said. “These would 
include the dissolved components of phosphorus which are fueling algal blooms and increased 
productivity in the Susquehanna River and its tributaries creating the primary stressor that cause young 
bass immune systems to be stressed, the fish to become weakened, then become infected with bacteria 
and die.” 
Arway said that specific recommendations which would have far­reaching impacts to improve 
the Susquehanna if enacted statewide include: 
­­ Avoid agricultural applications of phosphorus in the autumn; 
­­ Reduce the phosphorus load delivered during the spring period (March 1 to June 30); 
­­ Increase the scale and intensity of agricultural Best Management Practices (BMP) programs that have 
been shown to reduce phosphorus runoff; 
­­ Strengthen and increase the use of regulatory mechanisms of conservation farm planning to reduce 
nutrient loadings; 
­­ Accelerate 4Rs (Right source, Right rate, Right time and Right place) outreach/extension programs 
and phase in mandatory certification  standards for agrology advisors, retailers and applicators to ensure 
fertilizer is applied based on the 4Rs; 
­­ Ban the application of manure, biosolids and commercial fertilizers containing phosphorus from 
agricultural operations on frozen ground or ground covered by snow; 
­­ Work with local governments to promote and accelerate use of green infrastructure (such as filter 
strips, rain gardens, bio­swales and engineered wetlands); and 
­­ Prohibit the sale and use of phosphorus fertilizers for lawn care.  
A copy of the letter to the EPA is available online. 
For more information, visit the Fish Commission’s Susquehanna River Impairment webpage or 
DEP’s Susquehanna River Study Update webpage. 
NewsClips: 
Stormwater Management Pits Costs Against Clean Water 
Sewer Authority Learns When It Rains, It Pours 
Volunteer Program Helps Protect Streams In Schuylkill Watershed 
Adopt­A­Lake Continues Along Keystone Lake In Armstrong 
Editorial: Susquehanna River Should Be Declared Impaired 
Farm Manure Threatens Lehigh Watershed 
Man Charged With Illegally Dumping Sewage 
Sewage Plant Owner Charged With Dumping Sludge 
Latest From The Chesapeake Bay Journal 
 
Call For Abstracts: Susquehanna River Symposium Nov. 21­22 
 
Bucknell University will host the 9th Susquehanna River Symposium 
on November 21­22 at the Elaine Langone Center in Lewisburg, 
Union County.   
The symposium brings together researchers, managers, 
consultants, and the public to discuss ongoing scientific research and 
innovative projects, to share ideas, and to increase awareness of 
watershed health, management and sustainability issues facing the 
Susquehanna today. 
Abstracts are being sought for oral presentations and 
posters covering a wide range of projects and research topics pertaining to the Susquehanna watershed. 
All interested parties, including academics, professionals, and regulators, are invited to present either an 
oral presentation or poster.  Students are encouraged to submit posters.  
The deadline for online submission of abstracts is September 17. 
The final symposium program will be determined by the content of submitted and accepted 
abstracts.  The following list of topics is provided to encourage potential conference participants to 
consider the full extent of multidisciplinary themes, however, it is by no means all­inclusive­­ 
— Aquatic ecosystems; 
— Fisheries management and habitat restoration; 
— Groundwater hydrology; aquifer contamination and remediation projects ; 
— River valley terrestrial ecosystems and the riparian corridor; 
— Stormwater management; 
— Water policy; sustainable watershed management; 
— River water chemistry;  and remediation; 
— Lakes and wetland studies; restoration and cleanup projects; 
— Stream restoration and fluvial geomorphology; 
— Assessing the impact of natural resource extraction on the watershed; 
— Land use, BMPs, and water resources planning and protection strategies; 
— Susquehanna River ­ Chesapeake Bay connections; and 
— Susquehanna watershed and climate change. 
The poster session will be held November 21 from 7 to 9 pm (posters can be set up set up 
between 4:30 and 6 p.m.).  Posters are encouraged to remain on display until until 2 p.m. on November 
22. 
Oral presentations will be 15 to minutes in length and scheduled for presentation during the 
Symposium's technical sessions from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. on November 22. 
If the author wishes to be considered for an oral presentation, they can indicate so in the 
abstract submission online form. 
To be considered for placement in the symposium, please submit your abstract online by 
September 17.  Instructions on submitting abstracts and student posters will be available after August 
10. 
Soon after the September 17 submission deadline, abstracts will be reviewed by the Technical 
Program Committee for originality, technical merit, currency, and relevance to Symposium topics. 
Authors' suggestions for topic and format placement (oral or poster) will be considered, but the 
Committee will make the final decision. Abstracts received after the deadline may not be accepted. 
Acceptance and placement notification will be made via email to the corresponding author by 
October 1.  
Electronic versions of the Symposium Proceedings, which includes all accepted abstracts, will 
be made available on the River Symposium website. 
NewsClips: 
Stormwater Management Pits Costs Against Clean Water 
Sewer Authority Learns When It Rains, It Pours 
Volunteer Program Helps Protect Streams In Schuylkill Watershed 
Adopt­A­Lake Continues Along Keystone Lake In Armstrong 
Editorial: Susquehanna River Should Be Declared Impaired 
Farm Manure Threatens Lehigh Watershed 
Man Charged With Illegally Dumping Sewage 
Sewage Plant Owner Charged With Dumping Sludge 
Latest From The Chesapeake Bay Journal 
 
Chesapeake Bay Foundation Provides Summer Update On Watershed Cleanup Efforts 
 
The Chesapeake Bay Foundation­PA Summer Update newsletter is now available featuring a report on 
how Pennsylvania is doing in meeting its water pollution cleanup milestones and an update from Harry 
Campbell, PA Office Director, on a new initiative to educate and engage local officials in Pennsylvania 
in the watershed cleanup effort.  Click Here to read this edition. 
NewsClips: 
Stormwater Management Pits Costs Against Clean Water 
Sewer Authority Learns When It Rains, It Pours 
Volunteer Program Helps Protect Streams In Schuylkill Watershed 
Adopt­A­Lake Continues Along Keystone Lake In Armstrong 
Editorial: Susquehanna River Should Be Declared Impaired 
Farm Manure Threatens Lehigh Watershed 
Man Charged With Illegally Dumping Sewage 
Sewage Plant Owner Charged With Dumping Sludge 
Latest From The Chesapeake Bay Journal 
 
August Chesapeake Currents Is Now Available From Chesapeake Bay Program 
 
The August Chesapeake Currents newsletter is now available from the Chesapeake Bay Program. 
 
Check Out The Latest Articles In The Chesapeake Bay Journal 
 
Bookmark the Chesapeake Bay Journal to keep up­to­date on the latest from the Chesapeake Bay 
cleanup program. 
 
REAP Farm Conservation Tax Credit Program Begins Accepting Apps August 4 
 
The Resource Enhancement and Protection (REAP) Farm Conservation Tax Credit Program will begin 
accepting applications for completed projects on August 4 and for both proposed and completed 
projects August 25. 
This first­come, first­served program offers landowners between 50 and 75 percent of project 
costs in the form of tax credits up to $150,000 for the adoption of best management practices including: 
Development of a Nutrient Management Plan, Ag E&S Plan, and Conservation Plans, streambank 
fencing, riparian buffers, BMPs for ACAs and barnyard runoff,  manure storage systems, alternative 
manure treatment practices, filter strips, and no­till planting equipment. 
Costs that can be included are project design, engineering, and planning, construction, 
installation, equipment, materials, post construction expenses, and many others. 
$10 million has been allocated for the REAP Program in FY 2014­15. 
For copies of the REAP Guidelines and application forms, visit the State Conservation 
Commission’s REAP webpage. 
 
Brodhead Watershed Assn Annual River Ramble Aug. 10 In Monroe County 
 
The Brodhead Watershed Association in Monroe County 
invites everyone to join them for the annual River Ramble on 
August 10 from 1­4 p.m., at the ForEvergreen Nature 
Preserve in Analomink. There will be entertaining activities 
for the whole family.  
Whether you like to walk, pedal or paddle there will be 
something for you to enjoy, from nature walks, eagle nest 
viewing, kayaking demonstrations and guided bicycle rides 
(you must supply your own bicycle) it is a celebration of the 
Brodhead Creek and the watershed in which we live and play. 
Some of the regions finest naturalists and water resource experts will be on hand to share their 
love of the Brodhead Watershed with all. Everyone is invited to stay for refreshments from 4­5 pm in 
the old Evergreen Golf Course clubhouse during the traditional 'After Ramble' party. All of the 
presenters will be on hand in a relaxing atmosphere to visit with everyone.  
Pocono Lawn and Landscape and Mountain Creek Stables are helping to sponsor this special 
event. 
The suggested donation is $10 for members or $15 for non­members, with a $2 discount for 
pre­registration.  Children under 12 are free. 
If you would like more information on the day’s activities or other opportunities to get involved 
with BWA, visit the Brodhead Watershed Association website or call 570­839­1120. 
NewsClips: 
Stormwater Management Pits Costs Against Clean Water 
Sewer Authority Learns When It Rains, It Pours 
Volunteer Program Helps Protect Streams In Schuylkill Watershed 
Adopt­A­Lake Continues Along Keystone Lake In Armstrong 
Editorial: Susquehanna River Should Be Declared Impaired 
Farm Manure Threatens Lehigh Watershed 
Man Charged With Illegally Dumping Sewage 
Sewage Plant Owner Charged With Dumping Sludge 
Latest From The Chesapeake Bay Journal 
 
July Catalyst Newsletter Available From Slippery Rock Watershed Coalition 
 
The July edition of The Catalyst newsletter is now available from the Slippery Rock Watershed 
Coalition which features an article on the 16th Annual PA Abandoned Mine Reclamation Conference in 
June.  The Slippery Rock Creek Watershed is in portions of Beaver, Butler, Lawrence, Mercer and 
Venango counties. 
NewsClips: 
Stormwater Management Pits Costs Against Clean Water 
Sewer Authority Learns When It Rains, It Pours 
Volunteer Program Helps Protect Streams In Schuylkill Watershed 
Adopt­A­Lake Continues Along Keystone Lake In Armstrong 
Editorial: Susquehanna River Should Be Declared Impaired 
Farm Manure Threatens Lehigh Watershed 
Man Charged With Illegally Dumping Sewage 
Sewage Plant Owner Charged With Dumping Sludge 
Latest From The Chesapeake Bay Journal 
 
KPB’s Litter Free School Zone To Kick Off For New School Year 
 
The Keep PA Beautiful Litter Free School Zone Program is designed to 
encourage students to keep their school grounds litter­free and to raise public 
awareness regarding litter via a Litter Free School Zone sign to be displayed 
outside the school. 
Students, clubs, classes, and even entire school districts can 
participate in the Litter Free School Zone program. Keeping their school 
litter­free is an easy and fun way for students to work together, learning 
valuable community leadership and responsibility skills while gaining a respect 
for the environment and the world around them.  
It is also an opportunity to develop a school­wide stewardship ethic 
and set a community example. 
The Litter Free School Zone program strives to resolve the issue of littering in two ways: 
­­ Cleanup: Remove existing and deposited litter as soon as possible after it appears, so that further 
littering will be less likely to occur. 
­­ Prevention: Create a sense of understanding, caring, and responsibility, often described as 
environmental stewardship, in our children so that they will not think of littering as an acceptable 
behavior in their world. 
For more information, visit the KPB’s Litter Free School Zone webpage or contact Stephanie 
Larson by sending email to: slarson@keeppabeautiful.org or call 877­772­3673 x104.  
 
Centre County Arts Fest Recycling Sees Substantial Increase In 2014 
 
Approximately 4,000 pounds of recyclables were collected during the four­day Central Pennsylvania 
Festival of the Arts, a tenfold increase over 2013, in Centre County. 
Thanks to the efforts of FestZero; a group of Penn State Alumni, current students and 
concerned citizens, the Borough of State College,  the Pennsylvania State University and the Centre 
County Recycling and Refuse Authority, recycling collection was “stepped up a notch”, according to 
Joanne Shafer & Brad Fey; two of the event organizers.   
For the first time, organic waste was collected for addition into the Borough’s organics recycling 
program. 
“We’ve been recycling at Arts Fest since 1990”, Shafer stated, “but his year, a very dedicated 
group of volunteers vowed to improve the efforts”.  “I think the numbers speak for themselves.” 
“We need to be looking at organics as essentially another recycling commodity”, Shafer said. 
“Although the weight of the recyclables was not huge in comparison to the trash collected, since the 
majority of the organics were paper products and the bulk of the recyclables were plastic bottles, the 
volume was substantial.” 
According to the National Recycling Coalition’s Environmental Benefits Calculator, recycling at 
this year’s Arts Festival equated to an energy savings of approximately 90 households’ yearly energy 
consumption, and two metric tons carbon equivalents of greenhouse gas reduction.  This is the same as 
removing one car from the road for a whole year. 
Look for additional recycling efforts at the 2015 festival. 
 
Keep PA Beautiful July Beautiful Resources Newsletter Now Available 
 
The July issue of Keep PA Beautiful’s Beautiful Resources newsletter is now available.  Articles 
highlight the upcoming KPB report on recommendations to reduce illegal dumping to be released in 
September, details on the upcoming Litter Free School Zone Program for this year and much more. 
Click Here to read this edition. 
 
Gov. Corbett, Ohio, West Virginia Officials Rally Against EPA Climate Rule 
 
Gov. Corbett Wednesday rallied on behalf of working families in Pennsylvania’s energy sector. Joined 
at the Rally to Support American Energy in Pittsburgh by West Virginia Gov. Earl Ray Tomblin and 
Ohio Lt. Governor Mary Taylor, Gov. Corbett criticized the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s 
recent proposed rule for power plant emissions reduction, which could result in significant job loss in 
Pennsylvania. 
“In Pennsylvania, nearly 63,000 men and women work in jobs supported by the coal industry,” 
Corbett said. “Anything that seeks to or has the effect of shutting down coal­fired power plants is an 
assault on Pennsylvania jobs, consumers, and those citizens who rely upon affordable, abundant 
domestic energy.” 
Pennsylvania’s coal industry is a vital contributor to the state’s economy, with direct, indirect 
and induced impacts responsible for approximately $4.1 billion in economic output; $2.1 billion directly 
by the coal industry. Of the nearly 63,000 jobs attributed to Pennsylvania’s coal industry, more than 
8,100 are miners. 
Coal is a crucial energy resource, used to generate more electricity than any other resource in 
Pennsylvania and responsible for approximately 44 percent of the state’s electricity generation. In 2011, 
Pennsylvania generated 227 million megawatts of electricity, making it the second largest producer of 
electricity in the United States and the largest net exporter of electricity among the states. 
“Reducing greenhouse emissions is a goal we support,” Corbett said. “However, some officials 
refuse to acknowledge that coal is now cleaner, and they don’t recognize the advancement this 
American industry has made, particularly in Pennsylvania. In recent years, Pennsylvania has made great 
strides to reduce emissions, and I am confident in saying that our commitment to Pennsylvania’s coal 
industry does not mean we have to sacrifice clean air.” 
In April, in anticipation of EPA’s proposed rule, Pennsylvania submitted a plan that would 
achieve lower emissions from existing power plants, which would lead to cleaner air, by removing 
obstacles and encouraging efficiency projects. At the heart of Pennsylvania's plan is efficiency and the 
preservation of states’ authority and discretion in the development and implementation of emissions 
control programs. 
“No one disagrees that protecting our environment is crucial, and that we need to do our fair 
share,” Corbett said. “In Pennsylvania, that is exactly what we are doing. We have proposed a plan to 
EPA that would realize lower emissions and cleaner air through increased efficiency, without 
endangering jobs or our stable and diverse energy supply.” 
On Thursday, Vince Brisini, DEP Deputy Secretary for Waste, Air, Radiation and Remediation 
testified on EPA’s proposed rule, offering Pennsylvania’s plan for how cleaner air, lower energy prices 
and more jobs can be achieved through a responsible plan for emissions reduction that recognizes 
Pennsylvania’s diverse energy resources. 
For more information, visit Gov. Corbett’s Energy = Jobs Plan webpage.  Click Here for a 
copy of DEP’s greenhouse emission reduction white paper. 
NewsClips: 
EPA Hearings Put Pittsburgh In Crosshairs Of Climate War 
EPA Hearing Triggers Protests, Arrests In Pittsburgh 
Coal Rally Draws Thousands To Downtown Pittsburgh 
PennFuture: Many Voices Support EPA’s Climate Rule 
Corbett, Coal Interests Rally Before EPA Hearing 
Corbett Leads Rally Opposing EPA Rule 
EPA Regulation Hearings Draw Interest Groups To Pittsburgh 
EPA Hearing Brings Coal Debate To Pittsburgh 
2nd Day Of EPA Greenhouse Gas Hearings Begins Quietly 
Coal, Health Advocates Square Off At EPA Hearing 
Pittsburgh Braces For Demonstrations On EPA Rule 
The Politics Of Climate Change Debate 
Op­Ed: Preserves PA Trees To Slow Climate Change 
Op­Ed: EPA Rules Threaten PA Manufacturing 
Editorial: Coal Exports Transfers Pollution 
Construction Of $500M Natural Gas Power Plant Stalled 
 
DEP Testifies At EPA Hearing On Greenhouse Gas Reduction Rule 
 
On Thursday, Vince Brisini, DEP Deputy Secretary for Waste, Air, Radiation and Remediation testified 
on EPA’s proposed rule, offering Pennsylvania’s plan for how cleaner air, lower energy prices and 
more jobs can be achieved through a responsible plan for emissions reduction that recognizes 
Pennsylvania’s diverse energy resources. 
Click Here for a copy of DEP’s greenhouse emission reduction white paper. 
NewsClips: 
EPA Hearings Put Pittsburgh In Crosshairs Of Climate War 
EPA Hearing Triggers Protests, Arrests In Pittsburgh 
Coal Rally Draws Thousands To Downtown Pittsburgh 
PennFuture: Many Voices Support EPA’s Climate Rule 
Corbett, Coal Interests Rally Before EPA Hearing 
Corbett Leads Rally Opposing EPA Rule 
EPA Regulation Hearings Draw Interest Groups To Pittsburgh 
EPA Hearing Brings Coal Debate To Pittsburgh 
2nd Day Of EPA Greenhouse Gas Hearings Begins Quietly 
Coal, Health Advocates Square Off At EPA Hearing 
Pittsburgh Braces For Demonstrations On EPA Rule 
The Politics Of Climate Change Debate 
Op­Ed: Preserves PA Trees To Slow Climate Change 
Op­Ed: EPA Rules Threaten PA Manufacturing 
Editorial: Coal Exports Transfers Pollution 
Construction Of $500M Natural Gas Power Plant Stalled 
 
PA Earns International Recognition For Strategies To Attract New Energy Investments 
 
Gov. Tom Corbett Monday announced the Foreign Direct Investment Association named Pennsylvania 
the 2014 FDI Destination of the Future for Energy Intensive Industries for actively implementing 
strategies to support foreign direct investment in the energy sector.   
“Thanks to our diverse energy portfolio that is lowering energy costs and creating new jobs, 
Pennsylvania is leading an American energy revolution,” said Corbett. “New manufacturers are arriving 
and building plants. Companies are expanding and branching out to the energy supply chain, and 
engineering and environmental firms are growing and hiring.” 
Pennsylvania received recognition for the governor’s Energy= Jobs Plan, the Commonwealth’s 
first statewide energy plan. Corbett strategically outlines core concepts for leveraging Pennsylvania’s 
vast energy resources to further reduce energy costs and spur investment, industry development and job 
creation. 
“There are more than 200,000 people working in jobs either created or made more secure by 
Pennsylvania’s energy industry,” said Corbett. 
Today, Pennsylvania is second for electricity generation and nuclear production, fourth for coal 
production and is now the second largest producer of natural gas in the U.S. Pennsylvania is now a net 
exporter of energy, electricity and natural gas.  
Pennsylvania’s abundant and low­cost energy resources have resulted in a significant increase to 
the local economy through hospitality and service professions and a reduction in home heating and 
electricity cost. 
The FDI Association presented its second annual Foreign Direct Investment Awards at the 
World Forum for FDI 2014 held in Philadelphia. Nominations from around the world were accepted 
and evaluated during the month of May by a panel of distinguished global site consultants. 
The first time the international event was held in North America, The World Forum brought 
together representatives from 36 countries including site selection, trade and investment agencies, 
economic development organizations and corporations that are expanding from around the world. 
NewsClips: 
EPA Hearings Put Pittsburgh In Crosshairs Of Climate War 
EPA Hearing Triggers Protests, Arrests In Pittsburgh 
Coal Rally Draws Thousands To Downtown Pittsburgh 
PennFuture: Many Voices Support EPA’s Climate Rule 
Corbett, Coal Interests Rally Before EPA Hearing 
Corbett Leads Rally Opposing EPA Rule 
EPA Regulation Hearings Draw Interest Groups To Pittsburgh 
EPA Hearing Brings Coal Debate To Pittsburgh 
2nd Day Of EPA Greenhouse Gas Hearings Begins Quietly 
Coal, Health Advocates Square Off At EPA Hearing 
Pittsburgh Braces For Demonstrations On EPA Rule 
The Politics Of Climate Change Debate 
Op­Ed: Preserves PA Trees To Slow Climate Change 
Op­Ed: EPA Rules Threaten PA Manufacturing 
Editorial: Coal Exports Transfers Pollution 
Construction Of $500M Natural Gas Power Plant Stalled 
 
PUC Reminds Consumers Of Electric Choice Standard Offer Program Savings 
 
The Public Utility Commission Monday reminded consumers saving money on electricity can be as 
simple as enrolling in the Commission’s Electric Choice Standard Offer Program. The program was 
recognized last week by Gov. Tom Corbett as the year’s “Best Customer Service Innovation” at the 
2014 Innovation Expo. 
“The Standard Offer Program provides a voluntary, innovative approach to introducing 
non­shopping customers to the competitive marketplace,” said PUC Chairman Robert F. Powelson, 
who led the Innovation Expo presentation on the program before a panel of judges July 22. “In our 
view, the Standard Offer Program is a ‘win­win­win’ for electric consumers, competitive suppliers and 
the Commonwealth. This is why more than 200,000 electric customers in Pennsylvania have found the 
Standard Offer to be anything but standard.” 
The program was launched in August 2013 to offer non­shopping electric customers a simple 
way to enter the competitive market with guaranteed, immediate savings. The launch of the Standard 
Offer Program is projected to have saved Pennsylvania residential and small­business customers nearly 
$19 million in annual savings since its inception. 
The Standard Offer Program is geared toward customers who are utilizing their default supply – 
or paying their utility for electric generation, rather than a competitive supplier. Customers receive a 7 
percent discount off the utility’s generation rate, or price to compare, at the time of enrollment, for 12 
months at a fixed rate.  
The agreement includes no enrollment or cancellation fees, so customers can switch or cancel at 
any time without penalty. 
To take advantage of the Standard Offer Program, customers can call their utility and ask about 
the plan. The utility will explain the offer and transfer the customer to one of its participating suppliers, 
randomly chosen, who will help enroll the customer in the program.  
The choice of supplier makes no difference in electric service or contract terms. The utility will 
still distribute the electricity to the customer’s home, restore outages and send monthly bills. 
The PUC’s Office of Competitive Market Oversight (OCMO) implemented the Standard Offer 
Program as a follow­up to the 2012 Retail Markets Investigation, which required electric utilities to 
implement a standard offer for non­shopping customers. A group of key OCMO members representing 
several key Commission bureaus worked with the utilities on call­center scripts in order to set the 
program in motion. 
More than 2.1 million customers have switched to a competitive supplier for their generation 
supply in the Commonwealth. Pennsylvania is ranked second in the nation for its competitive electric 
market and number of shopping customers, according to the 2014 Annual Baseline Assessment of 
Choice in Canada and the United States.  
The Commonwealth is ranked only behind Texas, which requires its customers to shop – 
eliminating the option for customers to remain with a default utility for their generation supply. 
“From a PUC perspective, the Standard Offer Program has brought innovation and stimulated 
Pennsylvania’s robust competitive markets, producing extraordinary levels of participation in a very 
condensed timeframe – and providing stability to customers who were hesitant to enter the market 
during turbulent times with the run­up in variable rate prices,” Chairman Powelson said.  
For more information, visit the PUC’s Electric Choice Standard Offer Program webpage. 
 
PPL Electric Proposes Major New Regional Transmission Project 
 
PPL Corporation announced Thursday that its Pennsylvania utility, 
PPL Electric Utilities Corporation, is proposing to build a major 
new regional transmission line that would make electric service 
more reliable and enhance the security of the electric grid while 
reducing the cost of electricity for consumers. 
PPL Electric Utilities submitted the project to PJM 
Interconnection as part of the competitive solicitation process 
under FERC Order 1000. As currently proposed, the 
500­kilovolt line would run about 725 miles from western 
Pennsylvania into New York and New Jersey, and also south into Maryland. 
By delivering lower­cost electricity into the region, and by enabling the development of new 
power plants fueled by lower­cost and cleaner­burning natural gas, the project is expected to create 
savings for millions of electric customers in several states including Pennsylvania, Maryland, New Jersey 
and New York, according to the PPL Electric Utilities analysis submitted to PJM. 
The project is in the preliminary planning stages. If approved and built as proposed, the line 
would help replace supplies of electricity that will be lost when existing power plants retire. It also would 
help prevent power shortages during periods of extremely high demand, like the prolonged severe cold 
weather this past winter. 
"This is a forward­looking project with significant benefits for customers, for several states and 
for the region as a whole," said Gregory N. Dudkin, president of PPL Electric Utilities. He noted that 
the company has extensive experience planning, obtaining approval for and building major regional 
electricity infrastructure projects. 
The company has begun a comprehensive regional planning effort to determine the best route 
and final details of the proposed line. As always with such projects, the company would have an 
inclusive public outreach process and would consider public input when making a final route selection.  
The project is expected to create jobs, including thousands of temporary construction jobs, and 
have a lasting positive impact on the regional economy. The project also is expected to foster regional 
economic development as new employers take advantage of a reliable, secure and lower­cost supply of 
energy. 
"The project would help secure this region's ability to deliver adequate supplies of energy for 
decades to come," said Dudkin. "In addition, it would make the electricity delivery network more 
reliable and more secure over a wide swath of the Mid­Atlantic region." 
According to preliminary estimates, the cost of the project would be between $4 billion and $6 
billion. These potential capital expenditures are not included in PPL Corporation's most recent capital 
expenditure projections. PPL Electric Utilities may enter into partnerships to develop and build some or 
all of the project. 
The preliminary timeline envisions completion of the project between 2023 and 2025, assuming 
all necessary approvals are received and construction begins in 2017. Approvals are needed from 
various regulatory and regional planning entities. 
PPL Electric Utilities will be meeting with appropriate state and federal agencies as planning for 
the project moves forward. Further details of the project will be made public as they become available. 
NewsClips: 
PPL Plans To Bring Marcellus Shale Power To East Coast 
PPL Proposes New Cross­State Transmission Line 
PPL Proposes $4B Power Line Into MD 
PPL Smart Meters Not So Smart, Customers May Pay For It 
Observers Mixed On Grid Backup 
 
Marcellus Shale Coalition Issues Annual Workforce Survey 
 
The Marcellus Shale Coalition Tuesday released the results of its annual workforce survey. The findings 
– based on 2013 data – were provided by a large majority of MSC member companies, representing 
nearly 95 percent of Pennsylvania’s shale production. 
“Shale development represents a generational opportunity for our Commonwealth. Since day 
one, our industry has focused on fostering the growth of a skilled and well­trained local workforce to 
ensure that lifelong opportunities are being fully realized,” said MSC president Dave Spigelmyer. “These 
collaborative and ongoing efforts – industry groups, member companies and other key stakeholders 
working closely with a host of educational institutions as well as trade schools – continue to deliver 
strong results in the form of new jobs for our region’s workforce, as reflected again in this survey data.” 
Key survey highlights include: 
— 26.5 percent of new hires work in engineering and construction, 23 percent of new hires work in 
equipment operations; 15.2 percent in operations and maintenance, 8 percent in administration, 7 
percent in land and 5 percent in environmental, health & safety; 
— 83 percent of new hires came from Marcellus Shale [Pa., Oh., W.Va., N.Y., Md.] states; 
— Positions most difficult to fill; 
— Workforce diversity; and 
— Recruitment methods and challenges, including educational and professional training needs. 
According to the survey data, MSC member companies expect to hire more than 2,000 new 
employees in 2014. The survey also indicates that the majority of new hires are in three sub­sectors and 
are weighted more so in southwestern Pennsylvania: engineering and construction; midstream and 
pipeline; and operations and maintenance. 
“Attracting and retaining a high­quality, local workforce is a key tenet of our Guiding Principles. 
By nearly all metrics – and with Pennsylvania’s unemployment at its lowest level since September 2008 
and well below the national average – we continue to make positive progress on this important 
commitment, helping to create opportunities for those seeking work in our growing industry. And while 
some challenges still exist, this survey helps identify gaps to refine and better direct our collective efforts 
aimed at boosting local job growth for years to come.” 
A copy of the survey is available online. 
The MSC Job Portal, workforce survey results and other helpful resources are available online. 
Please also visit UnitedShaleAdvocates.com to join the industry’s growing grassroots movement in 
support responsible, job­creating shale development. 
NewsClips: 
Hiring In Shale Industry Shifts To Skilled Workers 
Gas Industry Survey Shows Job Growth Slowing 
 
More Pennsylvania Counties Report Positive For West Nile Virus 
 
The Department of Environmental Protection reported this week over 100 samples of mosquitoes and 
dead birds in nearly two dozen counties were positive for West Nile Virus prompting an increase in 
spraying operations. 
DEP announced portions of these counties would be sprayed to help control mosquitoes this 
week­­ Bucks, Centre, Chester, Cumberland, Franklin, Lancaster and Montgomery. 
Click Here for a rundown on where positive samples were found.  Click Here for the schedule 
of spraying operations in your counties. 
Click Here for a map of Hot Zones for West Nile Virus around the state. 
For more information on prevention measures you can take and more, visit the West Nile Virus 
website. 
 
DCNR Announces Public­Private Partnership To Preserve Lighthouse At Presque Isle 
 
Lt. Governor Jim Cawley Monday joined Department of Conservation and Natural Resources 
Secretary Ellen Ferretti in announcing the department and the newly created Presque Isle Light Station 
organization have reached an agreement for a public/private effort to renovate and eventually open to 
the public the historic lighthouse at Presque Isle State Park in Erie. 
DCNR owns the lighthouse and land, which for 141 years has been used as a residence, most 
recently for state park staff. 
The department is entering a 35­year­lease with the non­profit organization, which will then 
raise funds for restoration work, with the goal being opening the lighthouse to the public. 
“This is a great partnership between government and non­profit organizations to continue to 
improve and expand the resources and services that the Commonwealth provides to its citizens, and 
ensure that visitors understand the history as well as enjoy the beauty of Presque Isle State Park,” 
Cawley said at an event at the lighthouse today. 
The Presque Isle Lighthouse is the second oldest lighthouse on Lake Erie’s shore. The 
lighthouse was built in the 1800s and is on the National Register of Historic Places. Climbing the 78 
steps in the tower provides a nice view of Lake Erie. 
“Our relationship with the Presque Isle Partnership and the Presque Isle Advisory Committee 
leading to the creation of the Presque Isle Light Station organization is a true success story, as together, 
we have been able to accomplish many projects at the park,” said Ferretti. “This endeavor will be 
another shining star on that list of accomplishments.” 
The lighthouse was conveyed to the Commonwealth on June 10, 1998, by the federal 
government, but it continues to flash a white light that is maintained by the U.S. Coast Guard. 
“We have all come together and are working as partners to develop a plan to make this concept 
a reality,” said Presque Isle Partnership President Alana Handman. 
The tower and lighthouse will be available to the public on a more regular schedule once further 
renovations and public access plans are completed. The primary phase of reconstruction involves 
refurbishing the garage into a visitor gift shop. 
The Presque Isle Partnership, in cooperation with the newly created Presque Isle Light Station 
organization, is beginning plans for overall lighthouse restoration to resemble the architectural style of its 
early 20th century foundation. 
“It is a rare occurrence when the pulse of a community is captured in the essence of a building 
or a home, but the Presque Isle Lighthouse is such a landmark,” said Presque Isle Light Station Board 
President Joe Pfadt. “Since 1872, the Presque Isle Light Station has guided sea going vessels off the 
shores of Lake Erie for safe passage into the harbor, and now it is once again guiding us to a future of 
community service.” 
“Similar to the private spending being done by tremendous partners on this project, resolving 
our pension crisis would free up additional funds to spend on the important work of state government,” 
Cawley said. “The state’s current pension crisis consumes 60 cents of every dollar in general fund 
revenue, and its time the General Assembly address this issue.” 
The mission of the Presque Isle Partnership is to enhance the Presque Isle visitor’s experience 
by developing, funding, and implementing projects and programs on Presque Isle State Park while 
protecting the natural environment.  
For information, visit the Presque Isle Partnership website. 
 
Hawk Mountain Highlights The Important Connection Between Conservation, Economy 
 
Lt. Governor Jim Cawley visited Hawk Mountain Sanctuary in Berks County Tuesday to announce a 
$250,000 grant through the Department of Conservation and Natural Resources that will revitalize an 
existing trail connecting the amphitheater with the rest of the property, and making it accessible for 
people with disabilities. 
“Hawk Mountain is one of the single greatest conservation success stories of our time, and it’s 
also an important economic driver,” Cawley said. “Recent studies show that the average 70,000 visitors 
per year to Hawk Mountain funnel more than $7 million into the local economy through overnight stays, 
dinners at restaurants, and visits to other area attractions.” 
The grant will help improve the Wilderness Walkway, a family­friendly trail that will connect the 
Amphitheater to the parking lots, visitor center and other areas of the 2,600­acre sanctuary. 
The Hawk Mountain Sanctuary Association is raising additional private funds for the project. 
The DCNR grant money was provided through its Community Conservation Partnerships 
Program.  The program combines several funding sources into one grant program, including the 
Keystone Fund, which is generated from a portion of the realty transfer tax; the Environmental 
Stewardship Fund; the ATV/Snowmobile Fund generated through fees for licenses; and federal funds. 
For more information, visit DCNR Apply for Grants webpage. 
 
DCNR: Groundbreaking For Kinzua Bridge State Park Office/Visitor Center Aug. 21 
  
Department of Conservation and Natural Resources Secretary 
Ellen Ferretti Thursday announced  work will begin in August now 
that contracts have been awarded for the construction of a new 
park office/visitor center at Kinzua Bridge State Park, McKean 
County. 
A groundbreaking event will be held at the park on Aug. 21. 
“After completing the skywalk at Kinzua Bridge State Park in 
2011, we are now ready to move forward with the next phase of 
amenities ­­ a visitor center to welcome people and provide 
interpretation of the park’s history, and the recreational 
opportunities not only onsite, but in the Pennsylvania Wilds region," Ferretti said. 
This project is part of Enhance Penn’s Woods – a two­year, more than $200 million initiative 
launched by Gov. Tom Corbett to repair and improve Pennsylvania’s state parks and forests. 
Contracts have been awarded by the Department of General Services to JC  Orr of Altoona, 
$4.7 million for general contract work; W.C Eshenaur & Son of Harrisburg, $853,000 for HVAC 
system; A&MP Electric Inc. of Guys Mills, $614,000 for electrical work; and Rabe Environmental 
Systems, Erie, $707,500 for plumbing. The funds for the work are provided by the state’s capital 
budget. 
“Planning and preparations for the Kinzua Bridge State Park Visitor Center have been in 
progress for the past several years,” Sen. Joseph Scarnati (R­Jefferson) said.  “I am grateful to 
Secretary Ferretti and Gov. Corbett for supporting this important investment in our region.  This state of 
the art facility will help to provide numerous recreational and educational opportunities, while also 
fostering economic development for the surrounding area.  I am very pleased to be a part this project 
and look forward to witnessing the positive effects of the center in years to come.” 
The visitor center will house 2,800­square feet of space in two exhibit halls and a lobby; park 
administrative offices; public restrooms; and classroom space.  The project also includes a maintenance 
building. 
The building will seek LEED certification and will include water efficient plumbing fixtures; 
geothermal heating and cooling system; regionally sourced materials with a high level of recycled 
content; sustainably certified wood; and diversion of construction debris and waste to recycling centers 
instead of landfills. 
The work is expected to be complete by fall of 2015. 
The 329­acre Kinzua Bridge State Park features remnants of the 2,053­foot long viaduct that 
was first built of iron in 1882, and then rebuilt of steel in 1900. The viaduct, commonly referred to as a 
railroad bridge, is series of arches that carry the railroad over the wide valley.  
The viaduct was toppled by a tornado in 2003.  In 2011, DCNR opened a pedestrian walkway 
with a glass­bottom observation area down into the Kinzua Gorge on the remaining half of the bridge. 
The bridge and observation deck will remain open during construction of the office and visitor 
center. 
For more park information, visit the Kinzua Bridge State Park webpage. 
 
PA Parks & Forest Foundation President To Cycle 88 Miles In One Day To Raise Funds 
 
Putting her pedals behind her message, PA Parks and Forest Foundation President Marci Mowery is 
cycling to support the foundation’s work for state parks and forests with a Ohiopyle State Park to Point 
State Park ride. 
On September 9, Marci and PPFF Membership Coordinator Pam Metzger will hop on their 
bikes and ride from the foundation’s Western PA office in Confluence, through Ohiopyle State Park, 
and on to Point State Park—88 miles—in one day.  
The vital funds raised by the ride will support PPFF’s work to enhance, conserve and protect 
Pennsylvania’s state parks and forests. 
“The Pennsylvania Parks and Forests Foundation has been making a difference for 15 years,” 
Marci Mowery says, “Improving parks and forests through the establishment of friends groups, working 
on special programs, accessibility projects and trainings, and getting people excited about outdoor 
recreation opportunities across the state. Riding on the Great Allegheny Passage, we will test our will 
power and humor to support that important work.” 
This is also a ride to continue the conversation about remaining active throughout your lifespan 
and the value of outdoor recreation to mental, physical and emotional well being. Mowery says one of 
the challenges for her will be dealing with the arthritis in her hands for the length of the ride. 
“Anyone who knows Marci knows that she loves to just jump right into things and all too often 
she drags the rest of us along, kicking and screaming. In the case in question, it's kicking and singing,” 
Pam Metzger says. “It'll be fun no matter what, but it certainly would be more fun knowing we're raising 
a lot of money for the cause.” 
Upon arrival at Point State Park, Pam and Marci will break into a Pennsylvania­centric 
rendition of "Bicycle Race" by Queen, the length of which will be determined by the amount of funds 
raised.  
They also hope to take a kayak trip using the park's new ADA EZ launch—a joint venture 
between the Hillman Foundation, Point State Park, and PPFF—on the day following their bike ride… 
body willing. 
Follow her on Twitter at #OSP2PSP.  Visit Marci’s fundraising page for more information, and 
to make a donation. 
 
Manada Conservancy Presents Crickets & Katydids Aug. 21 In Hershey 
 
The Manada Conservancy presents a special program for kids and adults on August 21 called Crickets 
and Katydids with naturalist Steve Rannels who will take participants on a journey into their world. 
The program will be held at Camp Catherine, 1275 Swatara Road in Hershey starting at 7:00 
p.m., so bring your flashlights! 
The program is free and open to the public, but RSVPs are requested by sending email to: 
office@manada.org or call 717­566­4122. 
 
Help Wanted: Berks Conservation District Assistant District Executive 
 
The Berks County Conservation District will be accepting applicants for the position of Assistant 
District Executive starting August 7 through August 29. 
General requirements for the position: 
— Working knowledge of the mission, goals, laws and operations of PA Conservation  
Districts, State Conservation Commission, PADEP, PDA, USDA Agricultural Agencies,  
Berks County Government, Local Municipalities and other Conservation Partners. 
— Middle management experience pertinent to a staff size of 15­20 employees. 
— Exhibit Leadership skills. 
— Experience in working with a Board of Directors and volunteers. 
— Passion and excitement for the unlimited opportunities in a conservation district. 
The position has the opportunity for upward mobility within the Berks County  
Conservation District. 
Please submit your resume and references to: Berks County Conservation District, 1238 
County Welfare Road, Ste. 200, Leesport, PA 19533 Attn: Tammy Bartsch or send email to: 
tammy.bartsch@berkscd.com.  (No phone calls please.) 
 
Help Wanted: Chesapeake Bay Foundation­PA Staff Scientist 
 
The Chesapeake Bay Foundation Harrisburg office is looking to fill the position of Staff Scientist who 
will do critical technical analysis, summary, and translation of diverse and complex scientific issues, with 
a focus on issues related to surface and groundwater quality, into CBF positions on policy, regulation, 
legislation, and for general advocacy. 
The deadline for applications is August 15.  Click Here for all the details. 
 
Your 2 Cents: Issues On Advisory Committee Agendas 
 
This section gives you a continuously updated thumbnail sketch of issues to be considered in upcoming 
advisory committee meetings where the agendas have been released 
 
August 5­­ Agenda Released. DEP Environmental Justice Advisory Board meeting.  Delaware Room, 
Rachel Carson Building. 8:30. 
­­ Report from Environmental Advocate 
­­ Review of Chester listening session 
­­ Discussion of amendment allow easier disposal of prescription medications 
­­ Status of electronic permit availability 
­­ Website migration update and mining video 
­­ Environmental Justice Conference planning 
­­ 2015 goals and calendar planning 
<> Click Here for available handouts. 
 
August 5­­ DCNR Wild Resource Conservation Program hearing on funding applications.  6th Floor 
Conference Room, Rachel Carson Building. 10:00.  (formal notice) 
 
August 7­­ Agenda Released. DEP Air Quality Technical Advisory Committee meeting.  Room 105 
Rachel Carson Building. 9:15. 
­­ Discussion of EPA’s proposed carbon reduction regulation 
­­ Implementation of 1­hour sulfur dioxide standard & data requirements 
­­ Overview of U.S. Supreme Court decision on cross­state air pollution rule 
­­ Final 2014 air quality monitoring network plan 
­­ Overview of U.S. Supreme Court decision on EPA tailoring rule 
­­ Discussion of Lower Beaver Valley attainment demonstration 
­­ Update on PM2.5 redesignation requests 
<> Click Here for available handouts. 
 
August 7­­ Susquehanna River Basin Commission holds a public hearing on requests for consumptive 
water use.  Room 8E­B, East Wing, Capitol Building, Harrisburg.  2:30. (formal notice) 
 
August 12­­ CANCELED. DEP Climate Change Advisory Committee meeting.  Room 105 Rachel 
Carson Building. 10:00.  (formal notice) 
 
August 18­­ DEP hearing on proposed changes to natural gas compressor station in Milford, Pike 
County. Delaware Valley High School, 256 U.S. Route 6, Milford. 6 to 9 p.m. (news release notice) 
 
August 19­­ Environmental Quality Board meeting.  Room 105 Rachel Carson Building.  9:00. 
 
August 19­­ Environmental Quality Board holds a public hearing on proposed regulations setting 
emission standards from fiberglass boat manufacturing materials.  DEP Regional Office, 400 Waterfront 
Dr., Pittsburgh. 1:00.  (formal notice) 
 
August 20­­ Environmental Quality Board holds a public hearing on proposed regulations setting 
emission standards from fiberglass boat manufacturing materials.  DEP Regional Office, 2 East Main St., 
Norristown. 1:00.  (formal notice) 
 
August 20­­ CANCELED. DEP Agricultural Advisory Board meeting.  DEP Southcentral Regional 
Office, 909 Elmerton Ave., Harrisburg. 10:00. (formal notice) 
 
August 20­­ DEP holds a public hearing on a proposed revision of the State Air Quality 
Implementation Plan for the Delaware County Regional Water Quality Control Authority western 
regional treatment plant in Chester. DEP Regional Office, 2 East Main St., Norristown.  1:00.  (formal 
notice) 
 
August 21­­ Environmental Quality Board holds a public hearing on proposed regulations setting 
emission standards from fiberglass boat manufacturing materials.  DEP Offices, Room 105 Rachel 
Carson Building, Harrisburg. 1:00.  (formal notice) 
 
August 26­­ DEP hearing on cleanup of former Lock Haven Laundry Property Clinton County. Lock 
Haven City Hall, 20 East Church St., Lock Haven.  6:30.  (news release notice) 
 
September 3­­ DEP hearing on proposed attainment demonstration for Lower Beaver Valley 
Nonattainment Area for 2008 lead standard. DEP Southwest Regional Office, 400 Waterfront Dr., 
Pittsburgh.  1:00.  (formal notice) 
 
September 9­­ CANCELED. DEP Board Of Coal Mine Safety meeting.  DEP Cambria Office, 286 
Industrial Park Road, Ebensburg. 10:00. (formal notice) 
 
September 10­­ DEP Sewage Advisory Committee meeting.  Room 105 Rachel Carson Building. 
10:30. (formal notice) 
 
September 16­­ DEP Climate Change Advisory Committee meeting.  12th Floor Conference Room, 
Rachel Carson Building. 10:00.  (formal notice) 
 
September 24­­DEP Board Of Coal Mine Safety meeting.  DEP Cambria Office, 286 Industrial Park 
Road, Ebensburg. 10:00. (formal notice) 
 
October 15­­ DEP Cleanup Standards Scientific Advisory Board. 14th Floor Conference Room, 
Rachel Carson Building. 9:00. 
 
Visit DEP’s new Public Participation Center for information on how you can Be Informed! and Get 
Involved! in DEP regulation and guidance development process. 
 
Click Here for links to DEP’s Advisory Committee webpages. 
 
DEP Calendar of Events 
 
Add Green Works In PA To Your Google+ Circle 
 
Grants & Awards                                                                                               
 
This section gives you a heads up on upcoming deadlines for awards and grants and other recognition 
programs.  NEW means new from last week. 
 
August 4­­ NEW. REAP Farm Conservation Tax Credit Program Begins Accepting Applications,  
                              Completed Projects 
August 15­­ DEP Section 902 Recycling Grants 
August 15­­ PA Energy Development Authority Clean Energy Funding 
August 15­­ PA Housing Authority Marcellus Housing Funding RFP 
August 25­­ NEW. REAP Farm Conservation Tax Credit Program Begins Accepting  
                                Applications­­ Proposed, Completed Projects 
September 3­­ PPFF 2014 Photo Contest 
September 19­­ Southeast PA TreeVitalize Watershed Grants 
September 22­­ CFA Alternative and Clean Energy Program 
September 22­­ CFA Renewable Energy Program 
September 22­­ CFA High Performance Building Program 
September 30­­ DEP Recycling Performance Grants 
October 23­­ PEMA Fire Company & Ambulance Services Grants 
October 31­­ Hawk Mountain Sanctuary Digital Photo Contest 
October 31­­ PRC Lens On Litter Photo Contest 
December 31­­ DEP Alternative Fuel Vehicle Rebates (or until they last) 
 
­­ Visit the DEP Grants and Loan Programs webpage for more ideas on how to get financial assistance 
for environmental projects. 
 
Add Green Works In PA To Your Google+ Circle 
 
Budget/Quick NewsClips                                                                                  
 
Here's a selection of NewsClips on environmental topics from around the state­­ 
 
House GOP Cancels Next Week’s House Session 
Celebrating, Reflecting On Quecreek Mine Rescue 
Budget 
Lt. Gov. Candidate Rues Lack Of Severance Tax 
Public Will Get To Weigh In On Loyalsock Forest Drilling 
State To Seek Comments On Drilling  Below Loyalsock Forest 
DCNR Defines Allowable Drilling Activities On Public Lands 
House Bill Would Require Hearings On Leasing DCNR Lands 
Senate GOP Looks To McCord On Corbett Vetoes 
Other 
PRC Puts Hazardous Materials In Their Place 
5 Treated At Northampton Recycling Plant 
Landfill Approved To Use Auto Fluff To Cover Trash 
Windmills In Fayette County Threatened 
Covanta Spells Out Plan For Chester Waste­To­Energy Plant 
Gasoline Prices Falling, But Pittsburgh Lags Behind Average 
PPL Plans To Bring Marcellus Shale Power To East Coast 
PPL Proposes New Cross­State Transmission Line 
PPL Proposes $4B Power Line Into MD 
PPL Smart Meters Not So Smart, Customers May Pay For It 
Observers Mixed On Grid Backup 
EPA Hearings Put Pittsburgh In Crosshairs Of Climate War 
EPA Hearing Triggers Protests, Arrests In Pittsburgh 
Coal Rally Draws Thousands To Downtown Pittsburgh 
PennFuture: Many Voices Support EPA’s Climate Rule 
Corbett, Coal Interests Rally Before EPA Hearing 
Corbett Leads Rally Opposing EPA Rule 
EPA Regulation Hearings Draw Interest Groups To Pittsburgh 
EPA Hearing Brings Coal Debate To Pittsburgh 
2nd Day Of EPA Greenhouse Gas Hearings Begins Quietly 
Coal, Health Advocates Square Off At EPA Hearing 
Pittsburgh Braces For Demonstrations On EPA Rule 
The Politics Of Climate Change Debate 
Op­Ed: Preserves PA Trees To Slow Climate Change 
Op­Ed: EPA Rules Threaten PA Manufacturing 
Editorial: Coal Exports Transfers Pollution 
Construction Of $500M Natural Gas Power Plant Stalled 
Peoples Gas Hopes Surcharge Will Help Expand Service 
Why Solar Companies Are Teaming With Oil, Gas Industry 
Poll: Minorities Support Regulating Pollution 
Toomey Amendment Eliminating Highway Environmental Reviews Fails 
Degnan At William Penn Foundation Departing 
Lawmakers Put Aim On Hunting Drone Bills 
Game Commission To Host Program On State’s Bats 
Audubon Honors Bill Powers For Hays Eagle Nest Webcam 
Butterfly Weekend At York County Park 
 
­­ DEP’s NewsClips webpage ­ Click Here  
 
Add Green Works In PA To Your Google+ Circle 
 
Marcellus Shale NewsClips                                                                    
 
Here are NewsClips on topics related to Marcellus Shale natural gas drilling­­­ 
 
Lt. Gov. Candidate Rues Lack Of Severance Tax 
Public Will Get To Weigh In On Loyalsock Forest Drilling 
State To Seek Comments On Drilling  Below Loyalsock Forest 
DCNR Defines Allowable Drilling Activities On Public Lands 
House Bill Would Require Hearings On Leasing DCNR Lands 
Health Dept. Reaches Out To Doctors On Drilling Complaints 
Column: Fracking Compromises The Future Of PA 
Editorial: DEP Must Do More To Protect Water Supplies 
Couple Faces Fight To Drill In Land Near Mars Schools 
Natural Gas Field Illnesses Probed 
State Says No Calls To Stifle Drilling Health Complaints3 
Environmentalists Seek AG Probe Of Health Department 
Kane To Probe Health Dept. Handling Of Fracking Complaints 
Funding for Health Studies Near Drill Sites Loosening 
Op­Ed: Is PA Health Department Fracking Phobic? 
Editorial: Make Health Issues Top Priority Near Drilling Sites 
5 Gas Wells Leaked Methane For Years 
Op­Ed: Well­Meaning Natural Gas Law Headache For Homeowners 
Construction Of $500M Natural Gas Power Plant Stalled 
Peoples Gas Hopes Surcharge Will Help Expand Service 
Consol, Range Hamstrung By Lack Of Pipelines 
Lancaster County Struggles With Gas Pipeline Plan 
Sunoco Logistics Pipeline Cannot Bypass Local Zoning Laws 
Sunoco Logistics Pipeline Dealt Setback 
FERC To Hold Meeting On Transco Pipeline In NE 
FERC To Hold Meetings On Williams Natural Gas Pipeline 
FERC Sets Hearings On Natural Gas Pipeline 
Hiring In Shale Industry Shifts To Skilled Workers 
Gas Industry Survey Shows Job Growth Slowing 
Study: Oil, Gas Jobs Projected To Grow 
Why Solar Companies Are Teaming With Oil, Gas Industry 
Editorial: Federal Rail Mandates Will Make Oil Cars Safer 
Chevron Puts Moon HQ Plans On Hold 
National Fuel Gas Prices To Fall 5.66% 
Financial/Other States 
Range Resources Increases Profits To $171.4M 2nd Quarter 
Consol Energy Loses $24.9M, But Grows Gas Production 
UGI Gas Utility Profits Just 126.4% In Quarter 
GAO: Injecting Fracking Waste Could Threaten Drinking Water 
Report Criticizes EPA Oversight Of Injection Wells 
U.S. DOE Seeks To Curb Natural Gas Methane Emissions 
 
Add Green Works In PA To Your Google+ Circle 
 
Flooding/Watershed NewsClips                                                                         
 
Here are NewsClips on watershed topics from around the state­­ 
 
Flooding 
Demolition Will Reshape Flood­Ravaged Towns 
Other Watershed NewsClips 
Stormwater Management Pits Costs Against Clean Water 
Sewer Authority Learns When It Rains, It Pours 
Volunteer Program Helps Protect Streams In Schuylkill Watershed 
Adopt­A­Lake Continues Along Keystone Lake In Armstrong 
Editorial: Susquehanna River Should Be Declared Impaired 
Farm Manure Threatens Lehigh Watershed 
Man Charged With Illegally Dumping Sewage 
Sewage Plant Owner Charged With Dumping Sludge 
 
Latest From The Chesapeake Bay Journal 
 
Add Green Works In PA To Your Google+ Circle 
 
Regulations, Technical Guidance & Permits                                            
 
The DEP Board of Coal Mine Safety published proposed regulations setting standards for surface 
mining facilities for comment (PA Bulletin, page 5191). 
 
Pennsylvania Bulletin ­ August 2, 2014 
 
Proposed Regulations Open For Comment ­ DEP webpage 
Proposed Regulations With Closed Comment Periods ­ DEP webpage 
DEP Regulatory Agenda ­ DEP webpage 
 
Technical Guidance & Permits 
 
The Department of Environmental Protection published notice of final 2018 ozone season nitrogen oxide 
allowances and 2012 nitrogen oxide and sulfur dioxide emissions (PA Bulletin, page 5277). 
 
The State System of Higher Education published notice saying it will perform a life cycle cost analysis to 
determine if Bloomsburg University should be exempt from mandates for using coal its its heating system 
or switch to another fuel. 
 
Technical Guidance Comment Deadlines ­ DEP webpage 
Recently Closed Comment Periods For Technical Guidance ­ DEP webpage 
Technical Guidance Recently Finalized ­ DEP webpage 
Copies of Final Technical Guidance ­ DEP webpage 
 
Visit DEP’s new Public Participation Center for information on how you can Be Informed! and Get 
Involved! in DEP regulation and guidance development process. 
 
Add Green Works In PA To Your Google+ Circle 
 
Calendar Of Events                                                                        
 
Upcoming legislative meetings, conferences, workshops, plus links to other online calendars.  Meetings 
are in Harrisburg unless otherwise noted.  NEW means new from last week.  Go to the online Calendar 
webpage. 
 
August 5­­ Agenda Released. DEP Environmental Justice Advisory Board meeting.  Delaware Room, 
Rachel Carson Building. 8:30. 
 
August 5­­ DCNR Wild Resource Conservation Program hearing on funding applications.  6th Floor 
Conference Room, Rachel Carson Building. 10:00.  (formal notice) 
 
August 7­­  Agenda Released. DEP Air Quality Technical Advisory Committee meeting.  Room 105 
Rachel Carson Building. 9:15. 
 
August 7­­ Susquehanna River Basin Commission holds a public hearing on requests for consumptive 
water use.  Room 8E­B, East Wing, Capitol Building, Harrisburg.  2:30. (formal notice) 
 
August 12­­ CANCELED. DEP Climate Change Advisory Committee meeting.  Room 105 Rachel 
Carson Building. 10:00.  (formal notice) 
 
August 18­­ DEP hearing on proposed changes to natural gas compressor station in Milford, Pike 
County. Delaware Valley High School, 256 U.S. Route 6, Milford. 6 to 9 p.m. (news release notice) 
 
August 19­­ Environmental Quality Board meeting.  Room 105 Rachel Carson Building.  9:00. 
 
August 19­­ Environmental Quality Board holds a public hearing on proposed regulations setting 
emission standards from fiberglass boat manufacturing materials.  DEP Regional Office, 400 Waterfront 
Dr., Pittsburgh. 1:00.  (formal notice) 
 
August 20­­ Environmental Quality Board holds a public hearing on proposed regulations setting 
emission standards from fiberglass boat manufacturing materials.  DEP Regional Office, 2 East Main St., 
Norristown. 1:00.  (formal notice) 
 
August 20­­ CANCELED. DEP Agricultural Advisory Board meeting.  DEP Southcentral Regional 
Office, 909 Elmerton Ave., Harrisburg. 10:00. (formal notice) 
 
August 20­­ DEP holds a public hearing on a proposed revision of the State Air Quality 
Implementation Plan for the Delaware County Regional Water Quality Control Authority western 
regional treatment plant in Chester. DEP Regional Office, 2 East Main St., Norristown.  1:00.  (formal 
notice) 
 
August 21­­ Environmental Quality Board holds a public hearing on proposed regulations setting 
emission standards from fiberglass boat manufacturing materials.  DEP Offices, Room 105 Rachel 
Carson Building, Harrisburg. 1:00.  (formal notice) 
 
August 26­­ DEP hearing on cleanup of former Lock Haven Laundry Property Clinton County. Lock 
Haven City Hall, 20 East Church St., Lock Haven.  6:30.  (news release notice) 
 
September 3­­ DEP hearing on proposed attainment demonstration for Lower Beaver Valley 
Nonattainment Area for 2008 lead standard. DEP Southwest Regional Office, 400 Waterfront Dr., 
Pittsburgh.  1:00.  (formal notice) 
 
September 9­­ CANCELED. DEP Board Of Coal Mine Safety meeting.  DEP Cambria Office, 286 
Industrial Park Road, Ebensburg. 10:00. (formal notice) 
 
September 10­­ DEP Sewage Advisory Committee meeting.  Room 105 Rachel Carson Building. 
10:30. (formal notice) 
 
September 16­­ DEP Climate Change Advisory Committee meeting.  12th Floor Conference Room, 
Rachel Carson Building. 10:00.  (formal notice) 
 
September 22­­ NEW.  Environmental Issues Forum, Joint Conservation Committee.  Pennsylvania’s 
abandoned Turnpike, a 13­mile stretch of the original Turnpike in Bedford and Fulton counties and 
plans to turn it into a scenic, recreational biking trail.  Room 8E­A East Wing.  11:00. (Note time.) 
 
September 24­­DEP Board Of Coal Mine Safety meeting.  DEP Cambria Office, 286 Industrial Park 
Road, Ebensburg. 10:00. (formal notice) 
 
September 25­­ Penn State Extension Youth Water Educator’s Summit. The Central Hotel and 
Conference Center, Harrisburg. 
 
October 6­­ NEW. Environmental Issues Forum, Joint Conservation Committee. Keep PA Beautiful 
will present its recommendations for significantly reducing illegal dumping in Pennsylvania. Room 8E­A 
East Wing.  Noon. (Note time.) 
 
October 15­­ DEP Cleanup Standards Scientific Advisory Board. 14th Floor Conference Room, 
Rachel Carson Building. 9:00. 
 
Visit DEP’s new Public Participation Center for information on how you can Be Informed! and Get 
Involved! in DEP regulation and guidance development process. 
 
Click Here for links to DEP’s Advisory Committee webpages. 
 
DEP Calendar of Events 
 
Note: The Environmental Education Workshop Calendar is no longer available from the PA Center for 
Environmental Education because funding for the Center was eliminated in the FY 2011­12 state 
budget.  The PCEE website was also shutdown, but some content was moved to the PA Association of 
Environmental Educators' website. 
 
Senate Committee Schedule                House Committee Schedule 
 
You can watch the Senate Floor Session and House Floor Session live online. 
 
Add Green Works In PA To Your Google+ Circle 
 
CLICK HERE To Print Entire PA Environment Digest           
 
CLICK HERE to Print The Entire PA Environment Digest. 
 
Stories Invited                                                                                      
 
Send your stories, photos and links to videos about your project, environmental issues or programs for 
publication in the PA Environment Digest to:  DHess@CrisciAssociates.com. 
 
PA Environment Digest is edited by David E. Hess, former Secretary Pennsylvania Department of 
Environmental Protection, and is published as a service of Crisci Associates, a Harrisburg­based 
government and public affairs firm whose clients include Fortune 500 companies and non­profit 
organizations. 
 
Did you know you can search 10 years of back issues of the PA Environment Digest on dozens of 
topics, by county and on any keyword you choose?  Just click on the search page. 
 
PA Environment Digest weekly was the winner of the PA Association of Environmental 
Educators' 2009 Business Partner of the Year Award. 
 
Also sign up for these other services from Crisci Associates­­ 
 
Add Green Works In PA To Your Google+ Circle 
 
PA Environment Digest Twitter Feed:  On Twitter, sign up to receive instant updates from: 
PAEnviroDigest. 
 
PA Environment Daily Blog: provides daily environmental NewsClips and significant stories and 
announcements on environmental topics in Pennsylvania of immediate value.  Sign up and receive as 
they are posted updates through your favorite RSS reader.  You can also sign up for a once daily email 
alerting you to new items posted on this blog. 
 
PA Capitol Digest Daily Blog to get updates every day on Pennsylvania State Government, including 
NewsClips, coverage of key press conferences and more. Sign up and receive as they are posted 
updates through your favorite RSS reader.  You can also sign up for a once daily email alerting you to 
new items posted on this blog. 
 
PA Capitol Digest Twitter Feed: Don't forget to sign up to receive the PA Capitol Digest Twitter feed 
to get instant updates on other news from in and around the Pennsylvania State Capitol. 
 
Supporting Member PA Outdoor Writers Assn./PA Trout Unlimited          
 
PA Environment Digest is a supporting member of the Pennsylvania Outdoor Writers Association, 
Pennsylvania Council Trout Unlimited and the Doc Fritchey Chapter Trout Unlimited.