ISyE 3103 Introduction to Supply Chain Modeling: Logistics Spring 2008 Homework 6 100 points Issued: March 13, 2008

Due: April 1, 2008 (in class) Question 1.
Powerco has an electric power plant A that supplies the electricity needs of city B. Powerco also owns 4 power relay substations and a set of connections between the plant, relay substations, and the city. When power is sent from plant A to city B, it must first pass through one or more of the relay substations on a connection that is in Powerco’s network. The table below shows all connections in the network (if it is not in the table, that arc does not exist in the network). The table also gives the distance between any pair of nodes for which connections exist. Also during each transmission, a certain kilowatt of energy is lost due to the characteristics of the connection. The kilowatt loss for each connection is given in the table below. Connection (A,1) (A,2) (1,3) (1,4) (2,4) (3,B) (4,B) Distance 4 3 4 1 3 2 2 Energy loss 1 1 2 3 1 2 2

(a) Draw the network, labeling each node with the appropriate node number {A,B,1,2,3,4} and labeling each arc with the cost (dij,lij) where dij is the distance of the connection and lij is the energy loss of the connection. (b) Use the multi-label algorithm to find the minimum cost paths from plant A to city B, where the two types of costs being considered are described below. i. Assume that the cost of sending power is proportional to the distance the power travels. Find the minimum distance path from plant A to city B. Realizing that quality of service is also important, Powerco wants to minimize the total energy loss during transmission. Find the path for sending power from plant A to city B that minimizes the total energy loss.

ii.

(c) Are the two paths you found in part (b), (i) and (ii), the same? If not, what do you suggest Powerco should do? (d) Describe the steps you would take to solve this problem if you weren’t allowed to use the multi-label algorithm to solve it.

Question 2.
Two of the United States’ most-visited national parks are Yellowstone National Park (located mostly in Wyoming, but extending slightly across the border into Idaho and Montana) and Yosemite National Park (located in California). Like many other national parks, Yellowstone and Yosemite are located away from major cities and thoroughfares, so that driving to and from either one may involve either roundabout travel or travel on smaller, slower roadways. A company specializing in nature tours offers two-location camping trips at Yellowstone and Yosemite. Customers drive to their choice of either of the two parks, and the company provides tours of the parks, as well as bus service between the parks. Every few days a bus drives from one park to the other. A bus from Yosemite to Yellowstone, for example, might have some Yosemite-based campers on their way to the second part of their tour, and also some Yellowstone-based campers who are heading back at the end of their tour. Using the Rand McNally road atlas, the company has identified all of the major roads that might be used as part of the bus route between the two parks. The roads include, in decreasing order of size and speed, interstate highways, U.S. highways, and state highways. Interstate highways are denoted by an “I” before the highway number, U.S. highways by “US” before the highway number, and state highways by the state’s abbreviation (for example, “CA”) before the highway number. A map of the highways, as well as a table of the city-to-city connections, is included below. The company’s transportation director is unsure of the best path for the tour buses to take. Being a new, financially shaky company, they purchased older, heavily used buses. Therefore, minimizing the mileage that the buses travel is an important consideration. On the other hand, if the shortest-mileage path results in longer travel times then the company’s customers might be dissatisfied, so minimizing the travel time is also an important consideration. Part I In the data in the table and map, we assume that travel distances and times are the same in both directions along each arc. Is this a reasonable assumption? Why or why not? Based on this assumption, explain why, if you have found a shortest path from Yellowstone to Yosemite, reversing the path gives the shortest path from Yosemite to Yellowstone. Part II Use Dijkstra’s algorithm to calculate the shortest-distance (mileage) route between Yellowstone and Yosemite. Show your work. This means to get full credit you must turn in: the given table (completed), and a separate page that, for each clearly labeled iteration number, shows your path distance calculations (i.e. vj = vi + dij) and your conclusions regarding whether to update a label or not (i.e., was vj > vi + dij?). You must also draw the network with the shortest-distance tree clearly indicated on the network and turn it in. Part III Use the Bellman-Ford algorithm to calculate the shortest-time route between Yellowstone and Yosemite. Show your work (to get full credit, you must turn in all components as mentioned in Part II above). Draw the network with the shortest-time tree clearly indicated on the network. Part IV Based on the limited data you have about the company, which route would you tentatively recommend, and why?

Road Segment Endpoints Yellowstone N.P., WY Yellowstone N.P., WY Livingston, MT Butte, MT Butte, MT Missoula, MT Idaho Falls, ID Idaho Falls, ID Boise, ID Boise, ID Twin Falls, ID Salt Lake City, UT Salt Lake City, UT Wells, NV Wells, NV Winnemuca, NV Ely, NV Reno, NV Reno, NV Reno, NV Sacramento, CA Bishop, CA Livingston, MT Idaho Falls, ID Butte, MT Idaho Falls, ID Missoula, MT Boise, ID Salt Lake City, UT Twin Falls, ID Twin Falls, ID Winnemuca, NV Wells, NV Wells, NV Ely, NV Winnemuca, NV Ely, NV Reno, NV Bishop, CA Bishop, CA Sacramento, CA Yosemite N.P., CA Yosemite N.P., CA Yosemite N.P., CA

Highway(s) US-89 US-20 I-90 I-15 I-90 US-12, US-95 I-15 I-15, I-86, I-84 I-84 US-95 US-93 I-80 I-15, US-6 I-80 US-93 I-80 US-6 US-395 I-80 US-395, CA-120 CA-99, CA-120 US-395, CA-120

Time (Min) 84 128 100 210 110 475 206 155 128 303 141 174 262 162 180 153 337 255 152 225 277 132

Distance (Miles) 59 100 104 205 119 371 208 161 131 256 118 181 241 175 140 164 283 205 133 154 193 65

15: Yosemite

14: Sacramento

13: Bishop

12: Reno

11: Ely Shortest Distance From Yellowstone To

10: Wells

9: Winnemuca

8: Twin Falls

7: Salt Lake City

6: Boise

5: Missoula

4: Butte

3: Idaho Falls

2: Livingston

1: Yellowstone

Part II

p Step

PERM

NOT PERM

Init 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20

15: Yosemite

14: Sacramento

13: Bishop

12: Reno

11: Ely

Shortest Time From Yellowstone To

10: Wells

9: Winnemuca

8: Twin Falls

7: Salt Lake City

6: Boise

5: Missoula

4: Butte

3: Idaho Falls

2: Livingston

1: Yellowstone

Part III

p Step

LIST

Init 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20

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