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Birthright War compendium
Based on Ad&d 2.0 edition - first RELEASE
BETA Version 1.5; 23 April 2013
Rules team:
Stanios
Betos
Rock Star
Chapter developer/editors:
Stanios
Cover art /Interior art:
All interior art is copyrighted by TSR or free distributed by artists throught out the internet. Artwork is not used for
commercial purposes
Special Thanks:
Vigilant-Undercover Nazgoulis
"he
Thom
Reginald
Gary Foss
Arjan Duijs
Travis Doom
Ian Hoskins
All the people of Birthright.net
and all the lads that will tolerate all the playtesting


This copy is a free document meant for personal and private use
only. It is not for commercial sale, resale or distribution in whole or in part. Furthermore,
its contents may be quoted, duplicated, revised or become the basis of derivative works
under the understanding that such works must properly reference this text, its author, and
are themselves released free of charge and under a comparable license.

Based on the original DUNGEONS & DRAGONS rules created by E. Gary Gygax and Dave Arneson
and the new DUNGEONS & DRAGONS game designed by Jonathan Tweet, Monte Cook, Skip
Williams, Richard Baker, and Peter Adkison.
Based on and including BIRTHRIGHT material created by Rich Baker, Colin McComb, Jean Rabe, Ed
Stark, Dale Donovan, Duane Maxwell, and Carrie Bebris.
This rulebook contains copyrighted material used with permission of Wizards of the Coast. This
rulebook is not for sale or resale and no profit can be made from the use of this material.
DUNGEONS & DRAGONS, DUNGEON MASTER, BIRTHRIGHT, and the BIRTHRIGHT logo, and the
Wizards of the Coast logo are registered trademarks owned by Wizards of the Coast, Inc. The
System logo is a trademark owned by Wizards of the Coast, Inc. All characters,character names,
and the distinctive likenesses thereof are trademarks owned by Wizards of the Coast, Inc. This
material is protected under the copyright laws of the United States of America. Any product is a
work of fiction. Any similarity to actual people, organizations, places, or events is purely
coincidental.

2011 Evangelos Batalis





2
Contents




3
Prologue
Why War?
You might want to introduce a war into your campaign for any reason. War can set the tone of a campaign
world, herald large-scale changes in its political structure, or simply provide new adventuring options for
characters who have grown bored with the same old plotlines.
The sheer drama and grandeur of warfare can add sparkle to a campaignnothing quite equals the sights and
sounds of armies on the march. The measured tramp of booted feet on the road; the color and pageantry of
military standards, coats of arms, and uniformed troops; the sight of cheering commoners waving flags as
their troops pass in reviewall these elements bring with them a special sort of excitement. Eventually, this
movement of troops culminates in the flash of steel in the morning sun and the clash of arms as two armies
meet, struggling for supremacy on the battlefield. By playing up these aspects, you can use a war to bring out
the heroic nature of your world. The foregoing describes the bright side of war, but it has a grim side as well.
Troops and animals can become mired in a muddy field on a cold, rainy day, or have to flee for their lives before
invading forces, or end up starving in a ravaged countryside. Treachery and deadly ambushes can put a quick
end to even the best-laid plans.
Finally, the grim picture of carrion feeders flocking to the aftermath of a battle brings home the reality of war in
a way that nothing else can. By emphasizing these aspects, you can use war to underscore the gritty realism of
your world. War touches nearly every aspect of life in the area where conflict rages and sometimes in locales far
removed from the fighting as well. Player characters who live in a country at war may find themselves eluding
press gangs or perhaps running press gangs of their own. Some might take more active roles and serve their
country by fighting on the battlefield, commanding troops, carrying messages, or performing any of myriad other
tasks suited to their abilities.
Even when a war is far away, adventurers can still feel its effects. They may find themselves shelling out extra
gold the next time they shop for supplies, and some goods may be unavailable at any price. War also tends to
bring intrigue to distant places, as diplomats, spies, and saboteurs work to bring allies into the fray and to keep
their foes from doing the same. Any war can present new challenges to the PCs in a campaign, no matter what
their level. Epic-level characters can hardly ignore a large-scale invasionespecially if other epic-level characters
lead the invading armybut even low-level characters can find roles to fill.
War also provides an excellent opportunity to make a change in your campaign world. You can eliminate aspects
you dont like, such as troublesome non-player characters (NPCs) or even whole countries. At the same time, you
can introduce new elements, such as new allies for the PCs, new villains, or even new cultures and religions.
In short, war can take center stage in your campaign, provide a backdrop for the action, serve as a vehicle for
change, or merely provide the occasional adventure hook. Few campaign developments can prove so versatile.

Before playing
Before you start reading you have to keep in mind that what you are about to read is nothing other than work of
people found all over the internet but compiled in a way that it makes sense and adaptable to a book of rules
that can be used in our conversion system for BIRTHRIGHT. If you do heed our words and read carefully you
can find yourself caught in a midst of a battlefield or atop a rampart watching fiery rain coming down on you. Sea
spray and warm summer breeze can wind upon your hair at the helm of your Galleon and full winds blow on its
sails. This is what this book is about. We aint professionals, and surely we aint developers, what we are is
hobbyists. Our love for this game has driven us to come to these rules in order to enjoy our game.
This battle system has been designed to use the BIRTHRIGHT war cards as unit indicators, so if you have
bought the game and you have the war cards you can either use the war map the game provided or print a new
one as we have done, much larger to suit some strategic movement and give our battles some time to evolve. A
single war game can take from two to five hours depending on the number of players and units involved. If you
dont have the game war map or the cards you have to come up with something to correspond to the metric
system used here. Finally if you have any questions, remarks or even corrections to give us feel free to contact
us via our webpage or blog.



4
Chapter 1: WAR

The battle was all but won. Our enemies were huddled in a loose formation
before us. They had fallen back towards the forest, driven by our charging cavalry and the
relentless push of pikemen. Yet they did not flee or surrender. They had retreated in good order, and as many of
our dead littered the ground as theirs. Nonetheless, their position was dire, and it was only a matter of time
before their ranks broke and they would be crushed.
For the first time in hours, men began to smile as the relief of victory began to wash over them. The prince
ordered a final charge as the enemys formation began to press into the trees at their backs.
Do not let them escape! he ordered.
Show them no more mercy than they have shown our own people!
He led them himself. It was just as the first knight lowered his lance that we heard the hissing sounds and
fleshy thumps that fill the soldiers heart with dread. There were archers in the trees! The whole of our cavalry
was exposed to their fire! More arrows leapt from the right and left, and I realized that this enfilade that looked
like such a perfect place to force our enemies also gave anyone waiting for us a perfect view of our flanks. We
had been lured into a cunning trap. Many have told the tale of that brave charge, and that the prince fell
swinging his blade, surrounded by foes. I tell you truthfully, that I saw him fall in that first volley, and it was the
feathered shaft of an arrow that stuck from his gorget that silenced him. Without our leader, many found they
had little stomach for the coming slaughter. I count myself among them, and that is why I am here to tell you
the tale rather than feeding the crows upon some distant field.

THE ROLE OF COMMAND
Strategy can play a vital role in military endeavours. In this system, Strategy takes place during strategic
decisions made by characters. But more dramatically, Strategy takes place on the battlefield during the
Advantage phase of the combat round. At that time, leaders are able to get points that can be used later in the
combat round to alter the effects of the various actions. In a Birthright campaign, Strategy is the purview of the
PCs, usually in their role as regents. In a typical D&D campaign, PCs can be devastatingly powerful in combat in a
way that is difficult to portray in large scale combat. One of the conventions of this system is that the characters
who lead a military force do just that: lead. By directing combat, rather than engaging directly in it they are able
to wield forces beyond even their own powers. The coordination and teamwork involved in an organized military
unit makes that force more powerful than even high level characters, and one of the points in delving into a large
scale combat system is the assumption that even the most powerful character would not be able to confront an
organized military force in any realistic way.
Thats not to say that PCs dont influence events at the large scale combat level. Their presence can still be
vital to the outcome of a battle. However, their role is relegated to that of the commander. In this system, that
means their influence is determined early in the combat round as an abstract pool of points that is doled out by
the player as he sees fit during the remainder of the round. The strategy non-weapon has the corresponding
description about advantage points and its use.

The Battle Round
Each battle round has two main stages and lasts 10 actual rounds (10 minutes of fighting). Each combat round
is conducted in the following order: The Action Phase which is comprised from: Initiative,
Activation/Scouting/Ambush, Advantage, Stationary Range attacks, Cavalry charge, Movement/Formation and the
Battle Phase which is comprised by Magical Attacks, Combat ( Melee, Range attacks),and the Morale Phase.


5
The Battleground
The ground selected by the defender or sometimes the attacker to resolute a battle is a choice that can turn the
tides. The Battleground can be fields of plains with minor props but most of the times hills, rivers, keeps, armed
camps and several other sites can play a decisive role in a huge battle. The battle ground is going to be tiled in
rectangular hexes of 60 yards wide x 80 yards long. Since we are going to be using the battle cards from the BR
original campaign as markers for a amassment of troops we can safely assume that the unit itself take up some
space in the battlefield, hence we can use each battle card as a metric unit of its own. The best way to measure
this is to take in account the least metric unit in our system which is the slow mobility of the footmen, and that is
12yards per round. Translating that in the Battle system we can assume that a footman unit is moving 120 yards
per Battle Round. This system is going to make our lives a lot easier concerning movement, range, and special
manoeuvring during a huge scale battle. In order to be able to calculate accurately all details concerning the
battlefield all stats are going to be taken into account and a huge difference between all sorts of units will be
playing a huge part during war.
I. Initiative
Initiative is rolled at the start of each combat round. Initiative order is very important at this time. The first
initiative roll is made by the opposing Generals as dictated before battle, there are some times more than two
Generals involved in battle. A d20 is rolled with the highest result calling the order that the armies will declare
their actions. There are modifiers that can add to this result (see Strategy NWP). When Initiative order has been
declared you can proceed with the first phase of the battle.

II. The Action Phase

Activation/Scouting/ambush
Activation and scouting are two very important factors for a battle resolution. At this phase the leaders of the
opposed armies can choose to activate and/or scout throughout the battlefield. All units can scout 600 yards
ahead of them the actual size, type and origin of their enemy. Scouts can scout 960 yards away thus making
them a viable unit for every army. When a unit is revealed from scouting its presence becomes common
knowledge for the leading General and all units in his army benefit from this knowledge. Ambush is performed
from units able to do so and grants a very deadly advantage during battle. Units assigned to ambush do so at the
very start of the round and can assault units within their movement reach unnoticed. Ambush halves all defense
rating of the target for that attack. Activation usually follows after scouting and it is the moment where the
general sends through his scouts his first orders for mobilization. Activation is needed to perform any kind of
action, a unit not activated cannot perform any action or be targeted by advantage points unless rules state
otherwise. The activation cost for each unit is listed in the table below.

Advantage
At the beginning of this phase the leaders are called for a Wis/Int roll, if they make the roll they are awarded 4
advantage points, if they fail the roll they are awarded 2 points. Advantage points can be spent at this phase in
order to Augment Units , Perform Special Maneuvers or even activate extra units for movement. Units called to
perform Special Maneuvers must roll a morale check with a +2 bonus before they execute it.
Table 1-1: Activation Costs
Unit Activation Cost
Scouts/Levies 0
Infrantry /Archers/Pikemen 1
Elite Infranty/Light Cavalry 3
Knights 5
Artillery 7
Table 1-2: Advantage
Action Advantage point cost
Simple attack (melee/missile) 0
Move 0
Unit Activation 1/3/5/7
Forced Move* 2
Rally 2
Assume Formation* 2
Fortify* 2


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*Special Maneuvers

Unit activation: The commander spends advantage points at a ratio 1to1 for activation points for his troops.
Forced Move: The commander spends advantage points in order to double a units move this battle round.
Units ordered to force move twice in a row must roll a morale check.
Rally : The commander spends advantage points to Rally units in his army. By doing so the unit rolls a morale
check at the morale phase of the battle. Leaders can opt to save advantage point to rally check at the end of
battle to negate an in round morale event, this happens with -2 morale penalty. If the check fails the unit loses
one level of morale.
Assume Formation: By spending advantage points the commander can order a troop to assume strategic
formations in order to fight more efficiently. Not all troops are trained in formations. See unit descriptions.
Fortify: By spending advantage points a unit can be ordered to fortify and wait for an assault. A fortified unit in
order to move next round needs double its activation points and can only do a half move. A fortified unit receives
a +2 bonus on its AC value. All units can fortify
Targeting: Units employing long range missile weapons can use advantage points to use targeting for their
missile attack this round, Targeting can only be used by stationery missile attack. Targeting allows the missile
unit to shoot at already engaged units choosing target. Targeting Missile attack on stationary targets gets a +4
Bonus on Battle rolls.
Ambush: Only units mentioned in their description that are able to ambush can use this advantage. Ambush is a
very powerful advantage and can be performed only once from a unit that has appeared in a battle ground. Units
spoiling their cover cannot ambush any longer. Ambush units resolve attacks immediately and deal a +4 Battle
roll with a x2 damage die.
Charge: The commander orders his men on a furious assault. The unit can make a free move towards the
enemy as part of the charge. The unit rolls 2 dice of damage for damage resolution. Only units capable of
charging can use this advantage.
Fire Support: This advantage can be used by units which employ close combat and some sort of range
weapons, the moment this unit is about to engage in a melee combat round if points have been spent the unit is
entering the melee using a free attack and damage rolls using its missile rating first and then resolving the melee
action.
Hit & Run: Hit and run is a guerrilla warfare tactic used by specific type of units and its very difficult to perform.
The unit makes a move in the Movement sequence performs a missile attack depending on the weapon it uses
and then must use any remainder movement points to fall back.
Fast Attack: Fast Attack is a basic attack action executed very swiftly. All Fast Attacks are resolved prior to
other actions in the round. If both sides use Fast Attack, then first Fast Attacks are resolved in initiative order and
then other actions are resolved as normal. Fast attacking units roll first battle and damage on their opponents
and then if their opponent survives it can retaliate. All units can try to fast attack.
Tactical Withdraw: A unit can perform a tactical withdrawal during Movement Step, if the commander has the
initiative there are no further effects; the unit has simply used the benefit of initiative to break off contact and
pull back a short distance from the enemy unit. Withdraw is allows backwards. Units withdrawing are doing so
with half move.

Movement/formation
Units can been assigned to either move or change their formation if able to do so, activated units can now
perform the move that is allowed to them or if designated by advantage can assume a special formation. If a unit
has been activated and designated to change formation this will happen before the unit moves and uses half of
the units move allowance. Units in formations can take only half a move.




Action Advantage point cost
Targeting 4
Ambush* 4
Charge* 4
Fire Support 4
Hit & Run* 4
Tactical Withdraw 4
Fast Attack* 6


7
III. The Combat Phase

Stationary range attacks
All units that are capable of a range attack and not assigned perform any moves are capable of taking the missile
attacks at this phase if an enemy unit is within range. The units roll five battle rolls with the proper modifiers for
range/cover etc. This is considered one attack. Stationary missile units can perform Targeting at half the cost.
Cavalry Charge
Units who are capable of performing a charge advantage action can do so now. Charging will make the unit move
double its base move speed. The Charge deal a battle roll in damage plus two damage rolls on the defender.

Magic and magical Attacks
Spells, monster magical abilities and unusual power are resolved at this step. Wizard's are treated as individuals
and are subject to skirmish rules. Wizards cast spells in battle in the same manner they cast at other occasions.
Range, number of targets and all factors are taken into account for resolution.
Combat (Melee/Missile)
When two or more unit come in the same hex during the movement phase their movement stops
and a melee starts, the units are locked in battle and cannot escape till it has been resolved. Missile
Units that have moved at this phase and have not come into melee can perform any of its missile
attacks with a -4 penalty to its battle rolls. Shooting missile attacks in a melee causes the damage to
be distributed evenly among friend or foe. Roll five battle rolls and calculate the results, this is considered one
attack. When 2 units are engaged in battle they occupy one hex and no more units can enter that hex, what can
be done though is that friendly units can occupy the surrounding hexes in order to provide bonus to
the units Battle roll and an extra Damage roll per skirmish round. The bonus is calculated depending
the number of units supporting. (1 unit +2 to battle roll, 2 units +4 to battle rolls, 3 units +6 to battle
rolls, 4 units +8 to battle rolls) Morale modifiers for outnumber do count.

IV. The Morale Phase
After attacks are resolved, every military unit can be subject to a morale check. During the morale phase each
unit rolls 2d10 and the result must be equal to or less than the morale of the unit for it to succeed the check. A
simple failure indicates that the unit is losing one step of morale. A morale check fail that exceeds the total
morale of a unit by 9 or more means the unit has surrendered.

Morale Changing Events
These events will cause a unit to roll morale to resist losing a step of morale. One success is required to resist
such a shift, Make a morale change check at the end of every mass combat round in which such situations have
occurred.
1. The leader takes a serious injury. (-2 Morale, roll at Morale Phase)
2. The leader dies. (-4 Morale, immediate roll to avoid two steps of morale loss)
3. Unit moves more than once consecutively using a forced move action. (Roll at Morale Phase)
4. 75% of the unit has fallen. (-4 Morale, immediate roll to avoid two steps of morale loss)
5. Over 50% of the unit is fell with one attack (-4 Morale, immediate roll to avoid two steps of morale loss)
6. The unit realizes it's outnumbered by 5:1 or worse. (-4 Morale, Immediate roll to avoid two steps of
morale loss)

Morale Modifiers
1. 25% of the unit has fallen. (-1 Morale)
2. 50% of the unit has fallen. (-2 Morale, roll at morale Phase)
3. The unit realizes it's outnumbered by 2:1 or worse. (-1 Morale, roll at morale Phase)
4. The unit is within 2 spaces of another friendly unit that has lost a step of morale. (-1 Morale, roll at
morale Phase)
5. Over 25% of the unit destroyed with one attack. (-2 Morale, roll at morale Phase)
6. Received a charge from a charging unit. (-2 Morale)

Fallback: If a fallback occurs a special combat is fought at the moment the fallback takes place. All enemy units
in battle with the retreating unit are allowed to make a normal attack against the retreating unit--but the
retreating unit cannot attack. Casualties and any required morale checks are resolved for the withdrawing unit
before it can perform the withdrawal movement. If the unit routs, then it performs rout movement instead of the
withdrawal that had been planned for it. Half move is allowed to withdraw.












8
Rout: A unit that becomes routed has only one real objective: to get to a place of safety as soon as possible.
Rout movement simulates the action of a unit whose morale has been shattered, and which is running away from
the battlefield in panic. A routed unit will normally try to avoid coming into contact with other units (enemy or
friendly), but will not stray too far from the most direct path possible between its present location and the place it
wants to get to (the edge of the tabletop). A routed unit that cannot an enemy unit is considered destroyed, and
should be removed from the field and placed with the other casualties. A routed unit that cannot complete its
movement because of battlefield terrain is also considered destroyed. A routed unit performs rout movement
each turn until it rallies or it leaves the battlefield. If the unit does not rally and is not destroyed by running into
an enemy unit or impassable terrain, then it is removed from play as it leaves the field. Treat a routing unit as a
falling back unit but add a +4 on the battle roll of attacking units and double the damage rolls (x2).
Table 1-3: Steps of Morale
CAUSES

Consequences
Results of a failed
Morale Check
Bonuses/Penalties
1. A good unit that has been
targeted by a rally check and
succeed two consecutive
morale rolls.
2. A good unit that roots or
destroys at least 2 different
enemy units.
F
a
n
a
t
i
c
a
l

1. Unit cannot be used to support,
must engage an enemy at fastest
speed.
2. Unit cannot be targeted by
formations unless it passes a morale
check.
3. Unit will not fortify.
4. Unit will not hit and run.
1. The unit becomes Good and
for the next round suffers -1
on all Battle rolls.
1. +2 Total Morale.
2. +1 on Battle and Damage
rolls.
3. 1/2 Cost to perform a
Charge attack.
1. A unit always start at good
order
2. A shaken unit that makes a
successful rally check regains
good order.
G
o
o
d

1. Has no restrictions penalties; can
function with no penalties due to
morale status.
1. The unit becomes shaken
and must fallback.
N/A
1. A unit in good order that
fails a morale check.
2. A routed unit that makes a
rally check.
3. A unit that performs a
charge and fails to deal
damage is automatically
shaken.
S
h
a
k
e
n

1. Cannot perform special
manoeuvres.
2. Cannot deliberately attack an
enemy
3.If not in battle it can take a rally
check or perform movement, not
both on the same round.

1. Unit must reroll morale and
rout immediately;
2. Inside a Keep the unit
remains shaken.
1. Unit has -1 Morale, -1 on
Battle and Damage rolls.

1. A good order unit that fails
a morale check by 7 or more
becomes routed.
2. A unit that has no room to
fallback becomes routed R
o
u
t
e
d

1. A routed unit that cannot fallback
is immediately to a adjacent
unoccupied space it is disbanded
2. May affect morale of friendly units
it nears.
3. Cannot attack, will not defend.
4. Must continue with rout
movement until it leaves the
battleground or leader makes a
successful rally check

N/A
1. Unit has -2 Morale, -2 on
Battle and Damage rolls.

V. LULL
Battles are long, tactical affairs in which soldiers jockey for position and engage in a wide range of activities.
Inevitably there are breaks in the action. During these periods a commander has several options to choose from.
A commander can engage in only one of the following actions per lull.

Aid Casualties: A military unit that has lost hits can receive medical care that temporarily returns to a level of
active duty. Returning wounded soldiers to combat requires a healing group or specialists. Success means the
military unit gains a lost hits for the duration of the battle.The commander who orders to aid the casualties can
do so only in a disengaged unit, the unit forfeits its next move option and focuses only on healing the wounded.
Treat this as a 2d6 hits healed from specialized help of 1d6 from soldiers helping fallen comrades.
Retreat: A retreat is an attempt to break contact with the enemy and leave the current province. Retreat
requires that a commander disengage from a battle, which can be a very tricky proposition. A commander can
order some of his troops to stay behind and act as a rear guard, effectively sacrificing them to save the
remainder of the troops (and their leader.)
Withdraw: A withdrawal is a strategic maneuver in which the commander breaks combat with an opponent in
order to return to defensive positions, evade contact or otherwise prolong the period of conflict. Unlike a retreat,
units that withdraw remain in the province. Successfully withdrawing from combat ends the current conflict.
Hostilities are resumed in the next war move.



9
Units by cultural/race
All units must select one of the following basic unit types to represent their basic weapon and formation training:

Archer (Achr): Archers include bowmen, crossbowmen, slingers, and other units whose
principle training is in coordinated missile attack. Archer units are carefully trained to focus
their fire as directed by officers on vital points in advancing lines or to evenly distribute fire
throughout the enemy ranks. Archers are generally equipped with light armor and a simple
melee weapon in addition to their missile weapon. Archer units are most effective if they
are mobile enough to flank and evade slower, more heavily armed units.
Special : +3 for stationary targets; -3 for targets moving at a rate of up to 12; -6 for targets moving at a rate
greater than 12; +4 for the second and subsequent shots at a stationary target; +2 for targets whose largest
dimension is greater than 30';+4 for targets whose largest dimension is greater than 90';+6 for targets whose
largest dimension is greater than 270'. -2 for targets at medium range; -5 for targets at long range.

Artillerist (Art): Artillerist units consist of soldiers trained in the use of heavy missile devices and in the
construction and use of siege equipment. Artillerists are commonly armed with arbalests, ballista, light catapults,
and other slow, cumbersome, but powerful missile artillery weapons. Artillery soldiers are specialists in the use of
artillery weapons; they generally wear little armor and are relatively unskilled in hand-to-hand combat. Artillerists
are most useful when the can be protected from direct engagement with the enemy by other units, terrain, or
prepared fortifications. Artillerists carry equipment including tools, and the soldiers are trained in the
construction of heavy siege equipment, including catapults, mangonels, covered rams, scaling ladders, and siege
towers. A unit of artillerist provides significant
advantages to an army attempting to take a
fortification by siege or storm. When attacking with
their missile rating, artillerist units have increased
range and can ignore any defensive bonus their target
would normally receive from fortification or defensive
terrain.
Special : Ignore any terrain/fortifications defence
bonuses to their target. Artillerists can perform
targeting. Bombards, catapults, and trebuchets and
ballistas fire their projectiles in a high arch: thev are inaccurate and cannot really be aimed at anything; the crew
simply points the engine in the target's general direction and hopes the missile will land somewhere nearby. The
attack roll is modified as follows: +3 for stationary targets; -3 for targets moving at a rate greater or less than
12; -6 for targets moving at a rate of 12 or greaterl; +4 for the second and subsequent shots at a stationary
target; +2 for targets whose largest dimension is greater than 30';+4 for targets whose largest dimension is
greater than 90';+6 for targets whose largest dimension is greater than 270'.
War Machine Indirect Fire
Assuming the artillery unit is aiming at the yellow marked square and concerning the
skill of the main engineer coordinating the fire the rookie artillerist group while aiming
would roll 1d12 to determine the actual place the fire lands . A more coordinated
group will be lowering the chances of a miss during battle.
Artillery can shoot at an arc while aiming but that if not totally aligned with their target will
be done with a total of -2 to their battle roll. Only direct fire artillery can change facing.
Artillery units can employ several type of bombardment weapons but the type of weapon
determines and the units rate of fire and mobility.

Cavalry (Cav): Cavalry units include any unit primarily composed of swift animals and their riders. Calvary units
can charge their opponents to inflict heavy initial damage. A well-timed cavalry charge can smash almost any
defense. When charging, cavalry units receive a +2 bonus to their melee attack. Light cavalrymen wear medium
armor and generally fight with spear, crossbow or shortbow, and sword. Heavy cavalry units wear heavy armor
and generally fight with a lance or with a medium martial weapon and shield.
Special :Cavarly can perform Charge as per the advantage. Cavalry units gain a +2 attack bonus when charging.
Cavalry units can assume formations. Cavalry units can Raid.



1 2 3 4
5 6 7 8
9 10 11 12





10
Infantry (Inf): Infantry units consist of well-trained, well-equipped foot soldiers. They attack in formation to
maximize their offensive potential and defensive
capability. Infantry formations are particularly
effective in hand-to-hand battle against ill-
trained troops or troops poorly equipped for
close quarters battle. Infantry units are generally
equipped with medium or heavy armor and are
armed with martial weapons.
Special : Infantry units gain a +1 melee attack
bonus against irregulars and pikes. Infrantry
units can assume formations.

Irregular (Irr): Irregulars include volunteers,
conscripts, skirmishers, barbarians, marauders,
and other soldiers that, regardless of individual
skill, lack the cohesive unit training and discipline
associated with a regular military unit.
Special : Irregular units can be
drafted/conscripted. Irregulars can perform raid,
ambush, hit and run.

Pikemen (Pike): Pikemen consist of highly trained footman who are equipped with long weapons (such as
pikes or spears) and trained to operate in dense formations. Front rank pikemen wield large martial weapons
with reach (such as long spears) and a simple weapon (often a short sword) for close range battle. Pikemen
often wear light or medium armor.
Special : Hits inflicted by Pike units do damage during the "charge" phase of tactical battle during the first round
of an engagement. This attack inflicts double damage against charging units. Pike units gain a +2 attack bonus
against mounted units. Can assume formations.

Special training
Some military units are provided with specialized or advanced training in one or more areas. Green units may not
take advanced training. Veteran units may have a single area of special training. Elite units may have two areas
of special training.
Advanced training (Melee+, Missile+, AC+, Mrl+): Units with advanced training gain a +2 bonus to melee,
missile, AC, or morale ratings due to their special training. Unit modifier: +2 to selected rating, +1 GB muster
cost.
Berserk: Berserk units fight with total abandon and disregard for themselves and others. Only Rjurik, Vos, and
goblinoid units regularly train Berserks. Unit modifier: +2 melee, +2 morale, +1 GB muster cost.
Special: +2 attack bonus to melee when charging (mounted or afoot).
Magical support: The soldiers have been trained to coordinate their activities with the aid of battle magic, and the
unit contains a battle spell wagon with necessary ritual components. This special does not include the costs of
arranging for a spell caster to man the spell wagon. Unit modifier: +1 GB muster cost.
Special: An appropriate trained spell caster can cast battle magic to support the unit .
Marine: Marine units are seasoned in ship-to-ship combat. Only, human units may take marine training. Unit
modifier: +1 GB muster cost. Special: +2 to melee and AC at sea, move freely through swamp terrain.
Scout: Units with scout training are trained in quickly traverse hostile territory and returning with military
intelligence. Scouts are well-versed in stealth and wilderness lore, thus they are often able to move rapidly, even
through difficult terrain. Scouts identify hostile units in adjacent provinces and or during Battle. Can Raid,
Ambush at no cost.
Scout units are relatively small and thus have reduced melee and hits ratings. Scout unit combat training focuses
on the use of missile weapons, stealth, and mobility. Unit modifier: -2 melee, +2 missile, -1 hit, +1 move, +1 GB
muster cost. Special: Foot units in light or no armor may move freely through any terrain.
Toughness: Members of the unit are trained rigorously to increase their endurance and morale. Unit modifier:
+1 HD, +2 morale, +1 GB muster cost.
Siegemasters: Siegemasters are trained and equipped to besiege fortifications. Siegemasters gain +2 to Battle
Attack rolls to attacks made using war machines and narrow the scatter dice to d8. Siegemasters also reduce the
time needed to destroy fortifications by 1/4.
Unit Cost: +4 GB Muster Cost


11
Archery from Horseback. Archers on horseback are very effective against foot troops without missile weapons.
(If the character on foot has a weapon to reply to the horse archer's fire, it's a different story.) Weapons suitable
for use while mounted include short bows, composite short bows, hand crossbows, light crossbows, and size S
firearms. If the archer remains still (takes a no-move action), his rate of fire and range modifiers are unaffected
by his mount. If he rides a half-move his rate of fire is reduced by one category and he suffers a -2 penalty to
his attack rolls. If his mount takes a full move, his rate of fire is reduced as above, and h suffers a -4 penalty
to his attack rolls. These penalties can be reduced by expertise in mounted archery; refer to Chapter Four for
more information. The best way to exploit the archer's mobility is to gallop in for a round of fire and tt en retreat
when the foot troops try to respond. This tac:ical system was one of the most successful ever dev sed, and for a
time rendered infantry nearly obsolete. Unit modifier: +1 GB muster cost.

Formations
Units must be specificaly trained in a formation in order to employ it.
Shield formation:Units with shield formation are trained to use overhead shield walls to blunt the impact of
offensive missile. All members of the shield wall and any allies behind it are considered to be behind 50% cover
(-4 AC bonus) versus missile fire. Shield walls block lines of fire indoors or underground. Since the members of
the wall are in close order, shield walls allow them to concentrate their fighting power. They are also good for
controling enemy movement, especially in narrow areas such as dungeon corridors. Because the shields overlap,
all members of the wall gain a -1 AC bonus vs all other forms of attack.
Creatures forming a shield wall must be of the same size or the wall wont work. A shield wall can only take
half-move without breaking apart ,.
Unit modifier: +1 GB muster cost. Foot units only. movement when shield wall is formed.
Spear Hedge Formation.Units with
Large Pikes or Spears can have Pike
Wall formation training. Large pikes
are equipped and used in a deadly
way during battle. Pike Wall formation
deals four times damage to any sort
of charging unit and deals double
damage at normal melee units during
the first round of engagement. Pike
Wall damage is resolved during the
"Charge" damage phase. Unit
modifier: +1 GB muster cost
Special: movement when Spear
Hedge is formed.
Wedge Formation.Wedge
formation can be employed by all
units trained at it. Only Cavalry units
can perform a wedge in order to
lessen the impact of the first charge and squeeze in the pike lines. Unit modifier: +1 GB muster cost
Special: Unit negates the damage bonus of pikes vs charges. Reduces by half the initial damage the unit receives.
Units assuming Wedge formation cannot change heading.
Skirmish Formation: Skirmish formation is not an actual formation but rather a state at which non regular
army or trained warriors would opt during a large scale battle. Skirmish as an option for regular troops is used in
order to avoid ranged missile attacks and gain mobility during a fight. All Irregular, Levy, Scout, Elven, Goblin,
Gnoll, Orog and Monster units are considered to be in skirmish formation at the start of any battle unless
otherwise noted.
Special: Skirmishers can move up to their move allowance more during a battle turn. Skirmish formation
grants -2 AC bonus vs all range attacks and -1 AC vs cavalry attacks. In order to assume skirmish formation
tactical units need a Morale Check.




12
Combat resolution
What happens when 20 of the King's Guard fight over 30 Brigands or Bandits? It is easy to determine what
happens for the PC but what takes place all around them? What is the fate of NPCs involved or what happens
during the short fight for the participants on both sides? Do the brigands overwhelm the guards? What are the
results of this fight? The following skirmish system is set to determine such small-scale battles or it is used when
2 units in a large scale battle are locked in melee combat. First is needed to determine the statistics of the
combatants involved. If 100 soldiers are fighting 50 goblins and 20 orogs, statistics must be generated for all the
participants.

The total number of Hit Dice for the groups is treated as their Hit Points for the skirmish. 100 soldiers of
1 HD are treated as 100 HP in total, 20 orogs of 4 HD are treated as 80 HP.
Figure the Battle Roll needed to hit the target of each group. The Soldiers having an overall of 20 Thaco
hit the AC 10 Orogs over 10, each roll over 10 on the d20 roll is treated as a hit. The 17 Thaco Orogs hit
the AC 10 Soldiers over 7, each roll on the d20 over 7 is treated as a hit.
Double the base damage if the creatures are capable of dealing more than 12.

Each combat round roll for damage on all opposed group. The winning group modifies its damage by the
difference of the die rolled. e.g The humans roll 1d8 and roll 7 and the Orogs roll 1d8 and roll 3, the damage of
the humans is modified by +4 for this combat round. There are some modifiers involved:

+1 bonus per two levels of magic used on the battle ground.
+1 bonus per major NPC or PC involved in the unit.
+2 bonus if the group surprises the opponents.
-1 penalty if the enemy has the terrain advantage
Numerical advantage (2vs1 +2 on rolls, 3vs1 +4 on rolls, 4vs1 +6 on rolls, 5+vs1 +8 on rolls.
Determine the Defense rating of each unit, Leather units are considered to have DR of 2, Mail units are
considered to have DR of 3 and Plated Units are considered to have DR of 5. When hits are determined
reduce the hits depending on the units DR. Thus if the Orogs mentioned above rolled a 7 on the d8 roll
they are dealing 5 hits on the soldiers who are padded geared to reduce this damage by 2 points dealing
5 hits of damage.

When a group loses half its starting hit dice its die value drops to 1d6 for resolution. When a group reaches one
quarter of its starting hit die it's resolution die is reduced to 1d4. Attrition will take its toll in morale sooner or
later. If an army wins too consecutive resolution rolls the army gains a momentum and the opposing forces
begin to demoralize. On the next roll the winning army gains +1 bonus, and +1 for any subsequent rounds he
retains momentum to his resolution roll .
Following are tables that randomly determine the roll of a PC or NPC in the field of a large skirmish battle.
Consult the following tables to determine the outcome and involvement of characters or role play the events
taking place during the fight.

Level of engagement modifiers
Disengaged: If you remain disengaged during a skirmish battle you can opt to avoid any Critical Random event
that you roll on table 1. Pc takes 1d3 HP and 1d6 FP per round. Leather modifies by -1 HP, Mail armour Modifies
by -3HP damage but increases by 1D fatigue loss d6d8, Plate modifies by -5HP loses but increases by 2D
fatigue loss d6d10.
Engaged: If you remain engaged during a skirmish
battle you roll normally on your Critical Event table 1.
Pc takes 1d6 HP and 1d8 FP per round. Leather
modifies by -1 HP, Mail armour Modifies by -3HP
damage but increases by 1D fatigue loss d6d8, Plate
modifies by -5HP loses but increases by 2D fatigue
loss d6d10.
Heavily Engaged: If you remain heavily engaged
during a skirmish battle when you roll for the Critical
Random Event you subtract 2 if you roll from 6-10 or
you add 2 if you roll from 11-16. Pc takes 1d8 HP and
1d10 FP per round. Leather modifies by -1 HP, Mail
armour Modifies by -3HP damage but increases by 1D
fatigue loss d6d8, Plate modifies by -5HP loses but increases by 2D fatigue loss d6d10.


13
Combat Random Events
If an NPC randomly decide his fate if a PC you must play out this dramatic situation
Table 1-4: Roll d20 to determine the results
Roll Results
1-4 Critical Event Table 1-5
5-15 No Random Events
16-19 Heroic Event Table 1-6
20 Reroll Twice*
*If you get a heroic or critical random event from the first roll you dont roll a second time.

Table 1-5: Roll d20 to determine the results
Roll Result
1-4 Knockdown-out
5-7 Battlefield event
8-10 Weapon Trouble
11-13 Close Quarters
14-16 Break the Line
17-19 Save a wounded comrade
20 Few against Many

Knockdown/Knockout
The character is struck from overrun beasts or enemy warriors. The character is struck down or out 85% chance
for down and 15% chance for out. If down the character does not contribute to the unit the next round. If the
character is struck unconscious he will stay down for 1d3 Battle Rounds. (15xp)

Battlefield event
Something in or around the battlefield gets affected by the combat fray. If the fight occurs indoors, it might be a
piece of furniture, a window, or a keg of ale. The damage on the area affects the character directly and it is up to
the DM to determine the cause. (Tree braches, artillery attacks, deadfalls, fire exposed areas etc) Roll 1d6 to
determine the effect. (15xp)
1-3: Character gets damaged from the debris taking 1d4 damage
4-5: The character takes 2d4 damage from the area affected
6: The character gets a moderate (2d4) critical hit area effect, save vs reflex to avoid, from the effect

Weapon Trouble
The combatant experiences difficulty with his weapon. Roll 1d6: (15xp)
1-3: Combatant disarmed. In the fray the character cannot retrieve his weapon.
4-5: Hard parry may break weapon. Roll a successful item saving throw vs.
crushing blow to avoid.
6 : If the character killed an opponent last round, his weapon is stuck in the
foe's body. Take a round to pull it out.

Close Quarters
Two or more enemies threaten the character and thus find themselves inside one another's reach and are
effectively locked in close combat. Roll 1d6: (35xp)
1-2: One opponent of -2 HD of the character (min 1 HD, 5 HP)
3: Two opponents of -2 HD of the character (min 1 HD, 5 HP)
4: Three opponents, two of them are -2 HD and one is at -1 HD.
5: Sergeant of the enemy troops with equal HD of the character
6: Lieutenant of the Enemy Troops, if not designated or a noted NPC he is at least +1 HD of the character.

Break the Lines


You receive the command to charge the enemys front line! The character must face 1d4+1 opponents to
successfully attack the front line. The character is immediately moved to the Heavily Engaged level. During the
next Battle Turn, reduce the characters Critical event roll by 2, but add 2 to his commanders Battle Roll. (35xp)




14
Save a wounded comrade
In the midst of battle, you notice an ally has fallen! You have the opportunity to save him.
While saving his comrade, the character cannot undergo any other Heroic Opportunities until the ally is on safe
ground. Each Battle Turn, the character faces two or three opponents. If the character successfully defends the
fallen comrade, he can roll for leadership if he has the skill each round he defends the fallen comrade. He can
raise his skill only once though. He also grants a +2 Morale modifier to his unit. (50xp)

Few against Many


The character is caught in the middle of the an enemy detachment. The enemy flag carrier, lieutenant and
entourage are all around him. Roll 1d20 for NPC, Treat this even as a melee for Pc's (100xp)
1-9: Character is put down rendered unconscious or surrenders (50%) for either
10-14: The character is severely wounded and left down to die. Will die in 1d6 Battle Rounds.
15-17: The character sustains a critical hit (2d6) severity save vs fort and left to die
18-19: The character is killed outright
20: The character makes a break for it and runs, turning the tables on his opponents, taking courage his
comrades rally to help (+4) on next round battle rolls. A melee against 1d4+2 opponents If the characters ally
survives, the character can roll for Leadership, if he has the skill he can freely raise it by one rank, if not he may
be awarded with a henchman, GMs discretion.

Table 1-6: Roll d20 to determine the results


Roll Result
1-4 Lucky Break
5-7 Lucky Opening
8-10 Hold this Ground
11-13 Heal and Help
14-16 Regroup
17-19 Pick Up the Banner
20 Overwelm
Lucky Break
The combatant is favoured by fate and gains a +3 bonus to his next critical event table roll and -1 per die of
battle damage.

Lucky Open
The combatant sees his chance and takes it on the battlefield, he rallies troops near and guides them to the
enemy flanks,. he contributes a +2 bonus to the battle roll of his unit for the next battle round but he is
considered Heavily Engaged.

Hold this Ground


The combatant is holding fast his ground against all enemies who are coming towards him and he is standing on
top a field of dead bodies. The character must fight 1d4+2 opponents to resolve this event. The character
inspires all around him granting them a +2 Morale bonus for the next combat round a +2 bonus to the battle roll
but he gets a -2 on his Critical event roll table and will be considered Heavily engaged for the next round. (Grants
a Skill Roll on the battlefield roll to raise Leadership by 1 point if the character already has the skill).

Heal and help
The combatant stops and aids a fallen or injured comrade. If the character has any appropriate healing skills or
special powers he may even save the life of someone who is dying at the same time, the character is urging
more people to help around wounded comrades thus narrowing the casualty rate of his army at the end of the
battle at the end of the battle. Although totally distracted from the battle he penalizes his army with a -1 on their
battle roll. (Grants a Skill Roll on the battlefield to raise Healing if the character already has the skill, grants a
Skill Roll on the battlefield roll to raise Leadership by 1 point if the character already has the skill).

Regroup
The combatant manages to regroup his troops around him, with a successful morale roll the warriors are now
ready to re-enter the fight with more discipline and order, the event adds a 1d4 die to the next damage roll.
(Grants a Skill Roll on the battlefield roll to raise Leadership by 1 point if the character already has the skill).




15
Pick up the banner
You see the banner carrier fall to arrows. You have the opportunity to carry the armys banner, boosting your
armys morale. However, the banner carrier is a choice target for enemy soldiers. The character that accepts the
burden of the armys banner will be attacked by many enemy soldiers and archers every Battle Turn until he
abandons the banner. During every Battle Turn the character holds the banner, his general gains a +3 bonus to
his Battle Roll and the character can roll every turn he holds the banner for leadership, If he succeeds he can
raise his skill by 1 point.)

Overwhelm
You and the troops in your unit see an enemy commander in the midst of battle with no guardians, separated in
the chaos of battle. Though it may not be the most honourable thing to do, overwhelming him might give your
army a deciding advantage. The character and any others in his unit may decide to attack the enemy unit
commander (3HD at least). If this Opportunity is successful, the opposing unit suffers a 5 penalty to his next
Battle Roll. (Grants a Skill Roll on the battlefield roll to raise Leadership by 1 point if the character already has
the skill).

Unit Types per culture

Typical Anuirean units
Anuirean (An): Anuirean military forces are highly disciplined and form the standard from which the military
units of other nations are judged. Anuirean forces generally fight in tight formations and have excellent
leadership. Anuirean units consist almost exclusively of well-trained, heavily armored soldiers. The Anuireans are
famed primarily for the might of its cavalry, the skill of its officers, and the awesome size of its armies.
Type Thaco
Hit
Die
AC DR
Damage
Melee
Damage
Missile
ML Move Number HITS
Infantry, light 20 1/2 10 2 1d6 12 12 200 100
Infantry, Heavy 19 1 10 4 1d8 13 12 100 100
Archers 20 1/2 10 1 1d4 * 12 12 150 75
Cavalry 20 2 9 3 1d8 13 24/48* 75 150
Irregulars 20 1/2 9 1 1d6 1d4 10 12 150 75
Scouts 20 1 8 1 1d6 1d4 12 24 35 35
Knights 18 3 10 5 1d10 14 24/48* 50 150
Artillery 19 1 10 1 Varies 12 3/6 25 25
Levies 20 1/2 10 0 1d6 9 12 200-400 100-200
Pikemen 20 1/2 10 2 1d6 12 12 150 75

Typical Rjuven units
Rjurik (Rj): Rjurik forces are undisciplined but eager to do battle. Bands of unschooled Rjurik tribesmen can
form infantry and cavalry forces comparable to any in Cerilia. In their homelands, Rjurik forces are particularly
fierce, for the support of the druids provides them with nature, itself, as an ally. The Rjurik cannot field pikemen,
artillerists, or heavily armored cavalry. Rjurik commoners are largely skilled woodsmen. Rjuven archers are
longbowmen.
Type Thaco
Hit
Die
AC DR
Damage
Melee
Damage
Missile
ML Move Number HITS
Infantry 20 1/2 10 2 1d6 12 12 200 100
Battleragers 18 3 10 0 1d10 14 12 50 150
Cavalry 20 2 9 2 1d8 12 24/48 75 150
Housecarls 19 2 10 4 1d8 13 12 100 200
Irregulars 20 1/2 9 1 1d6 1d4 10 12 150 75
Tribesmen 20 1 10 1 1d6 10 12 100-200 100-200
Scouts 19 1 8 0 1d6 1d4 12 12 35 35
Archers* 20 1/2 10 1 1d6 * 12 12 150 75




16
Typical Brecht units
Brecht (Br): The Brecht culture has a high regard for individual fighting prowess. Its hot-tempered warriors
have little interest in training or fighting in formation. Once a Brecht unit is engaged, the melee often devolves
into hundreds of individual duals. Characteristically, heavy armor is scorned by most Brecht warriors in favor of
higher personal mobility. Brecht do not field Pikemen. Brecth lords never field Levies due to the political status in
Brechtur. Brechts field Marines almost 100% in naval battles.
Type Thaco Hit Die AC DR
Damage
Melee
Damage
Missile
ML Move Number HITS
Archers 20 1/2 10 1 1d4 * 12 12 150 75
Light, Infrantry 20 1/2 10 1 1d6 12 12 200 100
Elite, Infantry 19 1 10 5 1d8 14 12 150 150
Irregulars 20 1/2 9 1 1d6 1d4 10 12 150 75
Scouts 20 1 8 0 1d6 1d4 12 12 35 35
Cavalry 20 2 8 1 1d8 12 24/48 75 150
Artillery 18 1 10 1 Varies 12 3/6 25 25
Marines 19 1 7 1 1d6 1d4 13 12 50 50

Typical Khinasi units
Khinasi (Kh): The lightly armored, swift cavalry strikes of the Khinasi are widely respected throughout Cerilia.
Due to the heat of the native terrain, Khinasi military units wear little or no armor, depending on speed, instead
depending on mobility to defend them from reprisal following a strike. The Khinasi do not field pikemen.
Type Thaco
Hit
Die
AC DR
Damage
Melee
Damage
Missile
ML Move Number HITS
Archers 20 1/2 10 1 1d4 * 10 12 150 75
Spearmen 20 1/2 10 1 1d6 1d4 12 12 150 75
Infantry, Light 20 1/2 10 2 1d6 12 12 200 100
Infantry , Mamluk 18 1 8 2 1d8 14 12 100 100
Cavalry, Light 19 2 8 1 1d6 1d6 12 24/48 75 150
Cavalry, Medium 19 2 10 3 1d8 14 24/48 50 100
Scouts 20 1 8 1 1d6 1d4 12 12 35 35
Irregulars 20 1/2 9 1 1d6 1d4 10 12 150 75
Artillerists 19 1 10 1 Varies 12 3/6 25 25


Typical Vos units
Vos (Vo): In the wastes, every man must be a warrior. Vos warriors are highly skilled, ruthless, and seemingly
without fear on the battlefield. Armored in heavy hide and fur and wielding spears, swords, and other massive
weapons, the unorganized Vos hordes are easily able to match units of professional soldiers. The primary
weakness of the Vos is their lack of organization, their superstitious beliefs, and their tendency to fight among
themselves. The Vos cannot field Artillerist units. Special: All Vos units take toughness training.
Type Thaco
Hit
Die
AC DR
Damage
Melee
Damage
Missile
ML Move Number HITS
Archers 20 1/2 10 1 1d6 * 10 12 150 75
Irregulars 20 1/2 8 0 1d6 1d4 10 12 150 75
Cavalry, Light 19 2 8 0 1d6 1d4 12 24/48 75 150
Berserkers 17 3 10 0 1d10 - 12 50 150
Scouts 20 1 9 0 1d6 1d6 12 12 35 35
Light, Infantry 20 1/2 10 1 1d6 12 12 200 100
Heavy ,Infantry 18 1 10 3 1d8 12 12 100 100
Varsk Riders 19 3 10 2 1d8 14 12/24/48 50 150







17
Dwarf (Dw): Dwarven units are always well-trained and well equipped. Their highly organized formations are
nearly impossible to penetrate. The slow but inexorable dwarven units are prized as mercenaries. Cerilian
dwarves do not field Cavalry and cannot take Marine training.
Special: All dwarven units take advanced training in defense. Dwarven units move through mountain terrain
freely. +2 to morale saves involving magical attacks.
Type Thaco
Hit
Die
AC DR
Damage
Melee
Damage
Missile
ML Move Number HITS
Guards 19 2 10 5 1d8 14 6 100 200
Crossbow 19 2 10 3 1d8

*
12 6 75 150

Elf (Elf): Elves are superior archers, and their cavalry are the swiftest and most dangerous in all Cerilia. Elves
serve non-elven leaders in only the most unusual circumstances and are never available as mercenaries. All elven
must take Scout special training. Due to their long life spans, most elven units consist of veteran warriors. Elves
do not field units of levies, pikemen, or artillerists. Elven units do not normally use heavy armor.
Special: All elven units take scout training. Elven units have no limit on the number of special training options
that they may take.
Type Thaco
Hit
Die
AC DR
Damage
Melee
Damage
Missile
ML Move Number HITS
Archers 19 2 6 1 1d6 * 13 12 75 75
Cavalry 19 2 5 5 1d8 1d6 14 24/48 50 100

Gnoll (Gn): Bands of fierce, but ill-equipped, gnolls are always ready to fight for gold and loot. Due to their
fierceness, Gnoll units are usually veteran units. Gnolls prefer use light armor. Characteristically, gnoll units
muster quickly, demand the right to pillage, and have relatively low morale; thus they are treated as
mercenaries. Gnoll units may only be Irregulars or Infantry.
Special: +2 morale in home terrain. All gnoll units are mercenaries.
Type Thaco
Hit
Die
AC DR
Damage
Melee
Damage
Missile
ML Move Number HITS
Infantry 18 2 9 2 1d8 12 12 100 200
Marauders 18 2 10 3 1d6 1d4 12 12 75 150

Goblin (Go): Although goblin units are usually undisciplined and poorly equipped, they compensate with sheer
numbers and bloodlust. Goblin cavalry forces are generally mounted on wolves or other dangerous beasts. Tribal
goblin units are often available as mercenaries (or feared as marauders) in any area bordering goblin lands.
Characteristically, tribal goblin units muster quickly, demand the right to pillage, and have relatively low morale;
thus they are treated as mercenaries. Due to their lack of organized training, such units are often Green troops.
It should be noted, however, that goblin realms often have disciplined and skilled armies that rival those of any
human nation. Special : Tribal goblin units are mercenaries. Tribal goblins do not pay any increased
muster/maintenance cost for being mercenaries.
Type Thaco
Hit
Die
AC DR
Damage
Melee
Damage
Missile
ML Move Number HITS
Infantry 20 10 0 1d6 9 12 200 100
Wolfriders 19 1 9 1 1d6 12 12/24 75 75
Archers 20 10 0 1d4 * 9 12 100 50

Orog (Or): Both fierce and well-disciplined, Orogs are fearsome opponents. Orogs only field heavily armored,
veteran units. Orog cavalry are generally mounted on giant lizards.
Special: Orogs units always take toughness training.
Type Thaco
Hit
Die
AC DR
Damage
Melee
Damage
Missile
ML Move Number HITS
Pikemen 18 3 10 4 1d8 12 12 50 150
Warband 18 3 10 5 1d8 12 12 75 215



18
Chapter 2: Siege Warfare

The Approach of a Castle
The area around a castle usually provides clear lines of fire out to the maximum range of the castle's defensive
weapons. For example, a castle equipped with light ballistae offers a clear line of fire out to 360 yards. The
encounter range is always the same as the maximum missile range. Footing around a castle varies with the
terrain. A castle built on a plain has good footing. Mountain castles are surrounded by rocky slopes (2/3 or 1/3
movement when going uphill), forest castles tend to be surrounded by masses of stumps where trees have
been cut to provide clear lines of fire (1/3 movement). Cover is generally not available to creatures attacking a
castle once they enter maximum missile range, regardless of the quality of the footing. A castle's walls present an
obvious obstacle to attackers . In addition, castles often are surrounded by ditches or moats, usually from 10 to
20 feet deep.

Walls
One way to capture a castle or fortress is to climb the walls and overpower the defenders inside. This sort of
undertaking is very dangerous, but its simplicity and speed makes it an obvious choice for small bands of heroes.
There are four basic types of castle walls in the AD&D game:
Wooden Palisades: These walls usually are made from sharpened logs about six inches thick. They typically are
10 to 15 feet tall. Defenders cannot fight from atop a palisade unless it is provided with a catwalk or hoardings
(see below).
Stone: These walls are made of a single layer of stone or brick and are otherwise similar to palisades.
Curtain Walls: These walls are built of two layers of dressed stone with dirt and rubble packed in between.
Curtain walls generally are thick enough to provide a fighting platform and are usually battlemented (see below)
to provide extra cover. Curtain walls are usually 30 to 60 feet high and can be from 10 to 30 feet thick.
Ramparts: These walls are mounds of dirt, usually carefully packed and braced. Unlike the other three types of
walls, which are vertical, a rampart slopes upward at a steep angle. Defenders can fight from atop a rampart, but
a stone wall, palisade, or catwalk often is added at the top to provide extra cover. Ramparts are usually 20 to 40
feet high and 40 to 80 feet thick.

Wall Defenses
A simple wall offers no cover to characters
standing on it. Castle designers, however,
had
several ways to rectify the problem:
Battlement: This is a barrier about six feet
high with alternating solid parts (merlons)
and openings (embrasures). A battlement
gives Man sized creatures standing behind it
50% cover while actively defending the wall
against attacks coming from below the
battlement. The best cover an active
defender can claim from attacks coming from
the battlement's level or higher (for example,
from attackers atop a siege tower) is 25%. A
wall less than 10 feet thick requires a catwalk
to make a battlement useful.
Catwalk: This is a narrow ledge that allows defenders to hide behind the wall. It grants 25% cover against
attacks coming from below.
Embrasure Shutter: These heavy wooden shutters can be added to a battlement to increases the cover value
to 75% against all attacks.
Hoarding: This wooden construction is similar to a catwalk, but it is built on the outside of the wall. It gives
90% cover to creatures attacking opponents at the base of the wall, an d 75% cover otherwise. A hoarding made
of stone is called a machicolation.
Splay: This is an angled area at the base of a wall. It helps support the wall, and makes it difficult for siege
engines to attack the wall directly. If the defenders drop rocks from atop a wall fitted with a splay, the weapons
scatter if they miss. Use the bombardment engine scatter diagram, but treat a roll of 5, 6, or 7 as a roll of 2. The
rock bounces one square in the indicated direction.



19
Scaling Walls
It is possible for most characters to climb a castle's walls. See the Player's Handbook Chapter 14, for basic
climbing rules. Treat palisades as rough surfaces, stone and curtain walls as very smooth surfaces, and ramparts
as sloping walls (see PHB, Table 27). Note that climbing movement is measured in feet per round. Characters
scaling a wall suffer a number of restrictions and penalties:
A climber loses all Armor Class bonuses from a shield and Dexterity;
A climber suffers a -2 penalty to attack, damage, and saving throw rolls;
Attacks directed at a climber from the ground gain the standard +2 bonus for rear attacks. Attacks
directed at a climber from atop the wall gain the standard +1 bonus for an attacker on higher ground;
A climber struck for any amount of damage must succeed with an immediate climbing check or fall to the
ground. If an attack also causes a knockdown chance or a forced retreat, the climber must make a
successful saving throw roll vs. death or fall to the ground;
A climber cannot employ a twohanded weapon.

Ladders
This is the best way for an unskilled climber to get up a wall. Carrying a ladder requires two Man-sized creatures
per 10 feet of length. The carriers move as though heavily encumbered. A ladder can be put in position against a
wall in the End of Round step of any round when it is carried to the base of the wall. A ladder must be at least as
long as the wall is tall, plus five feet. A character can climb four feet of ladder per movement point each round.
Defenders atop a wall can use an attack to push a ladder away. If the ladder is not braced or loaded with
climbers, the attempt always succeeds. Otherwise, the ladder falls if the defender makes a successful open doors
roll. Trying to push a ladder away provokes attacks of opportunity if the defender is threatened.
When a climber reaches the top of a wall, he can step onto the wall during the round's resolution phase if there
is an empty square in front of him (this could provoke an attack of opportunity). If there is no empty square, the
climber must slay a defender or force a retreat and create an empty square before stepping from the ladder

Grappling Hooks.
To set a grappling hook, the wielder makes an attack roll vs. Armor Class 5, adjusted for range. It takes a full
round to hurl the hook and set it firmly or to recover the grapple after a miss. A character climbing by means of a
rope an d grapple moves at the rope and wall rate and receives a bonus to his climbing chance (see
PHB , Chapter 14). A defender can cut the rope attached to a grapple by attacking it with a slashing weapon. The
rope has an Armor Class of 5 and 5 hit points. A length of light chain can be attached to the grapple to make
cutting more difficult. A chain reduces the grapple's maximum range in half. The chain has an Armor Class of 0
and 20 hit points.

Sieges and War Machines
Sieges are ponderous affairs that involve a lot of waiting and general inactivity. The attacker's main goal is to
batter down the defending walls so they can launch an escalade or to drive the defender out through starvation
or thirst. The following system allows you to simulate the effects of an extended siege, handling months of
operations with a single die roll.
Attacker: The type of engine
attacking the wall. This assumes one
engine attacking each 30' section of
wall.
Defending Wall Type: This refers
to the wall types described in the
Escalades section. Curtain walls are
treated as hard or soft stone,
depending on the materials used to
construct them. Ramparts are treated
as earth. Palisades are treated as
thick wood. Normal buildings,
mantles, and abatises are treated as
thin wood. Note that ramparts are
difficult to batter down but fairly easy
to climb.




20
Table 2-1 Siege Machines
Attacker Siege
Weapon
Defending Wall Type
Hard Stone Soft Stone Rampart Thin Wood Thick Wood
Ballista Medium 3/Month 10/Day 5/Day
Ballista Heavy 3/Month 4/Month 11/Day 6/Day
Catapult, Light 2/Month 6/Month 4/ 3 Months 20/Day 13/Day
Catapult, Medium 3/Month 7/Month 5/Month 20/Immediate 14/Day
Catapult Heavy 4/Month 6/Month 6/ 3 Months 20/Immediate 15/Day
Trebuchet 5/Month 9/Month 7/ 3 Months 20/Immediate 16/Day
Ram, Simple 20/Hour 20/Day
Ram, Suspended 20/Immediate 20/Hour

Siege Weapon
Range
M/S/M/L
Thac0 Damage*1 ROF Movement
Type of
fire
Crew
Hardpoints/
Softpoints
Ballista, Light 0/12/24/36 12 0/D3 1/BR 12 Direct 1 0/1
Ballista, Medium 0/12/24/38 14 0/D4 1/2 BR 6 Direct 3 0/2
Ballista, Heavy 0/12/24/48 17 D4/D3 1/3 BR 3 Direct 5 1/0
Catapult, Light* 12/0/0/24 14 D4/D3 1/BR 6 Indirect 3 1/0
Catapult,
Medium*
12/0/0/36 15 D6/D4 1/2 BR 3 Indirect 5 2/0
Catapult Heavy* 18/0/0/48 16 D8/D6 1/3 BR 3 Indirect 9 3/0
Trebuchet* 24/0/0/60 17 D10/D8 1/3 BR 3 Indirect 9 4/0
Misc. War
Machines

Cauldron 0 15 D8 1/2BR 0 Indirect 2 1/0
Ram, Simple 0 N/A 0 1/R Varies Direct 2
Ram, Suspended 0 N/A 0 1/R Varies Direct 4
* The range penalty for medium and long range does not apply for indirect siege weapons.
*1 Anti-personnel damage

Saving Throw Failure
If a wall section fails its saving throw once, it becomes damaged. The center 10 foot section loses 1/3 of its
height and special cover such as hoardings, parapets, and splays are destroyed. The debris creates a crumbling
slope that any character can attempt to climb. If a wall section fails its saving throw twice, it is destroyed. The
center 10' section is breached and reduced to 1/3 of its original height. The breech becomes a rocky slope as
long as the wall's original thickness. In addition, the 10' section to either side of the breech becomes damaged.
Any piece of potentially useful battlefield equipment, offensive or defensive, can be considered a war machine if
it is too large for a single character to use. Any large device intended to hurl missiles qualifies as a bombardment
engine. The most common types and their basic statistics are listed on the table above.
Bombardment engines are difficult to aim at individuals. Generally, a bombardment engine can target only units
of creatures, buildings, other war machines, vehicles, ships, and single creatures of Gargantuan size; see the
individual bombardment engine descriptions for exceptions.
It takes time and effort to set up a bombardment engine and prepare it to fire for the first time. The minimum
preparation time is 10 minutes or the time required to change facing, whichever is greater. The number increases
by 50% if a trained artillerist is not on hand to direct the operation.

Ballista
This engine looks something like a giant crossbow mounted on a swivel. It usually fires spear like bolts, but some
versions fire round shot of stone or metal; both types use the same basic statistics. Ballista projectiles have a
relatively flat trajectory, and they are fairly accurate. A light ballista can be aimed at any target in sight, provided
the weapon is fully crewed. A light ballista with a partial crew can fire at single creatures of Large or greater
size. A medium or heavy ballista can fire at a single Huge creature, or at a Gargantuan creature if partially
crewed. Any ballista's field of fire is limited to 45 degrees left or right of the weapon's facing at the
beginning of the round. A ballista's facing can be changed up to 45 degrees during the last phase of any round
when it fires.




21
Catapult
This engine usually consists of some sort of lever mounted on a sturdy frame. The lever acts as a throwing arm
and is fitted with a cup or sling to hold the projectile. When fired, a catapult lobs the projectile high into the air.
Tension provides the catapult's power. In primitive catapults, the lever was made from some flexible material
(usually green wood) and provided its own power when it was bent back and released. More sophisticated
catapults were equipped with a rigid arm powered by a
mass of twisted skeins (usually horsehair). Ancient
catapults often resembled ballistae aimed upward to fire
indirectly; all types of catapults use the same basic
statistics. Catapults usually fire large stones, but they
can be loaded with almost anything: small stones,
chains, dead animals, or anything else small enough to
fit in the sling or cup and not so heavy that it overloads
the lever. Large objects inflict the damage listed on the
table. Masses of small objects can inflict an extra die of
damage against most creatures but are useless against
structures and any creature with a natural Armor Class
of 0 or better (including characters with an Armor Class
of 0 before shield or Dexterity modifiers).
A light catapult with a full crew can target Huge
creatures. A light or medium catapult can change facing
45 degrees during the End of Round step of any round
when it fires. Heavy catapults generally are left in place
once they are sited for a battle. A full crew can change a heavy catapult's facing after 20 minutes of work.

Trebuchet
These massive engines are similar to catapults, but they derive their power from gravity. A trebuchet's throwing
arm is a rigid beam with a heavy weight at one end and a sling or cup for projectiles at the other. When the
beam is released, the force of the falling weight hurls the projectile in a high arch. Like catapults, trebuchets fire
large stones or masses of smaller objects. Trebuchets generally are left in place once they are sited for a battle.
A full crew can change a trebuchet's facing after 30 minutes of work.

Flaming Projectiles:
Catapults and trebuchets can be loaded with missiles soaked in pitch or a similar flammable substance. The
missile's range is reduced by 1/3. When it strikes, the missile scatters flaming debris over its normal area of
effect. The debris burns for two rounds, inflicting 2d6 points of damage the first round and 1d6 points of damage
the second round. The effect on wooden structures is the same as flaming oil.

Battering Ram
In its simplest form, a battering ram consists of a sturdy beam that one or more creatures can pick up and swing
against a portal or wall to batter it down. More complex rams have beams with reinforced heads and a frame to
support the beam. Any long, heavy object (such as a log or bench) between five and 30 feet long can be used as
a simple ram, provided there is at least five feet of free space behind the ram (to allow the crew to swing it). A
minimum of one Man sized creature is required of each 5 feet of ram, and a maximum of two Man sized
creatures is allowed per five feet of ram. A ram can affect only portals or wooden structures or objects .Creatures
carrying or wielding a simple ram move and defend as though heavily encumbered, regardless of the ram's actual
weight. A ram suspended from a frame can be from 10 to 60 feet long. A suspended ram allows the crew to
employ its strength more efficiently, inflicting more damage. A ram crew can swing the ram once a round, during
the very slow phase.

Cauldron
The most common form of this weapon is a huge kettle placed in a frame that allows it to tip and spill its
contents on unfortunate opponents below. The same effect can be obtained by suspending a barrel, bucket, or
bladder from a beam and tipping or splitting the container so that its contents spill out.
Unless otherwise noted, the contents of a cauldron pour down in a stream one square wide. When it hits the
ground, it forms a puddle three squares wide and three squares long, centered on the point of impact. If there is
a wall or similar barrier that keeps the pool from spreading out, the pool is five squares long and two squares
wide, with the long side lying along the barrier.



22
The amount of damage a cauldron inflicts varies with the type of material in it:
Flaming oil burns for two rounds, inflicting 2d6 points of damage on the first round and 1d6 points of
damage on the second round;
Boiling oil must be heated for at least one hour before use or it is treated exactly like flaming oil (once
heated its temperature can be maintained as long as fuel is available). Boiling oil burns for two rounds,
inflicting 4d6 points of damage the first round and 1d6 points of damage on the second round;
Boiling water is much cheaper than boiling oil. It must be heated for 30 minutes before use. Boiling water
inflicts 2d4 points of damage when it strikes a creature and 1d4 points of damage the round thereafter
as it soaks into fur or clothing and continues to scald. Creatures entering the area of effect on the second
round take no damage;
Molten lead must be heated at least four hours before use, and the volume of hot liquid is generally
small. Molten lead forms a puddle two squares wide and two squares long, with one square directly
under the cauldron and spreading away from the cauldron to the left or right as the attacker chooses.
Molten lead sears its targets for three rounds, inflicting 4d6 point s of damage the first round, 3d6 points
of damage the second round, and 2d6 points of damage the third round.


Table 2-2: Fortification Levels
Level of
Fort.
Description
Hardpoints
/Softpoints
Garrisons Maint.
1 (Thin
Wood)
These are small forts or garrisons, designed to provide minimal protection to a province. Such
forts would not be built along the border with a dangerous foe, as they could quickly be crushed
by a superior invading army. They might, however, be used in a regent's smaller provinces, used
to provide a base of operations for his soldiers, as well as protect the local law enforcement
authorities. Level 1 castles are usually comprised of just a single building, which may or may not
be surrounded by a moat.
0/2 100-300
1GB/Ye
ar
2 (Thin
Wood)
Castles of this level are average sized forts or garrisons. They serve as garrisons for larger
armys, but still provide a province with little protection against a large army. As with level 1
castles, they are mainly used to provide protection for soldiers from rebellions, and to serve as a
base of operations for an army.
0/4 200-400
2GB/Ye
ar
3 (Thick
Wood)
Castles of this size are still too small to provide adequate protection for a province, but they are
often built by the local lord to act as his headquarters.
1/4 300-500
3GB/Ye
ar
4 (Thick
Wood)
Once fortifications reache this size, they becomes suitable as a protective
structures, as it can now hold enough men and supplies to hold off a large
force of invaders. Most kings will have at least one castle at this size,
usually more than one. Unlike smaller castles, a level 4 structure will always consist of more than
one building, usually a central keep, as well as several towers, a wall, and other buildings.
2/6 400-700
1GB/Se
ason
5 (Soft
Stone)
These are medium sized castles. As above but with 2 main keeps in the province. 2/8 500-800
2GB/Se
ason
6 (Soft
Stone)
This is considered a heavily fortified province, and few rulers will have more than one
fortification as big as this. They provide protection for a wide area, and if well
protected can hold off a strong invasion force for several months.
4/8 600-1000
2GB/Se
ason
7 (Heavy
Stone)
Fortifications of this size are very rare, and are built only by the most
powerful lords. They are comprised of at least onelarge fortress, providing protection for an
entire town, mostly the province capital or the domain Capital. If the regent is willing to spend
double the original cost, then he can extend the walls of the castle around an entire town,
providing protection for all holdings within that town.
4/10 1000-1250
3GB/Se
ason
8 (Heavy
Stone)
Fortress of this size can provide protection to large towns within a province. 6/12 1200-1500
3GB/Se
ason
9
(Ramparts)
Huge fortresses, that can protect entire towns and their populations. As above, the regent can
choose to pay double the cost and extend the castles walls around the entire town. If this is
done then he also gains a +1 GB bonus to taxation from the province, due to increased security
and patrols of his guards.
8/14 1500-1700
4GB/Se
ason
10
(Ramparts)
These gigantic castles would only ever be constructed in the capital city of the rich and powerful
empire. Their size is immense, and they also double as the home for the regent, and his
consolers. So big are these fortresses that in times of war they can hold much of the cities
population and protect them from enemies. As with other fortresses the regent can choose to
extend the walls of the castle around the city it protects, with
the same benefits as above. Additional Benifits: -2GB/Court, -1GB to the muster cost of any unit
created in the province. (min cost of 1 GB)
12/24 2000+
5GB/Se
ason





23
Chapter 3: weapons of the waves
Cerilia is ringed by the sea. From the warm waters of the Bair el-Mehare, the Sea of the Golden Sun, to the ice
choked mouth of the Krakennauricht, dozens of Cerilia?s realms sprawl along thousands of miles of coastline.
For a kingdom with a strong navy, the sea represents many things? a highway to all the other lands of Aebrynis,
a source of food and wealth, and a possible route
for raids or expansion. On the other hand, coastal
powers with weak navies (or, in some cases, an
obsession with their land ward frontiers) must
view their coastline as an undefendable border by
which invaders may strike at will into the heart of
the nation. Regardless of the question of national
character, ambitions, strengths, every coastal
domain of Cerilia must deal with the issue of sea
power.
The term sea power has many implications.
Obviously, the military force that a nation can
bring to bear on the main is an important part of
its sea power. But a nations sea power is also
greatly determined by its geographical
constraints. A kingdom that does not possess a
year-round ice-free port like the various maritime
powers of Brechtur is limited in its ability to apply
sea power in the months when its ports are
closed.
The merchant marine of a kingdom is another
part of its Sea power; the ability to carry out trade
or supply distant forces when the land ward borders
are hostile or impassable can be crucial in a
prolonged war. Without exception, nations with large merchant fleets are rich nations. National character,
leadership, and expertise also play a role in sea power. The Vos kingdoms of eastern Cerilia possess an extensive
coastline on the Dragonsea, but theyve never been great sea powers; for centuries, their rulers have looked to
expand and prosper inland instead of at sea. To become a sea power, a kingdom must develop the technical
expertise to build effective warships, a cadre of skilled seafarers to man them, and a handful of great captains to
lead them in war?and then, maintain this course for generations.
Finally, a kingdom or union of kingdoms will never become a true world power until it can command the sea.
While a nation may become a continental power to be reckoned with, it can?t project its power against distant
lands unless it has command of the seas. Many kingdoms ignore maritime interests in favor of building up land
power but in the long run, land bound kingdoms must face the threat of a rival with effective sea power dictating
the terms by which discourse, trade, or conflict take place.
Today, 500 years after the fall of the Anuirean Empire, there are a dozen or so great powers scattered around
Cerilia. Of all these great powers, only Avanil, Boeruine, Muden, Ariya, Khourane, Suiriene, and the Isle of the
Serpent are sea powers of any significance.

A Brief History of War At Sea
Galleons and roundships are sophisticated vessels, requiring advanced construction techniques. They are not the
products of a Dark Ages culture, and appeared in Cerilian navies only in the last two or three centuries. Like
many other medieval technologies, the art of the shipwright tends to make great strides in one generation, and
then remain at that level for several generations to follow. In our own history, chain mail was the armor of choice
from the end of the Roman Empire to the beginning of the Hundred Years War, almost 800 years later; in that
same time period, the Mediterranean galley remained virtually unchanged.
So, what was sea power like in the early days of Cerilia? Its easiest to consider four historical periods. Pre-
Deismaar, dating from the earliest human emigrations to Cerilia up until the War of Shadow. Early Imperial,
dealing with the rise of the Anuirean Empire (the first five centuries after Deismaar). Late Imperial, is the next
five centuries after Deismaar, and the heyday of the Anuirean Empire. Finally Post-Imperial, dating from the end
of the Empire at Michael Roele?s death up to the current day.


Anuirean Galleon


24
Pre-Deismaar
While elves, dwarves, and goblins inhabited Cerilia many ages before humans appeared, none of these races ever
displayed much interest in seafaring; however, even in ancient Aduria, humans were a race of mariners. By far
the most accomplished of these early voyagers were the Masetians, the most civilized of the old races. From their
walled cities on the placid waters of the Suidemiere, Masetian galleys explored the coasts of Cerilia long before
the first of the Six Tribes began their Flight from Shadow. The Masetian galley was an elegant vessel, light and
swift. They fought by ram, archery, and boarding.
The Andu, Rjuven, and Brecht peoples were tribal barbarians at this time, organized by clan and holding. They
built longboats that could be rowed or sailed. Unlike the Masetian galleys, the longboats were open, with no
decking or raised structures. Despite their simplicity, they were durable and hardy vessels, better suited to the
rough waters of the Sea of Storms than the fragile Masetian vessels. Unlike the Masetians, who viewed their
armies and their fleets as property of the state, the more barbaric humans built their ships one-by one as the
work of a family or clan. They had no
concept of fighting at sea and used their
vessels in war-time for nothing more
organized than a raid.
Over the years of the Flight from Shadow,
the Brecht and Rjuven relocated one clan at
a time to the northern stretches of Cerilia,
going by sea. The Andu marched overland
instead, and thus settled much closer to the
old land bridge to Aduria. Meanwhile, the
Masetian cities fell one-by-one to the
advancing evil. As the situation in the south
worsened, more and more Masetian outposts
and colonies were founded on Cerilias
southern shores. At Deismaar, the Masetian
fleets stood against the navies of the other
Adurian powers that had fallen under Azrai?s sway. Unknown sea monsters and other horrors rose from the
deeps to fight on the side of evil that day, but the Masetians?the most skillful seafarers in the world in that
era?defeated the southern fleets in a naval action that paralleled the epic struggle on land. Between the ghastly
losses inflicted by Azrai?s sea monsters and the violent upheavals that followed the gods? deaths, the ships of
the Masetian fleet?and indeed, Masetia itself?were destroyed beyond recovery.
Early Imperial
In the years following Deismaar, the Andu organized themselves into the Anuirean Empire beneath the leadership
of the first Roele. For two or three centuries, they were busy taming their own lands and pushing overland to
whichever lands were closest. But two great natural barriers?the Stonecrown Mountains in the north, and the
Iron Peaks in the east?hemmed in the growing power of Anuire. In order to circumvent these formidable
ramparts, the young Empire began to develop a navy. The cog?a sturdy, clinker-built sailing vessel with raised
platforms at bow and stern?was coming into common use, and the Anuirean navy consisted of merchant ships
pressed into military service whenever the legions needed to travel by sea. All in all, cogs (and a variety of similar
vessels, such as the nef and the knarr) represented an improvement over the old longships that had been built
by humans in simpler times. Although they lacked the rows of oars that gave longships the ability to defy the
wind, the cog was a far better sailing vessel and much more seaworthy. It was partially decked, and could carry
several times the amount of cargo?or fighting men. Andu and Brecht-built cogs were very similar, but the Rjuven
preferred to maintain some small rowing ability and developed the knarr instead. Meanwhile, in the southern
waters, the Masetians were dying out and vanishing into the new race of the Basarji. These people had come to
Cerilia in the years before Deismaar on sailing rafts made from reeds. Along Cerilia?s calm southern shores, the
old Masetian galley was still quite suitable for both trade and war, and the Basarji generally adopted Masetian
shipbuilding techniques. Galleys were maneuverable by northern standards, and their ability to ram made them
extremely dangerous in battle, even if they were not as sturdy as the cog or knarr.
While the Brecht and Rjurik peoples clearly required sturdy vessels such as cogs to survive their northern seas,
the Anuireans had a harder decision to make. Their cogs did not fare well in battle against the southern galleys.
For centuries, the Anuireans wavered between the northern tradition of merchant sailing ships and the southern
tradition of war galleys.
Rjuven Longship


25
Late Imperial
Over the course of time, the technology of shipbuilding continued to improve, especially in the northern powers.
Once the shipwrights began to view banks of oars as more of a hindrance than a help, ship design progressed
rapidly. Gradually, cogs and nefs evolved into vessels with complete decking and two or more masts. In Anuire,
this lead to the development of the greatship, a floating castle with towering fore- and stern castles. The
greatship required a crew of hundreds and, including soldiers, could carry over a thousand men. Yet, for all the
greatship's splendour, it was not an efficient fighting ship. It was ponderous and not very seaworthy; at least
once or twice a generation, nothing more than a bad gust of wind that heeled her over too far would sink a
greatship. The greatship had other disadvantages, as well. It was enormously expensive, and only the richest
nations could maintain a fleet of them. In Cerilia, this meant that Anuire (and some of her more prosperous
colonies) could afford them. Due to their expense, the Rjurik sea powers never built greatships in any number,
while the Brecht found the design too unwieldy in the treacherous waters of the Krakennauricht.
In the southern waters of Anuire and Basarji, ship-building remained fairly stagnant. The oared galley was still
the warship of choice. Even the mighty greatship had to fear the galley's ram. In the easternmost Basarji lands, a
new ship type called the dromond was
coming into use. Oared and sailed like a
galley, the dromond raised its ram above
the waterline, which improved its
manoeuvrability and seaworthiness. The
most important development in this period
was the introduction of missile weapons into
the fleets of Cerilia. The Brecht and the
Basarji both hit upon this idea at about the
same time. Although ships of all types had
carried great numbers of archers and
slingers for many centuries, the Brecht
began to mount light catapults on their
sturdy roundships. Meanwhile, the Basarji
experimented with volatile fire throwers and
other incendiary devices. Although few ships
could be sunk or even seriously damaged by catapult
shot alone, burning pitch-pots or buckets of spikes or
blades could set a ship afire or inflict grievous losses to a crew concentrated on deck. While the Brecht and
Basarji warships were maturing into their modern form, the Anuireans continued to develop both sailing ships
and galleys. One curious hybrid was the galleas, a full-decked galley with high fighting castles at bow and stern
that mounted catapults or fire throwers. It was felt that galleys still posed a mortal threat to vessels that were
not oared themselves. In battle, the galleas was no match for the greatships or roundships of northern waters,
although it was successful against the galleys of the south. By the end of this period, naval warfare was no
longer strictly a matter of ram-and-board, although many fights were decided this way. More by luck than by
design, some captains began to experience success with tactics of standing off and firing at the enemy with a
variety of nasty mixtures. At the very least, most captains would try to maneuver for deck clearing volleys of
archery and grapeshot before closing for the final grapple.
Post Imperial
As the Anuirean Empire fell in ruins, the extravagantly expensive Anuirean navy withered away. Captains and
admirals joined whichever faction they fancied, taking their ships or flotillas with them. Within 50 years, the
Imperial navy was a mere shell, and none of the successor states possessed a quarter of its former fighting
strength. With the collapse of this mighty Empire, the other races of Cerilia began to flourish.
Naval development continued, at a slower pace than in the previous centuries. The basic ship designs had
reached their effective limits; there was no point in building anything as large as a greatship, the experiments
combining oars and sail had largely failed, and no great revolutions of weaponry would surface in this time.
Accordingly, the shipwrights of this age have devoted themselves to perfecting the designs that work best.
Three major seapowers remain: the Anuireans, the Brechtur, and the Khinasi. The Anuirean greatship has
become the smaller and more seaworthy galleon; the Brecht roundship is the best sailer of Cerilia; and the zebec
is the only vessel built strictly for war. All of these vessels feature missile armament or naval artillery of some
kind, along with plenty of marines or soldiers for the inevitable hand-to-hand fights that still take place. Until hell
powder cannon come into common use at sea, tactics and ship design are unlikely to change much.
Masetian Galley


26
Current Naval Tactics
At the current time, a Cerilian sea battle features the same general tactics that have been used for the last four
or five centuries. A captain has three options at his disposal: boarding, missile fire, or if he commands a galley or
similar vessel, ramming.
Boarding
The earliest sea battles were nothing more than land skirmishes fought over the decks of ships floating next to
each other. This is still the surest way to decide a fight; once two ships are grappled alongside each other, one or
the other is almost certain to come out on top.
Obviously, for a captain to board his opponent, he must bring his ship alongside that of his enemy. For sailing
vessels, this means that he overtake or run down his prey. The prospective boarder must run the gauntlet of his
enemys archers and artillery. Finally, he must have some way of making his ship fast to the enemy. Dozens of
grappling hooks, lines, or planks can be used to snag the enemy before the captain can send his soldiers and
sailors across. When your regent character is leading his navy into battle, hell want to remember a few things
about boarding:
Boarding is a good tactic if your ship Out mans your enemy, or carries a crew of unusual quality. Boarding a ship
with a larger or better crew is foolhardy. Heroic adventurers can easily carry a ship manned by normal human
sailors, so player characters, henchmen, and lieutenants can make or break a boarding action. Never grapple
with a burning or sinking ship. A ship alongside another thats afire stands a 50% chance per round of catching
fire, too. A ship thats grappled with a sinking enemy may be fouled and unable to move for 1d3 rounds while the
grappling lines and wreckage are cleared away. If you have an advantage in missile fire, make several passes
alongside the enemy to sweep his decks clean before you board him. Soften up the enemy before the hand-to-
hand fight. Boarding offers one advantage over ramming or missile fire, you stand an excellent chance of
capturing the enemy vessel for later use in your own fleet. If the boarding party gets wiped out, break the
grapple and get away from the enemy. Many ships have been captured after they failed to win the boarding
fight. Magic use can be decisive in boarding actions. Most sailors and soldiers are 0-level characters who can be
felled in great numbers by even low level spells.
Ramming
The ram is one of the most ancient naval weapons, but it is still extremely dangerous. Of all the ships that are
commonly seen in Cerilia, only the galley is designed for ramming, all other ships may ram if the opportunity
presents itself, but it is a risky maneuver that could easily end up sinking both the ramming vessel and her
target. Despite the risk, many reckless captains
view a ramming attack as the perfect prelude
to a boarding action. A special tactic used by
some galleys when fighting other oared vessels
is the shear. In a shear attack, the galley tries
to plow through the other ships oars,
snapping them like matchsticks. The shear
works just like a ramming attack. However,
neither the ramming vessel or the target suffer
hull damage. Instead, the targets oars are
wrecked, preventing it from using its rowing
movement. The captain of the sheared vessel
may attempt a seamanship check with a -6
penalty to pull or raise his oars, negating the
attack, but if this check fails hes lost his oars
and is now a sitting duck. While your character
may view a naval battle as a demolition derby
in the making, most ships are not built to
withstand the colossal stresses of running into things on purpose. A wise captain will save this desperate and
spectacular maneuver for the most critical moment in a battle. Dont ram anything larger than your own vessel.
When battling galleys or other ramships, try to stay downwind or crosswind so that you can turn away and run
when they bear down on you. Keep lots of sea room on your disengaged side. If you have to turn into the wind
or the shore to avoid a galleys attack, youre as good as sunk. If you are rammed, board your attacker
immediately if you outnumber him. Boarding parties from vessels sunk by ramming have captured their
assailants. The best defense against a ram attack is a priest with a turn wood or lower water spell, or a wizard
with wall of force.


27
Missiles
The third tactic used at sea is the concentration of archery, magic, and artillery fire on ones enemies. Cerilias
navies are not equipped with cannon, so the tactics and technology of broadsides, crossing the T, and similar
considerations just dont come into play. A stout, well-built ship such as a galleon or roundship has little to fear
from most missile attacks... but from time to time, a well-placed stone can hole a large vessel.
While smashing holes in the enemys hull is next to impossible with Cerilian technology, there are many other
ways for missiles to be used to great effect. Catapults can throw burning pitch-pots at the enemy in an attempt
to set it afire. Archers can cut down any sailors, soldiers, or officers who dare to show themselves on the open
decks. And many wizardly spells can be every bit as devastating as a broadside of iron cannonballs.
The most terrifying enemy a wooden sailing ship faces at sea is the threat of fire. The fire thrower is a weapon
specifically designed to burn ships to cinders. Other large missile weapons, the catapult, the mangonel, and the
shot ballista, can be fitted for firing incendiary shot. When one of these weapons fires incendiaries instead of
normal shot, it suffers a -1 penalty to its hull damage roll ,but it has a chance to set the ship afire.
Whenever a ship suffers a hit from an incendiary shot, or certain fiery spells such as fireball or produce fire, it
may be set afire. The chance is 25%, for each point of hull damage inflicted by the attack. Once a ship is on fire,
it loses 1 hull point per round until it sinks. There is a 10% chance per round that the crew can extinguish the
flames before the ship suffers more damage, although some spells or magical items may be able to smother the
flames automatically.
There are two schools of thought on the topic of the most favorable wind for a battle to be fought with missile
weapons. Aggressive admirals prefer to enter battle upwind of their enemy, so that they can close at will.
Conservative admirals prefer to be downwind, so that they can turn away and open the range (or escape the
battle) if necessary. Range is crucial in missile engagements. If you find a range at which your weapons are more
effective than your enemys, try to remain there for the course of the battle.
Most ships are very limited in their ability to fire straight over the bow or directly behind the stern. Position your
ship in these blind spots, so that you can rake the enemy with your best concentration of missile fire while
escaping any serious retaliation on his part. If your ship is seriously outgunned in missile power, try to close the
range rapidly and turn it into a boarding fight.
By far the deadliest missile weapon at your disposal is the use of magic. If your PC is a wizard or priest, he may
command a variety of devastating spells that can seriously damage a ship (or sink it outright) with one blow.
Arcs of fire
The Naval War Cards included in the Cities of the Sun boxed set assume that an area of the battlefield is so large
that a ships exact facing doesnt matter for missile fire. This is an abstraction. In reality, ships dimensions
dictate that more weapons can be brought to bear the broadside than on the stern or the bow. You may want to
use a marker or chit of some kind to indicate which way a ship is heading. Naturally, its bow is pointing in the
direction that it last moved, and its stern is pointing in the direction it moved from.
If your DM prefers to use the artillery statistics to handle individual ship combat, your characters ship may be
customized to carry catapults, arbalests, or other such weapons. Heres the rule of thumb: no more than 25% of
a ships weapons can be arranged to fire for on ward or aft. If a ship can only carry one catapult, for instance,
that catapult must be limited to firing port or starboard. A ship mounting 12 arbalests could have as many as four
firing forward and four firing aft, but the rest must be mounted for firing over the sides.
Naval Combat Rules
For ages, the sea has served as the worlds foremost frontier as well as its primary trade route. The sea fills the
imagination the young, who long for adventure and fame, merchants who wish for fortune, and kings who lust
for ever-greater power. To these ends do men flock to ships, rushing to their dreams or to their deaths at the
hands of a heartless mistress a force so powerful that the mightiest of mans ships is little more than a shadow
to be swept away by a single, clear thought. Nations construct mighty navies and armadas to exert control over
shipping lanes or to cripple a foes ability to transport troops, thus increasing their power over their enemies.
These struggles have resulted in the great chronicles of naval conflict.

Initiative
As in all combat situations initiative is crucial, thus in naval warfare which ship will perform first its manoeuvres
can be the key to victory. Initiative in naval warfare is determined by the MC of the ships participating and the
Commanders that are handling them. The more manoeuvrable is a ship the fastest it can react during the naval
battle. If a tie ensues, the commanders of each ship roll d20 and add their Seamanship score to the roll. The
highest roll acts first.



28
Turn Sequence
When you know why and where the combat is occurring, who is involved right down to the number of ships
and placement of special characters, pick up the corresponding ship cards provided and let the battle begin!
Take each step below in turn. Note that the GM rolls for weather once at the beginning of the battle. Any
commanders with mages or even priests onboard may attempt to ameliorate the conditions through normal
weather-control mechanics assigned to that type of sorcery or magic. Sequence of play, Movement Phase-Highest
movement speed moves and attempts to grapple or perform a ramming attack if possible, second-third and so on
player moves and attempts to grapple or perform a ramming attack also. Attack
Phase- Resolve Magical Attacks, Resolve Boarding actions,
Resolve missile attacks. Morale Phase- Ships strike colours
or flee, Routed ships attempt rally checks, Withdraw or
surrender. Initiative rolls happen and occur when 2 or
more ships are moving at the same speed. If done so roll
d20 separately for each ship and add the captains
seamanship skill. The highest roll acts firsts.
Weather
Although naval battles usually occur during seasons in
which storms are unlikely, there are always exceptions.
Often the doom of sailors, weather at sea can range from
utter calm in which ships are unable to move unless they
have oars to a raging tempest which can cause even the sturdiest of ships to take on
water and sink. A captain can control many things relating to the
battle, but weather is not one of them. Sudden storms can force
enemy fleets to fight under the harshest of circumstances. At the
beginning of the battle, one of the captains rolls 2d6 on Table 3-1
:Wind Strength to determine the weather at the start of a battle.
Calms reduce a ships movement by 1d2-1 regardless of its normal
speed. Oared vessels can ignore calms and move at their oaring rate
instead. There is a 50% that a fog will be accompanying a calm, which
can make a ship run aground.
Gales are treated the same as strong winds, except that they also
move the ship 1d3-1 hexes towards where the gale is blowing or if the
Captain is a skilled seaman (seamanship 11-15) he can lower this to
1d3-2. Players must conclude a ships normal movement first and then
conduct its gale movement. Gales may cause shipwrecks too.
Storms resemble games but-worst! A ship cannot manoeuvre at all in a storm. It is simply blown 2d4 hexes
towards the storm is blowing. Storms blow out after 1d4 days and they naturally can cause a shipwreck.

Wind Direction
In cerilian water, the wind generally blows out of the west in spring and summer, and from the north in fall and
winter. For convenience players can assume the wind is blowing always from one of the four cardinal points. The
wind maintains its direction for 1d4 days before the DM checks it again. The wind direction is always the direction
the wind is blowing from.

MOVEMENT PHASE

Movement allowance
The movement of a sailing vessel depends on its manoeuvrability class on the wind strength and the wind
direction. Once a player finds the ships Manoeuvrability class it can compare it on table 3-3. Using the line
appropriate for the wind strength and whether the ship is sailing with the wind, across it or in it, the player can
find the number of hexes the ship can move in the battle terrain.
Oared Vessels: Longships, Knarrs and Drakkars are oared vessels. They can choose to ignore the wind results
and use there oars to move in the hex map, the number of moves allowed is mentioned in the Master List of
Ships, Table 3-4. Rowing in a wind will allow a ship to move one extra hex per battle turn.
Tactical Course Change: On its first move a ship declares its direction which determines its movement allowance.
If a ship starts its tactical move downwind it cannot change its movement across the wind to gain the movement
bonus. However the ship can change its course as often as it likes and in any direction as long as it does not
Table 3-1 Wind Strength
Die roll Wind Strength 1
st
Round Next roll
2 Calm 2d6 D4+1
3 Calm 2d6 D6+1
4 Light 2d6 2d4
5 Light 2d6 2d4
6 Light 2d6 2d6
7 Moderate 2d6 2d6
8 Moderate 2d6 3d4
9 Strong 2d6 3d4
10 Strong 2d6 1d6+6
11 Gale 2d6 1d6+6
12 Storm 2d6 2d6
2d6 Spring/Summer Fall/Winter
2 East South
3 East South
4 South East
5 South East
6 South North
7 West North
8 West North
9 West West
10 North West
11 North West
12 East East
Table 3-2: Wind Direction


29
exceed its movement allowance on the first round of movement. As a movement rule, when a ship is turning into
a wind either downwind or crosswind always ends its movement one area already moved inside the wind no
matter if they have more movement points to spend. If the ship is moving over 4 speed or in a Gale a
Seaworthiness check is required
Grappling: Anytime two opposing ships occupy after movement the same hex area, they can engage each other
by grappling. When two ships grapple the stop moving and come side by side. One attaches itself to the other
using grappling hooks. If both commander want to do so, this happens automatically, if neither wants to grapple
nothing happens, and if only one ship wants to grapple then you make a grappling
check. The roll is a normal attack roll vs the ships AC, the ships current speed is a
bonus to its AC since the speed it has reached makes it difficult for grapples
to reach target.
Five attack rolls are made with a total of three needed to successfully grapple
an enemy vessel. Ships may un-grapple if both commanders agree or if one
of the ships has been captured by a boarding action. Both ships willing or
unwilling to grapple, when they do so take d3-2 Hull Point of damage through
various destruction that comes during the collision.
Ramming: Since ramming attacks werent covered in the BIRTHRIGHT Naval
Rules, heres a quick way to resolve them in a Naval War Card battle. The
ramming ship must move into the same space as the target, and make an
attack roll using the Captains Seamanship check as a to hit bonus. Just like a
Grappling Check, the attack value depends on the relative movement
allowances of the two ships. If you fail the roll the target evades the ramming
ship. If you make the roll you inflict 1d4-1 points of hull damage to the
target. Add 1 point per difference in ship size (as measured by hull point
total). Add +2 if the ramming vessel is equipped with a ram, and +1 if the ramming vessel is moving at a Speed
of 3 or better when it hits. A result of a critical hit (Natural 20) indicates that the rammed vessel suffers a mortal
blow, and sinks after 1d4 rounds. Considering all the + and the on this roll cause it is possible that negative
results are damage self inflicted from the conflict. A failed roll means that either the ram was failed and the
enemy ship sailed meters away. There is a 10% chance per point of damage inflicted to the target that the ships
are now stuck together and effectively grappled. An oared vessel, like a galley, can back away if it becomes stuck
with a successful Seamanship check on the captains part. A sailing vessel requires much more time and effort to
disentangle itself from its victim. If one ship sinks while the other ship is still stuck, the surviving vessel must
make a seaworthiness check or be dragged down to.
Attack Phase
Magical Attacks
Spell casting comes first; a wizard can cast offensive magic upon any un-grappled enemy ship in his battle area.
Spells can be cast either offensively or defensively on the same naval battle square and must adhere all normal
magical rules for saving throws and areas of effect.
Boarding attack
When two ships have grappled a boarding attack ensues. Boardings are chaotic and fierce skirmishes across the
decks of the grappled ships. Resolve boarding as a normal skirmish mentioned on chapter 1 but there are a lot of
different in action heroic or critical opportunities that can take place; Embarked troops on add to the ships total
Hits and an average of AC, DR must be summed in order to count total damage on all participants. Falling backs
and routs that take place on naval skirmishes resolved in a different manner since there is no actual place to fall
back or rout at. If at the end of the skirmish battle round either side has surrendered or routed or won the battle
through sheer numbers the ship is captured but takes 1 point of hull damage when the skirmish in order to
reflect that the skirmish has destroyed random areas of the ship. The winner of the boarding attack if wants to
capture the vessel must assign at least half the Hit Die of crewmen the ship needs in order to operate normally.
Missile Attacks
Missile attacks represent a ships ability to damage another vessel using archery, catapult shot and other ranged
weapons. Different types of attack resolve differently. Artillery types of attacks roll d20 vs the enemy vessels AC.
The attacked vessels receive an AC bonus equal to its movement speed and the attacking vessel receives a Thac0
penalty its own movement speed. Size also plays a major role in artillery fire, the hull difference between ships is
also a negative modifier to the attacker. Thus a Galleon with strong winds and overall ship Thac0 of 20 trying to
attack a long ship with an AC of 8 with strong winds is as follows : 20 Thaco -3pentaly (current speed) -3
penalty (size difference) = 26 Thac0 vs 10 AC with a -2 Bonus =8 AC total needs a 18 or better at this velocity to
Winds A B C D
Light
Into 1 1 1 0
With 2 1 1 1
Across 3 2 1 1
Moderate
Into 1 1 0 0
With 3 2 2 1
Across 4 3 2 1
Strong
Into 1 0 0 0
With 4 3 2 2
Across 5 4 3 2
Table 3-3: Movement Allownace


30
actually find target on the smaller vessel. The artillerist skill conveys bonuses to this roll. Each ship can attempt
artillery fire shots for as many war machines it has equipped. In the 10 full battle round it is assumed that the
ships can change sides while maintaining its bearing Statistics for seafaring war machines as well vessel hull and
stats can be found on later tables. The number of artillery shots a ship can take is equal its hard points equipped
and with respect to the weapons ROF.
Archery range attacks resolve as much as artillery range attacks concerning modifiers. Embarked troops are not
on decks, rather they are safely hiding at the hull of the ship unless otherwise stated. Archery range attacks are
doing Hit damages on crew member total Hits. Archery range attacks roll as many attacks rolls as half the
number of Soft Points equipped on ship and with respect to weapons ROF. Treat successful hits accordingly.
Morale Phase
Ship morale follows the rule for morale mentioned in chapter 1; In boardings where morale plays a major role
there are some differences concerning morale results or battle results considering the fact that there is no solid
ground to fallback at or rout at other than your own ship. An attacking ship falling back on a boarding attack
phase finds its troops thrown back at its deck and the defender can opt to un-grapple in the morale phase this
turn or take the battle on the enemy ship. If a rout ensues during a boarding action the routed crew surrenders
and the ship strikes its colours since there is no space to rout at. During missile range attacks any morale effects
that result to fallback can be ignored but the ships crew is already demoralized by the bombardment. If a vessel
routed in a magical or missile attack phase, it must use the next movement phase to flee to the nearest open
battle area, avoiding enemy grapples if possible .Should the routed ,ship, while fleeing pass through a battle
square occupied by an enemy vessel, its player must roll another morale check with all negative modifiers in
order to see if it stops and surrenders. When enemies block all escape paths the ship must surrender. Natural
barrier force a ship to surrender or run aground. Each routed vessel can try to rally itself in its next morale phase.
If successful the ship may move normally or it continues to flee away from battle.

The Naval Skirmish
What happens when two or more of the ships involved in a naval battle grapple? It is easy to determine what
happens for the PC but what takes place all around them? What is the fate of NPCs involved or what happens
during the short fight for the participants on both sides? Which side is thrown back to its deck? Are the marines
falling over to the sea? What are the results of this fight? The following skirmish system is set to determine such
small-scale battles or it is used when 2 or more ships in a naval battle are grappled and boarding takes place.
First is needed to determine the statistics of the crew members involved. If 100 shipmates are fighting 50
marines, statistics must be generated for all the participants.

The total number of Hit Dice for the groups is treated as their Hit Points for the skirmish. 100 shipmates
of 1/2 HD are treated as 50 HP in total, 50 marines of 1 HD are treated as 50 HP.
Figure the Battle Roll needed to hit the target of each group. The Shipmates having an overall of 20
Thaco hit the AC 7 Marines over 13, each roll over 13 on the d20 roll is treated as a hit. The 18 Thaco
Marines hit the AC 10 Soldiers over 8, each roll on the d20 over 8 is treated as a hit.
Double the base damage if the creatures are capable of dealing more than 12.

Each combat round roll for damage on all opposed group. The winning group modifies its damage by the
difference of the die rolled based on the unit description.

+1 bonus per two levels of magic used on the battle ground.
+1 bonus per major NPC or PC involved in the unit.
+2 bonus if the group surprises the opponents.
-1 penalty if the enemy has the terrain advantage
Numerical advantage (2vs1 +2 on rolls, 3vs1 +4 on rolls, 4vs1 +6 on rolls, 5+vs1 +8 on rolls.
Determine the Defense rating of each unit, Leather units are considered to have DR of 2, Mail units are
considered to have DR of 3 and Plated Units are considered to have DR of 5. When hits are determined
reduce the hits depending on the units DR.

When a group loses half its starting hit dice its die value drops one level for damage resolution. When a group
loses 3/4 of its starting hit dice its die value drops two levels for damage resolution. Attrition will take its toll in
morale sooner or later. If an army wins too consecutive resolution rolls the army gains a momentum and the
opposing forces begin to demoralize. On the next roll the winning army gains +1 bonus, and +1 for any
subsequent rounds he retains momentum to his resolution roll .


31
Following are tables that randomly determine the roll of a PC or NPC in the field of a large skirmish battle.
Consult the following tables to determine the outcome and involvement of characters or role play the events
taking place during the fight.

Level of engagement modifiers
Disengaged: If you remain disengaged during a skirmish battle you can opt to avoid any Random event that
you roll on table 3-4. Pc takes 1d3 HP and 1d6 FP per round. Leather modifies by -1 HP, Mail armour Modifies by
-3HP damage but increases by 1D fatigue loss d6d8, Plate modifies by -5HP loses but increases by 2D fatigue
loss d6d10. The Pc gains 15 EPX per round he stays disengaged.
Engaged: If you remain engaged during a skirmish battle you roll normally on your Critical Event table 1. Pc
takes 1d6 HP and 1d8 FP per round. Leather modifies by -1 HP, Mail armour Modifies by -3HP damage but
increases by 1D fatigue loss d6d8, Plate modifies by -5HP loses but increases by 2D fatigue loss d6d10. The
Pc gains 35 EPX per round he stays disengaged
Heavily Engaged: If you remain heavily engaged during a skirmish battle when you roll for the Critical Random
Event you subtract 2 if you roll from 6-10 or you add 2 if you roll from 11-16. Pc takes 1d8 HP and 1d10 FP per
round. Leather modifies by -1 HP, Mail armour Modifies by -3HP damage but increases by 1D fatigue loss d6d8,
Plate modifies by -5HP loses but increases by 2D fatigue loss d6d10. The Pc gains 60 EPX per round he stays
disengaged

Naval Combat Random Events
If an NPC randomly decide his fate if a PC you must play out this dramatic situation
Table 3-4: Roll d20 to determine the results
Roll Results
1-4 Naval Critical Event Table 3-5
5-15 No Random Events
16-19 Naval Heroic Event Table 3-6
20 Reroll Twice*
*If you get a heroic or critical random event from the first roll you dont roll a second time.

Table 3-5: Roll d20 to determine the results
Roll Result
1-4 Take a swim
5-7 Raining sail and mast
8-10 Weapon Trouble
11-13 Ladder fight
14-16 Throw them over
17-19 Save a wounded comrade
20 Take the battle over to their ship!!
Take a swim
The character is struck from a swinging mast or maybe from falling debris. The character is struck down or
overboard 85% chance for down and 15% chance for out. If down the character does not contribute to the unit
the next round. If the character is thrown overseas he will have to swim his way back up the ship. (15xp)

Raining sail and mast
Something in or around the battlefield gets affected by the combat fray. In a boarding fight all chaos breaks
loose, it might be a piece of a mast, a sail, or a keg of ale. The damage on the area affects the character directly
and it is up to the DM to determine the cause. (15xp)
Roll 1d6 to determine the effect
1-3: Character gets damaged from the debris taking 1d4 damage
4-5: The character takes 2d4 damage from the area affected
6: The character gets a moderate (2d4) critical hit area effect, save vs reflex to avoid, from the effect

Weapon Trouble
The combatant experiences difficulty with his weapon. Roll 1d6: (15xp)
1-3: Combatant disarmed. In the fray the character cannot retrieve his weapon.
4-5: Hard parry may break weapon. Roll a successful item saving throw vs.
crushing blow to avoid.
6 : If the character killed an opponent last round, his weapon is stuck in the foe's body. Take a round to pull it
out.


32

Ladder fight
Two or more enemies threaten the character and thus find themselves inside one another's reach and are
effectively locked in close combat. Roll 1d6: (35xp)
1-2: One opponent of -2 HD of the character (min 1 HD, 5 HP)
3: Two opponents of -2 HD of the character (min 1 HD, 5 HP)
4: Three opponents, two of them are -2 HD and one is at -1 HD.
5: Sergeant of the enemy troops with equal HD of the character
6: Lieutenant of the Enemy Troops, if not designated or a noted NPC he is at least +1 HD of the character.

Break them over


You receive the command to charge the enemys support group! The character must face 1d4+1 opponents to
successfully attack the deck hands. The character is immediately moved to the Heavily Engaged level. During the
next Battle Turn, reduce the characters Critical event roll by 2, but add 2 to his commanders Battle Roll. (50xp)
Save a wounded comrade
In the midst of battle, you notice an ally has fallen! You have the opportunity to save him. While saving his
comrade, the character cannot undergo any other Heroic Opportunities until the ally is on safe ground. Each
Battle Turn, the character faces two or three opponents. If the character successfully defends the fallen comrade,
he can roll for leadership if he has the skill each round he defends the fallen comrade. He can raise his skill only
once though. He also grants a +2 Morale modifier to his unit. (50xp)

Few against Many


The character is caught in the middle of the an enemy detachment. The enemy mate, lieutenant and entourage
are all around him. Roll 1d20 for NPC, if a PC is involved this fight must be played out. (100xp)
1-9: Character is put down rendered unconscious or surrenders (50%) for either
10-14: The character is severely wounded and left down to die. Will die in 1d6 Battle Rounds.
15-17: The character sustains a critical hit (2d6) severity save vs fort and left to die
18-19: The character is killed outright
20: The character makes a break for it and runs, turning the tables on his opponents, taking courage his
comrades rally to help (+4) on next round battle rolls. A melee against 1d4+2 opponents If the characters ally
survives, the character can roll for Leadership, if he has the skill he can freely raise it by one rank, if not he may
be awarded with a henchman, GMs discretion.

Table 3-6: Roll d20 to determine the results


Roll Result
1-4 Lucky Break
5-7 Lucky Opening
8-10 Hold this Deck
11-13 Heal and Help
14-16 Regroup
17-19 Pick Up the Colours
20 Overwhelm
Lucky Break
The combatant is favoured by fate and gains a +3 bonus to his next critical event table roll and -1 per die of
battle damage. (15xp)

Lucky Open
The combatant sees his chance and takes it , he rallies troops near and guides them to the enemy flanks, he
contributes a +2 bonus to the battle roll of his unit for the next battle round but he is considered Heavily
Engaged. (15xp)

Hold this deck


The combatant is holding fast his ground against all enemies who are coming towards him and he is standing on
top of dead bodies. The character must fight 1d4+2 opponents to resolve this event. The character inspires all
around him granting them a +2 Morale bonus for the next combat round a +2 bonus to the battle roll but he gets
a -2 on his Critical event roll table and will be considered Heavily engaged for the next round. (Grants a Skill Roll
on the battlefield roll to raise Leadership by 1 point if the character already has the skill). (35xp)




33
Heal and help
The combatant stops and aids a fallen or injured comrade. If the character has any appropriate healing skills or
special powers he may even save the life of someone who is dying at the same time, the character is urging
more people to help around wounded comrades thus narrowing the casualty rate of his army at the end of the
battle at the end of the battle. Although totally distracted from the battle he penalizes his army with a -1 on their
battle roll. (Grants a Skill Roll on the battlefield to raise Healing if the character already has the skill, grants a
Skill Roll on the battlefield roll to raise Leadership by 1 point if the character already has the skill). (35xp)

Regroup
The combatant manages to regroup his troops around him, with a successful Leadership roll the warriors are
now ready to re-enter the fight with more discipline and order, the event adds a 1d4 die to the next damage roll.
(If successful the character can raise Leadership by 1 point). (35xp)

Pick up the colours
You see your ships colours fall to the deck. You have the opportunity to carry the ships banner, boosting your
armys morale. However, the banner carrier is a choice target for enemy cutthroats. The character that accepts
the burden of the armys banner will be attacked by many enemy soldiers and archers every Battle Turn until he
abandons the banner. During every Battle Turn the character holds the banner, his general gains a +3 bonus to
his Battle Roll and the character can roll every turn he holds the banner for leadership, (If successful the
character can raise Leadership by 1 point). (50 xp)

Overwhelm
You and the troops in your unit see an enemy Ship Captain in the midst of battle with no guardians, separated in
the chaos of battle. Though it may not be the most honourable thing to do, overwhelming him might give your
army a deciding advantage. The character and any others in his unit may decide to attack the enemy unit
commander (3HD at least). If this Opportunity is successful, the opposing unit suffers a 5 penalty to his next
Battle Roll. (Grants a Skill Roll on the battlefield roll to raise Leadership by 1 point if the character already has
the skill). (100xp)

Ships of Cerilia

Caravel. The precursor of the galleon, the caravel is a two-masted,
square-rigged vessel. However, the galleon has replaced it as the
Anuirean warship of choice. It can carry 3 GB of cargo. A rounded
prow and straight keel characterize the caravel. It has a lower deck, a
main deck with a low forecastle in the bow, and a quarterdeck. Larger
caravels often have a higher poop deck that provides the helmsman a
good vantage of treacherous waters ahead. The caravels rig varies
depending on its major trade route. Although the total cargo tonnage
the caravel can carry is significantly less than
that of the Brecht carrack, the Anuirean
regents prefer more valuable, lower
tonnage cargoes such as silks, spices, and fine wine. Although the caravel is not
designed for combat it does mount a minimum armament to deter pirates (or to
act as one itself.) While slower than many a ship her size, the caravel can go
places others cannot. Many a pirate has chased a caravel over a reef only to find
himself surrendering after he has been run aground.

Coaster. A variety of small fishing vessels and fast traders
make up the category of vessel called coasters. These one- or two-masted vessels
are rigged fore and aft-in other words, with triangular sails. The coaster has
replaced the cog and qarib as a merchant ship where renaissance technology is
current. The cog was a dual service vessel, but ships are now build with greater
specialization to make them better at their primary mission. Too small to act as
warships or carry any significant amount of cargo (not more than two tons, or 1 GB), coasters can transport a
small party or serve courier duty.


34
Cog: The two-masted, square-rigged cog resembles a caravel but has a
broader beam. It tends to be slower and more seaworthy. Cogs are still
popular with the Rjurik, but roundships are replacing them in Brecht
waters. Cogs are generally built of oak, which is an abundant timber
throughout most of Cerilia. This vessel is fitted with a single mast and
a square rigged single sail. Even though this type of rigging prohibits
sailing into the wind, it can be handled by a smaller crew, which also
reduces operational costs. This vessel is a capable sea-going vessel.
Cogs have a cargo capacity of 3 GB.

Dhoura: The standard Khinasi
merchantman, a dhoura is a two-
or three-masted vessel rigged fore
and aft. Unlike Brecht or Anuirean
shipwrights, the Khinasi dont incorporate
forecastles or sterncastles in their designs, but a dhoura may feature an
after deckhouse. Dhouras have a cargo capacity of 2 GB and can carry one
unit of soldiers. he dhoura is the favorite ship of Khinasi corsairs because
its speed, mobility, capability to move without wind, and its ability to
operate in shallow water -- crucial for hiding in coastal waters before
pouncing on a passing ship -- make it ideal for war and piracy.
Not as big as the zebec, it cannot attack the strongest ships without
surprise or some other advantage, but in terms of ships its own class, the
dhoura is more than a match for its adversaries except in rough seas. But
operating in the Bar el-Mehare, storms are reliably seasonal, and the greater threat is a calm which leaves sailing
ships vulnerable.

Dhow: The dhow-the common Khinasi fishing boat and light tradesman-fills the
role of the Anuirean coaster. It resembles a dhoura with only one mast, but its too
small to carry significant cargo (only 1 GB) or troops. A dhow is a traditional
Khinasi sailing vessel with one lateen sail. It is primarily used along the coasts of
the Bar el-Mehare. The hull is stitched with a sturdy cord. A dhow has a full deck.

Drakkar: translated as 'dragon ship', is a variant longship used by Vos for raids.
The drakkar is designed to carry more troops that the standard longships while still
being able to travel in shallow bodies of water, due to the ships being flat
bottomed. Also, unlike the
longship, the drakkar has high,
planked decks that allowed the
warriors on board to rain arrows
and spears onto their enemies during naval battles. However,
because it is top-heavy and long, the drakkar is less
maneuverable in battle than the longship. To counter this
weakness drakkars are frequently lashed together in battle,
creating a massive floating platform from which the
commander of a raider force commands men. Use of the
drakkar has fallen out of favor among the Rjurik, who prefer
the better handling of the longship.. It can carry 1 GB of
cargo.

Galleon: A galleon is a large, multi-decked sailing ship used
primarily by the Brecht and Anuireans. Whether used for war or commerce, they are well armed. Galleons are an
evolution of the caravel and carrack for the new great ocean going voyages. A lowering of the forecastle and
elongation of the hull gives an unprecedented level of stability in the water, and reduced wind resistance at the
front, leading to a faster, more maneuverable vessel. The galleon differs from the older types primarily by being
longer, lower and narrower, with a square tuck stern instead of a round tuck. Carracks tended to be lightly armed
and used for transporting cargo, while galleons are purpose-built warships, and are stronger, more heavily
armed, and also cheaper to build per ton. Galleons are heavily desired by Anuireans for war-fighting. Many of the
Anuirean galleons are imported from Brecht, though both Boeruine and Avanil have constructed their own. A


35
shipbuilder must have the feat "Galleon design" to construct a galleon. Currently there are no Anuirean
shipbuilders capable of building galleons, but Boeruine and Avanil are making sure that they have shipbuilders
apprenticing to the Brecht masters in their service. In Brechtr, the Royal Navy of Mden is the primary builder
and user of galleons which have been quite useful in their wars against the pirates of Grabentod and elsewhere.
Galleons can carry cargo capacity up to 6 GB.
Keelboat: Cerilias rivers serve as highways to its
interior, and dozens of types of small riverboats carry
cargo along these routes. Like coasters or dhows,
keelboats are individually too small to carry significant
cargo (only 1 GB), but theyre good for transporting
passengers along rivers. This 50- to 75-foot-long ship is
15 to 20 feet wide and has a few oars to supplement
its single mast with a square sail. It has a crew of eight
to fifteen and can carry 40 to 50 tons of cargo. It can
make sea voyages, as well as sail down rivers (thanks
to its flat bottom). It moves about 1 mile per hour.

Knarr: is a type of
Rjurik merchant
ship of the same
clinker-built method
used to construct
longships. It is
generally used as a cargo ship. The hull frame of a knarr is shorter, wider,
heavier, and has a deeper draft than the longship. It is a square rigged, single
masted trading vessel that relies
primarily on its single square sail for
propulsion at sea. It is usually half-
decked and typically features the
traditional built-up castle at the stern and a carved stern and
sternposts. The square sail rig and lack of keel give the knarr a poor
performance against the wind.

Longship: For more than a thousand years, longships have been the
favored vessel of the Rjurik. These clinker-built open boats can be
sailed or rowed. Seafaring Vos have adopted the longship as their
design of choice and even build larger versions for warfare ( Drakkars).
This fairly small ship can hold 1 GB of cargo and carry up to 30-40
soldiers.

Roundships: clinker-built method are ships that fit in the era of dark
ages technology, and are widely used by cultures at that level of technology. flat bottomed hulls and dual
steering oars rather than a single rudder. Roundships are generally built of oak, which is an abundant timber
throughout most of Cerilia. This vessel is fitted with a single mast and is
generally found with a square rigged single sail in northern waters, and a single
lanteen on the Suidemiere and Bar el-Mehare. This vessel is a capable sea-going
vessel in clear weather. Suited to trade or war, roundships can carry 5 GB in
cargo.

The Zebec is a the largest traditional Khinasi sailing vessel. It generally has
three lateen sails and so it is primarily used along the coasts of the Bar el-
Mehare. Zebecs are similar to galleys having both lanteen sails and oars for
propulsion. Early zebecs have two masts; later ones three. Zebecs feature a
distinctive hull with pronounced overhanging bow and stern, and are slightly
smaller than Brecht or Anuirean ships given the same duties. Captains will put a
square sail on the foremast for journeys in the open ocean. Khinasi captains
greatly favor zebecs as corsairs, second only to the smaller dhoura. Zebecs are
so effective because they are built with a narrow floor to achieve a higher speed
Executor, Boeruinean Flagship


36
than their victims, but with a considerable beam in order to enable
them to carry an extensive sail-plan. The lateen rig of the zebec
allows for the ship to sail close hauled to the wind often giving it an
advantage in pursuit or escape. The use of oars or sweeps allows
the zebec to approach vessels who are becalmed, a condition far
more common on the Bar el-Mehare than on other seas. In
peacetime, the zebec can transport cargo. A zebec can carry 2 GB
worth of cargo.

Dromond: This archaic vessel was formerly used extensively in
Khinasi. It is a two-banked galley with a raised ram, a full deck, and
usually two masts. The dromond is a fine sailing ship and also very
manoeuvrable by oars. Mainly used by pirates since it is very
maneuverable and the oars are very effective during sea battles.
The dromond can carry up to 2GB worth of cargo.

Galley: This three-masted ship has seventy oars on either side and requires a total crew of 200. A galley is 130
feet long and 20 feet wide, and it can carry 150 tons of cargo or 250 soldiers. For 8,000 gp more, it can be fitted
with a ram and castles with firing platforms fore, aft, and amidships. This ship cannot make sea voyages and
sticks to the coast. It moves about 4 miles per hour
when being rowed or under sail.


There are some rumours faring from the Great Bay
that the Muden Royal Fleet has used advanced
engineering methods and has started to produce a
new type of vessel that is replacing the heavy build
and armoured Galleon. This ship as expected will
dominate the seas of Cerilia and it will be about time
that it will make its appearances on rich domains
outside the Great Bay.





Ships of Cerilia 3-7
Ship MC Hull Seaw. AC DR Crew
Hard
Points
Soft
Points
Pass.
Caravel B 3 18 7 2 60/40/10 2 8 150
Coaster A 1 10 6 0 4/3/2 0 2 4
Cog C 2 17 9 2 20/8/4 1 4 50
Dhoura B 2 16 8 2 25/12/6 1 8 80
Dhow A 1 15 5 0 4/3/2 0 2 4
Drakkar D (2) 1 12 10 1 80/60/20 0 4 70
Galleon B 5 15 10 4 150/85/40 3 12 250
Keelboat C (1) 1 6 7 0 5/4/3 0 2 5
Knarr C (1) 3 16 8 1 12/8/6 1 4 40
Longship C (2) 1 14 7 1 50/40/16 0 2 60
Roundship B 3 16 9 2 70/38/19 1 6 100
Zebec A 3 16 7 2 80/60/20 2 6 100
Dromond A (2) 2 14 6 1 100/60/31 1 4 80
Galley C (1) 3 15 8 1 140/95/41 2 6 200




Arus, Ariyan Pirate Dromond


37
Ship: Type of ship, see page 32.
MC: The manoeuvrability class of the sea vessel. It
affects its speed during sea battles an voyages.
Hull: The ship's hull measures the strength of a ships
hull and its total tolerance to damage. Any time the
ship's hull value drops the ships MC rating drops at the
same time making it harder to leave battle, it was a
usual tactic to cripple the sails or mast of a ship and
them board to capture it. Hull points lost cost
Seaworthiness rating to the ship. Ship seaworthiness
drops in a ratio of 1:2 and DR at a ratio of 1:1.
When a ship loses hull points it loses part of its weapons
also. See the ratio of Hull points to hard and soft points
in a ship.
Sinking: A ships hull points represent how much
damage it can withstand before sinking beneath the
waves.
0 hull points: If a ships structure points drop to 0, the
ship is crippled. Its speed is immediately reduced to 0.
In addition, half of each type of weapon carried
becomes unusable for the duration of the combat. This represents gun decks taking on water. The ship will take
1 Hull point per BR till it reaches a negative amount of Hull points equal to its starting value, then it sinks.
Seaworthiness: The ships overall sturdiness. This is the d20 roll needed to make in order to avoid foundering,
sinking, and hazards, well-built vessels avoid more easily than small and frail ones.
AC: Measures how hard concerning size and manoeuvrability is to target this ship with Missile fire during naval
battles.
DR: Measures the defense rating vs artillery missile attacks, e.g. catapults, mangolens, shot ballistae.
Crew: This number indicates how many men are needed to operate the ship. The first number on the crew chart
measures the total men a ship needs to fully function without getting on each other feet. The second number
indicates the average men the ship needs, and the third number the absolutely necessary least members needed
to sail the ship. If the ship operates with the average number of men each round has to choose where to lose
half its hard points and half its soft points of weapon operation or suffer a -1 at movement speed and -2
seaworthiness. If the ship operates at skeleton crew the ship captain must choose if he will use missile or use his
crew to manoeuvre the ship. The ship will suffer -2 speed and a -4 Seaworthiness or it can waive its attacks and
suffer only -4 Seaworthiness.
Hard Points: How many large war machines can this ship equip.
Soft Points: How many lesser war machines can this ship equip.
Passengers: How many passengers or extra troops can the vessel carry.
Repairs
It happens to everyone, sooner or later. You limp away from an engagement with a number of Hull Points
missing. The time has come for repairs to your vessel. When a ship is damaged, there are several varieties of
repairs that can be attempted: Battle Repairs, Field Repairs and Port Repairs.

Battle Repairs
Batte Repairs are repairs that occur during the combat itself (pumping, patching of holes, quick lashing of broken
spars and rigging), and can only be attempted if:
1) The ship has a Carpenter on board who has at least 6 ranks in carpentry skill
2) The ship has currently taken no more than 75% of its Hull Points in damage. More significant damage requires
more extensive work than is possible under battle conditions, and requires either Field Repairs or Port Repairs .
Note that this restriction is not cumulative--it only reflects the current damage.
3) If the ship has taken more than 50% of its Structure Points in damage, the Carpenter can only patch (not truly
repair), and this will heal no more than 25% of the total damage taken.
Further repairs (Field or Port) will be needed. To effect Battle Repairs, the carpenter must make a Craft
(carpentry) check. This roll can also be modified by the Seamanship rating of the ships commander. Use the
base sail change results from the table on page 33 for the amount of time those repairs take (dont forget to take
into account the time penalties for operating with a skeleton crew). If succesful the carpenter can repair 1 Hull
Point per 3 Battle rounds but requires at least 15 men helping him with the job. So its better understood that
Battle repairs are done when the ship has not lost a lot of crew.


38
Field Repairs
More extensive damage requires more extensive repairs. There are two ways this can be done--by the ships
crew, in the field, or in port by a combination of the shipss crew and any ship builders that can be hired.
If a crew wants to engage in a Field Repair, lumber needs to be gathered. Large trees have to be felled
and cleaned to create lumber which are used for hull, decking, masts, etc.
The vessel is run aground on a secluded beach, the cargo and fittings are off-loaded, and the repairs
made (even to the point of pulling the vessel over onto its side to repair the bottom of the hull--a
process known as Careening).
If the entire crew is put to work on repairs, and an island is chosen with enough wood for the needed supplies,
the repairs will take 1 full eight-day of work (working during the daylight hours--12 hours) for
every Hull point of repair (this represents not just the repairs themselves, which actually dont take up
much time, but rather the finding and felling of trees, the planing of the wood, the offloading of the
vessel, the careening, etc.). If the vessel does not have a full crew, or if less than the full crew is
available for the work, the repairs will take additional time, based on the time penalty for skeleton
crews. (Double the week for Average Crew and four times the time needed if only skeleton crew present)
The Ships Carpenter makes a carpentry roll. The margin by which the roll exceeds the skill is the number of days
by which the process is reduced. (The expertise of the Carpenter makes the job easier). If the roll fails, the
amount by which it fails is the number of days of additional work required.
After the time has passed, the repairs have been made, and the ship is back up to its normal Hull Point total.

Port Repairs
Repairs in Port are much quicker, although much more expensive, and may also attract attention of the
authorities. Port facilities will repair 1 SP per four days, and cost based on the value of the vessel: take the value
of the vessel and divide it by the total number of Hull Points the vessel has when fully repaired, and this will give
you the cost to repair each point of damage.
The cost can be reduced by the repair crews taking more time. Taking 3 times as much time (reducing the rate
will reduce the cost by 50%.

Modifications
Ship owners often modified their vessels, adding more weapons, streamlining the hull and generally fitting out
the ship to be more suited for combat on the high seas than the shipwrights ever intended.
The following is a list of available modifications, their benefits, and any costs.

Adding Guns
A vessel can be over-armed up to 20% above the specs listed in the basic stat (Hard or Soft Points), by reducing
cargo space by 20% and passenger size. These guns can be placed anywhere the ship's owner wishes.
Upgrading Firepower
Often, a ship would have its guns replaced with larger bore weapons--however, due to the added weight and,
more importantly, the unbalancing effects of the larger weapons, no ship can carry weapons larger than 1 size
higher than the normally-outfit gun it replaces. In addition, the ships speed is reduced by 1 and maneuverability
is reduced by one category size for every 3 or more replacements thereof.
Streamlining
A captured vessel would sometimes have its rails cut down, its decks lowered and some of its heavy
superstructure beams removed in an effort to make the ship faster. This process requires a Ships Carpenter with
Craft(carpentry) of at least Journeyman skill (Rank 6), and will increase the top speed of a ship by 1 for every
point of Hull removed, to a maximum of 2.
Careening
The hull of a wooden sailing vessel would become fouled with barnacles and other growth which increased drag
on a vessel. A ship which undergoes careening (pulling the ship onto a beach to expose the underside) can add 1
to its top speed...although that extra speed will disappear after 3 months (as barnacles and other growth
returns), requiring re-careening.
Hull Reinforcement
Reinforcing a ships hull with heavier wood makes the ship harder to damage, but heavier and slower. Using the
rules for repair (including costs, if done in port), a ship can add up to 1 DR for a reduction of 1 speed to a
maximum of 2.


39
Anuirean Realms; Sea power

The following material can add naval dimension to an Anuirean campaign. To meet the costs of maintaining their
fleets, many regents offer protection to the merchant marine or loan vessels to local guilds in return for a share
of trade routes listed profits. (Or, the regent PC may use another source of income to support the navy, such as
a tax increase or decree by law holding.) Concerning the major change of roles in the Anuirean realm setup the
Navies are now controled by the major forces of Anuire, thus realms outside the extension of those are severely
outnumbered and exist in the sea power map only by their tolerance or diplomatic relations.

Aerenwenean Navy : 2 galleons, 6 caravels, 2 coasters. The fleet is based upriver at the port of Calrie itself, a
days sail from the Gulf of Coeranys.
Imperial Coalition Navy : 12 galleons, 18 caravels, 12 coasters. The Prince of Avanil holds the old Imperial
Yards of the City of Anuire and uses the citys harbour as his main naval base. The capitals fortifications protect
the naval dockyards and ships.
Boeruinean Navy : 9 galleons, 12 caravels, 9 coasters. Most of Boeruines fleet sails from the port of Tariene,
which has a much better harbour than Seaharrow.
Ilienese Navy: 2 galleons, 4 caravels, 2 coasters.
Ghoerian Navy: 5 galleons, 10 caravels, 8 coasters, 4 Dhouras. The fleet of Ghoere takes harbour at the port of
Gulfport and patrols all the Gulf of Coeranys against piracy.
Mieren Navy: 3 galleons, 7 Caravels, 6 Coasters. Still not part of any major alliance Mieres keepsakes its own
fleet in order to defend against the pirates that delve in the Straits of Aerele.






40

Primary source material

This fan-supported document is not available for sale. No profit can be made on the distribution of derivatives
work without the permission of copyright owners.

1. R. Baker and C. McComb. BIRTHRIGHT Campaign Setting Rulebook. TSR #3100, TSR, 1995.
2. E. Stark. The Book of Regency. TSR #3137, unpublished.
3. Gary Foss War and Conquest v 1.0 . Internet review
4. Birthright.net
5. Birthright 3
rd
Edition Rulebook
6. Pendragon Campaign Setting
7. 7th Sea Waves Of Blood
8. 7th Sea Ships Sea Battles
9. Sword and Sorcery, Cry Havoc
10. AEG Legend of the Five Rings 4th Edition
11. D20 Corsair, The Definitive Guide To Ships+
12. AEG War
13. AD&D 2nd edition, Battlesystem rules
14. AD&D 2nd edition , Player's Option, Combat and Tactics
15. All those not mentioned here whose work has inspired us.