City of Carmel-by-the-Sea, California

Quarterly Performance Report

Fourth Quarter
Fiscal Year 2013-2014
Presented to the City Council
August 5, 2014
August 5, 2014 Regular City Council Meeting
Page 62

FOURTH QUARTER
This report provides a quarterly update of the City’s Key Initiatives as well as a current
look at our fiscal, operational and capital projects based on the adopted fiscal year
2013-2014 operating plan and budget. The fourth quarter ended June 30, 2014.
Information on where things stand with Key Initiatives and additional fiscal reporting
can be found here. The financial summary, departmental summaries, and status of
capital projects remain as sections of this report.
Key Initiatives: The City Council adopted the 2014 Key Initiatives at the start of the fiscal
third quarter for calendar year 2014. You can find the status of each on Pages 3 - 7 of
this report. The city is progressing on each of the 2014 Key Initiatives that the City
Council adopted in January with certain initiatives funded and undertaken as part of the
fiscal year 2014-2015 operating plan and budget.
Financial summary: General Fund revenue received is at 97.35 percent as of June 30,
2014 with additional revenue of $1.4 million anticipated but not yet received. Revenues
are explained in more detail on page 8 of this report. General fund expenditures are at
97.23 percent, slightly below budget, as of June 30, 2014 with less than an additional
$450,000 accrued expenditures anticipated. Accounting for accrued revenues and
expenditures, revenues are anticipated to be at 105.71% of budget and expenditures at
99.93% for a projected year end surplus of approximately $1 million.
Department summary: The highlights of each city department’s activities can be found
on Pages 9-18. In each of these summaries you will find notable budget variances,
performance data, activity, and key trends. Reported performance measures reflect
those that were included in the operating plan and budget for the 2013-2014 fiscal year.
Capital projects: Starting on Page 19, we have included a summary of the funded fiscal
year 2013-2014 capital projects. Work progressed on all funded projects. Eleven
projects are complete.
Summary of Report
August 5, 2014 Regular City Council Meeting
Page 63

Develop a comprehensive list of parking solutions and implement solutions in accordance
with Parking Management Plan priorities and goals.
• In 2013 staff completed an analysis of the state of the City’s public parking. The City
Council provided parking management policy goals and guidance at its meeting of
December 3, 2013 and subsequently adopted this 2014 Key Initiative. 2014 activities
include implementation of various parking solutions in accordance with City Council
goals and guidance. A parking management plan was developed based on input
from the public and presented at the April 1 City Council meeting. The plan includes
recommended policies and technology that are responsive to the needs of the public
and parking options that provide value and service to our visitors, employees,
business owners, and residents. As a follow up to the recommended policies, a
timeline to implement the following polices was presented and approved by council
at the May 6, 2014 City Council meeting.
1) Extend current permitted parking enforcement time from 6:00 pm to 7:00
pm. This change was implemented on July 1st.
2) Provide more convenient and attractive parking options for employees by
allowing unrestricted parking at the Sunset Center north lot, and eliminating
time restrictions along Junipero Street between 3rd and 6th including the
center medians. This change is anticipated to be implemented on August 4.
3) Implement a paid parking multi-space pilot program on both sides of Ocean
Ave between Junipero Ave and Monte Verde Street. This change is
anticipated to be implemented on October 13th.

Maintain a leadership role in developing a long-term solution to the region’s water supply
and develop additional local water conservation and water supply alternatives.
• Supply
o Mayor Burnett serves as President of the Monterey Peninsula Regional Water
Authority (MPRWA). The goal of the MPRWA is to find a solution to the
Peninsula Water Shortage due to the over-drafting of the Carmel River. A
test well for the desalination plant portion of the Monterey Peninsula Water
Supply Project is in the permitting process with the City of Marina. Ground
Water Replenishment is another component of a water solution and work
continues on issues such as the source water negotiations, the drought
2014 Key Initiatives
August 5, 2014 Regular City Council Meeting
Page 64
strategies including identification of other water sources, storage of
differential flows, improvement of water quality and salt mitigation
strategies.
o Carmel-by-the-Sea is analyzing other local source water supply alternatives
and quantifying potential local need. The City testified at a State hearing to
consider licensing of the Odello Ranch water rights. Carmel asked the State
Water Resources Control Board to approve the petition and issue a
determination that the water delivered for municipal purposes is consistent
with the cease and desist order issued upon the California American Water
Company. Circulation of environmental documents by the Water Board is
expected to occur soon. A decision will follow.
• Conservation: The annual water conservation plan is scheduled to be presented to
the City Council in September 2014. It will include the status of several water
conservation and non-potable water supply alternatives. City facilities are compliant
with water conservation fixtures. Staff is analyzing opportunities for the City to take
a more active role in water leak prevention and mitigation.
Implement the Shoreline Management and Forest Management Plans focusing on beach
fires and the key priorities and including the Del Mar Master Plan and Mission Trail
Nature Preserve Master Plan.
• Shoreline and Forest Master Plans: Security patrols of the beach have been
enhanced to coincide with the increased amount of people visiting and recreating at
Carmel beach. Weekly charcoal cleanup has begun and the contract with California
Conservation Corps is being finalized for increased cleaning. Signage consultants are
being evaluated, with the goal of retaining a consultant by August to begin work on a
comprehensive assessment and design of signs for the shoreline (a FY 14-15 funded
project). A structural engineer has been retained to assess the condition of the
beach stairs. Sand redistribution efforts to cover revetments and assist with
improved access to the beach occurred in June. During the 4th quarter, 16 stumps
and 37 trees were removed and four trees were planted. A comprehensive stump
survey was completed to be used to develop a stump removal plan (increased
funding in FY 14-15 for stump removal) and ivy was removed on 10 trees along
Camino del Monte Avenue.
• Del Mar Master Plan: A professional services agreement is being negotiated with a
botanist to begin implementation of the Dunes Habitat Plan. Staff are evaluating
August 5, 2014 Regular City Council Meeting
Page 65
additional paver options for the Del Mar sidewalk project and preparing
recommendations for the August Planning Commission meeting.
• Mission Trail Nature Preserve Master Plan: Staff and Friends of MTNP are
collaborating on a work plan of activities that includes trail maintenance and other
minor improvements at the Preserve. The Friends continue to conduct weed pulls
and other invasive removal to augment staff efforts. Seasonal fuel abatement has
occurred and the options for the timing and use of the goats for vegetation
management are being explored. New trail signs have been installed at MTNP. The
contract with a landscape architect for the Mtn. View entrance is being finalized. A
conceptual design will be brought forth for the review by the Friends, the Forest and
Beach Commission and the Planning Commission.
Revitalize the Scenic Pathway and improve Rio Park and Rio Road entrance to the Mission
Trail Nature Preserve and begin development of a regional trail plan.
• Scenic Pathway: Installation of a wireless transmitter to improve irrigation of the
Scenic Pathway is anticipated to be complete by the end of August, after the
ASBS Dry Weather Diversion Project is completed. This will enable irrigation and
routine maintenance to recommence. Minor maintenance activities have
occurred such as the placement of fencing, plants and updated access signs to
prevent access to the beach from the pathway banks and slopes. A Scenic
Pathway revitalization project was added to the Capital Improvement Plan as a
fiscal year 2016-2017 project.
• Rio Park: This is included as a multi-year a capital project in the Capital
Improvement Plan.
• Rio Road entrance to MTNP: This is included as a Fiscal Year 2016-2017 capital
project in the Capital Improvement Plan. As design moves forward on the Mtn.
View entrance project, the landscape architect will be made aware of the
possibility of this project so that similar design elements may be incorporated
into both the Mtn. View and Rio Road entrances as appropriate.
• Regional trails planning: The City Council created an ad hoc committee to
examine regional trails connectivity. The group had several meetings and
identified a list of suggested trails improvements presenting its findings to the
City Council. Staff is examining the list to determine which are scheduled to be
completed, which will need to be brought to the City Council for inclusion in the
Capital Improvement Plan, and which will require interagency cooperation. City
August 5, 2014 Regular City Council Meeting
Page 66
Council authorized a consultant to help facilitate the entitlement work needed
for the Rio Park/Larsen Field Pedestrian and Bicycle Trail Project.
Implement year 1 of the Information Technology Strategic Plan.
• Administrative Services began implementation of Year 1 of the IT Strategic Plan. On
February 4
th
. Implementation of Phase I of the Information Technology Strategic
Plan is a 2014 City Council Key initiative. Phase I encompasses four key projects that
lead to the accomplishment of the Plan’s short and long range objectives as outlined
in the Strategic Plan. The four projects undertaken in Phase I are the website
update (online City Hall initiative), ERP upgrades, including the financial, payroll and
human resources systems, the legislative management system and technology
upgrades starting with the Emergency Operations Center. Progress is occurring on
all four projects as described in the capital project section of this report on page 19.
Adopt a Facility Use Plan and consider long-term highest and best use of the City’s
facilities.
• Staff is in the process of gathering additional assessments by structural and
mechanical engineers and waterproofing/roofing consultants. When the Plan
returns to Council, the information can be used in evaluating and determining the
long-term highest and best use of the City's facilities.
Coordinate a campus plan and transition corridor with the update of the Sunset Center’s
strategic plan.
• The Sunset Center operator has begun a strategic planning process. It will provide
insight into future use and needs of the Sunset Center campus. The October City
Council workshop is a potential date for Sunset Center to discuss the strategic
planning process and to receive feedback from the City Council and public about the
process and its findings.
• The transition corridor project is pending.
Complete the design of the Forest Theater renovation to enable construction documents
and fundraising to commence for future year construction.
• The City released a statement of qualifications in June for architectural services.
Respondents were evaluated and a recommendation to enter into an agreement
with an architectural firm to develop repair documents for the facility is on the
August, 2014 City Council agenda.
August 5, 2014 Regular City Council Meeting
Page 67
Focus on community beautification projects including trash can replacement, median
beautification, and signage updates; adopt a new waste hauler franchise agreement.
• Trash can replacement: About 30 new replacement cans have been placed on
Ocean Avenue; plans are underway to identify locations for additional cans at
Mission Trail Nature Preserve and to refurbish existing cans in the commercial area.
• Median beautification: A capital project is included in the proposed capital budget
to improve the Ocean Avenue median. During the third quarter the City Council
discussed Ocean Avenue median lighting. The Planning Commission has a
subcommittee to examine the lighting issue.
• Signage: The City received seven proposals in response to a statement of
qualifications it released for a signage consultant. The firms are being reviewed and
a signage consultant should be in place by the end of August to begin the
assessment and initial phase of the shoreline signage project.
• New waste hauler franchise agreement: The City Council approved a new hauler
franchise agreement during its July 17, 2014 meeting. A transition is underway to
enable the new hauler, Green Waste, to begin serving the community in 2015.
Investigate the five options for Flanders to move toward reaching a final resolution.
• The five options of the City Council include: lease as single-family residence, re-
examine the historic designation and consider demolishing or moving the facility,
sale for use as a single-family residence, hold occupied with minimal improvements,
and hold unoccupied.
o Lease: The long-term lease RFP remains active and the City continues to
actively show the property.
o Re-examine historic designation: Staff continues to search for a viable path
forward regarding this option
o Sale: Staff is providing walk-throughs with real estate agents.
o Hold occupied: Staff has completed an initial building habitability assessment
to determine what minimum improvements would be necessary to allow for
occupancy by a caretaker. Next, the City will need to develop a cost estimate
for the initial repairs, and an action plan for longer-term maintenance.
o Hold unoccupied: This option has been the status quo. Staff still needs to
confirm how long this option is feasible given other maintenance and upkeep
requirements.
August 5, 2014 Regular City Council Meeting
Page 68

Financial Summary
MAJOR FUND BUDGET SUMMARY 100% of the Fiscal Year
4th Qtr
Actual Actual Revi sed Budget Actual Adopted Budget Actual % of adj usted
Descri pti on FY 2010-11 FY 2011-12 FY 2012-13 FY 2012-13 FY 2013-14 FY 2013-14 Budget
GENERAL FUND
Source of Funds
Taxes 10,368,322 11,216,500 11,472,163 11,979,023 14,298,618 13,808,451 96.57%
Franchise Fees 476,597 491,674 512,698 500,965 547,402 519,265 94.86%
Fees & Permits 390,738 430,250 430,500 451,241 435,000 465,630 107.04%
Fines & Forfeit 19,314 17,907 25,200 16,648 25,960 31,525 121.44%
Intergovernmental 450,778 189,458 143,715 352,610 419,134 397,060 94.73%
Other 394,465 604,616 428,266 917,802 196,956 518,199 263.10%
Transfers from Other Funds 724,566 548,534 585,002 159,700 812,456 551,765 67.91%
12,824,780 13,498,939 13,597,544 14,377,989 16,735,526 16,291,895 97.35%
Uses of Funds
Policy & Executive 1,214,436 1,359,940 1,278,218 1,051,034 1,354,911 1,377,291 101.65%
Public Safety 4,850,572 4,701,255 5,012,695 4,773,680 5,007,091 5,068,240 101.22%
Public Services 2,113,969 2,098,402 2,596,133 2,438,583 2,436,077 2,257,675 92.68%
Library 969,482 910,722 956,427 954,747 986,177 915,425 92.83%
Administrative 891,592 1,000,749 1,197,166 1,302,323 1,629,063 1,637,333 100.51%
Planning & Bldg 571,994 599,918 600,960 578,670 935,185 1,003,141 107.27%
Non-Dept 753,845 781,289 923,318 769,129 692,426 695,008 100.37%
Transfers for Debt Service 536,609 537,771 710,048 709,765 1,245,206 1,241,565 99.71%
Transfers for Cap Ex 220,932 - 472,607 1,918,994 1,581,437 82.41%
Other Uses 493,830 456,898 322,579 1,328,295 483,886 450,216 93.04%
12,617,261 12,446,944 13,597,544 14,378,833 16,689,016 16,227,331 97.23%
GAS TAX FUND
Source of Funds
Taxes 64,117 114,833 72,450 103,425 124,256 106,765 85.92%
Interest - 554 2,500 -
64,117 115,387 74,950 103,425 124,256 106,765 85.92%
Uses of Funds
Salaries and Benefits 44,674 28,939 - - - -
Materials & Supplies 5,600 - - -
Trans. To Capital - - - -
Transfer to General - 100,000 74,950 78,121 124,256 106,765 85.92%
50,274 128,939 74,950 78,121 124,256 106,765 85.92%
CAPITAL PROJECTS FUND
Source of Funds
Grants - 247,978 465,632 35,632 705,000 272,437 38.64%
Intergovernmental - 291,000 370,000 96,000 -
Fees - 305,600 180,000 202,200 224,727 111.14%
Transfer in 220,932 110,000 2,058,994 1,581,437 76.81%
Use of Prior Funds - 1,058,918 651,758 426,178 -
Interest
220,932 1,597,896 1,792,990 847,810 2,966,194 2,078,601 70.08%
Uses of Funds
Capital Expenditure 1,085,637 1,597,896 1,792,990 847,810 2,966,194 2,078,601 70.08%
Designated for Future - -
1,085,637 1,597,896 1,792,990 847,810 2,966,194 2,078,601 70.08%
AMBULANCE FUND
Source of Funds
Call Income - 497,636 370,000 695,016 625,000 656,160 104.99%
County CSA 74 - 12,000 12,106 100.88%
Transfer in - 433,179 140,394 447,135 390,112 87.25%
Debts Recovered - - 2,500
- 497,636 803,179 835,410 1,086,635 1,058,378 97.40%
Uses of Funds
Salaries and Benefits 339,144 571,944 685,785 953,135 777,118 81.53%
Materials & Supplies 38,544 210,632 149,625 133,500 281,260 210.68%
- 377,688 782,576 835,410 1,086,635 1,058,378 97.40%
August 5, 2014 Regular City Council Meeting
Page 69
REVENUE

Revenue continued strengthening and ended the fiscal year above budget projections. The Big
3 revenue sources are exceeded projections by $900,000 when timing variances and revenue
accruals are taken into account.
Actual Transient Occupancy Tax (TOT) receipts received through the fourth quarter total
$4,257,930 which represents ten months of revenue; the remaining two months of revenue is
estimated to be $800,000 bringing the year end TOT revenue estimate to $5.1 million
compared to an annual budget of $4.9.
Sales tax advances are provided by the State three times per quarter and a reconciliation
payment is sent to make up the difference between the actual amount owed and the advances.
The reconciliation payment normally arrives two months after the fact. Staff anticipates the
reconciliation payment for the fourth quarter to be $640,000 bringing sales tax revenue above
annual budget projections by $600,000. Actual Sales Tax receipts received through the fourth
quarter total $4.2 million compared to the annual revenue budget of $4.2 million; the addition
of the projected reconciliation payment of $640,000 brings the annual sales tax revenue
estimate to $4.8 million compared an annual budget of $4.2 million.
Property taxes are primarily received in December and April with the December payment
typically slightly higher than 50% of the total. Actual property tax revenue received as of the
end of the fourth quarter was $4.8 million, or 102%, of the annual revenue budget of $4.7
million.

$0
$1,000,000
$2,000,000
$3,000,000
$4,000,000
$5,000,000
$6,000,000
TOT Sales Tax Property Tax
Big 3 Revenue
Q2 Est to Receive
Q4 Actual
Q4 Budget
Department Summary
August 5, 2014 Regular City Council Meeting
Page 70
EXPENDITURES


The City Council budget is below target as of the end of the fourth quarter with 94%
expended. The largest expenditures in City Council are set aside for City membership
dues and Council Discretionary spending primarily allocated to community partners.
Performance measures are as expected; City goals and objectives were reviewed during
the second quarter and adopted in the third quarter of fiscal year 2013-2014, and the
average length of meetings omits workshops including only the fourteen City Council
meetings that occurred during the year (one per month and the March special meeting
and June 10 budget hearing).

$0
$50,000
$100,000
$150,000
$200,000
City Council
Q4 Budget Q4 Actual
Financial FY 12-13 FY 13-14 Q4 13-14 % spent $ remain
Ci ty Counci l 118,170 171,621 161,376 94% 10,245
Performance FY 12-13 FY 13-14 Q4 13-14 FY 14-15 FY 15-16
Set Ci ty goal s and
objecti ves Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
Conduct annual
performance revi ews of
staff appoi ntees 4/4 4/4 3/4 4/4 4/4
Agenda i tems added after
agenda revi ew 12 0 2 0 0
Average l ength of Ci ty
Counci l meeti ngs 4:11 4:00 5:26 3:30 3:30
August 5, 2014 Regular City Council Meeting
Page 71


The expenditures through the end of the year show a positive variance of $13,189.
There were no significant variances between actual expenditures and budget. Legal
service trends are to balance the use of outside counsel and in-house counsel while
meeting the City’s need to comply with the law and protect the interests of the
organization.


$0
$100,000
$200,000
$300,000
$400,000
$500,000
$600,000
Legal
Q4 Budget Q4 Actual
Financial FY 12-13 FY 13-14 Q4 13-14 % spent $ remain
Legal 250,395 479,719 466,530 97% 13,189
Performance FY 12-13 FY 13-14 Q4 13-14 FY 14-15 FY 15-16
Resol ve 100% of l i ti gati on
cases wi thout any
payment to pl ai nti ff 100% 100% 100% 100% 100%
Provi de advi ce on an
esti mated number of
agenda i tems per year 184 225 184 230 230
Respond to 100% of l egal
requests by negoti ated
target date 100% 100% 100% 100% 100%
August 5, 2014 Regular City Council Meeting
Page 72


The key trend in the City Administrator’s Office is continuing to build capacity within the
organization to effectively meet the goals of the City Council and objectives of adopted policy
plans. Performance measures demonstrate significant activity. The demand for Public Records
Act requests is more than anticipated with the staffing approved in the adopted budget but a
management process is in place to effectively process requests. Requests beyond the 10-day
goal are indicative of both the volume and complexity of requests.

$0
$100,000
$200,000
$300,000
$400,000
$500,000
$600,000
$700,000
$800,000
City Administrator
Office
Marketing and Eco Dev Community Services
City Administrator's Office
Q4 Budget Q4 Actual
Financial FY 12-13 FY 13-14 Q4 13-14 % spent $ remain
Ci ty Admi ni strator Offi ce 683,905 703,571 749,385 107% (45,814)
Marketi ng and Eco Dev 304,587 356,800 359,255 101% (2,455)
Communi ty Servi ces 73,042 127,086 90,961 72% 36,125
General Ci ty Programs 3,279,796 4,340,512 3,968,226 91% 372,286
Performance FY 12-13 FY 13-14 Q4 13-14 FY 14-15 FY 15-16
Conduct quarterl y
operati onal revi ew
meeti ngs 24 24 24 24 24
Compl ete Department
manager performance
revi ews before due date 9 6 5 6 6
64/64 50/50 97/124 50/50 50/50
100% 100% 78% 100% 100%
% of error free Ci ty Counci l
agendas 39% 80% 93% 100% 100%
Marketing
Conde Naste Reader's
Choi ce rati ng/rank 77.6/10% 80/9 79/6 85/8 85/8
Opt-i n ebl ast subscri bers 23,931 30,000 36,023 40,000 45,000
Carmel Cal i forni a.com web
referral s 539,752 550,000 164,464 550,000 550,000
% Publ i c Records Act
requests processed wi thi n
10 days
August 5, 2014 Regular City Council Meeting
Page 73


Key trends include: Rebuilding the City’s IT systems and human resources support to
the departments and developing policies and procedures for purchasing, financial
activities, contract management, and other internal services. Administrative Services is
proceeding with Year One IT Strategic Plan activities, a 2014 Key Initiative.
Budget: There are no significant budget variances.
Performance: Data shows continued positive progress on closing out workers’
compensation claims. The new safety training program continues to develop, now
indicating 60% of training versus 15% reported in the previous quarter.

$0
$500,000
$1,000,000
$1,500,000
$2,000,000
Administrative Services
Q4 Budget Q4 Actual
Financial FY 12-13 FY 13-14 Q4 13-14 % spent $ remain
Admi n. Servi ces 1,299,723 1,626,663 1,634,933 101% (8,270)
Treasurer 2,600 2,400 2,400 100% -
Performance FY 12-13 FY 13-14 Q4 13-14 FY 14-15 FY 15-16
% empl oyee performance
revi ews compl eted on ti me 38% 95% 98% 95% 95%
# of worker comp cl ai ms
(new/open) 3/11 3/8 9/1 0/5 0/5
Compl ete regul ar
workforce safety trai ni ng - 80% 60% 85% 85%
# of Budget Revi si ons 16 10 9 10 10
Respond to hel p desk cal l s
85% of the ti me wi thi n 1 hr - 90% 87% 95% 95%
Resol ve 90% of l evel 1 IT
servi ce requests the same
day - 95% 95% 95% 95%
August 5, 2014 Regular City Council Meeting
Page 74


Key trends include: There is stable work volume in the three divisions. A total of 65
planning permit applications were received. The recently hired Building Official
commenced work on June 9, and the building safety program is under development.
There are a number of Planning Commission sub-committees set up to reviewing the
City’s wine tasting policy, median lighting, awnings, dunes, and sign regulations
Budget: The Department budget variance is primarily a result of staffing changes and
workload increases necessitating an increase in contract staff.
Performance: Other than for signs, the vast majority of planning permit applications
required more than two weeks for review. Typical turn-around times were 3 to 4
weeks, and 90% were reviewed within 30 days. Code compliance response significantly
improved during the 4th quarter as reported to the City Council in the monthly reports.

$0
$200,000
$400,000
$600,000
$800,000
$1,000,000
$1,200,000
Community Planning & Building
Q4 Budget Q4 Actual
Financial FY 12-13 FY 13-14 Q4 13-14 % spent $ remain
Communi ty Pl anni ng 578,670 935,185 1,003,141 107% (67,956)
Performance FY 12-13 FY 13-14 Q4 13-14 FY 14-15 FY 15-16
Revi ew al l desi gn revi ew
appl i cati ons for
compl eteness wi thi n 2 weeks 85% 90% 42% 95% 95%
Provi de bui l di ng permi t pl an
check correcti ons w/i n 4 wks 90% 95% 90% 98% 98%
Avg. 2 days from fi rst code
compl ai nt to i nvesti gati on 75% 85% 90% 90% 95%
Compl ete 100% of
i nspecti ons wi thi n three
busi ness days of request 90% 95% 100% 98% 98%
August 5, 2014 Regular City Council Meeting
Page 75


Key trends include workplan alignment of department activities to meet the expectations of the
Capital Improvement Plan, other policy plan objectives, and annual Key Initiatives. Completing
a robust capital improvement plan is also a key department trend. The waste hauler franchise
services negotiations culminated in the City Council adopting a franchise agreement. This
quarter reflected the completion of seasonal activities, including restriping and repainting of
curbs, parking stalls and other street markings; fuel abatement at Mission Trail Nature
Preserve; sand redistribution; replacement of new trash cans and maintenance of the tree
squares downtown and the beginning of weekly charcoal cleanup. Other forest management
activities included the removal of trees, stumps and ivy and the preventative pruning of trees,
with the trend of removal of trees continuing.

$0
$200,000
$400,000
$600,000
$800,000
$1,000,000
$1,200,000
$1,400,000
Facilities Forest, Park, & Beach Public Works
Public Services
Q4 Budget Q4 Actual
Financial FY 12-13 FY 13-14 Q4 13-14 % spent $ remain
Faci l i ti es 485,124 655,083 569,835 87% 85,248
Forest, Park, & Beach 464,608 506,636 432,430 85% 74,206
Publ i c Works 1,106,307 1,244,797 1,263,558 102% (18,761)
Engi neeri ng 4,914 10,613 10,800 102% (187)
Performance FY 12-13 FY 13-14 Q4 13-14 FY 14-15 FY 15-16
Custodi al expendi ture per
square foot 0.95 $ 0.85 $ 0.62 $ 0.80 $ 0.80 $
% of Ci ty trees recei vi ng
preventati ve mai ntenance 5% 7% 1.3% 10% 15%
% of l ane mi l es wi th a
Pavement Condi ti on Index
of 70 or greater 56% 60% 56% 65% 70%
Yards of materi al removed
from Ci ty streets annual l y 750 775 96 800 825
Avg. rati ng of cl eanl i ness
of beaches and parks
(1=good and 5 = poor) - 3 3 2 2
August 5, 2014 Regular City Council Meeting
Page 76


Ambulance Trends remain steady with calls for service totaling 167 for the quarter with
132 of those calls to areas within Carmel-by-the-Sea. Call income ended the year
slightly better than projected. Ambulance has all six staff positions filled.
Fire The primary trend is stability in service and response time. Fire responded to 167
calls for service within Carmel-by-the-Sea during the fourth quarter. The fire rescue
boat is in service available for deployment along the Monterey Peninsula. The
department is examining having an increased number of paramedics on the fire engines.
Police The trend in police is no change in Part One crime (property crime, burglary,
larceny) and a decrease (-17%) in Part Two crime (assaults, vandalism, drugs). There
was a continuing decrease in moving citations. Total calls for service were 3,377 up
from 3,048 during the prior quarter. Calls for service related to beach fires dropped
significantly as a result of the extra staffing on the beach devoted to beach fire
management.
$0
$500,000
$1,000,000
$1,500,000
$2,000,000
$2,500,000
$3,000,000
$3,500,000
Ambulance
Expenditure
Fire Police
Public Safety
Q4 Budget Q4 Actual
Financial FY 12-13 FY 13-14 Q4 13-14 % spent $ remain
Ambul ance Revenue 695,016 657,525 668,266 102% (10,741)
Ambul ance Expendi ture 835,410 1,086,635 1,058,378 97% 28,257
Fi re 1,766,835 2,039,181 2,044,727 100% (5,546)
Pol i ce 3,006,845 2,967,910 3,023,512 102% (55,602)
August 5, 2014 Regular City Council Meeting
Page 77


Performance FY 12-13 FY 13-14 Q4 13-14 FY 14-15 FY 15-16
Ambulance
% code-3 ambul ance cal l s
wi thi n CBTS wi th a response
ti me of 5 mi ns or l ess from
di spatch to arri val 95% 95% 97% 95% 95%
% pati ents i n need of
advanced l i fe support wi thi n
CBTS that recei ve treatment
wi thi n 5 mi ns or l ess from
ambul ance di spatch to arri val 95% 95% 97% 95% 95%
% ful l cardi ac arrest pati ents
wi th a pul se upon del i very to
the hospi tal 40% 40% 33% 40% 40%
Annual ambul ance transport
fee recovery rate 53% 53% 67% 53% 53%
Fire
Total Fi re expen per capi ta
(excl udes ambul ance) 471.39 $ 497.28 $ 547.01 $ 513.86 $ 523.83 $
Annual % of code-3 fi re cal l s
wi thi n CBTS wi th a response
ti me of 5 mi ns of l ess from
di spatch to ti me of arri val 95% 95% 98% 95% 95%
Annual % of structure fi res
wi thi n CBTS contai ned to
room or structure of ori gi n 80% 80% - 80% 80%
Annual compl i ance of 300 l i fe
and safety fi re i nspecti ons 98% 98% 65% 98% 98%
Police
Annual total pol i ce cal l s wi th
a response ti me of 5 mi ns or
l ess from di spatch to arri val 95% 95% 95% 95% 95%
Average di spatch process ti me 45 sec 45 sec 2:08 45 sec 45 sec
Student compl eti on of the
Carmel di versi on program 90% 90% 90% 90% 90%
Mai ntai n UCR Cri me
cl earance rate at or above 25% 25% 31% 25% 25%
August 5, 2014 Regular City Council Meeting
Page 78


The library has a positive budget variances as a result of fewer personnel expenditures
than anticipated. The Department’s employee lost time rate of 3.43% remained steady
from what it was at the end of the third quarter. Performance data remains strong
reflecting the key trends of increasingly strong customer satisfaction ratings and growth
in library and program attendance. Activity highlights include:
• The art appraisal project is underway as included in the adopted budget
• Year Two implementation of the Library Strategic Plan is underway
• Library programs are planned to return to Carpenter Hall for the upcoming
season



$0
$200,000
$400,000
$600,000
$800,000
$1,000,000
$1,200,000
Library
Q4 Budget Q4 Actual
Financial FY 12-13 FY 13-14 Q4 13-14 % spent $ remain
Li brary 954,747 986,177 915,425 93% 70,752
Performance FY 12-13 FY 13-14 Q4 13-14 FY 14-15 FY 15-16
Total Ci rcul ati on 145,000 148,000 153,227 151,000 154,000
Program Attendance 3,000 3,150 4,307 3,300 3,500
Ci ti zen rati ng of l i brary
servi ce 94% 94% 97% 94% 94%
Ci ti zen rati ng of publ i c
programs 94% 94% 98% 94% 94%
Note: This Department Summary section reports on variances of actual expenditures compared to budget.
The summaries differentiate timing variances from true variances. A timing variance is when an expenditure
is anticipated in the adopted annual budget but does not occur at the anticipated time or on an even
quarterly basis (for example a one-time expenditure that occurs in the first quarter). A true variance is an
expenditure that is not anticipated in the adopted budget.
August 5, 2014 Regular City Council Meeting
Page 79

Website Update: The Website Redesign Procurement is approximately 68% complete.
The RFQ for the Website redesign was issued and the City received fourteen proposals
which are being evaluated. The Project is on schedule and it is anticipated that the
approval of a contract for web-design services will be on the September Council Agenda
for approval.
Financial System Upgrades - Cloud-based: The ERP Finance/Payroll/ Human Resources
procurement process is 81% complete. The RFP was issued, vendor demonstrations and
bid evaluations are underway. It is anticipated that the recommendation to award
contract(s) will be on the September Council Agenda for approval. The project is on
schedule.
Legislative Management Suite - Paperless Agenda: The Legislative management system
is 84% complete. The award of the contract for the legislative management system
including a citizen engagement component will be on the September City Council
Agenda. The project is on schedule.
Network Spare/Replacement Equipment: A project plan for the implementation of the
technology upgrades has been developed. EOC equipment has been ordered and
installation has begun. This project is 37% complete and is on schedule.
Permit Tracking software: Needs have been identified by Community Planning and
Building and will be refined as the Building Safety program is staffed. Administrative
Services is including this as a bid component in the overall system upgrade project.
Water Conservation Projects: Water conservation report presented to the City Council
in September. The water conservation plan consists of four elements: City Facilities &
Operations, Identify Potential Sources for Additional Water, City Ordinances, and Public
Outreach. A water meter device was installed on the Del Mar tank on 1/2/14 to monitor
the volume of water flow as part of a possible future project between Cal Am and the
City regarding the use of City water from Del Mar spring. A test of the water quality of
the spring had been completed in September 2013. Funding of approximately $10,000
for additional projects remains.
Capital Projects
August 5, 2014 Regular City Council Meeting
Page 80
Art Appraisal: A request for proposal process to solicit appraisers to conduct the update
of the City’s appraisal and inventory of its artwork is complete. Selection of an appraiser
is complete and work is scheduled to begin this Fall.
Park Branch Library Book Return: This project has been scoped and a solution identified
to maintain service while making it easier for staff to ergonomically transport the books.
This project anticipated donations to proceed and a potential donor has been identified.
The Library Board of Trustees funded the Book Return in their FY 14/15 budget.
Park Branch Basement Restoration: As part of the facility use plan, City staff has been
working with a facility assessment consultant to identify possible sources of water
infiltration. Based upon investigative leak, exterior waterproofing of the building does
not seem to be a feasible option. Instead, staff have identified options to mitigate
water penetration to the interior of the building to limit property damage from future
leaks including water detection alarms, sump pumps and floor drains and are contacted
specialized consultants for proposals.
Ambulance Lease Purchase: Lease expired in December 2013. The front line service life
of the vehicle is anticipated until 2018 after which the vehicle is anticipated to serve as a
reserve unit.
Physio Control LifePak Cardiac Monitor/Defib: This project is complete and the
equipment is in service.
Fire Engine Lease Purchase: Lease expires in December 2015. The service life of the
vehicle is anticipated to exceed the five-year capital planning horizon.
Diesel Filter System: This project is complete and installed at the fire station.
Self Contained Breathing Apparatus: This is a grant funded project and grant
applications have been awarded. Equipment will be purchased by City of Monterey
obviating the need for this as a City project. Project was postponed to meet the
updated 2014 requirements. The equipment has been received, staff are undergoing
training, and the equipment will be placed into service for both Fire and Ambulance.
Parking Vehicle lease purchase: Lease expires in July 2013. The service life of the
vehicle is anticipated to exceed the five-year capital planning horizon.
August 5, 2014 Regular City Council Meeting
Page 81
Parking Management Study: Field work of the parking study is complete and a
presentation of the findings was presented to the City Council on November 5, 2013.
Solutions that meet the City’s goals and policy objectives are being implemented. This
project relates to the 2014 Key Initiative described on page 3 of this report.
Kenwood Radio Purchase & Encryption: Radios have been acquired and encryption
software is on hold this fiscal year to coordinate technology with partner agencies.
Street Sweeper Lease Purchase: Lease expires in July 2013. The service life of the
vehicle is anticipated to exceed the five-year capital planning horizon.
Street and Road Projects: All segments (asphalt overlay, concrete pavement and
sidewalk repairs) were completed on time and under budget.
Paint/Sign Truck: The paint/sign truck has been purchased and delivered. Road
restriping and painting occurred in May.
Santa Fe & 4th Storm Drain: Storm drain relocation work has been completed and
paving has occurred. The project cost was within the approved budget.
Caterpillar Loader Lease Purchase: Lease expires in December 2013. The service life of
the vehicle is anticipated to exceed the five-year capital planning horizon.
Bikeway Projects: City Council authorized professional services to help facilitate the
entitlement work needed for the Rio Park/Larsen Field Pedestrian and Bicycle Trail
Project. The entitlement work is underway.
PD/PW Roof/Patio Replacement: Staff have received a proposal to conduct a structural
analysis of the facility and are in the process of executing a professional services
agreement to have this work performed. The report will outline any structural and
nonstructural deficiencies as well as outline the feasibility of constructing additional
stories above the garage. Staff is developing a scope and contract with a qualified
waterproofing/roofing consultant to analyze the facility and suggest possible short and
long-term improvements.
Sunset Center Wood Patio Stage Replacement: Awaiting donor opportunity to fund
project or provide volunteer labor and donated material to complete. The project was
presented to the Sunset Board in April 2014 to highlight the partnership opportunity.
August 5, 2014 Regular City Council Meeting
Page 82
Forest Theater Renovation: Council will consider entering into a contract with an
architect during the August meeting to develop schematic plans in order to rehabilitate
the facility.
City Hall Renovations: Recommendations regarding the interior redwood finish are
being incorporated into a solicitation to perform the work. Preliminary design has begun
and a space planning consultant has been retained to discuss space options and
furniture options.
Sunset Center Railing Replacement: Obtained proposals to develop plans and
specifications for bidding documents. Examining options to replace with chain link or
other materials (estimated at $15,000-20,000) or with “like” material of solid, custom,
powered coated railing (estimated at $40,000). The project is on the August agenda of
the Historic Resources Board to solicit input.
Tennis Court Renovation: The project has been designed, bid, and awarded by the City
Council. A pre-construction meeting is being scheduled with the contractor and the
project will commence in August.
Beach Stair Maintenance: Assessment by a structural engineer is underway.
Scenic Rd. Restrooms: Project was awarded by the City Council in April 2014.
Construction is underway and anticipated to be complete by the end of October 2014.
4th Avenue Irrigation Meter: Pebble Beach Community Services District is continuing to
work on obtaining a permit by State Department of Public Health. Once the permit is
secured, the City will solicit bids for the installation of the meter.
Dunes Habitat Restoration: Public Services is identifying components of a work plan,
seeking services of biologist/botanist and coordinating with Community Planning and
Building on permitting.
City Hall Cistern: City staff is reviewing possible grant opportunities for this project. A
funding source has not been identified for this project.
Shoreline Assessment and Implementation: Staff is reviewing the qualifications of
signage consultants and will retain a design expert to assist with shoreline signage.
Installation of a wireless transmitter to improve irrigation of the Scenic Pathway is
August 5, 2014 Regular City Council Meeting
Page 83
anticipated to be complete by the end of August, to be installed once all of the ASBS Dry
Weather Diversion project work is completed.
Mission Trail Entrance: A landscape architect has been retained and is developing a
conceptual plan.
Trash Can Refurbishment and Replacement: Old cans have been replaced with new on
Ocean Avenue.
ASBS Dry Weather Diversion: The project is anticipated to be complete by the end of
August. A second phase was incorporated based on the results of monitoring, including
the installation of a CDS unit that will capture runoff and trash on Scenic and Eighth.


0%
10%
20%
30%
40%
50%
60%
70%
80%
90%
100%
W
e
b
s
i
t
e
F
i
n
a
n
c
i
a
l

S
y
s
t
e
m
L
e
g
i
s
l
a
t
i
v
e

M
g
t
I
T

N
e
t
w
o
r
k
P
e
r
m
i
t

T
r
a
c
k
i
n
g
W
a
t
e
r

C
o
n
s
e
r
v
e
A
r
t

A
p
p
r
a
i
s
a
l
B
o
o
k

R
e
t
u
r
n
L
i
b
r
a
r
y

B
a
s
e
m
e
n
t
A
m
b
u
l
a
n
c
e

L
e
a
s
e
D
e
f
i
b
u
l
a
t
o
r
F
i
r
e

E
n
g
i
n
e

L
e
a
s
e
D
i
e
s
e
l

F
i
l
t
e
r
B
r
e
a
t
h
i
n
g

A
p
p
a
r
a
t
u
s
P
a
r
k
i
n
g

V
e
h
i
c
l
e

L
e
a
s
e
P
a
r
k
i
n
g

M
a
n
a
g
e
m
e
n
t
R
a
d
i
o
s
S
w
e
e
p
e
r

L
e
a
s
e
S
t
r
e
e
t
s
P
a
i
n
t

T
r
u
c
k
S
t
o
r
m

D
r
a
i
n
L
o
a
d
e
r

L
e
a
s
e
B
i
k
e
w
a
y
s
P
D
/
P
W

R
o
o
f
S
C
C

O
u
t
d
o
o
r

S
t
a
g
e
F
o
r
e
s
t

T
h
e
a
t
e
r
C
i
t
y

H
a
l
l
S
C
C

R
a
i
l
i
n
g
T
e
n
n
i
s

C
o
u
r
t
s
B
e
a
c
h

S
t
a
i
r
s
B
e
a
c
h

R
e
s
t
r
o
o
m
4
t
h

A
v
e

i
r
r
i
g
a
t
i
o
n
D
u
n
e
s

H
a
b
i
t
a
t
C
i
s
t
e
r
n
S
h
o
r
e
l
i
n
e

A
s
s
m
n
t
M
i
s
s
i
o
n

T
r
a
i
l
T
r
a
s
h

C
a
n
s
A
S
B
S

D
i
v
e
r
s
i
o
n
%

C
o
m
p
l
e
t
e
Capital Project Completion
About this report format:
This report is produced quarterly to improve transparency and accessibility of the City of Carmel-by-the-Sea’s fiscal position and
operations. Popular financial reporting, such as this document, is to provide financial data in a form that is not confusing or discouraging
to those unfamiliar with accounting and financial reporting. It is not enough that reports are written. People must be able to access them,
read them, and understand them if government transparency and community engagement is to have meaning. Fiscal transparency can be
defined to involve ready access to reliable, comprehensive, timely, understandable, and comparable information on the City’s activities.
With a user friendly, less technical discussion of City finances, the report is our way of showing the taxpaying public the value of their tax
dollar and accomplishments of the City on the public’s behalf. These reports are prepared quarterly and distributed in November,
February, May, and August so the information can be used for effective public participation and enhanced accountability.
August 5, 2014 Regular City Council Meeting
Page 84