Staunton News Leader 08/01/2014 Page : A01

Copyright © 2014 Staunton News Leader 08/01/2014 August 3, 2014 12:30 am / Powered by TECNAVIA
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RICHMOND —The requests for lavish
gifts were frequent. Jonnie Williams —
the star witness in a corruption trial
against the former Virginia governor
and his wife — was being asked for ev-
erything froma joy ride in his Ferrari to
stock in the company he led.
The former Star Scientific CEOtesti-
fied Thursday that he complied with
some requests from the first family —
while turning down others —because he
hoped his company would gain credibil-
ity through an association with the gov-
ernor’s office. He tried to keep the ar-
rangement quiet —somethingthegover-
nor agreed would be a good idea, Wil-
liams testified.
“I didn’t want anyone to know I was
helpingthegovernor financiallywithhis
problems while he was helping my com-
pany,” Williams said.
During his testimony, Williams de-
tailed a pattern of requests for gifts by
former first lady Maureen McDonnell
and a loan that former Gov. Bob McDon-
nell asked for. He said his cozy
Rolex gift a ‘bad decision’
Williams: McDonnells’
requests were frequent
Associated Press
Federal prosecutors Jessica D. Aber, left,
and David B. Harbach II, right, head into
the Federal courthouse in Richmond on
Thursday. AP See ROLEX, Page A8
INSIDE
Our view: There ought to be a law. Page A7
NEWHOPE
A
rare crowd gathered
Thursday in the parking
lot outside the post office
for this agricultural ham-
let to let representatives
from the U.S. Postal Service know
howimportant the small, one-story
brick building is to them.
“It’s hard for me to get around,”
an older local woman said who was
seated in a wheelchair during the
hourlong meeting. She gestured to-
ward the building. “This, I use all
the time.”
The Postal Service won’t be clos-
ing the office. Congress won’t let
them. In fact, much of the meeting
covered the mandates and restric-
tions the federal government has
placed on the agency, which is run
off the money it collects.
The mail carrier is not indepen-
dently operated though, and many
of thecost-cuttingoptionsavailable
to private enterprises like closing
small, low-volume offices, Con-
gress has rejected.
Ditto reducing window hours
from six days to five or increasing
rates and fees on a schedule that
wouldcovercosts, saidBill Harlow,
manager of Postal Service opera-
tions in central Virginia and the
NEWHOPE FORPOST OFFICE
Mike Chittum, the sole worker at the New Hope Post Office, talks to local resident and customer Michael Hough on Thursday.
GRIFFIN MOORES/THE NEWS LEADER
Postal Service
outlines cost-savings plan
“I’m pleased the
operations manager
made a commitment
to get back to us before
a decision is made.”
FRANK NOLEN,
who rallied the community to show up
for a meeting with Postal Service
officials
Possible change would
cut retail hours down
to a part-time service
By Calvin Trice
ctrice@newsleader.com
See POST OFFICE, Page A5
WASHINGTON — Last summer, Sen.
Mark Warner, D-Va., embarked on what
his office trumpeted as a four-day, 1,000-
mile trip across his state, with press re-
leases notinghe “woke upearlyto hit the
road,” making stops at a minor league
ballpark, a craft brewery and a Roanoke
rail yard, among others.
But for several hundred of those
miles, Warner was not hittingthe road—
he was flying a chartered jet at a cost to
taxpayers of $8,500.
Warner was oneof twodozenU.S. sen-
ators who flewtaxpayer-funded charter
airplanes to, from or around their home
statelast year at atotal cost of just under
$1 million, according to a USA TODAY
analysis of Senate spending records
Senators’
choice of
charter jets
costs $1M
By Donovan Slack and Paul Singer
USA TODAY
See FLIGHTS, Page A8
STAUNTON — Three Staunton mu-
seums are in the running to be named
part of Virginia’s Top10 Endangered Ar-
tifacts program.
Starting Aug. 4, the public can vote
for their favorite endangered artifact —
ranging in more than 40 artifacts shor-
tlisted in Virginia and the District of Co-
lumbia.
Staunton’s Camera Heritage
Staunton’s Camera Heritage Museum’s
Kodak Brownie Collection is in the contest.
LAURA PETERS/THE NEWS LEADER
3 Staunton
museums in
state contest
By Laura Peters
lpeters@newsleader.com
See CONTEST, Page A8
Staunton News Leader 08/01/2014 Page : A08
Copyright © 2014 Staunton News Leader 08/01/2014 August 3, 2014 12:30 am / Powered by TECNAVIA
WEATHER
A8 • THE NEWS LEADER • FRIDAY, AUGUST 1, 2014
5- day Forecast for Staunton & Waynesboro
Al manac
Ki d’s Corner
-10s
-0s
0s
10s
20s
30s
40s
50s
60s
70s
80s
90s
100s
110s
Nati onal Forecast for Fri day, August 1
Nati onal
Extremes
Regi onal Forecast
WWWa W ton ton ton on on gton gton inngton gton shi n on gto ng i
80/69 0/ 9 69 0/ 80
ww NN oo Yo Yo YYY rkkk rk rk rk rk rrk
7 677 67 881/67 81/67 67 /6 81
Miamii m ia M
88/78 78 8/7 88
Atlan Atlanta an
81/69
roit roit roi rrr De DDDDetr Detr
62 66 /6 /6 /6 /6 82/ 82///6 2/62
ouston Hou nn o
72 88/72 8
Chicago c
82/62 6
apolis Minnea neapolis eapolis eapolis
83/63 63
Kansas K City ty
83/63 /
aso Pas
8885/69 85/69
Denver Den
80/56 8 6
Billings Billings g
92/61 2/61 /61
Lo Lo Loooooos s os os AAngeles g
88//68 /68 /68 /68 /68 /68 6688 /6 /68
SS sco Francis
8882/61 2/661 82/61
a eee Sea S
84//60
Washington
80/69
New York
81/67
Miami
88/78
Atlanta
81/69
Detroit
82/62
Houston
88/72
Chicago
82/62
Minneapolis
83/63
Kansas City
83/63
El Paso
85/69
Denver
80/56
Billings
92/61
Los Angeles
88/68
San Francisco
82/61
Seattle
84/60
City Hi Lo W Hi Lo W City Hi Lo W Hi Lo W
Statistics for Staunton are compiled using hourly information from
the Shenandoah Airport and radar estimates as of 5 p.m. yesterday.
Precipitation is supplemented with the information from the National
Weather Service the following day. Statistics for Waynesboro are as of
8 a.m. yesterday and are supplied by the National Weather Service.
Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs
for the day. Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities
Weather (W): s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, t-thunderstorms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice.
Yesterday for the 48
contiguous states
For current radar, updated forecasts, go to www.newsleader.com
Major today 3:59 a.m. 4:21 p.m.
Minor today 10:10 a.m. 10:32 p.m.
Major Saturday 4:47 a.m. 5:10 p.m.
Minor Saturday 10:58 a.m. 11:21 p.m.
TEMPERATURE Staunton Waynesboro
High/Low 84°/52° 75°/51°
Normal high/low 84°/63°
Record high 100° in 1953
Record low 46° in 1966
24 hrs 0.00" 0.00"
Month to date 2.52" 3.07"
Normal month to date 3.90"
Year to date 20.62" 22.13"
Normal year to date 22.87"
Sol unar Tabl es
The solunar period indicates peak feeding times for fish and game.
Ni ght Sky
– Morrison Planetarium, California Academy of Sciences
An hour after sunset, look southwest for the interesting line
of the waxing crescent moon, the star Spica, and the planets
Mars and Saturn. Over the next few nights, the moon will
pass the other objects in this line. Venus rises at 4:25 a.m.
Mars sets at 11:51 p.m. Jupiter rises at 5:46 a.m. Saturn sets
at 12:46 a.m.
Albany 82 65 pc 76 62 c
Anchorage 68 57 pc 67 56 pc
Atlanta 81 69 c 80 68 t
Austin 91 67 t 91 68 t
Baltimore 81 67 sh 79 68 t
Boise 97 67 pc 97 66 pc
Boston 81 65 pc 73 61 r
Buffalo 81 63 pc 78 62 t
Burlington 82 63 pc 79 62 c
Casper 85 50 pc 86 51 s
Charleston, WV 78 62 t 80 61 t
Chattanooga 82 67 t 84 65 t
Chicago 82 62 t 80 59 t
Cleveland 80 62 pc 77 62 t
Dallas 84 69 pc 88 67 pc
Denver 80 56 t 83 56 pc
Detroit 82 62 t 82 61 t
Duluth 80 56 pc 80 61 pc
El Paso 85 69 t 82 67 t
Fairbanks 61 56 r 63 53 c
Houston 88 72 t 88 72 pc
Indianapolis 81 61 pc 78 60 t
Kansas City 83 63 s 85 62 pc
Knoxville 80 63 t 83 63 t
Los Angeles 88 68 s 88 68 s
Louisville 86 66 pc 84 64 t
Memphis 84 69 sh 84 68 pc
Miami 88 78 t 88 78 t
Morgantown 79 62 t 78 63 t
Nashville 86 66 pc 86 64 t
New Orleans 87 74 t 88 74 pc
New York City 81 67 t 75 68 r
Orlando 92 74 t 92 75 t
Philadelphia 82 67 t 79 68 r
Phoenix 104 85 t 98 77 t
Pittsburgh 81 63 pc 78 61 t
Raleigh 76 67 r 77 69 t
St. Louis 85 66 pc 85 66 pc
Salt Lake City 88 65 pc 92 68 pc
San Francisco 82 61 pc 77 61 pc
Seattle 84 60 s 84 60 pc
Tucson 94 76 t 90 74 t
West Palm Beach 88 77 t 88 77 t
Wheeling 80 61 pc 77 60 t
TODAY SATURDAY TODAY SATURDAY
In the Sky
Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. ©2014
Moon Phases
First
Aug 25 Aug 17 Aug 10 Aug 3
Full Last New
TODAY TONIGHT SATURDAY
73° 62°
Occasional rain
and drizzle
Periods of rain
SUNDAY MONDAY
75°/62° 76°/60° 83°/60° 85°/62°
A couple of
thunderstorms
A couple of
thunderstorms
Warmer with a
thunderstorm
TUESDAY
Partly sunny
HIGH:
111° in Needles, CA
LOW:
36° in Bodie State Park, CA
RF: 79° RF: 60° RF: 81°/66° RF: 85°/60° RF: 92°/61° RF: 93°/63°
The patented AccuWeather.com RealFeel Temperature® (RF) is an exclusive index of effective
temperature based on eight weather factors. Shown is the highest and lowest values of the day. The higher the
AccuWeather.com UV Index™ (UV Index) number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection.
UV Index: 4
Occasional rain and drizzle today and tonight. Mostly
cloudy tomorrow with a couple of showers and a
thunderstorm. Sunday: humid with a shower or thun-
derstorm around.
PRECIPITATION Staunton Waynesboro
Alexandria 80/69/sh
Arlington 79/68/sh
Blacksburg 68/62/r
Bluefield 68/61/sh
Charlottesville 73/63/r
Danville 74/65/r
Elkins 74/59/sh
Fairmont 79/60/t
Fredericksburg 78/65/sh
Harrisonburg 75/61/r
Lewisburg 69/60/sh
Lexington 72/62/r
Lynchburg 74/63/r
Marion 69/60/sh
Martinsburg 79/62/sh
Martinsville 73/64/r
Moorefield 79/59/sh
Newport News 84/71/r
Norfolk 82/71/r
Petersburg 84/69/r
Richmond 81/67/r
Roanoke 71/64/r
Virginia Beach 81/70/r
Washington 80/69/sh
Winchester 76/63/sh
Wytheville 72/61/r
City Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/W
Sunrise today 6:19 a.m.
Sunset today 8:26 p.m.
Sunrise Saturday 6:20 a.m.
Sunset Saturday 8:25 p.m.
Moonrise today 11:35 a.m.
Moonset today 11:15 p.m.
Cole Stemerger, Westwood Hills Elementary
Occasional rain and drizzle today. High 71 to 75. Winds
southeast 3-6 mph. Little or no sunshine with a 55%
chance of precipitation and average relative humidity
85%. Drying conditions poor. Periods of rain tonight.
Low 60 to 64. Winds light and variable. Chance of
precipitation 65%.
Agri cul ture Forecast
Source: Virginia Adult & Pediatric Allergy & Asthma
Pol l en
Trees Absent
Grasses Low
Weeds Absent
Mold Low
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Museum’s Kodak Brown-
ie Collection, Woodrow
Wilson Presidential Li-
brary and Museum’s 1902
EllenWilsoninauguration
gown and the Frontier
Culture Museum’s Wam-
pler Wagon are on the
list, compiled by the Vir-
ginia Association of Mu-
seums.
David Schwartz, cura-
tor of of the Camera Heri-
tage Museum, has 5,000
cameras in the museum
collection, which made it
hard for him to pick out
somethinginparticular to
showcase for the contest.
The Kodak Brownie
came on the market dur-
ing the early 1900s until
the late 1970s.
According to
Schwartz, there were 710
different Brownie models
made during that period,
and his museum has 708.
“The next generation
has no idea what film is,
they think it’s a thing of
the past,” Schwartz said.
“The (analog) camera is
endangered.”
Schwartz hopes the
contest will bring aware-
ness to his collection.
The Woodrow Wilson
Museum wanted to pick
something directly linked
to Wilson, said Andrew
Phillips, museum curator.
The gown belonged to the
first lady, Ellen, who
handmade and wore it
during Wilson’s inaugura-
tion as president of
Princeton University.
But the gown, which is
at the Woodrow Wilson
Museum, is in poor condi-
tion, said Phillips.
“It’s in pretty poor
shape, and it’s primarily
silk,” Phillips said. “For
many years it was not
stored very well, the silk
has become brittle and is
deteriorating, and we
wanted to pick something
that could really use the
help.”
Thecontest, whichis in
its the fourth year, is to
raise awareness on mu-
seums, said Christina
Newton, assistant direc-
tor of the Virginia Associ-
ation of Museums.
“This help sites raise
awareness for their items
and the hard work of
maintaining their sites,”
she said, with many of the
organizations in the past
raising funds to conserve
their items.
No one from the Fron-
tier Culture Museum re-
turned calls to talk about
the Wampler Wagon.
“The site that receives
the most votes will be des-
ignated people’s choice.
People in the past who
have received that award
... have used that title to
receive grants,” Newton
said.
Winners will be an-
nounced Sept. 9.
Continued from Page A1
Contest
relationship with the Mc-
Donnells was borne of
poor business decisions,
not out of friendship.
“The McDonnells are
not my personal friends,”
Williams said. “I thought
it was goodfor mycompa-
ny.”
Under questioning
from prosecutors, Wil-
liams also denied that he
had a romantic relation-
ship with Maureen Mc-
Donnell. Her attorney,
William Burck, said dur-
ing opening arguments on
Tuesday that Maureen
McDonnell developed a
“crush” on Williams be-
cause she was in a broken
marriage, though Burck
didn’t suggest a physical
relationship.
Among the gifts from
Williams was a Rolex
watch given to Bob Mc-
Donnell that cost more
than $6,000. “It was a bad
decisiononmypart tobuy
that watch when she
asked for it,” Williams
said. “I shouldn’t havehad
to buy things like that to
get the help I needed.”
On Thursday, the
watch was passed to the
jury, where each juror
brieflyinspectedit as a si-
lent courtroom watched.
The watch is an impor-
tant piece of evidence be-
cause it represents a tan-
gible chunk of the more
than $165,000 in secret
gifts and loans prosecu-
tors say Bob McDonnell
andhis wife, Maureen, re-
ceived from Williams.
Other monetary gifts and
loans can’t be presented
in court for jurors to hold,
although many docu-
ments and photos have
been shown on courtroom
video screens.
Among them are pho-
tos of Bob McDonnell be-
hind the wheel of Wil-
liams’ Ferrari during a
free vacation at the busi-
nessman’s lake house.
Williams testified that
Maureen McDonnell, who
also is charged in the 14-
count indictment, was ad-
miring the car shortly be-
fore the vacation and
asked if any like it were
available at the lake
house. Williams said no.
“She said, ‘It would be
nice. We never get to do
thingslikethis,’”Williams
testified. He said he had
the car delivered.
Continued from Page A1
Rolex
compiled by the nonparti-
san Sunlight Foundation.
Senators pay for offi-
cial duties fromtaxpayer-
funded accounts. The
rules allow them to use
these accounts to pay for
charter aircraft for offi-
cial travel when commer-
cial flights “are not such
that reasonable schedules
may be kept.” Senators
decide which way to trav-
el, and some chose flying
commercial or simply
driving.
Warner’s trip took him
to the far reaches of west-
ernVirginia, remoteterri-
tory with no commercial
airports. A month earlier,
Virginia’s other U.S. sena-
tor, Tim Kaine, made a
swing to the same corner
of the state by car; his
travel cost taxpayers
$691.
“Sen. Warner is a road
warrior, and he insists on
a schedule that goes from
dawn to dusk,” said Kevin
Hall, Warner’s spokes-
man. “He spent 75 days on
the road in Virginia last
year, and that does not in-
clude events here in
Northern Virginia.”
Hall said the road trip
involved 25 public events
across the state. “Using a
plane ... allowed us to
schedule several addi-
tional events.”
Continued from Page A1
Flights

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