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By Laura De Grazia

Teacher UMNG
English Online Level 3B

and


are used to express our
agreement to what
another person has
said.

Too is used when the verb is in the affirmative form.
For example:


A: I have a red Ferrari
B: I have one, too


Either is used when the verb is in the negative form.
For example:


A: I don't have a Ferrari
B: I don't have one either


Too / Either

So is used to agree with the positive. For example:


A: I have a red Ferrari
B: So do I


Neither is used to agree with the negative. For
example:


A: I don't have a Ferrari
B: Neither do I


So / Neither

Too as well as either are used after the main sentence,
to which one is agreeing, copying its structure.


A: I have a red Ferrari
1 2

B: I have one, too Too is used agree on the positive

1 2 one replaces a red Ferrari, because it would be
redundant to mention it twice in the same conversation.

A: I don't have a Ferrari
1 2

B: I don't have one either Too is used agree on the negative

1 2

Too / Either - FORM

So is used to agree, but in a shorter manner.


A: I have a red Ferrari

So is used to agree on the positive


B: So, do I The person who is replying
Auxiliary according to the tense of the sentence, in this case
Present Simple, and to the pronoun, in this case I.

A: She will buy a Ferrari


B: So will I I am agreeing.

The sentence is in simple future, so will is the auxiliary



So - FORM

Neither is used to agree, but in a shorter manner.


A: I didnt buy milk!

So is used to agree on the positive


B: Neither did I The person who is replying
Auxiliary according to the tense of the sentence, in this case
Past Simple, and to the pronoun, in this case I.

A: Jane is not here


B: Neither is Mark I am agreeing.

The sentence is in simple present, but the verb be does not need
an auxiliary, thus is-am-are would take the place of the auxiliary
according to the pronoun, in this case he (Mark)



Neither - FORM
By Laura De Grazia
Teacher UMNG
English Online Level 3B
do/does when the verb is in the simple present

are/is when the original verb is in the present
continuous or when be is its main verb

will when the original verb is in the future

have/has when the original verb is in a
perfective tense

a modal when the original verb uses a modal,
etc.
Tommy and I are going to the cinemma.


Mariah and Mike are going, too
or
So are they (or Marih and Mike).


Tommy and I are not going to the cinemma.


Mariah and Mike are not going, either
or
Neither are they (or Marih and Mike).

Jossie plays volleyball.


John does, too
or
So he does / So John does.


Jossie does not play volleyball.


John does not play either
or
Neither does John / Neither does he.

Sammy has lived there since she was born.


Moe and Jacquie have, too.
or
So have they / So have Moe and Jacquie.


Sammy has not lived there longer than a year.


Peter has not either.
or
Neither has he / Neither has Peter.