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Since May 2005
August 1, 2014 Volume 10 Issue 7 FREE
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EDISTO
PG 9
INSIDE THE ISLAND EYE NEWS
FUN
RUNNING
PG 23
CULINARY
CENTER
PG 25
I
f your child could describe his or
her perfect school, do you think it
would sound something like this: No
homework, Fridays off, recess on the
beach and the chance to talk to and meet
really cool people from all over the world?
If so, you might want to check out
Sullivan’s Island’s newest school, The
Crown Leadership Academy. But, despite
that description sounding like a slackers
paradise, students at Crown are anything
but.
The school’s approach to education is
rigorous and relevant, seeking to produce
students instilled with a lifelong love of
learning, an understanding of personal
responsibility, and a deep respect for those
around them. The school’s project-based
approach and blended curriculum, which
is heavily technology-based, allows for an
individualized education for each student.
It is a dramatically different approach to
learning, and requires intense effort from
its students as well as an innate desire to
learn.
A private Christian School, Crown
Leadership Academy was born from the
Searching for
a crowning
achievement
NE W S CHOOL ON S UL L I VA N’ S
OF F E RS A DI F F E RE NT
A P P ROA CH T O E DUCAT I ON
BY JENNIFER TUOHY
ISLAND EYE NEWS EDITOR
Academy continues on page 10 Release continues on page 4
Tricky times for turtle team
STORY ON PAGE 20
A
182-pound loggerhead sea turtle treated by the
South Carolina Aquarium Sea Turtle Rescue
Program for more than thirteen months has
fully recovered and was returned to the deep blue sea,
Tuesday, July 15, 2014 at the Isle of Palms County Park.
A huge crowd of adoring fans watched as Briar, an adult
female loggerhead, tentatively returned to her ocean
home.
PHOTOS BY BARBARA BERGWERF
P
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B
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Sea turtle once
facing blindness
returned to wild
LOGGERHEAD SUCCESSFULLY TREATED
BY SEA TURTLE RESCUE PROGRAM
BY KATE DITLOFF
FOR ISLAND EYE NEWS
Briar heads home.
PHOTOS BY STEVE ROSAMILIA
Terence Carey, Ashton Howard and Jack Wilson test
out their science project, a solar powered boat.
2 August 1, 2014
CIVIC
“IF (IOP) TURN THE SWITCH ON NEXT YEAR
FOR MANAGED PARKING THAT MEANS WE’LL
GET A TREMENDOUS VOLUME OF VEHICLES
FROM THERE." ~ Andy Benke
T
he standing-room-only
crowd, as usual, came for
one thing. This time it was to
debate the relative merits of coffee
shops compared to restaurants.
But had they stayed through
the bitter end of the Sullivan’s
Island’s July Town Council
meeting, they would have been
just as interested in the plans to
implement a paid parking system
by next summer.
“By summer 2015, Isle of
Palms will be ready for managed
parking. This means charging in
some areas and moving people
in to the commercial area,” Town
Administrator Andy Benke said.
“They’ve had a consultant under
contract for the last 18 months. If
they turn the switch on next year
for managed parking that means
we’ll get a tremendous volume of
vehicles from there.”
Thus far IOP has made no
decisions regarding its parking,
and likely will not until the
consultant frm, Stantec, has
delivered its fnal report, which
should be after the summer
season. However, discussions
during IOP government meetings
over the last few months
indicate the proposed
plan will include an
island-wide permit
system, controlled via
smartphones, requiring
people to purchase a
daily, weekly, monthly
or annual parking
pass. This will apply
to anyone who wants
to park anywhere on the island,
including residents when they
are not parking on their own
property.
“We have talked about staying
neck and neck with IOP in terms
of parking in the past,” Benke
said during the Council meeting.
“So I’ve been talking with their
consultant and think we need to
start addressing parking for next
summer.”
Sullivan’s Council then
discussed how plans to implement
parking payment structures
had been considered in the past
but never implemented due to
the high infrastructure costs
as well as the Department of
Transportations’ restriction.
However, in recent years the DOT
has become more open to local
municipalities managing parking,
and technology has advanced so
far that installing dozens of ticket
machines is no longer necessary.
“The tech has changed so
much,” Benke said. “Now you can
go on your smartphone and do
a PayPal and enter your license
tag and it goes into a database.
Then the offcer rides by with a
character recognition software
device and scans the license
plates.”
There were no decisions
made at the meeting regarding
implementing a parking plan.
The next step will be for the Town
to open more formal discussions
with a consultant frm such as
Stantec.
Considering Coffee Shops
Now back to the pressing
issue of coffee shops. At a heated
and lengthy public hearing held
on June 11, Sullivan’s Island
Planning Commission presented
its proposed amendments to the
ordinance that governs eating
establishments on the island.
These changes would allow
for coffee shops to operate on
the island with a 700 square
foot maximum patron use
with 25 percent available for
outdoor patios, porches and
decks. Under the changes there
could potentially be four coffee
shops within the commercial
district, with a total of 100 seats.
Currently coffee shops are not an
“allowed use,” and the businesses
that resemble coffee shops are
operating under the takeout
license in the ordinance.
The reason behind this change
is defnitely not to help Café
Medley, which currently operates
under a takeout license, even
though it appears to be a coffee
shop. The Planning Commission
Sullivan’s considers coffee shops,
begins plans for paid parking
BY JENNIFER TUOHY
ISLAND EYE NEWS EDITOR
SI council continues on page 13
August 1, 2014
3
Isle of Palms
886.6428
www.iop.net
Tuesday, August 5
Board of Zoning Appeals
5:30 p.m.
1207 Palm Boulevard
Real Property
Committee Meeting
5:30 p.m.
1207 Palm Boulevard
Wednesday, August 6
Personnel Committee
10 a.m.
1207 Palm Boulevard
Accommodations Tax
Advisory Committee
11 a.m.
1207 Palm Boulevard
Public Works Committee
5:30 p.m.
1207 Palm Boulevard
Thursday, August 7
Public Safety Committee
NEW TIME
12 p.m.
1207 Palm Boulevard
Recreation Committee
NEW TIME
9 a.m.
1207 Palm Boulevard
Wednesday, August 13
Municipal Court
9 a.m.
1207 Palm Boulevard
Planning Commission
4:30 p.m.
1207 Palm Boulevard
Thursday, August 14
Livability Court
5 p.m.
1207 Palm Boulevard
Sullivan's Island
883.3198
www.sullivansisland-sc.com
Monday, August 4
Special Council Meeting
6 p.m.
2050 Middle Street
Special Council Meeting
6:30 p.m.
2050 Middle Street
Tuesday, August 5 & 12
Municipal Court*
5:30 p.m.
2050 Middle Street
Wednesday, August 6
Coffee with the Chief!
Stop by for a chat about SI with Police
Chief Howard at Cafe Medley.
8:30 a.m.
2213 Middle Street
Wednesday, August 13
Coffee with the Chief!
See Wednesday, August 6.
Planning Commission
6:30 p.m.
2050 Middle Street
Thursday, August 14
Board of Zoning Appeals
6 p.m.
2050 Middle Street
CIVIC
* Bench Trials will be at a temporary Town Hall facility located behind the Fire Station, next to the Stith
Park (2050 Middle Street). Contact SI Clerk of Court directly at 883-5734 (Maria LoRusso) for payments
or questions.
Civic Calendar
 
Recycle - WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 6 - Recycle
Lynn Pierotti
publisher
lynn@luckydognews.com
Jennifer Tuohy
managing editor
jennifer@luckydognews.com
Swan Richards
graphic designer
Lori McGee 614.0901
advertising executive
Christian LeBlanc
social media
christian@luckydognews.com
Steve Rosamilia
photographer
Kathryn Casey
staff writer

Contributors:
Carol Antman
Marilyn Markel
Mary Pringle
Dimi Matouchev
Bob Hooper
Katie Ditloff
Ruth Thornburg
Sarah Reynolds

Published by:
Lucky Dog Publishing
of South Carolina, LLC
P.O. Box 837
Sullivan’s Island, SC 29482
843-886-NEWS
Submit your letters to the editor to:
info@luckydognews.com
Future deadline: August 6 for
our August 15 issue
LUCKY DOG PUBLI SHI NG
OF SC, LLC
Publisher of the Island Eye News
and the Island Connection
The Island Eye News, a wholly owned subsidiary
of Lucky Dog Publishing of SC LLC, is a free,
independent newspaper published every two
weeks and is for and about the Isle of Palms,
Sullivan’s Island, Goat Island and Dewees Island.
Copies are mailed free of charge to every active
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WWW.ISLANDEYENEWS.COM under “advertising”.
N
ow that the 2015 budget
has been approved, Isle
of Palms City Council has
been busy starting its upcoming
projects. The Ways and Means
committee has moved forward
with a couple of projects for this
upcoming year; the frst of which
is the replacement of the Front
Beach restrooms.
“They’re in need of serious
work,” Mayor Cronin said.
As a response to the Request
for Proposal that was sent out by
the city, Liollio and Associates
presented a strategic plan on the
restrooms to the committee on
July 15.
During the presentation by
Liollio, presenters Rick Bousquet
and Seth Cantley highlighted the
sites they were asked to evaluate
and weighted them accordingly,
by the factors they considered
were most important in a public
bathroom.
The sites they were asked to
evaluate included 1118 Ocean
Boulevard (the current location
of the public restrooms), 30 JC
Long Boulevard, 1116 Pavilion
Drive, and the intersection of
Ocean Boulevard and JC long
Boulevard. All of these sites are
within the Front Beach area and
could easily become the next site
for public restrooms.
Liollio focused on a series
of factors for replacing the
restrooms including food zones,
ADA regulations, proximity to the
beach, pedestrian safety, traffc
patterns, construction costs and
durability in a harsh environment.
Additionally, Liollio considered
the impact on the businesses in
the Front Beach area, the best
use of property, familiarity to the
site and aesthetics.
As a result of this work the
frm recommended
two locations, the
municipal parking
lot at 1116 Pavilion
Drive and the
existing site at 1118
Ocean Boulevard.
Following the
presentation
Council awarded a $10,290
expansion to the existing Liollio
contract instructing them to
provide a clear understanding
of construction costs associated
with each site. With this
expansion, Liollio will defne
the construction impacts on
the municipal parking lot and
generate separate cost estimates.
In addition, Liollio will present its
fndings to the city two additional
times. The new bathrooms will
be offcially added to the FY2016
budget.
IOP approves funding for Front Beach
restrooms, beach renourishment
BY KATHRYN CASEY
ISLAND EYE NEWS STAFF WRITER
IOP council continues on page 7
“WE CANNOT ASK OUR CITIZENS TO PAY FOR
SOMETHING THE [PEOPLE OF] CHARLESTON
COUNTY USES, WE DO THAT ALREADY ENOUGH."
~ Mayor Cronin
Briar had been found stranded on
the beach in Myrtle Beach in May of
last year. She was emaciated and
severely anemic and her vital signs
were dismal. Briar was also covered
in barnacles as a result of her
lethargic state while in the ocean.
Once admitted to the Aquarium's
Sea Turtle Hospital, prognosis of
her survival was questionable and
staff came to work each morning
with fngers crossed she was still
alive.
Over the next six months,
Briar responded well to medical
treatments and gained more than
50 pounds, putting her back
in a healthy weight range. But
soon after, staff and volunteers
noticed that Briar was having
trouble fnding food in her tank.
Aquarium veterinarian Dr. Shane
Boylan examined Briar's eyes and
discovered that she had developed
cataracts, which cause blindness.
Confronted with such a rare medical
issue, Dr. Boylan consulted Dr.
Anne Cook with Animal Eye Care of
the Lowcountry, and in April 2014,
Dr. Cook led a team in the surgical
removal of the damaged lenses.
Almost immediately after surgery,
rescue staff could see a difference
in Briar's sight as she was able to
track down and eat her normal diet
of cut fsh as well as live blue crabs,
meaning she was fnally ready to go
home.
To track the progress of current
patients in recovery, visit the Sea
Turtle Rescue Program blog at
scaquarium.org. If you fnd a sick or
injured sea turtle contact the SCDNR
sea turtle hotline at 800.922.5431.
Release continues from cover
Briar mugs for the camera before going home.
August 1, 2014 7
WWW.ISLANDEYENEWS.COM
LETTER TO THE EDITOR
OOPS
Barbara Spell submitted a letter to the editor a few
weeks ago telling all that Judge Markley Dennis ruled
that the Town of Sullivan’s Island and Town Council
violated the law in not allowing for a referendum on
the new school.
To quote Ms. Spell, “It would serve all to wait on
the written ruling before passing along misleading
conjecture and information that is just simply
incorrect.” Barbara should have taken her own advice
as the fact is that the Judge’s ruling said the exact
opposite of what Ms. Spell told us it would.
She should have taken her own advice prior to
writing her latest ridiculous assessment of the Judge’s
ruling. Hopefully we will not have to read any more of
her letters to the editor concerning the school.
Scott Kegel
Isle of Palms
All letters submitted to the Island Eye News must
bear a full name, address and phone number for
verifcation. Only the author’s name and city will be
printed. Submissions are accepted via email to jennifer@
luckydognews.com or mail to PO. Box 837, Sullivan’s
Island, SC 29482.
Letters may be edited for length and readability.
The Island Eye News reserves the right to reject letters
that are libelous, unseemly, not individually addressed
to the Island Eye News or that have been previously
published elsewhere. The Island Eye News will not
publish letters endorsing political candidates.
The issue now is how IOP will get
the County of Charleston to pay for the
bathrooms.
“We cannot ask our citizens to pay
for something the [people of] Charleston
County uses, we do that already
enough,” Mayor Cronin said.
SHOAL MANAGEMENT PROJECT
MOVES FORWARD
In addition to moving forward with the
Front Beach restrooms, the Council
voted to move forward with the Shoal
Management Project Engineering,
awarding $107,662 to Coastal Science
and Engineering. Currently the City
has contributed $200,000 toward
the project, and plans to meet with
stakeholders to explain the funding
gap that remains.
City Administrator, Linda Tucker,
expressed the necessity to move
forward with this project due to its
longevity. After a re-nourishment
project was completed in 2008,
more erosion has occurred. CSE
submitted an application for a sand
redistribution project on October 1,
2010. After USACE was issued a permit
on February 27, 2012, the project is
fnally moving forward.
FIRST READING OF BEACH
PRESERVATION FEE PASSED
In addition to the beach preservation
projects, Council unanimously passed
the frst reading of Ordinance 2014-08.
This Ordinance will levy and impose a
one percent Beach Preservation Fee on
the Accommodations Tax. This tax will
be levied against rental properties as
well as hotels. This ordinance will defne
the purposes for which the proceeds of
the beach preservation fee may be used.
It will provide for a referendum on the
imposition of the Beach Preservation
Fee and will prescribe the contents of
the ballot questions in the referendum
and will provide a separate fund and
remittance of the Beach Preservation
Fee, if approved.
IOP council continues from page 3
In an article titled “Isle Of Palms
Barely Passes Budget, Faces Diffcult
Decisions” in the July 4 issue of
Island Eye News, it was reported that
Councilmember Loftus was absent
from the Council Meeting. Mr. Loftus
was absent due to a pre-arranged
vacation.
August 1, 2014 9
WWW.ISLANDEYENEWS.COM
I
magine waking up to the
sounds of birds at play,
watching a blue heron
searching for breakfast, the smell
of salt in the air, a cool ocean
breeze and a peaceful quiet that
reaches in and touches your soul.
Just a short 45-minute drive
south of bustling Charleston is the
beautiful Edisto Island, situated
between the banks of the Edisto
River and the shimmering shores
of the Atlantic Ocean. Located
in Colleton County where the
Edisto River, one of the longest
free-fowing blackwater rivers
in North America, completes its
206-mile journey to the Atlantic
Ocean. Low-lying houses are
situated along 4.5 miles of this
pristine beach. With a laid-back
lifestyle and a quiet, yet breath-
taking, natural setting, this sea
island destination offers everyone
a chance to enjoy the slower pace
of days gone by.
You'll fnd unspoiled
beaches, scenic lagoons and
marshes that create the perfect
backdrop for all of your outdoor
activities. Whether you are 1
or 100, and no matter what
your interests are, you will fnd
a peaceful, relaxing and un-
crowded destination any time of
the year.
Try your golf game at The
Plantation Course, or explore
the shores of the scenic Edisto
Beach State Park. Visitors can
get to know Edisto Island's
more secluded side
with Botany Bay
Ecotours or charter
a sunset cruise
out of the Edisto
Marina. The
Edisto Island
Serpentarium
is “dedicated
to the
recognition,
preservation
and study
of the world
of reptiles.”
Nearby museums
highlight life as it
was.
Although you won't
fnd any big box stores,
chain restaurants, stoplights
or motels on Edisto Island, and
the residents are so very happy
you won't, there are plenty of
opportunities to get your shop
on. It's a very casual affair with a
mix of souvenir shops, boutiques
and artisan crafts to take home.
Restaurants are casual and
the freshest seafood is prepared
in so many ways—all of them
mouth-watering. For those who
want to catch their own dinners,
fshing trips provide scenery,
expert assistance and always,
the chance of bringing home
a trophy.
Visitors can choose
from beachfront
resorts or old
family homes.
Whether the
length of stay
is a week or a
generation, a
complete range
of services
from banking
to health care is
here.
The best thing
to do on the island
is drive around it
and just take it in.
Every road on Edisto is
two lanes and either tree-lined
or looking out over beautiful
marshlands with clumps of trees
here and there.
“Thousands of people visit
Edisto Island’s beautiful beaches
every year, but there’s so much
more to Edisto’s natural features,”
said Meg Hoyle, local biologist,
tour guide operator and native of
the South Carolina Lowcountry.
“That’s when I started looking for
alternative ways to share Edisto’s
beauty, history and culture with
more people. “Now visitors can
hear about the island as they
drive along Scenic Highway
174 by downloading the app
offered by Botany Bay Ecotours
(www.botanybayplantation.
com), the excursion company
Hoyle founded in 2008. The
app plays audio commentary
automatically as your vehicle
passes points of interest such
as 200-year-old churches built
by enslaved artisans and a local
dance club that plays old R&B.
As you meander along the two-
lane road which cuts through the
historic island, the app displays
an interactive GPS map and also
provides images and detailed
descriptions of unique natural,
historic and cultural aspects of
the area.
You will hear many people say
“After a week in Edisto I fell in love
with it's charm and had decided
it would be one of the places I
would visit again and again.”
“The sunsets are majestic, the
light dancing over the wetlands
magical.” So come see for yourself
and get to know Edisto Beach...a
family sanctuary. You might just
discover a new place to call home.
Discover Edisto, island time starts here
BY LORI MCGEE
FOR ISLAND EYE NEWS
PHOTO BY JACKIE SHEDROW
WWW.ISLANDEYENEWS.COM
10 August 1, 2014
"THEY KNOW THAT THEY ARE UNIQUE, NOT ‘SPECIAL,’
BUT NOT MAINSTREAM. THEY DON’T GO WITH THE
FLOW, THEY SEEK OUT THE BENDS."
~ Sarah Carey
desire of Sarah and Lathan Carey to fnd
the perfect ft for their four very individual
children.
“We had four kids, each with very unique
personalities and I didn’t feel I could fnd
a place where they could all be who they
were,” Sarah Carey, one half of the school’s
founders, said. “I saw a school in Florida that
was what I wanted, and at around the same
time some friends said to me why don’t you
start a school. My frst thought was ‘Who
starts a school?!’”
If anyone is going to however, a couple with
as much teaching experience as husband and
wife team Sarah and Lathan Carey, seems
like a pretty good choice.
In the school’s frst year,
2010, they had seven students
in grades 3 through 8, three of
which were their own children.
The school’s fourth year,
2013/14, saw its frst full
complement of K through
12 classes.
“We now we have 35
kids and three graduates,
two this last year. All
got accepted to college,”
Sarah said. “We’re
growing and that’s why
we moved the school
from Mount Pleasant out here
to Sullivan’s Island. We needed
more space; we were just in one
room before,” Sara said, who has
lived with her family in Mount
Pleasant since 2002.
The school is located inside
The Church of the Holy Cross,
between Middle Street and
Jasper Boulevard. It occupies
the entire top of the church’s
annex building. But the crux of
the school is still one big room. The school is
not separated in a traditional sense.
“We mix more based on ability and interest
than grade level,” Sarah said. “And we spend
a lot of time together as a group.”
Sarah says each student is challenged at
his or her highest level. So if a student is in
4th grade but excels at math, he or she could
easily be taught at an 8th or 9th grade math
level.
“Each student makes his or her own class,
in each subject level,” she said. “I’m targeting
each student’s learning style and personal
strengths and weaknesses. So if I have six
students in a math class I’m actually teaching
six classes.”
Crown’s main philosophy is to encourage
self-governance, and operate much more
like a college than a traditional school. In
one classroom there’s a senior working solo
on her math, while in the room next door
a group are working with a teacher, as two
seniors tap away on their laptops pursuing
their personal projects. Downstairs a group
test out their science project, a solar powered
boat. Additionally, all students 4th grade and
up are in a Rosetta Stone class, and can pick
their language. Japanese and Swahili are two
current choices.
“We follow where students lead,” Sarah
said. “Next year we’re introducing basketball,
volleyball and competitive cheerleading.”
Sarah feels the characteristics of students
who thrive well in this environment are
independent learners with an intrinsic
curiosity about things.
“They know that they are unique, not
‘special,’ but not mainstream,” she said.
“They don’t go with the fow, they seek out
the bends.”
The National Association of Private Schools
recently accredited the school, and students
meet the same graduation criteria as any
South Carolina school. Homework at Crown
is limited to reading and preparation for
tests, presentations and projects, based on
the premise that students to use their time
wisely while at school.
Crown also employs an advanced
technology-based curriculum to connect
with students around the world and experts
in felds of interest, allowing students to
participate daily in a worldwide classroom by
video-conferencing.
Each Friday is dedicated to independent
projects, including internships, volunteer
work, athletics, theater, archery, arts and
tennis, and the school spends as much time
as possible out on the beach, one of the many
benefts of being located on Sullivan’s Island.
For more information about Crown
Leadership Academy visit www.
crownleadershipacademy.org or stop by the
school at 2520 Middle Street, Sullivan’s Island.
Academy continues from cover
(above) Zoë Tuten, Scott Carey, and Sienna Howard at work in Crown’s Early Education classroom.
(right) Sara Carey, the founder of Crown Leadership Academy, located on Sullivan’s Island.
August 1, 2014 11
WWW.ISLANDEYENEWS.COM
J
oin Fort Sumter National
Monument as we celebrate
National Lighthouse Day at
the Sullivan’s Island Lighthouse
on Thursday, August 7, 2014. The
special public event takes place
from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on the
grounds of the U.S. Coast Guard
Historic District at 1815 I’On
Avenue on Sullivan’s Island.
The Historic District represents
the evolution of events important
in United States maritime history
from 1895 to 1962. Commissioned
52 years ago on June 15, 1962 as
the last major lighthouse to be built
in the United States, the Sullivan’s
Island Lighthouse replaced the
original Charleston harbor light
(also known as the Morris Island
Lighthouse) which was built in
1876. Its unique triangular shape,
interior elevator and aluminum
siding distinguish it from more
traditional lighthouses.
It was on August 7, 1789 that
Congress passed an Act for the
establishment and support of
lighthouses, beacons, buoys and
public piers. In honor of the 200th
Anniversary of the establishment
of the frst federal lighthouse,
Congress designated August 7,
1989 as National Lighthouse Day.
This recognition has encouraged
communities and citizens groups
to dedicate themselves to the
preservation of these historic
structures. As part of the
anniversary, lighthouses, where
feasible, were open to the public.
“It is in the spirit of public
access that park staff and
volunteers invite the public to
explore the grounds of the US
Coast Guard Historic District,”
said Superintendent Tim Stone.
The grounds, quarters cupola
and boathouse will be open to the
public, because of serious health
and safety concerns the lighthouse
interior will not be open. Visitors
may view exhibits in the historic
life-saving station boathouse and
pick up a free commemorative
poster. Displays on water safety
and activities for children are
planned in conjunction with the
US Coast Guard Auxiliary and
Sullivan’s Island Fire & Rescue.
Representatives from the non-
proft Save the Light organization
will report on efforts to preserve
the Morris Island Lighthouse.
Refreshments will be served.
All activities are free and open
to the public. For more information,
call the park at 843. 883.3123.
Celebrate National Lighthouse Day
BY BILL MARTIN
FOR ISLAND EYE NEWS
T
he newest Bushido Asian
Restaurant & Bar opened
its doors on the Isle of
Palms last month, offering
customers a variety of Asian
dishes including; General Tso's
chicken, Pad Thai, Hibachi and
Sushi. For the residents of the
island this gives them a great
option for dinner without having
to cross the connector. Bushido
is located in the newly remodeled
Harris Teeter shopping center.
The ambiance is not only
inviting but very unique for the
island. The bar has colorful
dancing lights, which give it a
fun and happy vibe. The bar
staff has come up with some
unique twists to plain old
sake by infusing it with fresh
vegetables and fruits, creating
some absolutely lovely cocktails.
There is the cucumber sake-tini,
which is perfect for a hot muggy
day, its crisp light favor sure
to refresh any parched palate.
They also have the "Megan
Special" made from the mango-
infused sake and added a touch
of coconut and fruit juice to it to
make it dangerously appealing.
Bushido originally gained
its fame for the “Man vs Food"
television show, which featured
its hot sushi challenge. This
location also features the
challenge and should have the
sauces in any day now, but
make sure you call ahead for
reservations if you are planning
on trying it. The challenge itself
is ten rolls ranging in spiciness
from one to ten. Anything above
a level fve the customer must
sign a waiver to order. All rolls
must be consumed in one hour
without any drinks, besides
water. To the brave customers
that complete the challenge, a
special Bushido headband is
their prize, one that earns them
free appetizers on each visit.
Now back to the amazing sushi
chefs, these guys put together
some of the prettiest dishes and
truly are masters at their craft.
Having come from some of the
top sushi restaurants in New
York they have really stepped up
the level of sushi on not only the
Isle of Palms but Charleston as
a whole. The specialty rolls they
have come up with are unlike
any around town, and beyond
delicious.
“We have put a lot of effort into
not only bringing people into the
restaurant but making sure they
want to come back. We love the
people on the Island and want to
be a fun place for the locals to
hang out at all year long.”
Asian Restaurant &
Bar opens on IOP
BY LOUIS LIU
FOR ISLAND EYE NEWS
WWW.ISLANDEYENEWS.COM
12 August 1, 2014
Lifeguards show off
their skills on IOP
BY SARAH REYNOLDS
FOR ISLAND EYE NEWS
P
ractice makes perfect, and Charleston County Parks strive
for perfection, particularly when it comes to aquatic safety.
On June 27, lifeguards from Charleston County competed in
the 14th Annual South Carolina Recreation and Park Association
Lifeguard Competition, a challenge designed to showcase and
sharpen lifesaving skills.
Comprised of 6 teams from CCPRC and 2 teams from the Mount
Pleasant Recreation Department, the lifeguard competition kicked
off with beach events at Isle of Palms County Park then moved to
R.L. Jones Center in Mount Pleasant for pool events in the afternoon.
Organized by the Charleston County Park and Recreation
Commission and the Mount Pleasant Recreation Department,
this annual event brings together beach, pool, and waterpark
lifeguards in a healthy yet competitive environment, allowing them
to demonstrate their skills to the community without any threat of
danger. The competition is held on behalf of the SCRPA Aquatics
Branch to motivate guards to improve their aquatic safety skills
through vigorous training and practice.
Crowds gathered around competitors at Isle of Palms County Park
to watch as they raced to the fnish line in the Run-Swim-Run event,
competed for the fastest time in the one-mile race, dove for beach
fags in the sand, and simulated rescues in the Active Victim Ocean
Rescue event. Once the beach events concluded, the competitors
moved to the R.L. Jones Center to begin the pool portion of the
competition. Lifeguards participated in speed races and lifesaving
technique events, including Spinal Injury Management, Rescue Tube
Relay, 50-Yard Sprint and Submerged Deep Water Rescue.
Continuing their winning tradition, CCPRC took home frst,
second, and third place at the SCRPA Lifeguard Competition. The
teams were made up of lifeguards from Isle of Palms County Park,
Folly Beach County Park, Splash Island and Whirlin’ Waters.
Congratulations to Sarah Thibaudeau, Allie Buechele, Trace Hall, and Chase Heffron
on winning frst place.
WWW.ISLANDEYENEWS.COM
August 1, 2014 13
has been very careful to emphasize that
this ordinance is not about helping any one
particular business, as that would be illegal.
Zoning Administrator Joe Henderson said
that staff had identifed a business license
enforcement issue, discussed the matter
with Town offcials and, in an effort to work
with the business owner, initiated language
for public consideration of a new land use, a
coffee shop use.
Gary Visser, Planning Commission Chair,
said that in his personal opinion, a use that
is not allowed on the Island is currently in
operation (Café Medley) and the Town is
offering the opportunity to explore whether
this use is something the Island wants to
have.
“There is no intention to craft an ordinance
specifcally to allow Café Medley a coffee shop
license,” he said.
The issue has elicited a lot of heated
feelings on the island, both for and against.
The Planning Commission had received a
total of 37 correspondence items as of June
11.
The primary concern appears to be about
the unintended impact of potentially allowing
four more eating establishments on the
Island; the effect that will have on parking
by drawing more people to the island, and
the impact on the general ambience of the
commercial core.
“Are we really asking for four more
restaurants? Who wants this?” Allison
Bourland said at the public meeting.
At the July Town Council meeting
however, the predominant mood was for the
amendment.
“My friends from Mount Pleasant don’t
come here to have lunch with me at Café
Medley,” said Marie Louise Ramsdale. “They
come to have dinner in the restaurants. The
coffee shops are for the locals, I can call them
to ask if they’ve seen my kids, they are a vital
community resource. They’ve been here and
they need to continue to be here.”
“This is not about parking,” she continued.
“The coffee shops don’t cause the parking
issues, the restaurants cause the parking
problems, the 10,000 new residents in Mount
Pleasant cause the parking
problems. We need to address
the parking problems, but that’s
a separate issue from this, and
it needs to stay separate. Locals
walk and bike or ride their golf
carts to the coffee shops.”
At least one business owner
disagrees with this assessment,
saying after the meeting that she regularly
observes locals driving their cars and golf
carts into the commercial district.
Council listened to all the many opinions
during the July meeting, then voted on the
frst reading of the ordinance to amend zoning
ordinances regarding eating establishments,
passing it unanimously, with Councilmember
Jerry Kaynard recusing himself from voting
on the issue. There was no discussion during
the meeting. Mayor Perkis told the assembled
audience that the issue would be discussed
further at the Council Workshop meeting,
Monday, August 4 at 6 p.m., before a second
reading and ratifcation at the August Town
Council meeting on August 19.
Comprehensive Plan
Council unanimously approved the second
reading and ratifcation of the motion to adopt
amendments to the 2008 comprehensive
plan. This was a 5-year update/review, which
has been through the Planning Commission
and a public meeting.
“It’s been a year through the planning
commission, this fnal plan is result of input
from residents and council and I really
appreciate hard work planning commission
did on creating this,” Mike Perkis said.
New Sewer
Council unanimously approved a resolution
to accept a bid proposal from Arcadis US.,
Inc. for the Sewer Rehabilitation project.
New Fire Truck
Chief Stith is about to get his new fre
truck—well order it anyway.
“Based on recommendations from fre
committee, we’ve come up with a good truck
that will last us 40 years or more and take
care of all our needs on the island.
The Council unanimously approved to
accept the proposal from E1 to build the
truck. It will take a little under a year to
complete.
The next Town Council meeting will be held
Tuesday, August 19 at 6 p.m.
SI council continues from page 2
“THE COFFEE SHOPS DON’T CAUSE THE PARKING ISSUES,
THE RESTAURANTS CAUSE THE PARKING PROBLEMS, THE
10,000 NEW RESIDENTS IN MOUNT PLEASANT CAUSE THE
PARKING PROBLEMS."
~ Marie Louise Ramsdale
August 23 Is l and Eye Cal endar
August 1
ONGOING EVENTS
Tuesdays
Mount Pleasant Farmers Market
3:30-7 p.m. Corner of Coleman
and Simmons Street
Wednesdays
Cafe Medley Wine Tasting
Every Wednesdays, 6-9 p.m., $5,
$13 with cheese plate. 2213 Middle
St. Middle Street, Sullivan’s Island.
Call 843.793.4055.
Barn Jam
6 – 10 p.m. The Awendaw Green
Barn every Wednesday, 6-10 p.m.
$5 at the door, all ages welcome.
Enjoy a night of diverse music
from around the globe on the
uniquely bohemian ground of the
Sewee Outpost. Wood fred pizza
and fresh grilled oysters (while in
season) will be available as well
as libations. www.facebook.com/
awendawgreen.
Nickelodeon Character
Wednesdays
10 a.m. – 6 p.m. Starting June
4 your favorite Nickelodeon
characters will be making special
appearances at the waterparks on
Wednesdays this summer. Catch
them during your visit to Splash
Zone, Splash Island, and Whirlin’
Waters Adventure Waterpark.
Characters will make appearances
during regular park hours (10
a.m. – 6 p.m.); exact times will be
available on site.
Thursdays
Mah Jongg Nights (adults)
Poe’s Library hosts Mah Jongg
Thursdays at 6 p.m. Learn to
play American Mah Jongg. No
experience necessary. 1921 I’on
Avenue, 883.3914.
Nature Movie at SeeWee
Visitor Center
2 p.m. Call 843-928-3368 for more
information.
Fridays
Acoustic Sunset Oyster Roast
The Wreckfsh, 7690 Northwoods
Blvd. Every Friday 5-8 p.m. on
the outdoor patio. There is $12
all you can eat oysters as well
as live music and drink specials.
Call 843.580.4040 for more
information.
Saturdays
Tae Kwon Do for Seniors
Must be 50 or older. 9-10 a.m.
at the Isle of Palms Recreational
Center. $35 resident fee and $40
non-resident fee. There is a drop
in fee of $10 per class. For more
information call 843.886.8294
Charleston Farmers Market
8 a.m. to 2 p.m. rain or shine
in Marion Square, 329 Meeting
Street. A variety of local produce,
plants, herbs and cut fowers
as well as breakfast and lunch
vendors, live entertainment and
arts and crafts from local artisans
for visitors to experience.
ONGOING
Live Music at Southerly
Every night 6 to 9 p.m. Southerly
Restaurant and Patio at Southern
Season offers Live Music on the
patio every evening from (11 a.m.
to 2 p.m. on Sundays). Make the
most of happy hour with appetizers
and craft beers and cocktails
from our Patio Bar and unwind to
the tune of local bands from the
Lowcountry. Southern Season, 730
Coleman Blvd, 843.416.3965.
FRIDAY, AUGUST 1
Shark Week
At the South Carolina Aquarium,
August 1-10.
GASLIGHT STREET w/
American Fiction
10 p.m. Live music at Home
Team BBQ, 2209 Middle Street,
Sullivan's Island.
Weird Science (Charleston’s
Favorite 80′s Cheese)
9 p.m. Tickets $8 at the door.
Weird Science is a band from
Charleston, SC dedicated to
preserving the art form that is 80s
cheese. Windjammer, IOP, Front
Beach.
SATURDAY, AUGUST 2
Stand Up Paddleboard Trips:
Palmetto Islands Historical SUP Tour
12:30 -3:30 p.m. Mingle with the
locals - such as snowy egrets,
osprey, and more - while looking
back through time with a trained
naturalist. This is a casual
paddle with a historical twist for
a unique Charleston stroll on the
water. All that's missing is iced
tea! Pre-registration required.
Course # 33683 Meets at:
Palmetto Islands County Park
Age: 16 & up. Fee: $36/$30 CCR
Discount. Call 795-4386 or visit
CharlestonCountyParks.com to
register.
Repticon Returns
Reptiday, a new 1-day show,
opens to the public at 10 a.m.
with a fun and educational reptile
exposition geared to all ages
and personalities. A true family-
oriented event, Repticon’s reptile
shows are held in major cities
throughout the United States and
attract thousands of enthusiasts.
Omar Shrine Auditorium in Mount
Pleasant, SC. The expo offers
hundreds of reptiles, amphibians,
invertebrates, spiders, and small
exotic animals to area enthusiasts.
Top breeders and vendors will
have animals, merchandise, cages,
supplies, live and frozen feeders,
and much more, as well as offer
their expert advice where needed.
The doors open to the general
public at 10 a.m. on Saturday,
closing at 5 p.m. At the door,
tickets are $10 for adults, $5 for
children 5-12, and children under
5 are admitted free. VIP early-entry
tickets may be purchased at www.
reptiday.com/charleston.
AMERICAN FICTION w/
Gaslight Street
10 p.m. Live music at Home
Team BBQ, 2209 Middle Street,
Sullivan's Island
WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 6
Barn Jam
6 – 10 p.m. The Awendaw Green
Barn every Wednesday, 6-10 p.m.
$5 at the door, all ages welcome.
Enjoy a night of diverse music
from around the globe on the
uniquely bohemian ground of the
Sewee Outpost. Wood fred pizza
and fresh grilled oysters (while in
season) will be available as well as
libations. Bands this Wednesday
include Casey Malanuk from The
Shoelaces, The Mountain Pleasers,
Jackaroe, Marbin and Steph
Stewart & the Boyfriends.
THURSDAY, AUGUST 7
National Lighthouse Day
Free special event at the U.S.
Coast Guard Historic District on
Sullivan's. See story on page 11.
WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 8
Lowcountry Blues Club
Every Wednesday, join some of
Charleston’s newest students of
the blues as the Lowcountry Blues
Club hosts its weekly open, electric
jam. Simply bring the talent that
God gave you…along with your
sticks and guitars to Home Team
BBQ in West Ashley. Simply sign
up on the list, wait until the emcee
calls your name, and come get
your 15 minutes of fame. Certainly,
it is always best to be early as early
as possible as slots fll quickly, but
even late arrivals have a chance.
Full backline provided courtesy
of club members Greg Levkus,
Bill Nance, Jon Scott, and Jerry
Ray. Friday Aug. 8: T J Kong &
The Atomic Bomb, 10 p.m., 2209
Middle Street, Sullivan's Island.
SATURDAY, AUGUST 9
Burgers & Brews with Crabpot
Players
Fundraiser for the theatre
company, featuring a summer
cookout, food, beer and live
entertainment. Crabotplayers.com
for more details.
Wild Dunes Oyster Roast and
Southern BBQ
6 - 8:30 p.m. Vacationers and
locals alike are welcome to a
sumptuous summer celebration at
Wild Dune's Palm Cove Summer
Oyster Roast & Southern BBQ
dinner. Taste summer in the
south with freshly roasted oysters,
fnger-licking barbecue and
Southern fare. In addition to the
Southern-style feast, enjoy live
entertainment, free soft drinks,
a cash bar, and family-friendly
activities at Wild Dunes Resort's
newest pool, Palm Cove. Buy
tickets at www.wilddunes.com or
call 843.886.2218.
Lucky Day Yard Sale
8 a.m. to 2 p.m. sponsored by IOP
Exchange Club and Garden Club
at 201 Palm Blvd., Isle of Palms.
See story on page 17.
Fried Goat
10 p.m. Live music at Home
Team BBQ, 2209 Middle Street,
Sullivan's Island.
SUNDAY, AUGUST 10
The Center for Birds of Prey
Family Program
1 p.m. a fun day of interesting
activities for all ages, learning
about and enjoying birds and
nature together, including hands
on interaction with avian bio-
artifacts and arts and crafts
to fight demonstrations and
behind-the-scenes tours of the
restricted Avian Medical Clinic.
Our Bee Cause will offer an
insider’s view of a working bee
hive plus a honey harvest and
tasting. Wild Birds Unlimited
of Mt. Pleasant will provide an
exclusive offer on a special back
yard birding starter package, and
kid-friendly refreshments will be
available for purchase. Space is
limited and advance purchase
is recommended. Tickets can
be purchased online at www.
thecenterforbirdsofprey.org.
Budweiser Bikini Bash “2014″
FINALS
5 P.M. The Budweiser Bikini
Bash is a long-standing tradition
drawing locals from IOP and all
over Charleston. For more than 25
years, the Windjammer Budweiser
Bikini Bash has showcased some
of “Charleston’s fnest bikini-clad
ladies.” The Windjammer, IOP
Front Beach.
Double Trash
7-10 p.m. Live music at Home
Team BBQ, 2209 Middle Street,
Sullivan's Island
WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 13
The Awendaw Green Barn Jam
6 – 10 p.m. $5 at the door, all ages
welcome. Enjoy a night of diverse
music from around the globe on
the uniquely bohemian ground
of the Sewee Outpost. Wood fred
pizza and fresh grilled oysters
(while in season) will be available
as well as libations. Bands this
Wednesday include John the
Revelator,
Scott Low, Francie Moon & The
Great Outdoors, Behind the Times,
Wade Baker and Skunk Ruckus.
THURSDAY, AUGUST 14
Thursday Night Boogie
6 – 10 p.m. Mount Pleasant Pier.
Join us for this new event at the
Mount Pleasant Pier specifcally for
the 21-and-up crowd! The pier will
be rockin' with the sounds of DJ
Jim Bowers as he plays a variety
of line dancing hits, unforgettable
oldies, and beach music classics!
Beverages and food will be
available for purchase. Tickets
are limited; advance purchase
is recommended. A photo ID is
required to gain entry into the
event. For ages 21 and up. Fee:
$10/$8 CCR Discount/$10 on-site
(if available).
SATURDAY, AUGUST 16
Book Club
10:30am. Edgar Allan Poe/
Sullivan’s Island Library holds its
next book club meeting to discuss
The Midwife of Hope River by
Patricia Harman at 10:30 a.m. on
Saturday, August 16. The public
is welcome to attend. Stop by
the library to check out the book
prior to the discussion. Interested
attendees are invited to email
Connie Darling at darlingc@
ccpl.org for book discussion
questions. The Edgar Allan Poe/
Sullivan’s Island Library, located
at 1921 I’On Avenue, Sullivan’s
Island, is a branch of Charleston
County Public Library. For more
information, call 883-3914.

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 20
The Awendaw Green Barn
6-10 p.m. $5 at the door, all ages
welcome. Enjoy a night of diverse
music from around the globe on
the uniquely bohemian ground
of the Sewee Outpost. Wood fred
pizza and fresh grilled oysters
(while in season) will be available
as well as libations. Bands this
Wednesday include Alex Culbreth
solo, The Zealots, Heather Luttrell
and the Possumden, PROVERBIAL,
and Southern Belles.
SATURDAY, AUGUST 23
Wild Dunes Oyster Roast and
Southern BBQ
6-8:30 p.m. Vacationers and locals
alike are welcome to a sumptuous
summer celebration at Wild Dune's
Palm Cove Summer Oyster Roast
& Southern BBQ dinner. Taste
summer in the south with freshly
roasted oysters, fnger-licking
barbecue and Southern fare. In
addition to the Southern-style
feast, enjoy live entertainment, free
soft drinks, a cash bar, and family-
friendly activities at Wild Dunes
Resort's newest pool, Palm Cove.
Buy tickets at www.wilddunes.com
or call 843.886.2218.
16 August 1, 2014
island eats
Ben & Jerry’s
Enjoy an array of ice cream
favors, from Chocolate Therapy
to Peach Cobbler on Isle of Palms’
Ocean Boulevard
$
886-6314
www.benandjerrys.com
1009 Ocean Boulevard,
Isle of Palms, SC 29451
Café Medley
Start your day or end it with
a well rounded café, serving
breakfast, lunch, and a glass of
wine in the evening.
$$
793-4055
www.cafemedley.com
2213 Middle Street
Sullivan’s Island, SC 29482
High Thyme Cuisine
A small island bistro with a wide
range of dishes from seafood,
tapas on Tuesdays, and a brunch
on Sunday mornings.
$$$
883-3536
www.highthymecuisine.com
2213 Middle Street
Sullivan’s Island, SC 29482
Home Team BBQ
Not limited to barbeque, this
casual eatery also serves salads,
wraps, tacos, and quesadillas, as
well as Sunday brunch.
$$
883-3131
www.hometeambbq.com
2209 Middle Street
Sullivan’s Island, SC 29482
Long Island Cafe
Come in for lunch, dinner, or
Sunday brunch and enjoy all your
favorite seafood plus so much
more at this island favorite.
$$
886-8809
www.longislandcafesc.com
1515-A Palm Boulevard
Isle of Palms, SC 29451
Morgan Creek Grill
Relax with a front row seat on
the Intracoastal waterway while
enjoying fresh seafood and
southern hospitality.
$$$
886-8980
www.morgancreekgrill.com
80 41st Avenue
Isle of Palms, SC 29451
Poe’s Tavern
Famous for their gourmet burgers
and chicken sandwiches, this Poe-
inspired eatery also features great
deals on fresh fsh tacos.
$$
883-0083
www.poestavern.com
2210 Middle Street
Sullivan’s Island, SC
SALT at Station 22
Enjoy a fun atmosphere with fresh
seafood and southern favorites,
and a fresh, local raw bar.
$$$
883-3355
www.saltstation22.com
2205 Middle Street
Sullivan’s Island, SC 29482
SaltWorks Dockside Deli
Located inside the Isle of Palms
Marina Market, come enjoy
fresh breakfast, smoothies, &
sandwiches. Open from 7AM-3PM
daily.
$
www.saltworkscc.com
50 41st Avenue
Isle of Palms, SC 29451
Sullivan’s
Grab a casual dinner of fried
founder or crab cakes in a cozy
atmosphere, as well as lunch on
the weekends.
$$
883-3222
2019 Middle Street
Sullivan’s Island, SC 29482
Taco Mamacita
Enjoy made-from-scratch “Tex
Mex” soups, salads, tacos, and
enchiladas, and quench your
thirst with one of several specialty
margaritas.
$$
789-4107
www.tacomamacita.com
2213-B Middle Street
Sullivan’s Island, SC 29482
Crave Kitchen & Cocktails
Located just over the bridge from
IOP, Crave's National Award
Winning Chef proudly serves Low
Country visitors and residents
a unique casual fne dining
experience!
$$$
(843) 884-1177
www.cravekitchenandcocktails.
com
1968 Riviera Drive
Mt. Pleasant, SC 29464
Gilligan's Seafood Restaurant
For Family Friendly Fun- Gilligan's
is the One! Patio and private dining
available as well as daily and
happy hour specials.
$$
(843) 849-2344
www.gilligans.net
1475 Long Grove Dr.
Mt. Pleasant, SC 29464
Southerly Restaurant & Patio
Open for breakfast, lunch, dinner,
and weekend brunch, boasts a
fresh seasonal menu highlighting
local ingredients and contemporary
cuisine, all with Southern fair.
Our scenic outdoor patio is a lovely
setting to savor a meal, while
our elegant indoor spaces are
perfect for receptions, parties and
meetings.
$$
(843) 416-3965
www.southernseason.com
730 Coleman Blvd,
Mt. Pleasant, SC 29464
Sewee Restaurant
See Wee Southern Style local
Seafood, local farm to table
veggies, sinful homemade desserts.
$$
(843) 928-3609
www.seeweerestaurants.com/
4808 N Hwy 17,
Awendaw, SC 29429
Stack's Coastal Kitchen
Come join us for lunch where
we offer fresh soup, salads and
sandwiches. Enjoy dinner in a
casual
bistro-style setting with a nice wine
selection, full bar, and outdoor
dining.
$$-$$$
(843) 388-6968
www.stackscoastalkitchen.com
1440 Ben Sawyer Blvd #1107
Mt Pleasant, SC 29464
off-island eats
T
he S.C. Department of
Natural Resources asks
coastal visitors and
residents to keep Lights Out
for Loggerheads. Loggerhead
sea turtles (Caretta caretta) are
present on South Carolina's
barrier islands from May through
October. From May through
August, loggerheads come ashore
to deposit approximately 120 eggs
in a nest cavity in the dry sand
dune system. Sixty days later,
loggerhead hatchlings emerge
from the nest at night and head to
the ocean. Nests hatch from July
through the end of October.
Loggerhead hatchlings are
vulnerable to disorientation by
artifcial lights. When loggerhead
hatchlings emerge from the shell,
they are attracted to the blue and
green wavelengths of celestial
light that are naturally refected
off the ocean. They use this
natural light to navigate from the
nest toward the ocean.
"If artifcial light on the beach
is brighter than the natural ocean
horizon, the hatchlings will head
toward this artifcial source,"
says Michelle Pate, Sea Turtle
Coordinator for DNR. Light
from streetlights, exterior lights
on commercial establishments
and beachfront homes can all
disorient hatchlings. People
on or near the beach carrying
fashlights or lanterns and
bonfres can also disorient
loggerhead hatchlings.
Disorientation of loggerhead
sea turtle hatchlings results
in increased mortality.
Disorientation makes hatchlings
more vulnerable to nocturnal
predators and desiccation.
"While crawling the wrong
way on the beach, hatchlings
exhaust valuable, limited energy
that is needed to swim offshore,"
Pate advises.
Hatchlings need energy once
they reach the ocean to swim to
dense foating rafts of seaweed
found as far as 60 miles
offshore. They use the seaweed
as camoufage to protect them
from predators. The seaweed is
also home to small crustaceans
that loggerhead hatchlings eat to
replenish their energy.
Loggerheads are listed as
threatened under the Endangered
Species Act and are protected by
federal and state laws. If a sea
turtle hatchling is disoriented
by artifcial light, the maximum
federal fne for harming a
threatened species is $25,000.
County and local lighting
ordinances exist to protect sea
turtles. To see a list of lighting
ordinances in South Carolina,
visit: www.dnr.sc.gov/seaturtle/
volres/ordinances.pdf. Violating
local or county lighting ordinances
carry fnes up to $500.
As coastal development
continues to increase, the number
of disorientation events may also
rise. If sea turtle friendly light
fxtures and bulbs are used, this
trend can be reversed. To learn
more about available sea turtle
friendly products visit www.dnr.
sc.gov/seaturtle/lights.
Lights out for loggerheads
H O W Y O U C A N H E L P T H E B E L O V E D
E N D A N G E R E D S P E C I E S
BY SCDNR
FOR ISLAND EYE NEWS
PHOTO BY BARB BERGWERF
17 August 1, 2014
WWW.ISLANDEYENEWS.COM
A
ugust 9, 2014 just might be your lucky day. The Isle of Palms
Exchange Club and the IOP Garden Club are combining efforts to
present the soon-to-become- famous, annual Lucky Day Yard Sale.
Who knows; you just might discover a Rembrandt hidden behind an old
framed Elvis painting or some other treasure lost for years and surfacing
at this yard sale. Well, probably not, but you may fnd the perfect piece
of furniture for your offce printer or the planter that you’ve needed to
brighten that dark corner of the
house.
Even better, the Garden Club will
be selling plants in the front of the
Exchange Club to fll your planters
and your other garden needs. Are
you thinking that you don’t need
any more stuff? Then the Lucky Day
Yard Sale is an opportunity clean
out the basement and contribute
unwanted and unused items to the
sale.
Proceeds go to the Isle of
Palms Exchange Club, a service
organization that raises funds for
other organizations that aid in the
prevention and treatment of child
abuse.
Items may be dropped off at the
Exchange Club on the Isle of Palms
on August 7-8, 2014 from 8 a.m.
to 2 p.m. or call Janis Ashley at
843.883.9016 for an earlier drop-
off. Please come by and see us on
Saturday, August 9, 2014, 8 a.m. to
2 p.m., and make it your lucky day.
Janet Ashley, Yard Sale Coordinator and
President of the Isle of Palms Garden Club
and Sandra Russell, Exchange Club Member
price items for sale at the upcoming yard sale
Is it your Lucky Day?
BY RUTH THORNBURG
FOR ISLAND EYE NEWS
Here piggy piggy!
E
rin Schwartz was quite taken aback during the last
day of her family’s visit to Sullivan’s Island. They
were playing on the beach at Station 16 1/2 when a
wild pig swam ashore. Exhausted and visibly shaken, the
pig was helped out of the water by island resident Willy
Hutcheson before being rounded up by the Sullivan’s
Island Police Department.
PHOTO BY ERIN SCHWARTZ.
18 August 1, 2014
COMPUTER CORNER
S
ome of this may be old hat
to those who have read my
column over the years but
for newer readers I want to go
over some basic information that
can help in determining the type
of computer you want or need,
be it a Desktop, Laptop, Tablet
or even just a Smartphone. Each
type has pros and cons so without
further ado let's explore each.
A desktop computer is your
traditional "computer" with a
separate tower or box, monitor
(TV), keyboard and mouse. The
tower is the guts of the computer
and has the hard drive, CPU
(central processing unit), DVD
drive, connection to the Internet
(NIC card—network interface
card), video/audio connections
and USB connections. It can also
have specialized connections
such as extra monitor or TV
tuner, removable hard drives, etc.
With a desktop computer, if
your monitor goes bad you can just
replace it, same with keyboard or
mouse. If the tower is damaged,
again you can replace it and
continue to use the monitor and
other external devices. There is a
hybrid desktop that is sometimes
called an "all-in-one" in which
the monitor includes the tower
portion. I would caution against
one of these as if the monitor
portion goes bad it is expensive
to replace, it would be cheaper
to just buy another one. With the
standard desktop you would just
be replacing the monitor, which
nowadays would be around $125.
Desktops come in both Windows
based and Apple (Mac). You can
still fnd Windows 7 desktops
online from companies like Dell.
Laptops are your more common
type of computers nowadays
and are just as strong and fast
as their desktop counterparts,
except in the very high end
products. A laptop combines the
tower, monitor, keyboard and
mouse into one compact design.
The touchpad replaces the
mouse, the monitor is replaced
by the LCD screen, and the hard
drive/CPU are included. The
sizes vary from a "netbook" at
about 11" to huge 10-15lb, 19"
monster notebook that rarely
leave a table. Once considered a
bit low on computing power and
RAM (random access memory)
the modern laptop is a brute,
even on the low end of pricing.
If doing simple email reading,
some light Internet surfng, basic
word processing one of the light
11" types is great to slip into a
purse or small backpack. Some
weigh less than 5lbs and yet
provide everything you would
need for travel AND have a real
keyboard/touchpad. Again both
Windows and Apple are offered in
an array of sizes with the 15.4"
size being a very common size.
Same as desktops, you can still
fnd Windows 7 online.
Tablets and hybrid phablets
(large phones) are all the rage
today and have a great place in
your life. Many things can be
accomplished using the tablet,
just watch one of the many TV
ads about them! I'm not sure I
can use one to create a symphony
or draw a masterpiece but dealing
with email, surfng the 'net, etc. is
a no-brainer. Rarely do I suggest
Android, versus Windows, versus
Apple products but in the case of
Tablets, for now, I still suggest
going with the granddaddy of
them all, the iPad. Yes it's a bit
expensive but the service, use,
and add-on products just make it
easier right out of the box. I would
suggest you buy directly from
Apple, either online or through
the Apple store downtown.
Android makes some great tablets
and the pricing can be well below
iPad but usually you need some
help getting it set up, it can be
a bit confusing. In the very near
future it may be that the Android
tablet overtakes iPads but for now
personally I would stay with the
iPad. Older versions of iPad, still
new and sold by Apple, can be
had well below the $499 starting
price for the latest version.
So we now come to
smartphones. Wow has the phone
come a long way in a short period.
A smartphone can do about what
a tablet and in some cases a
laptop can, in a small product. In
the smartphone world both Apple
and Android based phones are
about equal for me. The Galaxy
version of Android phones and the
Apple 5 series have many similar
features and in reality costs are
about the same give or take $100.
Can a smartphone take the place
of a laptop or a tablet? They may
be able to produce the same data,
i.e. a word document or even a
spreadsheet, but the size makes
it rather hard to view an entire
document at one time. Different
ways to view the data, such as
heads-up displays are on the way
but still the size limits the way the
data can be manipulated. I have
tried the Windows based phone
and for now it just does not excite
me, although the integration of
the Offce products is seamless.
Can a person live with just a
smartphone and ditch all the
other stuff? I guess it can be
done but I think writing a letter
or editing a spreadsheet could
become rather tiresome. Do you
really need a desktop, laptop,
tablet and smartphone? I have
all but then again I am a geek
for sure! I think that in today's
world a desktop is needed in a
business environment where you
want the data staying in the same
place, whereas a laptop would do
if you are constantly on the go.
A laptop does provide the real
keyboard and touchpad or the
ability to add an external mouse,
most tablets offer the virtual
keyboard and touch screen. A
tablet could suffce if all you are
doing is email/surfng the 'net
but again could be tiresome if
you fnd yourself needing to write
that letter or do a spreadsheet.
Both can be done, especially with
an add-on keyboard but a laptop
would be easier.
For now I would suggest you
stay with at least one desktop/
laptop in the family along with
the tablet and smartphones.
Businesses still need to have the
desktops or laptops that make
commerce fow.
As always if you have questions
or need help call Rent A Bob at
843.822.7794 or email rentabob@
live.com.
It’s time to go back to basics
D E S K T O P, L A P T O P, TA B L E T O R S MA R T P H O N E , WH I C H I S R I G H T F O R Y O U ?
BY BOB HOOPER
FOR ISLAND EYE NEWS
WWW.ISLANDEYENEWS.COM
19 August 1, 2014
FINANCIAL FOCUS
Breach I nl et Ti de Char t
Date High Tide Low Tide
Hurricanes, storms etc., are NOT included in the
predictions. Tidal current direction changes and tide time
predictions can be very different. Tide predictions are
PREDICTIONS; they can be wrong so use common sense.
Source: www.saltwatertides.com
Aug 1
Aug 2
Aug 3
Aug 4
Aug 5
Aug 6
Aug 7
Aug 8
Aug 9
Aug 10
Aug 11
Aug 12
Aug 13
Aug 14
12:07pm
12:06am/12:50pm
12:51am/1:40pm
1:42am/2:37pm
2:40am/3:38pm
3:42am/4:41pm
4:46am/5:42pm
5:49am/6:41pm
6:50am/7:37pm
7:49am/8:32pm
8:47am/9:24pm
9:43am/10:16pm
10:38am/11:08pm
11:33am
5:39am/6:06pm
6:19am/6:56pm
7:05am/7:52pm
7:57am/8:54pm
8:56am/9:57pm
9:58am/10:59pm
11:01am/11:58pm
12:02pm
12:54am/1:01pm
1:47am/1:58pm
2:39am/2:53pm
3:29am/3:48pm
4:19am/4:42pm
5:09am/5:38pm
"TO CREATE YOUR LEGACY, YOU’LL NEED TO DO
SOME PLANNING."
U
nless you keep close track of obscure
holidays and observances, you
probably didn’t know that August is
“What Will Be Your Legacy?” month. Still,
you might want to use this particular month
as a useful reminder to take action on what
could be one of your most important fnancial
goals: leaving a meaningful legacy.
A legacy isn’t simply a document or a bunch
of numbers—it’s what you will be remembered
for, and what you have left behind that will be
remembered. It’s essentially your chance to
contribute positively to the future, whether
that means providing fnancial resources for
the next generation, helping those charitable
organizations whose work you support, or a
combination of both.
To create your legacy, you’ll need to do
some planning. And you can start by asking
yourself a couple of key questions:
What are your goals?
When you think about leaving a legacy,
what comes to mind? First and foremost,
you may well want to leave enough money
to help your own grown children meet their
fnancial goals. After that, you probably
have other things you’d like to accomplish.
Perhaps you want to provide resources for
your grandchildren to attend college? Or set
up a scholarship at your own alma mater?
Give fnancial support to a cultural, social,
religious or scientifc group? By thinking
about your goals and putting them on paper,
even in an informal sense, you’ll be taking the
important frst step in leaving the legacy you
desire.
How can you turn your goals into reality?
If you don’t take some concrete steps, your
legacy just won’t materialize. And the most
important step you need to take is to create
a comprehensive estate plan. Your estate
plan can be quite involved, because it
may involve several legal documents,
such as a will, living trust, health care
power of attorney, and so on. In creating
these materials, you will need to work
with your legal and tax advisors because
estate planning is defnitely not a “do-it-
yourself” endeavor.
You probably shouldn’t wait until
you are deep into retirement to take action
on your estate plan because developing the
necessary documents and arrangements can
take a fair amount of time—and you’ll want to
make these preparations when you’re in good
mental and physical health. Also, the longer
you wait to set up your estate plan, the less
likely it will be that you’ve communicated
your wishes clearly to your family members,
who may end up unsure about what you want
and what their roles are in carrying out your
plans—and that’s an outcome you certainly
don’t want to see.
In fact, clear
communications are
essential to developing
a successful estate
plan. You should
not only tell your
family members—and
anyone else affected
by your estate plan—
what you are thinking
of doing but also
inform them about
the professionals with
whom you are working
and the locations in
which you are storing any vital documents,
such as your will.
By identifying your goals, working with
the appropriate professionals to create an
effective estate plan, and communicating
regularly with your family members and other
“key players” in your life, you can go a long
way toward leaving the legacy you desire.
So, do what it takes to launch that legacy.
This article was written by Edward Jones
for use by your local Edward Jones Financial
Advisor.
Your legacy is in your hands
BY DIMI MATOUCHEV
FOR ISLAND EYE NEWS
20 August 1, 2014
WWW.ISLANDEYENEWS.COM
O
n July 6 Alex Garcia found
loggerhead tracks and a
nest near Station 14 1/2
not far from Ft. Moultrie. This
is Alex's frst year on the Turtle
Team and she did well to spot the
short tracks which led up onto
a small scarped dune and to a
nesting body pit
with lots of broken
and buried green
vegetation. It took
us a while to locate
the eggs since the
turtle had crawled
back out over the
nest and incoming
tracks when she
left.
We rely on
certain feld signs
left by nesting
loggerheads. These
can be a difference
in incoming and
outgoing tracks
on the beach if the
tide went out while
she nested, buried
green vegetation,
a mound of sand
pushed up near
the entrance in the
6’ body pit where
she laid the eggs,
and thrown sand
scattered around.
These clues help
us fgure out which
way she faced
while dropping
the eggs and
where we need
to look to fnd
the hidden
egg chamber.
We cannot
document it as
a nest without
confrming that
eggs are there. We found the eggs
and marked the nest but did not
move it.
One week later on July 13
with the extra big full July
“super moon” the tide chopped
the beach seaward of Sullivan's
Nest #3 at Station 14 1/2, taking
away about six feet of dune sand.
Eve Gentieu sent a photo of it
showing that someone had moved
the front stick holding sign and
buried it right in the center of the
triangle of tape because the dune
had washed away where the sign
had been placed. This was bad
and we were afraid that the stick
might have damaged the eggs.
But when we got there, we found
that fortunately it had missed the
eggs.
However, the eggs were only
about 4 inches inside the vertical
surface of the scarped dune wall.
Another few more waves might
have exposed the egg chamber
and washed away the nest. Since
embryonic development had
begun, we had to handle the
eggs with extreme caution and
not rotate or turn them over to
any degree. In reptiles such as
turtles and alligators the embryo
attaches to the inside of the
eggshell, so jostling or fipping it
over when development is taking
place can kill it and keep it from
hatchling.
We very carefully removed 117
eggs and found a spot closer to
Station 14 approximately 30
yards toward Ft. Moultrie that
was another 20 feet back from
the high tide scrap line to relocate
the whole clutch. This was an
emergency situation and we will
be interested to see how well
this nest fares when hatching
occurs around the beginning of
September.
A close call on Sullivan’s Island
BY MARY PRINGLE
FOR ISLAND EYE NEWS
Barb Gobien (left) and Mary Pringle carefully removing the
eggs to be relocated to a safer spot.
PHOTOS BY BARBARA BERGWERF
"THE EGGS WERE ONLY ABOUT 4 INCHES INSIDE
THE VERTICAL SURFACE OF THE SCARPED DUNE
WALL. ANOTHER FEW MORE WAVES MIGHT HAVE
EXPOSED THE EGG CHAMBER AND WASHED
AWAY THE NEST."
WWW.ISLANDEYENEWS.COM
22 August 1, 2014
Charlotte Webster poses with her fsh-based art during a crafts event
at Poe Library on Sullivan's.
These "Frozen" fans enjoyed getting their hands dirty in the pursuit of art.
S
O
M
E
T
H
I
N
G

F
I
S
H
Y
PHOTOS BY STEVE ROSAMILIA
9-14 year-old fun run starting line.
WWW.ISLANDEYENEWS.COM
23 August 1, 2014
Run for the beach
THE ANNUAL IOP 10K & 5K BEACH RUN
SATURDAY, JULY 19
5k champion Chase Smith.
10k champion Matt Moldenhauer. 10k and 5k starting line.
closing the gap in the 5-8 year-old fun run..
PHOTOS BY STEVE ROSAMILIA
WWW.ISLANDEYENEWS.COM
25 August 1, 2014
Seasons
South
of the
Duck Quesadillas with
Chipotle Mayonnaise
BY MARILYN MARKEL
FOR ISLAND EYE NEWS
S
moked duck is a delicacy to behold. This takes a quesadilla to
a new level with some delicious melting cheese. This will be a
new favorite…
Ingredients
½ cup mayonnaise
¼ cup yogurt
1 teaspoon lemon juice
1-2 teaspoons chipotle chile in adobo sauce, minced
3 cups Cantal cheese, or other mild melting cheese like cheddar
2 cups smoked duck breast, thinly sliced
2 piquillo peppers, thinly sliced
½ cup red onion, minced
8 (8-inch) four tortillas
olive oil
Directions
1. Combine mayonnaise, yogurt, lemon juice and 1 teaspoon
chipotle chile. Taste and add more chile if desired. Set aside.
2. Combine cheese, duck, peppers and onion in a medium bowl.
Fill half tortilla with flling, divided evenly. Press other side of
tortilla over and brush both sides with oil.
3. Heat skillet over medium heat or panini press over high heat.
Cook quesadillas on both sides until crispy and golden. Serve
with adobo-chipotle mayonnaise.
Marilyn Markel, Culinary Director at Southern Season, developed a
lifelong passion for food while learning from her grandmother in the
kitchen as a child. In 2013, she was privileged to act as a judge for
the James Beard Cookbook Awards and attended the James Beard
Book and Broadcast Awards Ceremony in New York City. Markel
began developing Southern Season’s Cooking School over a decade
ago and has helped develop the store into a food destination and
nationally-recognized culinary center hosting over 300 classes a year
for seasoned and novice cooks.
WINE PAIRING
Pair with Rundquist 1448 or Taliano Roero Riserva
For this recipe of duck and chipotle, we are aiming
for a boldly favorful wine with qualities that will
resonate with the ingredients of the dish. The
combination of rich smoked duck with chipotle
is just begging for a red with savory notes
of bacon, berry cobbler, and – you guessed
it – smoke. These bold, rich favors can be
found in Rundquist 1448, a red blend that is
a favorite of ours for its smoothness. This wine
pairs perfectly with any kind of BBQ, by the way.
A second option, the Taliano Roero Riserva, is a
Nebbiolo wine from the Piemonte region of Northwest
Italy. A cousin of the famous Barolo and Barbaresco
wines, Roero produces wines of similar quality at a
much friendlier price. Look for earthy favors here -
smoke, leather, licorice, and savory spices at the fore,
with frm tannins and surprisingly bright acidity. Grab
a couple of bottles for your cellar, too, as this wine will
age beautifully.
“Y
ou’re nothing like your
father. Take off your
clothes and jump in the
water.”
Thayer Sarrono’s teasing
lyrics accompanied our
welcome toast as we began
our visit to Athens, Georgia.
My husband and I were
ready for some adult fun.
The University of Georgia
is often ranked among the
country’s top party schools
and the town’s motto is
“Life Unleashed” so we were
hopeful we’d fnd it here.
The Foundry Inn and Spa
got the good times rolling
right away. This is the city
that famously birthed some
of the country’s best bands:
R.E.M., Widespread Panic,
the B-52’s and many others.
Just a few steps from our
comfortable room at the
hotel was the Melting Point.
Every city should have a
venue like this one with a
frst-class sound system,
a big stage and a room full
of enthusiastic listeners of
all ages. There are outdoor
seats for folks who want
to smoke or talk more loudly,
a bar with TVs away from the
stage and plenty of seats around
the large dance foor as well as
Unleashed in
Athens, Georgia
BY CAROL ANTMAN
FOR ISLAND EYE NEWS
ROADTRIPS CHARLESTON
At the State Botanical Gardens
Athens continues on page 27
27 August 1, 2014
a balcony perched above. As we
listened to Thayer’s folky set we
munched on fsh tacos from the
menu that ranges from snacks to
hearty meals.
We really appreciated that the
music starts quite early. You can
catch the headliners and still be
in bed before midnight. It was so
fun and easy that we went every
night. The club hosts plenty of
stellar local talent as well as
national acts like The Soul Rebels
who rocked the house a couple of
nights later with their explosive
New Orleans brass sound. We
never left the dance foor and
couldn’t believe our luck in seeing
this world-class band in such an
intimate venue as they stopped in
Athens on their world tour—next
stop France. And what a bargain!
Admission to the Melting Point
was included in our hotel charge
and is otherwise only about $10.
We’d return to Athens just to go
to the Melting Point again.
At Mama’s Boy Café, you can
get two essentials: a creative
breakfast and life advice. My
colorful plate of vegetable
hash with a poached egg and
hollandaise sauce made me
reach for my camera before I took
a bite. The menu invites diners
to be true Southerners and order
a biscuit sandwich with eggs or
fried chicken or channel their
inner child and go for the warm
breakfast chocolate cake. With
our bellies full, we selected a
thought for the day from their
fshbowl on our way out. I’ve tried
to take mine to heart: “Good
judgment comes from experience
and experience—well, that comes
from poor judgment.”
Hobnobbing with the
friendly crowd at the Athens
Wine Weekend, many people
commented to us that Athens is
not your typical college town. “The
wide range of ages, the cool and
funky vibe and the burgeoning
creative industry have contributed
to a town of professionals that
are very creative. It makes you
dream to live beyond what you
imagined when you came out of
college” said Meredith Metcalf of
the Classic Center which hosted
some of the weekend’s events.
The Wine Weekend is a
fundraiser each January for
the Cultural Foundation which
provides scholarships, buys art
and makes grants to cultural
organizations. It began with a
classy Amuse Bouche where we
sampled several wines including
the Sea View Ridge Pinot Noir
which was described as “not
your Tuesday night wine." This
is the we-just-got-engaged wine.
The next afternoon almost 1,000
people came to the wine tasting
and a sold-out crowd enjoyed
the Gourmet Dinner that evening
where shrimp timbale was the
frst of six courses highlighting
the city’s best chefs.
Meanwhile, we were exploring
the town’s other attractions.
Since the Bulldogs weren’t playing
football that weekend, nothing
was very crowded. At certain
times of year, it’s all about those
“Dawgs”. We especially enjoyed
the 313-acre State Botanical
Garden where we wandered
the hiking trails amid the frost-
covered trees. The town’s North
Oconee Greenway drew my
husband for a morning jog and
I wandered the pretty downtown
where 16 neighborhoods are
on the National Register and
history is around every turn.
Stately columned houses,
many with historic markers,
abound. The University was
the frst state college in the
country to be chartered in 1785
and the campus is particularly
charming. Scattered amid the
grand architecture are occasional
funky sculptures made from
found objects, many inspired by
bulldogs of course. It’s all part of
Athen’s Dawg-as-muse attitude
to “loosen up your collar” and
enjoy.
Roadtrips Charleston! is a
feature of Lucky Dog Publishing.
Each month the column presents
adventurous, interesting
destinations within a few hours
drive of Charleston. Carol
Antman’s passion for outdoor and
artistic experiences has led her
to exotic and nearby destinations
far and wide. For suggestions,
comments and to view more
images please see www.
peaksandpotholes.blogspot.com.
Athens continues from page 26

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