Volume 26 Number 5 August 8, 2014 16 Pages

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Retired and active members from the Navy,
Coastguard, National Guard, Army, police and
fire departments, and even a World War II Civil
Service employee gathered for breakfast on the
morning of August 30 at The Inn at Fairview. The
breakfast was held in honor of those who serve
this country, both foreign and domestic, as a way
of saying “thank you” for all their work. It was
the first of future heroes breakfasts as Fairview
plans to make it an annual event.
Veterans Gather
for Heroes Breakfast at Fairview
MooreMart to Celebrate MooreMart to Celebrate
10th Anniversar 10th Anniversaryy 10th Anniversar 10th Anniversar 10th Anniversar 10th Anniversary
by Marc Ayotte
It is a truly amazing,
inspiring and motivating
story that started with a
simple personal request
being answered. And just
10 years later, the service
organization known as
MooreMart continues to
receive national recognition
for its patriotism and support
of thousands of United
States Armed Forces serving
throughout the Middle East.
Paul Moore and his sister
Carole Biggio are co-founders
of MooreMart. It is Moore’s
military history that has
played an ongoing and telling
role in his involvement with
this wonderful endeavor. A
1975 graduate of Alvirne High
School, Moore finished Airborne School in
1978, completed Ranger School and was
commissioned in 1980 and while in the
Army served in Korea in 1981.
But Moore’s military service came to a
tragic and abrupt end that year when he was
involved in a parachuting accident which
resulted in him being in a body cast for nine
months as well as undergoing therapy for
18 months. Over 20 years later, Moore’s
ill-fated jump would in part serve as the
impetus for starting the now nationally
renowned liaison between deployed U.S.
soldiers and caring loved ones at home.
In early 2004, Paul Moore received a
request from his brother, Brian, who had
been deployed to Afghanistan
as part of the New Hampshire
National Guard. In the first of
his eventual three tours in the
Middle East, Brian requested
his first care package. A
subsequent request by Brian
involved sending a care
package to a fellow soldier
in his unit. That turned
into three or four packages
per shipment. And as Paul
Moore recalls; “it turned into
20, then 40 as word spread
to adjacent units.” Soon
he was sending out 100
packages per month and the
concept of troop support
via care packages sent from
home, would prove to be
monumental.
On August 16, when the
next shipment is making its way to the
troops, the inception-to-date total count
will have reached a staggering 65,000 care
packages. Additionally, MooreMart will
exceed 8.5 tons of relief supplies shipped,
as part of the humanitarian aid effort to help
clinics, orphanages, scout troops, schools
and other civic organizations in the Middle
East.
The moniker of MooreMart came about
early on as a result of an e-mail Paul Moore
received. He recalls the e-mail starting out
with: “Dear MooreMart,” and the reason for
that, according to Moore, was because the
writer intimated that ‘we believe you have
more supplies than Wal*Mart’! “We used
Two New Support Programs
Approved by Hudson School Board
by Len Lathrop
During its August 4 meeting the board
approved two staff programs that were presented
to them by Superintendent Bryan Lane. Both
were presented, discussed and passed by the
board on a vote of 4-0. Chairman Laurie Bissen
was not in attendance.
A tech support program came from the
technology subcommittee whose goal is to
increase the amount of technology support
available in each building within the district. It
would create technical support assistant (TSA)
stipend positions in each building for the initial
screening of requests for simple problems. Staff
would apply for these positions to provide
assistance to fellow staff for simple computer
issues that could range from jammed printers to
disconnected wires. School district computer
network technicians estimate that more than 50
percent of their requests for assistance are of this
nature. The TSA would be a staff member who
is comfortable in solving these basic problems.
There would be one TSA for every 30 staff
members in a building. Each elementary campus
would have one, the middle school would have
two, and at the high school there would be three.
The proposal is based on a time commitment
of three hours per week and the stipend would
be $2,300 per person. Eight TSAs would require
funding of $20,000, which includes NH
MooreMart to Celebrate
10th Anniversary
Robinson Road Fire Station
Now Staffed 24/7
by Len Lathrop
Known in the fire department as Station One,
located on Robinson Road almost in sight of the
pond, now has a crew of three firefighters/EMTs
around the clock. The long-awaited opening
occurred on this past Sunday.
With the staffing of Station One the town now
has nine firefighter/EMTs on duty at all times,
with three staff members at each station. The
staff scheduling continues to be based on four
groups of firefighters/EMTs who work 24-hour
shifts. Every station has an ambulance and there
are paramedics in every manpower group.
All Hudson firefighter/EMTs are cross apparatus
trained, and apparatus alarm assignments have
been adjusted under the direction of Chief Rob
Buxton to minimize response time and to have
the equipment and manpower on all emergency
scenes, to handle all situations.
As your HLN goes to press Wednesday night,
only three days have passed with Hudson
having three stations staffed 24/7. No data is yet
available on new response times to north Hudson
homes and will be shared with readers as soon
as it is.
Sylvie Cotnoir, director of Laurel Place at Fairview Healthcare, extends a special thank you
to Marjorie Trainor who served as a nurse in the U.S. Army.
First duty crew at Robinson Road Station.
As co-founder of MooreMart 10
years ago, Paul Moore continues to
play an active and vital role in the
service organization that provides
care packages for U.S. troops
stationed in the Middle East.
continued to page 7 - MooreMart Celebrates
continued to page 7- Fairview Heroes
continued to page 8- School Support
U.S. Troops in the Middle East receive care packages from MooreMart
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by Lori A. Bowen, Hudson Senior Services Coordinator
Hello from the Hudson Senior Center!
We are busy bees over here, having fun and
making new friends. Our enrollment
continues to grow and we are up
over 330! Anyone over
55 can join so grab
a friend and come
on over.
The North News has
been printed and you
can find our schedule
and information on the programs
we offer inside it. It can be picked up at some
local venues but it is always available here at the barn.
If you would like to make a suggestion for the newsletter or
about any of our activities here at the center please stop by and
leave a note in the box.
We had our first Cribbage game at the center on Tuesday! Thank
you to Frank and Dick for making this historic event possible! They
would love for more people to join them on Tuesdays at 1 p.m.
John is interested in learning to play Bridge. Anyone wanting to
join John to play Bridge stop by the center on Tuesday afternoons
around 12:30.
Aerobics is moving and grooving! We are filling our class up
every week and all our participants look great! Go Sylvie!
Our first crafting class was last week at the barn and the ladies
had so much fun we have decided to make it an annual thing!
So introducing arts and crafts the last Thursday of the month!
In August we are going to make fairy gardens! It will be $3 to
participate and that will cover the cost of soil and a fairy plant. Be
sure to stop by the office to sign up to get the materials list!
Thank you to Stephanie, one of the pharmacists from Walgreens
in Hudson. She came
over and held the first
blood pressure clinic
at the center this past
week. Thank you
Stephanie! It was so kind of
you to come spend the morning with
us checking on our health. Stephanie will
also be back in September to run our first flu clinic.
You can add your name to the list at the office.
The shelf over the coat closet is filling up with freebees and fun
stuff! Stop by to load up on magnets, calendars, fliers and books!
The Lunch Bunch is getting bigger everyday and there is always
room for more. If you aren’t an early eater the dining room is set
up all day to enjoy your bag lunch, a snack or a cup of hot coffee.
(Careful … the coffee is really good and has been known to make
people stay and enjoy the afternoon!)
A huge thank you goes out to our volunteers that help make the
barn run smoothly. Lucille running the trips is amazing, you’re the
best! Mary and Dot still make the very best coffee; Mack serves
your meals with a smile; Davin is our newest addition and has
already proved invaluable. Thank you also to Dave who helps me
with the housekeeping tasks and of course the Bingo bunch: Dave,
Frank and Shirley. You all make the day so great, thank you!
2 - August 8, 2014 | Hudson - Litchfield News
Accolades Accolades
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•Inquire about our Restorative Program
Contact our office for a tour of our facility!
Our rehab team, together with our clinical team, will create a
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Conveniently located, just off Route 3 in Hudson NH. We are within easy reach
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Newly Expanded Gym
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Physical Therapy
Occupational Therapy
Speech Therapy
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203 Lowell Rd,Hudson NH,
603-882-5261
•Brand New Rehab Gym
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•On-Site Rehab Medical Director
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•24 Hour Nursing Care, Meals, Laundry, & Beauty Shop Services
Fairview
Rehabilitation
603-553-9040
877-728-9593
www.insphereis.com/Karen.Archer
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Personal Benefits Consultant
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Londonerry, NH
Life / Health / Dental / Long Term Care / Medicare / Disability
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262 Derry Road
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Serving Southern New Hampshire for 20 years
THURSDAY
AUGUST 14, 2014
DQ Miracle Treat Day is August 14th
Buy a Blizzard® & Help Kids!
From 1:00-4:00pm


DQ Hudson is donating the proceeds of Blizzard®
Treat sales to Children’s Miracle Network Hospitals
Visit your local Hudson DQ
at 119 Ferry Street
DQ Hudson will have a petting zoo & pony rides
courtesy of Whispering Brook Farm
Come and Meet Miss NH from 1:00-3:00
Amanda Moreau from Litchfield and a member of the Class of 2017
at Nichols College has achieved the Dean’s List for the just completed
spring term.
Justine Kashulines of Hudson, majoring in Graphic Design, has been
named to the Dean’s List at University of Massachusetts-Lowell for the
spring semester.
Kaitlynn Deck of Hudson has graduated from SUNY Buffalo State with
a bachelor’s in criminal justice.
Phillip Croce of Hudson was named to the Dean’s list for academic
excellence for the spring semester at Johns Hopkins University.
Send your Accolades to news@areanewsgroup.com with a photo
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July Run Total : 260
1839
Year to Date
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Dennis C. Hogan, Esq.
Law Ofce of Dennis C. Hogan, PLLC
491 Amherst Street, Suite 22 L
Nashua, NH 03063-1259
(603)886-8700
www.dchoganlaw.com
CRIMINAL, INJURY
&
BANKRUPTCY
Joanne, Frank, Simone, Clara and Louis check their numbers.
Estie and Sheila “Te Chicken Lady” enjoy Bingo.
Aerobics with Sylvie
Bingo Caller Extraordinaire, Dave McGilvray
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‘Running the School Board’
Litchfeld Police Log
Wednesday, July 23: 12:13 a.m. Suspicious vehicle, Talent
Road. 10:25 a.m. Suspicious person, Moose Hollow Road. 6:58
p.m. Suspicious activity, Oak Drive. 8:00 p.m. Motor vehicle
complaint, Hillcrest Road.
Thursday, July 24: 4:21 p.m. Alarm activation, Colby Road. 4:48
p.m. Police assistance, Pondview Drive.
Friday, July 25: 2:35 a.m. Road hazard, Page Road.
Saturday, July 26: 4:55 a.m. Abandoned 9-1-1 call, Lance Avenue.
8:23 a.m. Motor vehicle lockout, Route 3A. 8:34 p.m. Noise
complaint, Burgess Drive. 8:44 p.m. Theft, Route 3A. 11:17 p.m.
Suspicious vehicle, Route 3A.
Sunday, July 27: 3:05 p.m. Motor vehicle complaint, Winter
Circle. 3:40 p.m. Paperwork served, Derry Road. 5:49 p.m. Civil
standby, Liberty Way.
Monday, July 28: 1:35 a.m. Suspicious person, Route 3A. 10:49
a.m. Medical emergency, Cardinal Lane. 1:14 p.m. Suspicious
vehicle, Lockemill Drive. 5:55 p.m. Paperwork served, Derry
Road. 6:39 p.m. Trees down, Hillcrest Road. 8:04 p.m. Road
hazard, Meadowbrook Lane. 10:30 p.m. Suspicious activity,
Albuquerque Avenue.
Tuesday, July 29: 2:21 a.m. Suspicious person, Route 3A. 3:12
a.m. Suspicious vehicle, Route 3A. 8:20 a.m. Traffic hazard,
Pinecrest Road.
Responding to a “Tumbs” comment in last week’s Hudson~Litchfeld News,
School Board member Patty Langlais stated if she is accused of running the
school district “I guess I can wear the crown.”
Many interesting statements are made by town officials during
meetings and other gatherings. While most don’t warrant enough
for a full story for our readers, some are great ideas, forward thinking
and others make you say “what?” Or just shake your head. Our
newspaper staff members when out and about are often asked
questions, as if we should know more than the average citizen.
Sometimes we do, but many times we have to make phone calls to
find out.
Take a moment to ponder these thought-provoking happenings
around Hudson and Litchfield:
Altering Traffic Patterns
Hudson Selectmen learned that change is hard. After a
recommendation from the Highway Safety Committee and two
public hearings and hours of discussion, the traffic pattern in the
Sagamore Industrial Park has been changed. Just as they were
ready to vote on the town ordinance, a business owner in the
industrial park appeared before them stating that they have turned
Wentworth Avenue into a race track with the removal of stop signs
at both of the three-way intersections. Selectmen hope to keep
traffic from the park off Lowell Road especially with the arrival of
the Comcast Call Center. They hope that by making it easier to
come out of the park on Flagstone Drive and turn right onto the
bridge, it would keep traffic off of Lowell Road at Executive and
Hampshire intersections. Only time will tell.
Engineering Change
E-mail released from the Hudson Engineering Department
indicated that Laurie Stevens is no longer the Hudson town
engineer. Stevens had only been with the town for about five
months. The e-mail advised that those with engineering matters
address them to Gary Webster.
A Deadly Concern
A Litchfield reader called a member of the news team asking if
it would take a fatality for the state and the town to install a light
at the Page and Derry Road intersection. There was another severe
accident earlier in the day.
School District Money Matters
During Monday night’s meeting, the Hudson School Board
approved by a 4-0 vote $39,697.99 for Ex/Co-curricular
nominations for the upcoming school year.
A final question for the Hudson School - what is the difference
between a department head and a mentor?
Hudson - Litchfield News | August 8, 2014 - 3
The Word Around Town...
Letters to our Editor
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Lynda Bennett Proclaims her
Candidacy for Treasurer
of Hillsborough County
Ralph Boehm Declares
Candidacy for Litchfeld
State Representative
I am Ralph Boehm, candidate for State
Representative for Litchfield. I am asking
for your vote to re-elect me to continue
what I have always done. That is to
represent the people of Litchfield, all the
people not some group, but all. I do not
accept donations from any individual,
corporation, or unions. I am a retired
software engineer, and as always will be
your full time representative. I have lived
in Litchfield for 38 years. For 22 years,
from 1988 to 2010 I was a Selectman,
Budget Committee member, and on the
School Board . I have been a state rep in 2005-2006, and 2009 to
present. In the past I was on the Home Education Advisory Council
and presently on New England Board of Higher Education (NEBHE).
During the 2013-2014 academic year, 15 Litchfield students saved an
estimated total of $78,116 on their out-of-state tuition bills because of
NEBHE’s programs.
As reported by the Nashua Telegraph some months ago, I had
100 percent attendance for the past two years. And to repeat what
someone had said in the Hudson~Litchfield News, one cannot
represent you if they don’t show up. Not only do I have 100 percent
attendance for house sessions, I have also not missed any committee
meetings.
I am currently the ranking Republican on the House Education
Committee and previously the vice-chair, and over the past years we
have passed a number of education bills to help fix the education
mess we have now. We increased tenure from three years to five, so
your school board can make sure we hire good teachers. I worked on
a bill that decreased the mandates for home schooled students. We
also passed a scholarship law that will make private school accessible
to all and not just the rich. But more needs to be done to put local
control back in education.
In the past two years I have received:
99 percent and 100 percent from the House Republican Alliance
– Highest among all Reps currently running.
I am also on the New Hampshire Liberty Alliance’s five year
Honor Roll. And received an A- the past two years.
A+ in the past two years from Americans for Prosperity.
A+ from the NH Families for Education.
As you can see from these ratings, I am pro U.S. and NH
constitutions, pro-business and against any increase in taxes. My
goals are to continue to protect your freedom of speech, religion, your
right to bear arms, and all other rights, including the 9th and 10th
amendments which the federal government is abusing.
Challenges for this term is to turn around the state’s economy. We
need to lower the corporation taxes, we are the 48th highest in the
country, and the highest in the region. Young people are leaving the
state because of jobs, we need to keep our brightest in the state, and
we can’t do this if businesses leave the state. We need to cut our
spending, but we need a good conservative governor to force the state
commissioners to slim their departments.
So please vote for Ralph Boehm on September 9th and allow me to
continue to represent all the people of Litchfield. If you want to help
my campaign by allowing a sign in your yard, holding signs at the
polls, etc., contact me at: rgboehm@comcast.net. Remember, I do
not want your money, just your help and vote.
Lynda Bennett announced on August 1 her
candidacy for county treasurer of Hillsborough
County which includes 29 towns and two cities.
“If I am elected, I will be a strong advocate
to return each fiscal year budget surpluses to
our taxpayers and scale back our bonding for
county projects which, in turn, will save dollars
for our citizens,” stated Hillsborough County
Treasurer Candidate Lynda Bennett.
Lynda is a native of New Hampshire,
attended local schools and graduated from
the University of New Hampshire and New
England Deaconess Hospital School of Nursing.
She is a CMC Parish Nurse Volunteer, active in
her church, and an avid sports fan. A former
regional administrator of Home Health Care,
Lynda has two sons, Jeffrey and Gregory.
Some Comments on ‘Weather Whys’
Following are some comments on HLN’s “Weather Whys” of last week.
So far, the planet has only gained a degree F. from manmade CO2 in the
atmosphere. So of course, “all the bad things” have not happened yet. Te
question is, what happens in a hundred years, when CO2 has doubled?
With a constant Sun, and the present CO2 emissions trend, predictions
center around a further increase of 6 degrees F.
We can’t be completely certain of CO2’s precise efects, but should we
“buy some insurance” and cut its emission when the net cost is reasonable?
Reducing the burning of coal saves lives. Wikipedia says: “A study
commissioned by the Maryland nurses association in 2006 found that
emissions from just six of Maryland’s coal-burning plants caused 700 deaths
per year...” Tat is over 100 people dying, per year, for each coal fred plant.
As the article says, cuts in fossil fuel use are fnancially painful in the short
term, and people don’t want pipelines in their own backyard. “Weather
Whys” claims “nor is anyone going to be allowed to build them.”
To the contrary, four small pipelines are under construction now.
Tey are listed at http://www.northeastgas.org/pdf/system_enhance0714.
pdf. A dozen specifc proposals are listed at http://www.northeastgas.org/
pipeline_expansion.php. I predict: Follow the money, we will get
more pipelines.
Te article speaks of warming in the tropics: “where the models
projected the steepest rise.” Tat is not what the models predict.
Te models predict more surface warming at the higher latitudes
and less at the tropics, which has, in fact, happened. See http://
stephenschneider.stanford.edu/Climate/Climate_Science/Science.
html#Itislikelythathumanactivitieshavecausedadiscernibleimpactonobserved.
Te models predict that in the tropics, troposphere warming should be
more than the warming of the surface there. Te graph shows the actual
troposphere warming. It is less than expected so the data are under review.
It is complicated. Sun was perhaps brighter in the 20th century than
for hundreds of years. It has been less bright last 50 years, but the Earth
continued warming. So to determine the amount of warming caused by
CO2 we use science, and that means equations and models.
And to project to the future, we must use models, since we obviously have
no data for the future. And local or short time data don’t matter. We need
a longer time frame, and global data. Tat is my proposal for the context of
the quote spoken by Chris Folland. Te quote is from 1992. Te data for
global warming were clear even then.
Paul Watson was half quoted in “Weather Whys,” to infer that Watson
is in favor of lying: “It doesn’t matter what is true; it only matters what
people believe is true ... “ But in the rest of the quote, that was not
included, Watson continues: “ … You are what the media defne you to be
... ” To know Watson’s meaning you need more of the quote. Te quote
is from http://www.aim.org/wls/author/paul-watson/, with their source:
Environmental Overkill, by Dixy Lee Ray with Lou Guzzo, 1993, page 172.
Spreading the truth is an uphill battle. Unfortunately, sometimes it
doesn’t matter what is true. It only matters what people believe is true.
You can quote me on that. But use the whole quote, please.
Bruce Atwood, Hudson

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Hudson - Litchfield News | August 8, 2014 - 5
Hudson Old Home Days Hudson Old Home Days
Events & Happenings!
Thursday, August 14th, 5PM to 10PM
Theme Night = “Be A Character” Everyone is invited to come as your favorite Character
Freddy the Fire Truck will be roaming around visiting – provided by Hudson Fire Department
5pm-10pm Food, Vendors and Carnival Rides - Pay One Price wristbands ($25)
6pm-10pm Karaoke for Everyone with Perfect Entertainment sponsored by Eastern Propane Inc
7pm-10pm Live Entertainment with “The Dueling Murphy’s” Dueling Piano’s with a Twist
6pm-7pm Trick or Treating for 12 & under – (free) little goblins visit all our vendors for candy treats
7pm Costume Parade of Horribles for 12 and under by the flag pole - Prizes
7:30 pm Hula Hoop Contest ages 6—14 (hoops provided) by the flag pole – Prizes (free)
Friday, August 15th, 5PM to 11PM
Theme Night = “It’s a Beach Party”
Freddy the Fire Truck will be roaming around visiting – provided by Hudson Fire Department
5pm-11pm Carnival Rides, Food, and Vendors
5pm-9pm Hills House—Open House & Tours by the Hudson Historical Society (fee)
5:30pm Zack Tompkins 5K Race at Alvirne High Track (5:30 registration; 6:30 start)
5pm-8pm RE/MAX Hot Air Balloon Rides (weather permitting)
$10 Adults/$5 kids to benefit Alvirne Boosters Club
6:30- 8:30pm Free Stonyfield Organic Yogurt Sampling
7pm Adult Haystack Treasure Hunt— Prizes! By the flag pole (free)
7pm—10pm Live Entertainment by “Figure 8”
7pm—11pm Live Entertainment by “Voice of Hudson” Singing Competition – CASH Prizes
Presented by Perfect Entertainment, $10 registration fee
Saturday, August 16th, 12PM to 11PM
Theme Night = “Country Time” Everyone is invited to dress a little bit country!
12pm-11pm Carnival Rides, Food and Vendors
12pm-3pm Bronco Belly Bustin’ Chili Cook Off – People’s Choice Tasting* $7/tasting kit
to benefit Alvirne High School Music Programs *Chili Awards presented at 4pm
12pm-2pm Touch-a-Truck – (free)
2pm-9pm Hills House– Tours & Open House by the Hudson Historical Society (fee)
1pm-4pm Live Entertainment by “The Rock Daddys” Sponsored by Fairview Health Care
12:30-4pm Free Kids Games in Activity Tent - Free -Prizes! (Duck Pond Game, Ring Toss, etc.)
5pm-6pm Live Entertainment by “Silent Fist”
6pm Pie Eating Contest – ages 8 – 12 (free)
6:15pm Pie Eating Contest for ages 13 – 17 (free)
6:30pm Pie Eating Contest for ages 18 and over (free)
6:45pm Pie Eating Contest Finale – Winners of each age group competes for grand prizes!
7pm-10pm Live Entertainment “Voice of Hudson” singing competition – CASH Prizes
Presented by Perfect Entertainment, $10 registration fee
7pm-11pm Live Entertainment by Country Band “Walkin’ the Line”
9:00pm Fireworks by Atlas Fireworks (*weather permitting, rain date Friday)
Sunday, August 17th, 12PM to 5PM
Theme Night = “Patriotic Celebration” It’s all about the Red, White & Blue!
12pm-5pm Food, Vendors and Carnival Rides — Pay One Price wristbands ($25)
12pm-4pm Hills House– Tours & Open House by the Hudson Historical Society (fee)
12pm-4pm Local Group Demonstrations – Ballroom Dancing Demo by WPI Ballroom Team;
1pm Dance Demo by Showcase Performing Arts Center
2- 3pm Ballroom Dancing by Paper Moon Dance Center,
3pm Dance Demo by Shane’s Anti-bullying Team
12pm-5pm Free Spin to Win - Chunky’s Cinema Pub Prize Wheel & Bio Truck
12pm-2pm Hayrides & Farm Tour by Alvirne High School FFA (fee)
12pm-2pm Live Entertainment “Voice of Hudson” Singing Competition Finale – CASH Prizes!
1pm-3pm Children Scavenger Hunt & Prizes – Prizes - Free!
Tent Ages 7—12
2pm Haystack Treasure Hunt & Prizes for ages 3 –6 at the flag pole, prizes, free!
3pm Haystack Treasure Hunt & Prizes for ages 7—10 at the flagpole, prizes, free!
4 - August 8, 2014 | 5 Hudson - Litchfield News |
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31 West Hollis St.Nashua, NH
883 7739
Your Local tire
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Established 1928
Proceeds: Benefit Rotary Charitable Causes
Hudson / Litchfield Rotary Pancake Breakfast
Saturday, August 16th & Sunday, August 17th
(During Old Home Days) 8:00 AM – 11:30 AM
Checkers Restaurant, AHS, Derry Road, Hudson
$5 per person, children
5 and under FREE
Art Exhibit & Sale
Automatic Standby & Portable Generators
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24 HOUR EMERGENCY SERVICES
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36 LOWELL RD,
HUDSON, NH
Monday - Friday 7:30 - 5:30
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Have a Great Time at Old Home Days!
No Appointment needed for
Oil Changes OR Inspections!
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Old Home Days!
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With any purchase
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Old Homes’ Day Schedule
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www.cookieschuckwagon.com Enjoy Old Home Days!
Stop by for newmenu items
or your Old Favorites!
$55.13/week
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2 FLAGSTONE DR, HUDSON, NH
603-882-1573
www.hudsoncycle.com
2 FLAGSTONE DR, HUDSON, NH
603-882-1573
www.hudsoncycle.com
882-6637
156 Lowell Rd
Hudson, NH
BOYERS
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OLD HOME DAYS
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Prepared meals from four different restaurants,
Healthy & organic grocery items including Farm Fresh Meats
& Dairy, Aquaponics, Staple items, Vitamins,
Beer & Wine, Plants & Floral Arrangements, Health & Beauty,
Pet Products, Cleaning & Household Items, Gifts & Beautiful
Gift Baskets. Gluten Free Options
225 Derry Road (Route 102)
on the Hudson/Litchfeld Line
Come Meet NH’s Small Business Owners
10-5 Saturday, August 9th
Mobile farmfun for whole family
Beer & Wine Tasting
Vendor sampling and demos
9-8 Mon-Fri, 10-5 Sat & Sun

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Enjoy Old Home Days!
www.joksauto.com
We Sell For Less!
Save big on quality cars & trucks backed with
great service and customer satisfaction!
Over 30 years of serving our customers!
Call for your pre-owned vehicle needs today!
Easy Financing- No Credit, Bad Credit, Great Credit!
We take pride in our work.
Custom Made to Order:
Memorial Markers
Military Plaques
Custom Emblems
Name Plates
Address Name Plates
And Much More!
Hudson, NH204-4051
www.granitestatefoundry.com
2 Christine Drive, Hudson, NH 603-459-4311
Oil Change $16.95
PEG
M-F 8-5, Sat 8-1
General Auto Repair
Our Work Speaks For Itself!
Up to 5 qts, Most cars, synthetic extra
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Owner
46 Lowell Road, Hudson, NH 03051
Bus: (603) 880-7799
Fax: (603) 880-8926
Supporting The Community
and Our Neighbors in
Hudson and Litchfield!
See you at the Old Home Day’s Fireworks! See you at the Old Home Day’s Fireworks!
Celebrating Old
Home Days: Bigger,
Better
Plants!
Buy ONE Get ONE
FREE!
Spring Flowering Trees
Equal/lesser value. Cannot be combined w/
other offers. Must have coupon.
Expires 8/31/14 Promo code: OHD14
33% OFF SHRUBS
When you buy 3 or more!
Mix & Match: Azaleas, Rhodys,
Viburnums, Hydrangeas & more
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Must have coupon. Expires 8/31/14
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Flowering Pear
175 Lowell Rd • 886-5200
Across from Presentation of Mary
6 - August 8, 2014 | Hudson - Litchfield News
Generated by http://www.opensky.ca/~jdhildeb/software/sudokugen/
6 2 4 3 9 8 5 1 7
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Are you looking for a church home?
Visit us and feel the warm welcome.
"Best kept secret
that is right
in plain sight."
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH OF HUDSON
236 Central St., Hudson, NH 882-6116
www.firstbaptisthudson.com
See us on Comcast Cable ch. 20 Sundays at 9AM and 6PM
On the First Sunday of each month we serve communion and
have a time of fellowship and refreshments after the Worship Service.
Sunday Worship Services-
10:00 am to 11:00 am
No Sunday School during the Summer.
Gatherings
Good for the Community
Your Hometown Community Calendar
A
ugust 2014
Old H
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Old H
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Errors: Te liability of the publisher on account of
errors in or omissions from any advertisement will in no
way exceed the amount of the charge for the space
occupied by the item in error, and then only for the frst
incorrect insertion. Advertisers should notify
management within three (3) business days if any error
occurs.
880-1516 • Fax: 879-9707
Published by Michael Elizabeth & Moore, Limited
Area News
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Hudson~Litchfield News is an Area News Group Publication
Deadline for all materials is due Tuesday at noon, prior
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Every lifetime has a story
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Jean Spaulding
Jean Spaulding, 70, of
Franklin, died at Dartmouth-
Hitchcock Medical Center in
Lebanon on August 3, 2014.
She was born on January
1, 1944, in Dover-Foxcroft,
Maine, the daughter of Fred
and Eva (Shannon) St. Pierre.
Jean was raised in Dover-
Foxcroft and graduated from
Foxcroft Academy.
Before moving to Franklin, she resided in Milford,
Litchfield, and Londonderry.
Jean was employed at Freudenberg NOK in
Bristol and Laconia.
She enjoyed tending to her house plants and
reading. She especially loved and enjoyed her
grandchildren.
She is survived by her husband of 51 years,
Lewis A. Spaulding of Franklin; her daughter, Lynn
Dion; three grandchildren, Amanda, Diane, and
Christopher Dion; her sisters, Linda Crosby and
husband Bob, Arlene St. Pierre, Marie Keites and
husband Phil, all of Dover-Foxcroft, Sheila Savage
and husband Bill of Sebec, ME, and Bonnie Green
of Dexter, ME; her brothers, John St. Pierre of
Goffstown and Fred St. Pierre of Wilton; and nieces
and nephews.
Besides her parents, she was predeceased by a
daughter, Tracy Spaulding; a son, Russell Spaulding;
and a sister, Priscilla Phinney.
Funeral services and burial in Pinecrest Cemetery,
Litchfield, are private.
Thibault-Neun Funeral Home on Franklin is
assisting with arrangements.
Saturday, August 9
Pokémon League for All Ages. Every
month the Rodgers Memorial Library in
Hudson holds a meeting for fans of the
monster collecting and battling series to
meet and play together. All ages are welcome.
All video game versions, new players, and TCG
players are also welcome to attend. Second
Saturdays from 10 to 11:30 a.m.
Gaming Day at Rodgers Memorial Library.
From 12 to 4 p.m. on the second Saturday of
each month join Play Date NH as they teach
an assortment of new board games, card games
and role playing games at the Rodgers Memorial
Library. Play Date NH is a volunteer organization
aimed at educating the community about the
benefits of games and gaming. They hold events
to introduce new games, expand the gaming
audience and invite citizens to make gaming of all
types a part of their family, school and community.
There will also be Wii games available to play.
Call the library at 886-6030 for more information.
Sunday, August 10
A Used Book Sale with the Friends of
the Library of Hudson will be held from
11 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the lower level of
the Hills Memorial Library Building at 18
Library St. in Hudson.
Tuesday, August 12
Campbell Athletics Important Dates
Tonight at 7 p.m., CHS Auditorium:
Annual mandatory Player/Parent meeting,
for all seasons’ sports teams.
Fall Sports Try-outs: The respective coaches will
discuss practice information after try-outs have
ended.
Football: CHS Football practice field (next to the
shed)
Wednesday-Friday, August 13-15, 6-8 p.m.:
Football Skills
Monday-Tuesday, Aug. 18-19, 6-7:30 p.m.:
Equipment hand-out
Wednesday-Friday, Aug. 20-22, 4-7 p.m.
Cross Country: CHS Track
Monday-Friday, Aug. 18-22 at 9 a.m.
Spirit: CHS Gym
Monday-Wednesday, Aug. 18-20, 7-8:30 p.m.
Boys Soccer: Track Field
Monday-Tuesday, Aug. 18-19, 8-9:30 a.m.
Monday-Friday, Aug. 18-22, 4-6:30 p.m.
Girls Soccer: Baseball Field
Monday-Wednesday, Aug. 18-20, 8-10 a.m.
Monday-Friday, Aug. 18-22, 4-6:30 p.m.
Golf: Hidden Creek Golf Course, Litchfield
Monday-Wednesday, Aug. 18-20 at 6 a.m.
Volleyball: CHS Gym
Monday-Wednesday, Aug. 18-20, 4-6 p.m.
Friday, Aug. 22, 2-4 p.m.
If you have any questions, contact Coach
Patterson (jpatterson@litchfieldsd.org) or Dawn
Miller (dmmiller@litchfieldsd.org) in the Campbell
Athletic Department.
How to Get What You Want: The Basics of The
Law of Attraction. The Law of Attraction is based
on the belief “like attracts like,” but it’s a little
more complicated than that. This presentation by
Master Life Coach Diane MacKinnon, MD will
give you some tools to start exploring The Law of
Attraction for yourself so you can create and have
all the things you want in your life. 7 p.m. at the
Rodgers Memorial Library. Pre-register at rmlnh.
org/events or call 886-6030. .
Wednesday, August 13
Introduction to Mandarin Chinese for All
Ages. Learn some basic Mandarin words
and phrases with a high school student
who has been studying Mandarin for nine
years. 7-8 p.m. at the Rodgers Memorial Library.
Pre-register at rmlnh.org/events.
Thursday, August 14
Children’s Miracle Network Hospitals
raise funds for 170 non-profit children’s
hospitals across North America, which,
in turn, use the money where it’s needed
the most. When a donation is given it stays in
the community, ensuring that every dollar is
helping local kids. Since 1983, Children’s Miracle
Network Hospitals has raised more than $4.7
billion, most of it $1 at a time. These donations
have gone to support research and training,
purchase equipment, and pay for uncompensated
care, all in support of their mission to save and
improve the lives of as many children as possible.
Hudson Dairy Queen along with the Dairy
Queen at Pheasant Lane Mall will host a
fundraising event today to help raise money for
Children’s Hospital of Boston. Come in to any of
these three Dairy Queen locations and purchase
any size Blizzard Treat and we will donate the
proceeds to Children’s Hospital of Boston. In
addition from 1 to 5 p.m., the Hudson Dairy
Queen located at 119 Ferry St., will have a live
Petting Zoo and pony rides for young children.
If you are unable to attend this event but would
like to support Children’s Hospital you can do so
by sending a check or money order to Hudson
Dairy Queen, 119 Ferry St., Hudson NH 03051.
Make check payable to Children’s Hospital of
Boston. If you include your name
and address or e-mail we will send
you coupons in appreciation of your
support.
The Page Turners Book Discussion
Group for Tweens and Teens in grades 6-8
reads “Ungifted” by Gordon Korman for
today’s meeting at 2:30 p.m. at the Aaron
Cutler Memorial Library. Join the group
for a snack, discussion and activity! Copies
of the book are available in the Upper
Level Teen Area or the Lower Level Young
Readers’ Room. Page Turners meets the
second Thursday of each month.
Green Thumbs Needed for Library Garden
Club. The Rodgers Memorial Library gardens
are once again in bloom and we are looking
for people interested in keeping our beautiful
gardens healthy and beautiful. We also plan
to have some gardening related programs
and discussions. Today’s meeting will be at 3
p.m. with a rain date of August 21. This will be
a working meeting, bring work gloves, clippers,
weed buckets, and any other useful tools.
Unraveled Knitting Group, Aaron Cutler
Memorial Library. Unraveled is a drop-in
needlework group for people of all ages and skill
levels, meeting the second and fourth Thursdays
of the month from 6 to 8 p.m. Bring your knitting,
crocheting, needlepoint, cross-stitch, etc., and
your enthusiasm!
Thursday, August 14 thru Sunday, August 17
Hudson Old Home Days happening at Hills
House Field, 211 Derry Road, Route 102 Hudson.
Enjoy various vendors, live music, food, petting
zoo, demonstrations, contests, games and
exhibits! See page 4 for Schedule of Events.
Tuesday, August 19
It’s another Rocket Launch at 6:30 p.m.
at the Community Center on Lions Ave!
Join the Hudson Cubs for a fun-filled
evening launching 2 liter soda bottles into
the sky. Open to all ages, the kids will build and
launch the air and water powered rockets and
escape the gravity of their screens. We will also
be signing up boys ages 6-11 for Cubs, or older
for Boy Scouts. Rain date is the 20th.
Wednesday, August 20
The Litchfield Senior Citizens group
will be meeting at 1:30 p.m. at the
Community Church on Charles Bancroft
Highway in Litchfield. There will be
entertainment and refreshments. All
senior are invited to attend
Thursday, August 21:
A Used Book Sale with the Friends of
the Library of Hudson will be held from
5 to 8 p.m. in the lower level of the Hills
Memorial Library Building at 18 Library St. in
Hudson.
Friday, August 22
Hudson Youth Baseball Golf
Tournament at Green Meadow Country
Club. All Hudson and Litchfield residents
and their friends/families are invited to
register. https://hyb.sportssignup.com. $125
per golfer includes steak/chicken dinner, greens
fees, and cart. Plenty of chances for prizes and
drawings. Best ball format and shotgun start. For
more info, e-mail Scott at spower@nhcuc.org.
Tuesday, September 9
State Primary Election:
Hudson - Community Center, 7 a.m. to 8
p.m.
Litchfield - Campbell High School, 7 a.m.
to 7 p.m.
Saturday, September 27
Second Annual Hudson Historical
Society Lumberjack Show is coming on
the grounds of the historic Alvirne Hills
House, 211 Derry Rd., 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.,
rain or shine! Free parking and admittance. No
pets, please.
For questions, or if you’d like to be a sponsor,
e-mail hudsonlumberjackshow@yahoo.com.
Alex Tucci Completes Intense Army ROTC Training
by Laurie Jasper
Now that it is August, members of
Alvirne High School’s Class of 2014 will
soon be transitioning into college or the
working world for the first time. For 2014
AHS graduate Alex Tucci, his transition has
already begun.
Alex is enrolled in Wentworth Military
College’s accelerated Army ROTC program
in Lexington, Missouri and recently returned
from a 29-day Leaders Training Course
at Fort Knox, Ky. This intense course is
designed to combine the first two years
of Army ROTC into four weeks. Alex
learned skills such as land navigation,
marksmanship, leadership and team
building, as well as extensive physical
training.
Upon completion of this two-year
program, Alex will be commissioned as a
2nd lieutenant in either the Army Reserve
or Army National Guard, and will then
complete his bachelor’s degree at a college
he chooses. He plans to take part in the
Army CULP program, spending three
weeks in a foreign country, training with
its military and teaching English to military
cadets. Alex certainly has the intelligence,
energy and motivation to succeed, as those
who know him can attest.
Alex received the Early Commissioning
Program scholarship that covers tuition,
room and board and other expenses, and
also pays a monthly stipend. Alex was
vice president of the Alvirne Class of 2014.
He is the eldest of three sons of John and
Bridget Tucci.
Courtesy photos
Alex’s graduation from Alvirne
9
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Nashua Man Charged in
Harassment of Hudson
Police Department
submitted by Hudson Police Department
On Monday, August 4, Hudson Police arrested Paul Dinucci, 53, of
Nashua, on a Hudson Police Department arrest warrant. The arrest warrant
was issued charging Dinucci with two counts of Harassment (Class B
misdemeanors) and one count of Breach of Bail (Class A misdemeanor).
The harassment charges stem from an investigation where Dinucci, with
no legitimate purpose, either contacted the Hudson Police Department or
appeared at the police station multiple times between July 16-29, and again
between August 3-4.
On November 9, 2013, Dinucci was charged with three counts of
Harassment when he, with no legitimate purpose, contacted the Hudson
Police Department multiple times between November 6-8, 2013. At the
time of that arrest Dinucci was rereleased on bail. Subsequently, Dinucci
violated the conditions of his bail and was arrested for Breach of Bail on
January 13 and again on August 4.
Hudson - Litchfield News | August 8, 2014 - 7
Dumont - Sullivan
Funeral Homes &
Cremation Services
50 FERRY ST.
HUDSON, NH
370 MAIN ST.
NASHUA, NH
882-9431
www.dumontsullivan.com
Sponsored by:
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around you means...
Getting you back to what you love.
Hudson
Pediatric Rehab Center
5 George Street
603-579-3601
Hudson
300 Derry Road
603-598-0729
Nashua
460 Amherst Street
603-577-8400
Nashua
17 Prospect Street
603-577-3050
Milford
10 Jones Road
603-672-5209
Merrimack
696 DW Hwy.
603-429-8427
Services vary by location.
Recovering from illness or injury? We’ve got you covered. Our staff includes physical therapists,
occupational therapists, speech-language pathologists, and audiologists who specialize in a
variety of treatment techniques for adults and children. Special services offered include:
Aquatic Therapy, Bowenwork, Feeding Team, Graston Technique, Hand Therapy, Hearing Aids,
ImPACT Testing (Baseline), Lymphedema Management, Osteoporosis Program, Pelvic Pain &
Incontinence, Sensory Integration, Therapeutic Listening, Unsedated Diagnostic Auditory
Brainstem Response Testing, Vestibular Therapy, Wheelchair Assessment, Wound Care Program.
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the name originally as a
good-natured joke, recalled
Moore, adding, “next thing
you know, people all over the
country are sending e-mails
to ‘MooreMart’ requesting
supplies.”
In the formative months
of the service, expenses
associated with sending the
care packages were paid
by Moore, along with his
family and friends. In the
fall of 2004, Moore began
to obtain financial support
from veterans organizations
and the like and from that
point forth as he recalled; “it
just exploded.” Because of
the increase in volume, shipments went from monthly to every six
weeks. “When it (packages) hit four to five hundred, we went to
every ten weeks,” said Moore. In the last three years, MooreMart
has been averaging 1,000 to 1,200 packages every shipment.
The service also incorporates seasonal themes into their support
of the troops. Christmas stockings are a big hit; a record 4,678
stockings were sent in 2010 with an average of 3,000 per year
having been shipped since then.
Originally, all items destined for care packages were stored in
Moore’s Nashua-based attorney’s office. As the requests increased,
the size of the storage facilities needed to house the items changed
accordingly. Currently, the donated and purchased items are stored
locally in Hudson and when shipment time comes around every
13 weeks, the items are transported to the Nashua National Guard
Armory where the three day packing and shipping process takes
place.
Thursday is set aside for set-up and inventory. Friday is pre-
packing day, with Saturday being the big day when the items are
packed and shipped. “Right now it’s a well-oiled machine,” said
Moore of the network of volunteers involved in the shipment of the
packages. With a core group of 10 volunteers, he says that each
packing event day also reflects about 30 different volunteers helping
out, resulting in about 100 different people showing up to help get
the packages on their way. “Everyone is there because they have a
sincere desire to support our troops,” expressed Moore.
One of the afore-mentioned core volunteers is Ted Luszey. Moore
has known Luszey for 25 years and says that Luszey offered his
services back in the beginning and has since become a vital part
of the operation. According to Moore, “Ted is the backbone of the
organization. Without his managerial skills and hard work, only a
fraction of the packages would be going out the door.” Moore also
commends Luszey’s wife, Deborah and their daughter, Ashley, for
their spirited commitment to the MooreMart cause.
Each ‘first’ care package sent to a soldier is identical to the next
one. However, inside that initial package, as explained by Moore, is
an index card on which soldiers are able to submit personal requests
for the ensuing
shipment. And as is
the case with all the
items contained in
the care packages,
there is no cost to the
recipient or the family
member or friend
making the request on
behalf of the soldier.
“We are one of the
few non-profit care
package organizations
serving on donations
from the community,”
expressed Moore,
adding; “everyone is
a volunteer; no one
gets paid.”
One of the aspects that Moore pays close attention to is the
quality of the items sent to the troops. “We’re very careful about
rotating stock,” cited Moore who also noted that all items that are
purchased and/or donated, are brand names. “If someone requests
Oreos, they get Oreos,” he said with a proud grin. Also, he notes
that special arrangements have been made with area suppliers and
manufacturers in an attempt to provide the freshest items possible
to the troops. “We have on-demand buying,” said Moore, adding
relatedly that it takes just seven days for the package to reach its
destination. “Think about that,” urged Moore, “half way around
the world into a battle zone – I think it’s pretty impressive.”
Moore also indicated that care packages are ‘built’ to suit
specific soldier needs in the different geographic regions. For
instance, troops in the mountainous terrain of Afghanistan would
receive hand warmers to deal with the colder weather, while
those stationed in the desert would receive sunscreen. In addition
to the necessary, regionally-specific items, Moore lightheartedly
indicated that over 8,000 T-shirts bearing the phrase ‘MooreMart
Regional Rep’ have been shipped to troops in the Middle East, not
to mention 9,200 cases of Girl Scout cookies.
Through the years, MooreMart has received recognition from
the White House, the U.S. Senate and the Department of Defense,
to go along with citations from the state of New Hampshire. In
addition, for their service to the National Guard, Moore has
received accolades from all of the major veterans’ organizations.
Perhaps the most meaningful of all, was the recognition received
from the Congressional Medal of Honor Society; presented to
MooreMart for its support of the troops.
In remembering his stint in the army, Moore recalls that back
then, it took “forever and a day to get a care package.” While
addressing the importance to him of receiving a package from
‘back in the states’, he explained; “it was important for me to know
I had friends and family at home thinking about me.” He believes
that feeling is prevalent with today’s soldiers as well. “That’s part of
the motivation,” he explained with respect to why he is still a driving
force in the MooreMart endeavor. “I was very lucky to survive and
there were a lot of people in the military that helped me and I’d just
like to pay that forward,” revealed Moore.
Today, as a Merrimack Circuit Court Justice, Moore continues to
be active in the day-to-day intricacies associated with supplying
care packages to the troops. With regard to how he thinks the
deployed soldiers’ psyche is affected by the continued receipt of
care packages, Moore shared his thoughts, “I truly believe the
average service man, and woman appreciates the fact that his or
her community is supporting their deployment.” He continued by
saying; “by sending care packages, they recognize the community is
recognizing the sacrifices that the soldier and his family are making.
It’s a constant reminder they are not forgotten and that we appreciate
their sacrifice, as a country as a whole.”
As both active and retired service members ate, they reminisced
about their days of service. A total of 15 people attended the
breakfast. The notable service members included Fairview resident
Bob Winter, who shared stories about being a guard at a Japanese
prison in 1947 during World War II.
Resident Edith Perkins also had a very heroic past herself.
Perkins may have not served as an enlisted member of the war, but
was considered a “hero” by the Fairview community just the same.
Perkins worked at Atlantic Parachute Corp repairing and inspecting
parachutes for American troops serving overseas in World War II.
“Those of us who haven’t served were sure to say a heartfelt
thank you for giving us the freedoms we enjoy today,” said Rosie
Samson, director of Community Relations at the Inn at Fairview,
concerning the veterans.
The meal, provided by Fairview, included stuffed breakfast
burritos, homemade red bliss potato home fries, homemade
blueberry muffins, banana bread, sausage links and fresh fruit
salad.
“The Inn at Fairview/Fairview Healthcare appreciates the
sacrifices that have been made in the past as well as the service
that is provided today,” Samson added.
The Inn at Fairview was added two months ago to give the facility
expanded rehabilitation and specialized focus on memory care.
Fairview will continue to serve the community with fundraisers and
events throughout the year. One of the next major events will be
a car wash fundraiser on Saturday, Sept. 15 from 9 am to 1 pm to
raise money to research a cure for Alzheimer’s disease.
C
Rosie Sampson, director of Community Relations at Te Inn at Fairview/
Fairview Healthcare, thanks resident Bob Winter for serving.
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Fairview Heroes
- continued from front page
Tese are examples
of some of the items shipped
to deployed soldiers.
Te shipping event, held four times per year,
is based out of the National Guard Armory
located in Nashua.
MooreMart Celebrates- continued from front page
Courtesy photo
8 - August 8, 2014 | Hudson - Litchfield News
Remember Hudson when ...
Hudson Center and Hambletts Garage - the frst ALA Station
submitted by
Ruth Parker
Everett Hamblett
operated a garage
at Hudson Center
for many years. His
first garage was
located to the right
of the Old Town
Hall (now Wattanick
Hall and home of
Hudson Grange).
The picture was
taken about 1920. It
shows three old cars
behind Everett “Bill”
Hamblett leaning
against a gas pump.
Back then the price
for gas was 24 cents per gallon. His garage was later moved onto what is now Central Street near the location
of Burger King.
submitted by Kathleen Christopher
On Sunday, June 22, friends and
family joined Troop 20’s Connor
Hamilton at Hudson Fish and Game
Club to celebrate his rise to the rank
of Eagle Scout, an honor bestowed
on less than two percent of boys
who join Scouting. While the rank
embodies hard work, diligence and
leadership, a boy might take a more
roundabout way to the top, with
multiple stumbles and starts along
the way.
According to Master of Ceremonies
and former Troop 20 Scoutmaster Bill
Zaharchuk, “…it took Connor a while
to get his Second Class merit badge
due to an inability to fold and repack
his tent at campouts.” At this point in
the ceremony Connor was presented
with an instruction pamphlet from the
Eureka Tent Company, much to the
amusement of the audience.
Beyond packing tents, an Eagle candidate must earn 21
merit badges; he must be active and serve in a leadership
position in his troop. He must display an adherence to the
principles of the Scout Oath and Law in the decisions he
makes and the actions he takes in his personal life. Finally,
he must organize, plan and lead a service project to benefit
a religious organization, school or his community.
Connor is a quiet fellow, but he had a vision. Connor
is a lifelong member of St. John the Evangelist church in
Hudson, and it was there, during his years of religious
instruction that Connor became familiar with the St.
Vincent de Paul Food Pantry and its mission. He knew
he wanted to help the food pantry in its quest to serve the
community.
Father Pierre Baker was not immediately sold on the
project. He questioned Connor’s commitment before
permitting him to begin, but Connor was true to his word.
He and his crew replaced the food pantry’s metal racks
with spacious, sturdy shelving over six weekends of work.
Pauline Boisvert, director of the St. Vincent de Paul Food
Pantry, expressed her appreciation for Connor’s project
which, she said, expanded storage in a limited space and
permitted the organization of goods in such a way as to
expedite their retrieval. Since this food pantry serves
approximately one-third of Hudson’s population, this is no
small feat.
Connor admits there were bumps along the way. The
worst part, he said, was the proposal he had to prepare
for the Eagle Board before they would sign off on the
project: 16 hours of writing, checking and re-writing.
Before construction could begin, there was calculating and
measuring, there was ordering and storing supplies; there
was the scheduling of work crews and tracking volunteer
hours and expenditures and the meticulous logging of
everything for the Eagle Board’s review.
According to Father Baker, the finished project is a great
gift to the food pantry and to the Hudson residents it serves.
And it’s a great legacy for Connor, who, through his efforts,
exemplifies the first two lines of the Boy Scout Oath:
“On my honor I will do my best
To do my duty to God and Country … ”
Well done, Connor. Well done.
Eagle Scout’s Work Improves Food Pantry
From left are former Troop 20 Scoutmaster Bill Zaharchuk; Connor Hamilton, Eagle Scout;
and Assistant Scoutmaster and dad Paul Hamilton.
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Courtesy photo
5 George Street, Hudson, NH
www.hudsondentalnh.com
603-889-8499
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Christine Lonegan, DMD
Brandon Beaudoin, DMD
Retirement and FICA. For this first year, the funds would come from
savings in the vacant staffing list of the budget. After documentation
and evaluation of the first-year operation, if successful, it would
become part of the budget for the 2015-2016 school year.
The computer network technician in each building would keep a
log that the district technology director would review on a quarterly
basis. In addition, an evaluation would be presented to the school
board in May to determine its viability.
The second program came from a recent survey of teaching
staff in which 98 percent responded that a “mentor program for
teachers” would be an essential facet in creating a better educational
environment within the district. After meeting with SAU staff it was
proposed and presented to the board.
The following was the bullet points of the presentation:
• Two mentors would be in place for every 30 staff members in
each building: two mentors at each elementary, four mentors
at Hudson Memorial and six mentors at Alvirne. Mentor
expectations would consist of one hour per week for 36 weeks at
$25 per hour, $900 annually with an annual cost to the district of
$14,400. In the FY15 budget, funds would come from savings in
salary costs and for future years, the cost of the program would
be budgeted.
• Two one-hour formal meetings would occur per month with the
mentees. This would be considered the “study committee” in
the contract for new staff. Informal meetings and responses to
questions would satisfy the other two hours per month.
• Teachers new to teaching would be involved for two years;
teachers coming with experience would participate for only one
year.
• Activity logs would be kept by mentors.
• On a quarterly basis, mentors would meet with the
superintendent to monitor progress of the program.
• If there was a minimal need in one school and a greater need in
other schools, budgeted resources could be moved annually.
Assistant Superintendent Phyllis Schlichter mentioned that she
already had a list of teachers wanting to be involved, and she saw
this setting a tone of leadership. Acting Chairman Patty Langlais
asked Beth Lavoie, president of the Hudson teacher union, who was
in the audience to speak to the board about this proposal, Lavoie
was very positive and explained that Superintendant Lane had
spoken with her about it. While she felt that teachers always try to
help the teacher across the hallway, she thought having a formal
system with an assigned and compensated person would make it
easier to get answers. Board member Stacy Milbouer asked Lane
if he felt that this would help hold on to people and overcome the
lower salaries offered in Hudson. Lane replied that it was moving in
the right direction.
School Support- continued from front page
by Tom Tollefson
In its first year, redistricting has been a success according to the
Hudson School Administration due to the increase in state test scores
for all levels of elementary school students.
Last year, staff and students were situated around the district
according to grade. All four school buildings had previously housed
grades kindergarten through fifth grade. Since the redistricting,
grade levels are located this way:
• Grades 2-5 at Hills Garrison;
• Grades 2-5 at Nottingham West;
• First grade at H. O. Smith; and
• Pre-K and kindergarten at Library Street.
The goals for this change have been to better meet the students’
academic needs, spread out the district’s resources, and help
improve the test scores for each school.
“Our goal was to create better practice for instruction and
assessment and to make informed decisions around instruction
through the use of data,” said Hudson Superintendent Bryan Lane.
The test scores in both math and science have improved for all
levels of elementary school students in town according to the state
standardized test results, taken in the fall. The next standardized test
will come in the spring of 2015.
“Our goal is to continue to increase our student scores and to
ensure that the gap with those with special needs and those without
closes dramatically,” Lane said.
The school district has also begun using STAR Assessment, which
measures student improvement in math and reading throughout the
year. This assessment also showed an increase over the course of the
first year after the recent transition.
In spite of the optimism for the new change, several concerns
were raised about transportation and cost impact on the district’s
budget.
According to Lane there are no negative ongoing impacts on the
budget. The only cost item was $25,000 (larger than expected) for
the moving expenses.
The transportation costs remain the same on the budget, as no
additional buses were needed for the change.
Lane stated that “we still have to cover the entire town regardless”
in reference to the transportation.
Parents’ main concern was the increased commute times for their
children. Some parents reported that their children did not get off
the bus until 4 p.m. or later. Lane has stated that the district has
addressed these issues by working to decrease travel times for the
buses.
“Initially there were major problems which after about four to five
weeks were solved. Some of the runs are a little bit longer, and we
worked throughout the school year to modify them to decrease travel
time,” Lane said. “We will continue to work to decrease travel time
throughout the district in every way possible.”
Another concern parents had were the anxieties in their children
as they dealt with the change of a new building, teachers, and new
peers.
Lane, administrators and teachers around the district agreed
that the school communities (teachers, principals, and guidance
counselors) excelled in easing the anxiety and providing a smooth
transition for all students.
“I didn’t see any sign of people not belonging,” said Hills Garrison
Principal Marilyn Martellini. “We worked really hard to get to know
the students and the staff. Staff worked hard to welcome everyone
into the school. We had a lot of new names to learn. I greeted the
children at the front (door) every day, and you do whatever you need
to make the children feel comfortable. The children adapted well to
the new facility and enjoyed it.”
Lane has been pleased with the changes he’s seen throughout the
schools.
“It’s been a positive change across the board. There have been
some concerns from parents about the changing schools and
transportation that we are dealing with. Academically, it has been a
positive change in every way,” he said.
The ideas for redistricting came from the administration team
comprised mostly of Lane and principals from around the district.
The team developed the idea after analyzing the strengths and
weaknesses of the district.
“We found that there were class sizes that were not consistent,”
Lane said referring to the fifth grade at Nottingham having 29
students per class compared to H. O. Smith having fewer than
20 per fifth grade class. “We also found that there was a lack of
organizational structure because our resources were spread pretty
thin. We focused resources where they were needed most and
could be better utilized, and we came up with a plan to create a
change in staffing patterns.”
The staff at each school regularly meets in their grade level to
discuss curriculum, exchange ideas, analyze student data, discuss
student concerns, and discuss the strengths and weaknesses of their
classrooms.
“It has been a very productive year for that exchange of ideas and
working together. I can honestly say that the teams meshed from the
very beginning,” said Martellini.
The school administration believes this change has been critical to
the students’ recent progress. Instead of only having a small team of
teachers on grade level, H. O. Smith has all the first grade teachers
in the district, and Library Street has all the pre-k and kindergarten
teachers in the district. They believe this change gives the two
schools more individual ideas and strategies that can be shared and
discussed in order to meet the best decisions for the students’ needs.
“By focusing staff on grade levels we were able to create better
access for instruction, interaction between staff by grade level
to compare and contrast information, and enhance instructional
practice,” Lane said.
This year isn’t the end goal for the district. The long-term goal is
set for five years. In that time Hudson schools will continue working
together to increase state test scores for all levels of students;
decrease academic learning gaps; and improve overall use of their
staffing, time, and resources to better suit the needs of the students
as they prepare them for middle school
“To make real change and academic progress we stated that in
a five-year span we would have to show that we are successful in
increasing test scores for all students. At this time we are on our way
to doing that,” Lane said.
Hudson Elementary School Redistricting
Viewed as a Success: One Year Later
Hudson - Litchfield News | August 8, 2014 - 9
2
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Keep Them Home, Happy and Studying: Creating a Kid-friendly Space
(BPT) - Would a great study space ease your child’s transition from
summer to school? Perhaps an awesome lounge area could convince
your teens - and all their friends - that your house is the best hangout
spot ever. Whatever your objectives, a few design and decorating
tricks can help you create a kid-friendly space in your home.
The basics of good design that make grown-up spaces appealing
also work for children’s spaces. When designing a kid-friendly room,
however, it’s important to keep in mind not only the purpose of the
room (study, fun, sleep, etc.) but the age of the occupant, his or her
interests as well as incorporating fun into the design. Here are some
tips to get you started:
* Consider creating a theme. Kids of all ages love themes. To
decide which one might be right for your project, consider things
your child has shown an enduring interest in. For example, she may
be into princesses right now and hate the theme next year. On the
other hand, if she’s always loved the color pink and has a passion
for animals, those elements could be worked into a theme that she’ll
appreciate for years to come.
* Choose flooring that fulfills multiple needs. Carpeting ab-
sorbs sound (for when kids play loud video games or music) and is
comfortable for youngsters who like to sit or lie on the floor while
they do homework, read, watch TV or socialize. What’s more, it’s
available in virtually every hue and pattern imaginable, ensuring
you’ll find something that appeals to both your design sense and
your child’s tastes. Stain-resistant formulas and durable fibers ensure
modern carpeting can stand up to the rigors of use in a child’s room.
And, according to the Carpet & Rug Institute, properly cleaned
carpet can maintain indoor air quality, making it a viable choice
for families impacted by asthma and allergies. To learn more about
carpet, visit www.carpet-rug.org.
* A child’s space needs layers of lighting, just as adult spaces
do. As you’re choosing lighting, keep in mind how your child will
use the room. If he will be doing homework, task lighting and desk
lights will illuminate study areas. Will the room be a movie room or
a “hangout” for older teens? Recessed and dimmable lighting may
be appropriate. Don’t forget to include natural light in your illu-
mination plans. Avoid heavy drapery. Instead, opt for bright colors
and lightweight materials for window treatments so windows admit
ample light. If you have a larger budget, consider adding a skylight
to provide light while preserving privacy.
* Organization is key in a child’s room, and ample storage facili-
tates good organization. Depending on the size of the room and
how it will be used, shelving, portable cubes, book cases and other
furnishings can provide plenty of storage space. For desks, look for
desktop organizers that will keep important papers and supplies tidy
and close at hand. By helping kids stay organized now, you’ll be lay-
ing the foundation for a lifetime of good organizational skills.
* Remember the fun factor. Whatever the purpose of a child’s
room, fun should be a universal ingredient. You can infuse fun in a
room in many ways, from creating a video game center for lounge
rooms to choosing colorful, texturally appealing carpeting for a bed-
room. A touch of whimsy, such as a swing hung from the ceiling or
a wall mural of your child’s favorite cartoon character, can produce
smiles every time kids see them.
With some creativity and the right decorating materials, it’s pos-
sible to create a space that will make children comfortable, happy
and ready to tackle the new school year.
Teaching Kids to Give Back
(BPT) - One of the most
rewarding reasons to get
involved in your community
is to set a good example for
your kids. Whether you do-
nate money or time, giving
back is beneficial, and not
just for the recipients. The
reward for your selfless acts
can be a beautiful thing for
both your community and
your children’s future. But
what are some of the ways
you can teach kids to give
back and what age should you begin encouraging them?
Giving back is just as much about volunteering as it is about
philanthropy. Dr. Lois Winchell, child and family
therapist at Argosy University, Sarasota, believes
it should be a combination of both. “If we want
our children to give back, our families need to
be involved in multiple activities,” says Winchell.
“These include volunteering resources and time
and giving money when possible. Learning how
to donate time can be a very powerful lesson for
children because it is a giving of ourselves. This
intimate experience can be significant and can
often reap a more personal reward than the offer-
ing of money and things.”
As with everything else in life, kids learn best
by example. The closer you can bring your child
to the recipient of the gift, the more personal the
experience becomes.
“Nurturing a sense of giv-
ing and making sure this is a
value for your children starts
as early as age 3 or 4,” says
Winchell. “At this develop-
mental age, we can teach
them that others have feel-
ings and that your child has
an impact on those feelings.
This sense of empathy is the
underpinning of charity. The
most significant impact on
our children is what they
actually see us doing as it
relates to a giving spirit. As we engage in specific projects, we can
have conversations with our children regarding why the project is
important and who will benefit.”
Start by expanding their sense of environment, from the immedi-
ate family to their local community and eventually the world around
them. A sense of awareness of something greater than themselves
is important in raising a compassionate individual. This sense of
responsibility to others and the environment as a world citizen can
be supported by making children aware of others’ needs whether
in visiting a shelter or a food banks with family members or simply
helping younger siblings.
“From infancy to about 5 years old, children aren’t necessarily
capable of thinking outside of themselves. Even so, parents need to
foster their child’s sharing with others,” says Winchell. As children
grow older they can begin volunteering and supporting community
projects more directly. Whether they donate toys to a children’s
shelter or simply participate in a walk for charity, these years are
continued to page 10- Giving Back
10 - August 8, 2014 | Hudson - Litchfield News
2
SCHOOL
2014
Library
Computer
Technology
Art
Phys. Ed
Music
Religion
French



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Please contact us with any changes, alterations or questions.
tel: 603-537-2760 email: production@nutpub.net
Deadline for changes is 5 p.m. on the Thursday prior to Thursday’s publication.
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SIZE: 4X3.25 RUN DATE: 7/17/14
Register for Fall Online Now
Celebrating our 25th Season!
All preschool
classes available
Days, Nights and
Saturdays
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• Parent/Tot (20+ mo)
• Preschool I & II (3-4 y/o)
• Tumbling sprouts (3-5)
• Hippety Hop (4-5)
• Kindercombo (5-6 y/o)
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210 Robinson Rd.
Hudson, NH 03051
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Healthy Lunch and Snack Ideas for Back to School
(BPT) - If schools and parents received report cards on the lunches
they’re serving kids, most wouldn’t receive a passing score. Many
lunches, whether served at school or brought from home, are made
with bleached flour, artificial sweeteners, food coloring, high-
fructose corn syrup, artificial preservatives, hormones and trans fats.
Studies have shown that these ingredients are linked to weight gain,
defects in insulin and lipid metabolism, hyperactivity, increased risk
of tumors, cancer, digestive issues, asthma, premature heart attacks,
diabetes, and overexposure and resistance to antibiotics. Some of
these ingredients are even banned in other countries.
As a parent, what can you do to keep your child healthy? Life
Time - The Healthy Way of Life Company, suggests checking in with
your child’s school to learn where foods are sourced, the nutritional
values and ingredients in order to make informed decisions.
“The more highly processed foods are, the more likely they are to
contain the seven unsavory ingredients. Meaning they are foods it’s
best to find alternatives for,” says Laura Burbank, a registered dieti-
tian with the Life Time Foundation.
“We encourage parents to speak with school nutrition direc-
tors and cafeteria managers about reducing the amount of highly
processed and artificial items served in their lunch rooms, in favor
of wholesome, real foods, and we’re able to help parents throughout
that process,” Burbank says.
Until changes are made, Burbank advises actively engaging kids
- starting when they’re young - in packing lunch at home. “Getting
kids involved in packing their lunches makes them more likely to
eat and enjoy them,” says Burbank. “They feel helpful and they’re
learning along the way.” She says it’s important to include a protein,
whole grains, fresh fruit, vegetables and healthy fats with every meal,
and provides some ideas below.
Lunch box option one:
* Lunch: turkey or ham sandwich with avocado and spinach on
whole grain bread. Look for meat that is free of hormones, antibiot-
ics, nitrates, artificial preservatives and other additives.
* Snack: orange slices and string cheese.
Lunch box option two:
* Lunch: grilled chicken breast, avocado and roasted bell pepper
or shredded carrots in a whole grain pita with a Greek yogurt based
dressing or pesto.
* Snack: apple slices and almond butter. If your child’s school has
a strict nut-free lunchroom guideline, include Greek yogurt with
vanilla and/or honey.
Lunch box option three:
* Lunch: a wholesome PB&J made with al-
mond butter and 100 percent fruit preserves on
whole grain bread.
* Snack: hard boiled eggs, cherry tomatoes, cucumbers with
Greek yogurt based vegetable dipping sauce, or pita chips and pep-
pers with hummus.
Healthier lunch room choices
Burbank notes that sometimes making lunch at home isn’t a viable
option. If that’s the case, she suggests parents discuss healthy lunch
room options with their kids, as studies have shown that in addi-
tion to nutritional benefits, healthier diets also associate with higher
academic performance. Things to consider include:
* Choose a salad when available to include more vegetables in the
meal.
* Choose white milk over chocolate milk to cut down on sugar
intake.
* Choose 1 percent milk over skim or non-fat milk, the higher fat
content is more satiating.
* Choose whole grain pasta over bread which may contain
bleached flour and preservatives.
* Choose red pasta sauce (vegetable-based) over cream sauce
(high in fat).
Choose fresh fruit over canned fruit which may contain artificial
colors, preservatives and sweeteners.
Parents should also be encouraged to talk to the nutrition direc-
tors and cafeteria managers about reducing the amount of highly
processed and artificial items in the school meals. The Life Time
Foundation is a great resource for more information on this.
The Life Time Foundation partners with schools to help them
remove highly processed and artificial ingredients from school meals
by providing resources and assisting with menu development. For
more information on how your school can get involved, visit www.
ltffoundation.org.
important for a child to learn the art of giving back. When they
become teenagers, they can do even more for the community by
assisting an elderly neighbor with his yard work or helping out at a
local food bank or soup kitchen.
Additionally, it is important to convey the message that “giv-
ing back” does not include an expectation of getting something
in return. Instead, highlight the sense of joy in being able to make
someone happy and how those feelings are the greater gift.
“When a child experiences sharing and the serving of others, an
internal sense of contentment and self-worth is experienced,” says
Winchell. “This self-enhancement and sense of belonging is coinci-
dent with their giving and results in a benefit that cannot be gained
any other way. This sense of happiness and accomplishment then
contributes to their positive sense of self.” In other words, teaching
kids to give back is one of the best things a parent can do for the
community and the child.
Giving Back-
continued from page 9
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Thumbs Up? Thumbs Down? Thumbs Up? Thumbs Down?
“Thumbs down to the
response to left turners out
of Lowell Road condos. And
thumbs down to anyone who
takes the ‘left of way.’ Yes,
people turning right have the
option of right turn on red.
That’s the law, has been for a
long time. A short time on the
light isn’t license for cutting
someone off. If there’s an
accident - you’re at fault! If
there’s not enough time on
the light, tell the highway
department. Don’t barrel out
and almost hit me.”
“Thumbs up to all the
motorists who follow the State
of NH Move Over Law, by
moving over and if you cannot
then slow down for stopped
emergency vehicles.”
“Thumbs down. Would you
Obama supporters please do
yourselves a favor and research
subjects before you speak
(or write). Every time I read
your ‘facts’ which are actually
uneducated opinions, I cry at
what our Country is coming
to.”
“Thumbs up/Thumbs down.
Glad the green droid is gone!
Three years of incessant
honking - enough already.
If you were a Lowell Road
condos neighbor, you wouldn’t
think it was so cute. Over
1,200 honks every weekend.
Verizon didn’t care even after
multiple complaints. Now we
can finally open our windows
and sit outside in peace
without feeling like we live
next to a never-ending protest
rally. Your actions affect others
- think before you honk!”
“Thumbs up to the patron
who expressed interest in
increased hours at Litchfield’s
public library. While it’s true
we are closed on Saturdays in
July and August, we are open
10-8 Tuesday – Thursday, and
10-6 on Friday. Please call or
email and let us know if we
can help you in any way!”
“Thumbs down to Walt
Haverstein. Apparently he was all for Obamacare
when it personally benefited him and his
company but now that he’s thrown his hat in
the ring as a GOP candidate, he’s decided
he’s against it after all. Give back the money
you made off it and then I’ll
believe you, otherwise you are
a hypocrite.”
“Thumbs up to the man
cleaning up litter along
Albuquerque early in the
mornings. I tip my hat to
you!”
“Thumbs up to Sue Ayer
and the wonderful CHS staff
for supporting WorkcampNE
this summer. All your hard
work was greatly appreciated
every day! You assisted
everyone in a very pleasant
and professional manner.
Thank you from all of us!”
“Thumbs
down to the
man going to
the Litchfield
dump that
did not stop
at the four
way stop on
Albuquerque
and Hillcrest.
Just because
others stop,
does not
mean you
can go without stopping. A
4-way stop means all cars
must come to a complete stop.
Learn the rules of the road
before you cause an accident.”
“Thumbs down to the
chicken owner. You wake up
my entire family every day
and they are constantly getting
loose!”
“Thumbs up to the Water
Rocket Launch sponsored by
the Cub Scouts. Join us at the
next one coming up on the
19th.”
“Thumbs up to me for being
in the right lane at the DD’s
light, and for all the folks
merging nicely before the
Sagamore Bridge.”
“Thumbs down to greedy
corporations and the
executives that run them! First
Comcast and PSNH and now
Market Basket ... C’mon guys
no need to rape and pillage
all the villagers at once. Save
some for the next generation
of greedy executives following
right behind you! What a
disgusting shame things have
become! Whatever happened
to the days when you received
a quality product for a fair
price?”
“Thumbs down! Ray
Buckley’s recent rant in
the local daily newspaper,
belittling Romney, is ridiculous.
Do you know why he wrote
about Romney? Because
there is buyer’s remorse in NH! They need to
squash any hope now if Romney decided to run
for President. Romney would have been one of
the best President’s ever. He was belittled by the
Obama machine then and they are still beating
the drum. This is what the democrats do ... make
out the good guy to be a demon, out of touch,
mean-spirited, and a racist when you don’t agree
with the democrats ... woman haters ... hates
the poor. Yeah, look at where the poor are now
... even more hooked on the ‘free’ stuff. What
incentive have they been given? And, woman?
Oh, ‘Free’ birth control! Now, that’s something for
the democrats to be proud of.”
“Thumbs up/Thumbs down. A great big
heartfelt “Thank You” to Hannaford’s in Hudson,
NH for donating the Hoodsie Cups and toppings
for Alvirne High School’s Bronco Marching Band
and Color guard’s Freshman Ice Cream Social.
We appreciate everything that you do for us and
our community.
“Thumbs up. Two thumbs up and a thank you
to the parents, guardians, students and alumni
who took time out of their busy schedules to assist
with Alvirne High School’s Bronco Marching Band
and Color Guard uniform fittings over the summer.
Without you we would be lost fitting 200 band/
CG members.
12 - August 8, 2014 | Hudson - Litchfield News
Tank you for your submissions. All comments, thumbs
up or down, are anonymous and not written by the
Hudson~Litchfeld News staf. Tumbs comments
can be sent via telephone, 880-1516 or emailed to us at
thumbs@areanewsgroup.com. When submitting a Tumbs
comment, please specify that you would like it printed
in the Hudson~Litchfeld News. During the election
campaign, no comments will be allowed that are direct
endorsements or censure of candidates on the thumbs page.
No names are necessary. Please keep negative comments to
the issue. Comments should be kept to 100 words or less.
Comments expressed in this column are the sole views of those callers and do not reflect the views of the Hudson~Litchfield News or its advertisers. Town and school officials encourage
readers to seek out assistance directly to resolve any problems or issues. The Hudson~Litchfield News editorial staff holds the right to refuse any comment deemed inappropriate.
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Ulery Attends 2014 ALEC Conference
submitted by Jordan Ulery
Last week Representative Jordan Ulery, representing Hudson and
Pelham, attended the annual meeting of the American Legislative
Exchange Council. Ulery joined nearly 1,200 other legislators from
across the nation to discuss issues facing the several states and the
nation and review possible answers to those issues. Sited in Dallas,
the event was opened by Governor Perry and closed with comments
by Attorney General Abbott of Texas.
Ulery was able to attend a series of lectures on fiscal policy led by
international experts such as Dr. Richard Vetter, Dr. Stephen Moore,
Dr. Arthur Laffer and Dr. Jonathan Williams. Said Jordan Ulery of
Vetter’s presentations; “Dr. Vetter is the only person who can make
the dry subject of ‘economic theory’ exciting and funny.” Dr. Vetter
was invited to address the new General Court in early January. He
expressed a desire to return to the Granite State if he is available.
“Despite being a seeming unexciting topic of economic policy”
said Representative Jordan Ulery, “fiscal freedom is what separates a
freeman from a serf.”
The Wednesday luncheon speakers reviewed the new publication
on how states acquire revenue and how they spread the wealth to
others. Titled “An Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth
of States,” Dr. Arthur Laffer and Messers. Alex Spinquefield and Travis
Brown published a New York Times and USA Today Best-selling
book on the economics that directly affect each of us through local
taxation, said Representative Ulery. For a preview of this exciting
new economic theory book you may consider visiting http://www.
wealthofstates.com.
Two new and innovative programs to deal with the massive tax
burden caused by Medicaid Expansion were reviewed as well.
These programs have been tried in other states and have reduced
dependence upon government direct assistance and helped people
received better health care than the traditional poor out-come
Medicaid assistance programs existing. Representative Ulery
commented that “the purpose of Legislators getting together to
discuss common problems is to use each state as a laboratory of
innovation to help all the other states.” Some of the ideas presented,
especially dealing with the highly successful volunteer foster care
programs developed in other states, may find its way into NH
legislation.
The Representative from Hudson and Pelham was also able to
have quiet dinner with Herman Cain to discuss the on-going active
efforts to pass a Balanced Budget Amendment (BBA) in the states.
Many states, including New Hampshire, have already petitioned
Congress for an Article V convention to change the Constitution
to force the federal government to live within its means. Mr. Cain
has stated that he hopes to return to New Hampshire to discuss this
issue in the Winter or Spring. Other states, including California and
Vermont, have requested a Convention To Propose Amendments.
Congress is not
going to limit its own
power. The Founders
created a mechanism
in the Constitution
for the Several States
to limit a runaway
Congress. For more
information of Article
V consider: http://
conventionofstates.
com/ and http://
articlevcaucus.com.
For information on
the many speakers
and educational programs offered visit www.alec.org. All was
not lectures and discussion groups. One single evening, after
the lectures, was set aside for a Texas barbeque, complete with
mechanical bull riding, beans, BBQ brisket and BBQ pork, jalapeño
corn bread (rather good), peach cobbler and Shiner Boch (in my
opinion, NH regional beer is better in case you are wondering).
The American Legislative Exchange Council is a 501(c)3 charitable
association registered with the IRS. The mission statement of ALEC
is “Limited Government. Free Markets. Federalism.” Before some
highly opinionated person begins a critical diatribe based upon
lack of accurate information; no ‘evil corporate entities’ (you know,
the ones that provide jobs, healthcare programs and pensions to
say nothing of investment opportunities) contributed directly to
Representative Ulery or any of the several other New Hampshire
Representatives, of both political parties, who are members of ALEC.
Yes, I am a member of ALEC and serve as a co-chair for the Granite
State (which only means I get to arrive early and leave late at events).
Ulery with Herman Cain
Dallas skyline from 27 foors up
C
o
u
r
t
e
s
y

p
h
o
t
o
s
Thumbs Up? Thumbs Down? Thumbs Up? Thumbs Down?
“Thumbs down to the
response to left turners out
of Lowell Road condos. And
thumbs down to anyone who
takes the ‘left of way.’ Yes,
people turning right have the
option of right turn on red.
That’s the law, has been for a
long time. A short time on the
light isn’t license for cutting
someone off. If there’s an
accident - you’re at fault! If
there’s not enough time on
the light, tell the highway
department. Don’t barrel out
and almost hit me.”
“Thumbs up to all the
motorists who follow the State
of NH Move Over Law, by
moving over and if you cannot
then slow down for stopped
emergency vehicles.”
“Thumbs down. Would you
Obama supporters please do
yourselves a favor and research
subjects before you speak
(or write). Every time I read
your ‘facts’ which are actually
uneducated opinions, I cry at
what our Country is coming
to.”
“Thumbs up/Thumbs down.
Glad the green droid is gone!
Three years of incessant
honking - enough already.
If you were a Lowell Road
condos neighbor, you wouldn’t
think it was so cute. Over
1,200 honks every weekend.
Verizon didn’t care even after
multiple complaints. Now we
can finally open our windows
and sit outside in peace
without feeling like we live
next to a never-ending protest
rally. Your actions affect others
- think before you honk!”
“Thumbs up to the patron
who expressed interest in
increased hours at Litchfield’s
public library. While it’s true
we are closed on Saturdays in
July and August, we are open
10-8 Tuesday – Thursday, and
10-6 on Friday. Please call or
email and let us know if we
can help you in any way!”
“Thumbs down to Walt
Haverstein. Apparently he was all for Obamacare
when it personally benefited him and his
company but now that he’s thrown his hat in
the ring as a GOP candidate, he’s decided
he’s against it after all. Give back the money
you made off it and then I’ll
believe you, otherwise you are
a hypocrite.”
“Thumbs up to the man
cleaning up litter along
Albuquerque early in the
mornings. I tip my hat to
you!”
“Thumbs up to Sue Ayer
and the wonderful CHS staff
for supporting WorkcampNE
this summer. All your hard
work was greatly appreciated
every day! You assisted
everyone in a very pleasant
and professional manner.
Thank you from all of us!”
“Thumbs
down to the
man going to
the Litchfield
dump that
did not stop
at the four
way stop on
Albuquerque
and Hillcrest.
Just because
others stop,
does not
mean you
can go without stopping. A
4-way stop means all cars
must come to a complete stop.
Learn the rules of the road
before you cause an accident.”
“Thumbs down to the
chicken owner. You wake up
my entire family every day
and they are constantly getting
loose!”
“Thumbs up to the Water
Rocket Launch sponsored by
the Cub Scouts. Join us at the
next one coming up on the
19th.”
“Thumbs up to me for being
in the right lane at the DD’s
light, and for all the folks
merging nicely before the
Sagamore Bridge.”
“Thumbs down to greedy
corporations and the
executives that run them! First
Comcast and PSNH and now
Market Basket ... C’mon guys
no need to rape and pillage
all the villagers at once. Save
some for the next generation
of greedy executives following
right behind you! What a
disgusting shame things have
become! Whatever happened
to the days when you received
a quality product for a fair
price?”
“Thumbs down! Ray
Buckley’s recent rant in
the local daily newspaper,
belittling Romney, is ridiculous.
Do you know why he wrote
about Romney? Because
there is buyer’s remorse in NH! They need to
squash any hope now if Romney decided to run
for President. Romney would have been one of
the best President’s ever. He was belittled by the
Obama machine then and they are still beating
the drum. This is what the democrats do ... make
out the good guy to be a demon, out of touch,
mean-spirited, and a racist when you don’t agree
with the democrats ... woman haters ... hates
the poor. Yeah, look at where the poor are now
... even more hooked on the ‘free’ stuff. What
incentive have they been given? And, woman?
Oh, ‘Free’ birth control! Now, that’s something for
the democrats to be proud of.”
“Thumbs up/Thumbs down. A great big
heartfelt “Thank You” to Hannaford’s in Hudson,
NH for donating the Hoodsie Cups and toppings
for Alvirne High School’s Bronco Marching Band
and Color guard’s Freshman Ice Cream Social.
We appreciate everything that you do for us and
our community.
“Thumbs up. Two thumbs up and a thank you
to the parents, guardians, students and alumni
who took time out of their busy schedules to assist
with Alvirne High School’s Bronco Marching Band
and Color Guard uniform fittings over the summer.
Without you we would be lost fitting 200 band/
CG members.
12 - August 8, 2014 | Hudson - Litchfield News
Tank you for your submissions. All comments, thumbs
up or down, are anonymous and not written by the
Hudson~Litchfeld News staf. Tumbs comments
can be sent via telephone, 880-1516 or emailed to us at
thumbs@areanewsgroup.com. When submitting a Tumbs
comment, please specify that you would like it printed
in the Hudson~Litchfeld News. During the election
campaign, no comments will be allowed that are direct
endorsements or censure of candidates on the thumbs page.
No names are necessary. Please keep negative comments to
the issue. Comments should be kept to 100 words or less.
Comments expressed in this column are the sole views of those callers and do not reflect the views of the Hudson~Litchfield News or its advertisers. Town and school officials encourage
readers to seek out assistance directly to resolve any problems or issues. The Hudson~Litchfield News editorial staff holds the right to refuse any comment deemed inappropriate.
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Ulery Attends 2014 ALEC Conference
submitted by Jordan Ulery
Last week Representative Jordan Ulery, representing Hudson and
Pelham, attended the annual meeting of the American Legislative
Exchange Council. Ulery joined nearly 1,200 other legislators from
across the nation to discuss issues facing the several states and the
nation and review possible answers to those issues. Sited in Dallas,
the event was opened by Governor Perry and closed with comments
by Attorney General Abbott of Texas.
Ulery was able to attend a series of lectures on fiscal policy led by
international experts such as Dr. Richard Vetter, Dr. Stephen Moore,
Dr. Arthur Laffer and Dr. Jonathan Williams. Said Jordan Ulery of
Vetter’s presentations; “Dr. Vetter is the only person who can make
the dry subject of ‘economic theory’ exciting and funny.” Dr. Vetter
was invited to address the new General Court in early January. He
expressed a desire to return to the Granite State if he is available.
“Despite being a seeming unexciting topic of economic policy”
said Representative Jordan Ulery, “fiscal freedom is what separates a
freeman from a serf.”
The Wednesday luncheon speakers reviewed the new publication
on how states acquire revenue and how they spread the wealth to
others. Titled “An Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth
of States,” Dr. Arthur Laffer and Messers. Alex Spinquefield and Travis
Brown published a New York Times and USA Today Best-selling
book on the economics that directly affect each of us through local
taxation, said Representative Ulery. For a preview of this exciting
new economic theory book you may consider visiting http://www.
wealthofstates.com.
Two new and innovative programs to deal with the massive tax
burden caused by Medicaid Expansion were reviewed as well.
These programs have been tried in other states and have reduced
dependence upon government direct assistance and helped people
received better health care than the traditional poor out-come
Medicaid assistance programs existing. Representative Ulery
commented that “the purpose of Legislators getting together to
discuss common problems is to use each state as a laboratory of
innovation to help all the other states.” Some of the ideas presented,
especially dealing with the highly successful volunteer foster care
programs developed in other states, may find its way into NH
legislation.
The Representative from Hudson and Pelham was also able to
have quiet dinner with Herman Cain to discuss the on-going active
efforts to pass a Balanced Budget Amendment (BBA) in the states.
Many states, including New Hampshire, have already petitioned
Congress for an Article V convention to change the Constitution
to force the federal government to live within its means. Mr. Cain
has stated that he hopes to return to New Hampshire to discuss this
issue in the Winter or Spring. Other states, including California and
Vermont, have requested a Convention To Propose Amendments.
Congress is not
going to limit its own
power. The Founders
created a mechanism
in the Constitution
for the Several States
to limit a runaway
Congress. For more
information of Article
V consider: http://
conventionofstates.
com/ and http://
articlevcaucus.com.
For information on
the many speakers
and educational programs offered visit www.alec.org. All was
not lectures and discussion groups. One single evening, after
the lectures, was set aside for a Texas barbeque, complete with
mechanical bull riding, beans, BBQ brisket and BBQ pork, jalapeño
corn bread (rather good), peach cobbler and Shiner Boch (in my
opinion, NH regional beer is better in case you are wondering).
The American Legislative Exchange Council is a 501(c)3 charitable
association registered with the IRS. The mission statement of ALEC
is “Limited Government. Free Markets. Federalism.” Before some
highly opinionated person begins a critical diatribe based upon
lack of accurate information; no ‘evil corporate entities’ (you know,
the ones that provide jobs, healthcare programs and pensions to
say nothing of investment opportunities) contributed directly to
Representative Ulery or any of the several other New Hampshire
Representatives, of both political parties, who are members of ALEC.
Yes, I am a member of ALEC and serve as a co-chair for the Granite
State (which only means I get to arrive early and leave late at events).
Ulery with Herman Cain
Dallas skyline from 27 foors up
C
o
u
r
t
e
s
y

p
h
o
t
o
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Classifeds!
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We do not endorse or guarantee these or any advertisers’ claim. We encourage you to be a good consumer and do your homework before you invest/purchase any products or goods.
Scoop’s got your Scoop’s got your
AUTO/
MOTORCYCLE
WE BUY junk cars and
trucks. Call Pat at Jean-Guy’s
in Pelham, a N.H. Certifed
Green Yard, at 603-635-7171
8/8/14
2005 Chevy Malibu 4 door,
air conditioned, good tires,
excellent shape, one driver,
6 cylinder, service records
available. 103K miles. $5,500.
424-6636. 8/8/14
CLEANING
A GREAT CLEANING
BY LUCI. Afordable,
experienced, free estimates.
Reliable, with excellent
references. Organizing services
available upon request. Call
Luci at 603-521-4636.
7/25-8/15/14
A QUALITY HOUSE
KEEPING: Dependable &
high quality work. Home and
commercial. Free estimates.
References available. Call
Leia, 603-557-2330. 7/18-8/15/14
MILENA’S QUALITY
Home Cleaning Service:
Personalized Home Cleaning,
Professional Ofce Cleaning,
Free Estimates & Excellent
References, Reliable &
Afordable Prices.
Don’t wait, make your
appointment today.
Call Andrea at 603-461-1137,
603-438-9533. 8/8/14
METICULOUS CLEANING
by Deborah: Home and ofce
cleaning. Weekly, bi-weekly,
monthly. Honest, reliable,
excellent references, 18 years
experience. Call 603-440-
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TWISTER CARPET
CLEANING Truck mounted
units. We ofer residential and
commercial cleaning and foor
maintenance. Fully insured.
Call 603-759-5220
06/27-8/22/14
CHILD CARE
CHILD CARE OPENING
for one family. $150-200/
week. Clean, pet-free, smoke-
free home. Flexible hours.
Great references. Contact
Allison, 603-493-9792.
7/18-8/8/14
CONSIGNMENT
CONSIGNERS WANTED
for large children’s
consignment sale. Sept. 12-14.
Newborn/teen clothing, toys,
furniture and more. Clean
out-Cash In! Consigners earn
a minimum of 65%. www.
roundaroundwegrow.com
7/18-8/15/14
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room bath $825 all util.
2 room ofce 450 all util.
inc. Retail, Warehouse &
Investments, Apt Buildings for
sale. Visit our website www.
sresre.com. Summerview RE.
603 432-5453 8/1814
RENTALS
Canopy Tent Rentals
RCM RENTALS
978-771-2744
rcmtentrentals.com
Great for outdoor parties!
• Tables • Chairs
Free local delivery &set up
We’ll beat any competitor’s pricing.
8/1/14








HEALTH

WOMEN’S FITNESS
BOOTCAMP at Darrah Pond
Litchfeld Mon 9:15 am;
Tues/Turs 5:45 pm. Call/text
603-682-1920 to enroll. www.
bootcampatdarrahpond.com
8/8-8/29/14
YOGA FOR YOU We love
beginners and seasoned
practioners. We teach
variations since every body
type is diferent. Call 603-
231-9443 today. 7/25-8/15/14
HELP WANTED
PLANT COMPANY
SEEKING part-time service
technician for care of interior
plantings in southern New
Hampshire. 5 - 8 hours per
week. Must be knowledgeable
in plant watering and lighting
requirements. Car and
insurance necessary. Call 603-
524-1516. 8/8-8/15/14
DRIVERS: Money &
Miles… New Excellent Pay
Package. 100% Hands OFF
Freight + E-Logs. Great Home
time/Monthly Bonus. 1 yr.
OTR exp./No Hazmat 877-
704-3773 8/8-8/15/14
INSTRUCTION
PHLEBOTOMY COURSE:
5 Weeks, $800.00. Register
now for August classes.
Wed and Fri, 6p.m.-8p.m.
Phlebotomy and Safety
Training Center, Litchfeld,
NH. 603-883-0306 8/1-8/22/14
HOME
IMPROVEMENT
1 A11 IN ONE PAINTING.
25+ years experience, interior/
exterior painting, power
washing, all work guaranteed,
free estimates. Fully insured.
www.allinonepainting.net,
603-305-4974.8/8-8/29/14
1 COLLINS BROS.
PAINTING: Interior &
Exterior; Top quality work;
Afordable; Fully insured;
Free estimates; Excellent refs.
603-886-0668. 7/11-8/8/14
A TO Z DANIEL’S
Hand-d-Man: Specializing in
jobs too small for remodelers
or contractors. Husband to-
do list. Big + small, inside
and outside. Yardwork spring
clean-ups. Replacement door
+ windows. Painting inside +
outside. Fully insured. Dan,
603-365-6470. 8/8/14
BOUCHER Handyman and
Remodeling LLC. Home
repair and maintenance.
Interior and exterior painting.
Power Washing. Finished
basement & bath, etc. No job
too small! Let us take care of
your “Honey Do” list. BNI
member. 603-882-7162.
7/18-8/8/14
DAVE’S HANDYMAN
SERVICES. Interior painting,
windows, doors, decks,
basements, and general home
repairs. Licensed and insured.
Free estimates. References
available. 603-486-1310.
7/25-8/15/14
FULL SERVICE
REMODELING: Licensed,
insured, registered. Repairs/
additions. Roofng/Siding.
30 years experience. Formerly
with Tis Old House.
Competitive pricing. Walter,
603-661-652768/1/14
*JACOBS
CONSTRUCTION*
Additions, decks, screened
porches, basements, interior
trim work, etc. Licensed
and insured. Over 25 years
experience. We accept
MC, Visa, Discover. Call
Joe 603-635-9953.www.
jacobsconstructionllc.com.
8/8/14
KITCHEN CABINET
INSTALLER, Modifcations,
Repairs, Custom Built-ins,
Finish Carpentry, Additions
and more. Rocco, 603-231
5225 7/18-8/8/14
KME PAINTING LLC.
Why remodel? Painting is
quicker, cleaner and better
bang for the buck. Interior,
exterior, home improvement.
Quality work at a fair price.
Fully insured, call for a free
estimate. 603-759-5680.
8/8/14
JUNK REMOVAL
A’S UNWANTED scrap
metal, cars and trucks, lawn
tractors, washers and dryers,
hot-water tanks, etc. Free pick
up. Call Steve at 261-5452.
6/27-8/8/14

ALL ABOUT JUNK
REMOVAL. Call Us For All
Your Junk Removal Needs.
We Take It All. 10% Of for
Seniors and Veterans.
Call John, 603-889-7173,
978-758-8371.
www.junkoutnh.com.
7/18-8/8/14
LANDSCAPING
LANDSCAPING
Property Maintenance
Call Gary
Office: 603-883-1028
Cell: 603-490-7757

Pelham, NH
FULLY INSURED
Spring Cleanup 10% OFF 
Thatching • Power Raking
Landscape Design
Walkways, Walls & Patios
Trees • Mulch • Shrubs
Loaming • Hydro Seeding
Irrigation • Tree Removal
Weekly Mowing
Complete
8/8/14
AAA LANDSCAPING:
Lawn Mowing Most Lawns
$30 - $45, Spring Cleanups
Starting at $175, Mulch
Installation, Patios, Walkways,
Walls, Fences, Fully Insured,
Reasonable Rates, Free
Estimates, Call 603-759-4591
or Schedule An Estimate
On Our Website at www.
JasonsAAALandscaping.com.
8/8/14
NEED YARD WORK
DONE? Small tree cutting/
trimming, bush trimming,
brush clearing, leaf blowing.
Call Steve 603-235-4014.
8/15/14

IRRIGATION INSTALLATION
Lawn Maintenance • New Lawns,
Landscape Construction
Hardscaping
Bobcat & Excavation Services
Free Estimates • Insured
603-305-6845

8/8/14
SERVICES
IN-TUNE PIANO
SERVICES. Certifed Piano
Technician. Tuning, Repair,
Regulation, Appraisals,
Rebuilding. 603-429-6368.
randy@in-tunepiano.com,
www.in-tunepiano.com.
7/25-9/12/14
QUALITY
POWERWASHING
Rejuvenate your home,
deck, patio, shed. Eradicate
moss and mold. Reliable
service, great prices. www.
colbystoughton.com
Call/Text: (603)557-6992.
8/8/14
REPAIR, DESIGN &
BUILD SEPTIC SYSTEMS
Call Fisette Excavating at
603-508-0947
8/8/14
TREE SERVICES
BOUTIN TREE REMOVAL.
Specializing in hazardous tree
removal. Fully insured.
Free estimates and frewood
for sale. Call Daryl at
603-321-8768.
www.boutintreeremoval.com
6/13 - 8/15/14
HIGH VIEW TREE
SERVICE: Fully insured, free
estimates, 24-hour service.
Specializing in all aspects of
tree service. Call Brownie,
603-546-3079 8/1-8/29/14

Hudson - Litchfield News | August 8, 2014 - 13
WANTED
A’S UNWANTED scrap
metal, cars and trucks, lawn
tractors, washers and dryers,
hot-water tanks, etc. Free pick
up. Call Steve at 261-5452.
6/27-8/8/14

LOOKING FOR FANTASY
FOOTBALL FANATICS
to play in our local Fantasy
Football League. Call Kevin
603-234-3261. 8/8/14

YARD SALES
YARD SALE: Designer
clothes-girls size 12-18, Junior
to size 5, water cooler, patio
set, household treasures.
55 Page Rd. August 8 -
10am-2pm, August 9 - 8am-
2pm. 8/8/14
YARD SALE: Saturday, Aug.9
8am-2:30pm. Household
goods and loads of “tween”
girl items! Rain or Shine!
53 Sullivan Road, Hudson.
111East, Right on Clement,
Left on Sullivan 8/8/14
FREE BEES
PORTABLE BASKET
BALL HOOP needs net -
need truck to pick up. Call
Angela at 603-867-9270.
20 Words
for
$
10
PUBLIC NOTICES
REAL Estate
Feature your home. 880-1516
REAL Estate
Feature your home. 880-1516
Buying or Selling, Give me a Call
for Personal, Professional Service
Ibo Yilmaz
Verani Realty
175 Amherst St,
Nashua, NH
603-459-9216 cell
603-888-4600 ofce
ibo.yilmaz@verani.com
verani.com/IboYilmaz
How Much is Your Home Worth?
FREE Market Analysis
Call “DJ” Clement,
she has the
“right spin” on all
your real estate needs!
RE/MAX Properties
Cell 603-765-9797 Office 603-589-2397
Email: realtor.djc@gmail.com www.djclement.com
-Town of Hudson-
NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
Proposed Modification to Chapter 317-30
of the Town Code of the Town of Hudson
Chapter 317-30 is entitled “Vehicles and Traffic, Schedule III,
Stop Intersections”
Please take notice that in accordance with NH RSA 41:11-b the Town of
Hudson Board of Selectmen shall hold a public hearing on August 12,
2014, at 7:00 PM in the Selectmen’s Meeting Room at Town Hall, 12
School Street, Hudson, New Hampshire to consider an amendment to
Chapter 317-30 of the Code of the Town of Hudson. The amendment
would add a stop sign on Friars Drive, westbound, at the intersection of
Executive Drive.
Residents wishing to speak on the matter are invited to attend.
Stephen A. Malizia - Town Administrator

883-8840
www.Harmony-RE.com
2 Winnhaven Dr, Hudson, NH
Call For A Free Foreclosure List Today!!!
Licensed by the NH Banking Dept. NMLS ID# 131782
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2 Bedroom 2 Bath Mobile
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Mike Christopher
Cal Fuller
Sunday, July 27: 12:34 p.m. Allergic reaction, Derry Road.
2:31 p.m. Illegal burn, Boyd Road. 5:07 p.m. Allergic reaction,
Brickyard Drive (L).
Monday, July 28: 8:53 a.m. Box alarm, Derry Road. 10:14 a.m.
Fall related injury, Acorn Way (L). 12:43 p.m. Mutual aid
Ambulance, Nashua. 2:40 p.m. Residential fire alarm,
Richman Drive. 5:30 p.m. Difficulty breathing, Derry Road. 7:25
p.m. CO detector activation, Shoreline Drive. 7:34 p.m. General
illness, Cutler Road. 8:14 p.m. CO detector activation, Oblate
Drive.
Tuesday, July 29: 6:10 a.m. Alarm box detail, Lowell Road. 8:09
a.m. Difficulty breathing, Pelham Road. 9:11 a.m. Blasting, Belknap
Road. 9:32 a.m. Motor vehicle accident, Derry Road. 10:49 a.m.
Box testing, Lowell Road. 1:13 p.m. Unconscious person, Cliff
Avenue. 4:38 p.m. Chest pain, Woodhawk Way (L). 8:28 p.m.
Difficulty breathing, Pondview Drive (L).
Wednesday, July 30: 7:15 a.m. Stroke, Wason Road. 7:50 a.m.
Laceration, Paget Drive. 12:00 p.m. Mutual aid Ambulance,
Nashua. 1:18 p.m. Blasting, Brody Lane. 2:29 p.m. Alarm box
detail, Executive Drive. 11:20 p.m. Box alarm, Hampshire Drive.
11:57 p.m. Unknown medical, Dugout Road.
Thursday, July 31: 9:51 a.m. Blasting, Greeley Street. 10:26 a.m.
Difficulty breathing, Rosemary Court. 10:34 a.m. Abdominal pain,
Derry Road. 11:22 a.m. Fall related injury, Dracut Road. 3:07 p.m.
Unconscious person, McKinney Drive. 3:33 p.m. Alarm box detail,
Executive Drive. 3:56 p.m. Alarm box detail, Hampshire Drive.
4:39 p.m. Dizziness, Derry Road. 7:37 p.m. Unconscious person,
Hill Street. 8:08 p.m. Difficulty breathing, Thorning Road. 10:44
p.m. Difficulty breathing, Webster Street.
Friday, August 1: 12:19 a.m. Chest pain, Lydston Lane (L). 12:52
a.m. Abdominal pain, River Road. 7:08 a.m. Allergic reaction,
Robinson Road. 9:32 a.m. Blasting, Brody Lane. 9:40 a.m. Alarm
box detail, Flagstone Drive. 11:03 a.m. Alarm box testing, Derry
Road. 1:58 p.m. System trouble, Pelham Road. 2:54 p.m. Difficulty
breathing, Lowell Road. 4:07 p.m. Motor vehicle accident, Webster
Street. 9:12 p.m. Laceration, Locke Mill Drive (L). 9:19 p.m.
Unconscious person, Baker Street.
Saturday, August 2: 1:58 a.m. Unconscious person, Elaine Street.
2:06 a.m. Motor vehicle accident, Greeley Street. 8:13 a.m.
Difficulty breathing, Melba Drive. 9:04 a.m. Alarm box detail,
Central Street. 2:03 p.m. Allergic reaction, Derry Road. 3:29 p.m.
Neck pain, Robinson Road. 4:11 p.m. Back pain, Hopkins Drive.
Hudson Fire Log
submitted by Robert Everett, President, VFW Men’s Aux. 5791, Sr.
Vice Commander S.A.L. Sqdr. 48
The American Legion Post 48 family is proud to announce this
year’s scholarship recipients. We would like to congratulate Ethan
Beals, Alyssa Huggins, Jacob Huggins, and Victoria LaRoche,
all who recently graduated from Alvirne High School and each
receiving a $500 Community Scholarship. We also are pleased
to announce that we had two $500 American Legion Family
Scholarship awards. Those recipients were Kathryn Paquette, also
from Alvirne, and Emily Paquin from Campbell High School. On
behalf of Post Commander Val Hanadek, we wish to congratulate all
of the graduates from the Class of 2014 and wish them well as they
further their education.
The VFW Hudson Memorial Post 5791 and its auxiliaries also
congratulate the Class of 2014 and would like to announce its
scholarship recipients each who received a $1,000 scholarship.
They are Jenifer Coates, Meenal Goyal, Christina Guessferd, Brittney
Lambert, all from Alvirne, and Andrew Picard and Leah Stagnone
from Campbell High School. Celeste Pedersen was the VFW Men’s
Auxiliary Alvirne JROTC recipient earning a $500 scholarship.
Again, on behalf of our post commander, we too wish these
graduates the very best in their future endeavors.
Local Veterans Posts
Select Scholarship Recipients
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14 - August 8, 2014
DOGGIE DAYCARE
48 BRIDGE STREET, NASHUA, NH • (603) 889-9800 visit us online at 
Your Best Friend Can Still Have Fun While You Work:
Beginner Obedience I- For dogs 4 months old and older.
Beginner Obedience II- This class is for dogs and handlers
who have completed Beginner I or equivalent course.
Puppy Kindergarten- For Puppies 8 weeks to 14 weeks.
Agility Level I & II (I) Basic obstacle familiarization,
i.e.: climb ramps, go through tire, etc. (II) Target training,
obstacle discrimination and simple sequences.
Canine Center
R
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Canine Center
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www.riversidek9.com
15 Derry St., Hudson, NH (603)882-5400 • 168 Main St., Nashua, NH (603)943-8355
Exp. 8/31/14 Exp. 8/31/14
1/31/12
50OFF
Brake Pads and Shoes
•Applies on basic, preferred,
and supreme service package
•Additional parts and service
may be needed at extra cost
•See manager for complete
service details
BRAKE SPECIAL
1/31/12
$
19
.95
Oil Change Oil Change
• INCLUDES OIL &FILTER*, CHECK FLUID LEVELS, 23 POINT COURTESY CHECK Includes up to
5 qts of standard motor oil and a standard flter. Additional disposal and shop supply fee
may apply. Special oils and flters are available at additional cost.
Rotation service for vehicles with TPM systems is available at additional cost.
Expires 9-10-14
• ARE YOU DUE? STOP IN FOR YOUR STATE INSPECTION TODAY.
Discount applies to regular retail pricing.
See additional details below. Expires 9-10-14
$
10 OFF
NH State Inspection
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Hudson Girls Softball League
Hudson Girls Softball League hosted its annual
2014 HGSL Championship playoff game. It was
on Friday night, June 20 when 27 senior division
players met at Alvirne High School field C, to
battle it out on the softball diamond for the 2014
HGSL Championship title.
Both teams known as the “Nor’ Eastas” and
the “Storm” stepped on to the field with one goal
of winning the 2014 championship title. For
a tense two and half hours both teams showed
outstanding offensive and defensive softball
playing. The Nor Eastas came out strong in the
first few innings, taking a large lead over the
Storm. Team Storm rallied together for a strong
warning with an unbelievable turn around, and
bringing it to a two-run game.
Coming back from a devastating last place
in the 2013 season, the Nor Eastas showed no
mercy, as they swept the Storm away, taking the
win and rights as the 2014 HGSL champions.
‘Nor’ Eastas’ Capture HGSL 2014 Championship
Hudson Girls Softball League Senior Division team “Storm” takes
second place in the 2014 HGSL Championship Playof game.
Top (from left): Kursten Lorrey, Savannah Emerson and Kiara Chase
Bottom row: Becky Labrie, Kiersten Green, Kayla MCLean,
Stephanie Meyer, Maggie Dery, Katherine Karafelis, Emma Bates,
Amanda Blais, Brooke Coburn, and Ashleigh Dahlstrom.
Congratulations Senior Division team. “Nor’ Eastas” 2014 HGSL Championship team.
Top (from left): Assistant Coach Jay Curran, Head Coach Tom Curran, Emma Beals, Kendra Gerace,
Katherine Callery, Julia Isso, Arianna Lemon, Chelsea Garry, Liv Callery, Assistant Coach Mary Linnehan,
Assistant Coach Chris Callery. Bottom: Arianna Fielding, Ashley Perry, Jocelyn Fielding,
Haley Gerace, Sarah Linnehan, Sara (Hey) Hey, Megan Curran.
Courtesy photos
Successful First Season
for 8U All Star Travel Team
submitted By
Coach Ron Ricard
This summer Hudson Youth
Baseball put together its first
8U All Star Travel Team for
the 2014 season and was
quite successful. Managed
by Ron Ricard and assisted
by coaches Dave Thibeault
and Mike Laroe, Hudson 8U
came out with a 7-5 and 1
record.
The team had a great
time participating in three
tournaments in Salem,
Lowell and Tyngsborough
just missing a playoff spot
in the first two tourneys and
securing a playoff spot in the
final tourney in taking fourth
place in Tyngsborough.
Hudson played the first-
place Lowell Highlands team
in the playoffs for a chance
to play in the championship
game. Hudson kept it a close
game (0-0 through three
innings) losing 3-1. Several
great defensive plays were
made by both teams and the
pitching was great. In a short
period of time (one month)
Hudson came together as
a strong team constantly
keeping up with older 8U
teams. Hudson, which was
comprised of seven 7 year
olds and five 8 years olds,
kept all opponents on the
fence and the parents on the
edge of their seats in every
game. These Hudson players
are going to be baseball
leaders next year at their age
level.
Special thanks to team Mom Cheryl Belanger
for all of her support and help, Ian Nickerson for
constantly keeping score and the support of all of
the parents at practices and to the Hudson Youth
Baseball Organization for making this possible.
Te 2014 Hudson Youth Baseball 8U All Star Travel Team. Back row (from left):
Coach Ron Ricard, Coach Dave Tibeault and Coach Mike Laroe.
Middle row: Charlie C., Andrew H., Hayden R., DJ T., Derek B. and Cody C.
Bottom row: Kyle D., Logan C., Brady N., Brett M., Max F. and Cole D.
Team cookout with game balls and trophies and smiles
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Hudson - Litchfield News | August 8, 2014 - 15
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Blast 10U Softball Captures Regional Title
by Marc Ayotte
They took things as far as they could
and beat the best of the rest. The spirited
and talented ensemble of Litchfield softball
players culminated a phenomenal, season-
long run this past week when they added
to district and state titles by earning the
title of New England Regional champions.
The Blast blew away Windham in a mercy-
shortened, 13-1 affair in Rochester on
July 27. At the U10 level, there is not a
World Series to compete in, consequently,
the regional win served as the softball
pinnacle in what was an exciting and highly
successful tournament season. After the
regionals, the Blast owned an impressive
season mark of 30-10-1; including four
tournament wins along with a second-place
finish.
With a downpour of Rochester rain pre-
empting their post-tournament celebration,
the Blast team celebrated their victory this
past week at Darrah Pond in Litchfield. After
a short practice in preparation for the season-
ending tournament being held on their home turf,
the team took advantage of a photo op; posing
with this year’s collection of trophies and plaques.
Then, under somewhat threatening skies, players,
coaches and parents moved to the pavilion to
enjoy a well-earned pizza party.
Heading into the Rochester-based tournament,
the 10U Blast were looking to make it
back-to-back regional titles; adding to their
accomplishment of ‘B2B’ years of winning the
districts and states. In what was a crucial first
game, Litchfield faced the revered, hometown
Rochester team. Trailing 4-1 late in the game, the
Blast exploded for five fifth inning runs on their
way to a 6-4 win.
Litchfield continued its quest for a title repeat by
running into an uncharacteristic speed bump from
Connecticut; losing to the Cheshire Flames, 5-3
in game 2 of pool action. “Once again our bats
were slow,” recalled Head Coach Rich Gamache,
referencing the team’s timid offensive start in
the opening game. After staking Cheshire to a
5-0 bulge with all five runs coming in the fourth
inning, the Blast comeback fell short, answering
with only three runs in the fifth.
In their third game of the tournament,
Litchfield’s bats were resurrected. Spearheaded
by Nikki Monoxelos’s three RBI performance
on a 2-for-2 day at the plate, the Blast emerged
from pool play as a number 2 seed after bombing
Barrington (NH) by a 10-4 score. In the circle,
Litchfield received strong efforts from Madeline
Davis and Sarah Corbett. Davis, who Coach
Gamache referred to as his ‘work horse,’ went the
distance in game one and fired four innings in
game 3 in picking up the wins. Corbett pitched
the final two innings in that game, earning praise
from her coach: “She is a legitimate closer; she
had a change-up that baffled every girl.” In all,
Corbett went on to make relief appearances in
every game except the opening game against
Windham.
Moving into the double-elimination bracket
round, Davis staked her claim to
pitching prominence with three
wins, as the Blast started by
disposing nearby rival Windham
in game one, crushing the
Wildcats to the tune of 12-2. In
the next game, the Blast exacted
revenge on the Cheshire nine,
dousing the Flames with a 6-4
win.
Cheshire was then ousted
from the tournament when
they suffered an elimination
game, 9-8 loss to Windham;
setting the stage for yet another
Litchfield vs. Windham battle
for it all. In what proved to be
the second championship game
confrontation in as many weeks,
Davis and Corbett once again
combined to shut down the
‘Cat attack.’ And with a timely
offensive surge as reflected by
Catherine Carignan’s three-run
home run along with notable
at-bats from Chloe Steiniger (two
hits, two RBI) and Abby Buxton
(3-for-3, two RBI), Litchfield
lit up Windham pitching for
double-digit runs on the way
to an abbreviated, four-inning,
13-1 victory.
In referencing current 12U
Blast team member O J Byers,
who almost single handedly
shut-down opponents’ bats last year while in the
circle as a 10U, Coach Gamache gave praise to
the concerted team effort of 2014. “I can’t believe
where this team went. Pitching and bats all came
together at the right time to accomplish what they
did,” admitted Gamache, adding; “I’m very proud
of them.”
Members of the 2014 Girls 10U Litchfeld Blast, Babe Ruth
Softball New England Regional champions - (front row from
left): Lily Kuczkowski, Kayleigh Wilnus, Lyndsey Brown, Riley
Gamache, Abby Buxton and Alexa Robert; (second row from left):
Chloe Steiniger, Catherine Carignan, Madeline Davis, Nicole
Monoxelos, Sarah Corbett and Emily Cooper; (Coaches from left):
Mike Cooper, Keith Buxton, John Steiniger,
Rick Gamache, Kevin Brown and Bill Corbett.
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submitted by J. Kohm
Jillian Kohm and Madison Caron, both soccer
players at Campbell High School, completed
their sophomore project by running a soccer
camp for 4-6 year olds. The camp was attended
by 14 campers who had a great time learning
soccer and playing fun games. Emily Moreau, a
senior, and Jessica Manning, a sophomore, both
CHS soccer players, donated their time to help.
Sophomore Project a Success
Fourteen campers attended the soccer camp run
by Campbell High School students.



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Jill Kohm
works
with the
young campers.
Michael Decarli, Madison
Rossi, Lauren Kohm and Julia
Noury also assisted with the
camp.
The camp was based on
the highly popular Cougar
Cubs program run by Litchfield
Youth Soccer.
Hudson~Litchfield
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16 - August 8, 2014
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by Marc Ayotte
Several familiar faces were absent from this year’s
Alvirne High School-hosted 5K Invitational, but truth
be known, it’s unlikely any of them would have been
able to stop the Bronco locomotive who has been
lights-out since last spring’s high school track and field
season. In a personal record-setting performance,
AHS junior Kendall Westhoff broke away from a field
of nearly 40 runners and established a new Muck-
Muck/Ding-Ding race record, crossing the finish line
in a mid-summer, eye-opening time of 16:55.4.
The Hills House in Hudson was the site for the
start of the third annual Hudson Community Run
that serves as a fundraiser for the Alvirne boys’ and
girls’ Cross Country teams. Bronco running star Josh
Bellomo (2nd, 17:09.9) had the lead at the first turn
on the AHS home course, but soon after, Westhoff
took control of the race and it was his to lose. “Spring
track was the season everything came together for
me,” offered Westhoff who destroyed his previous
personal best by 37 seconds.
Westhoff will be entering his junior year at Alvirne
when school resumes later this month. He became
a Bronco this past season after relocating to Hudson
from the North Pacific’s Marshall Islands. “I ran while
I was there,” reflected Westhoff, but noted that the
competitive atmosphere did not compare to what
he has experienced here in Division I. Going on to
explain that not only is the competition better in NH,
but the training he is receiving from his coaches is
better. Westhoff noted, “Even on the team, the guys
push me.”
Pushing him
almost the
entire distance
and finishing
just 15 seconds
behind in
second place
was 2013
winner, Noah
Bellomo.
Once dubbed
the ‘fastest
freshman’ in
D-I, Bellomo
did not
establish a new
PR but did beat
last year’s time
in this event
by nearly 90
seconds. “I ran pretty well; Kendall took it out pretty
hard and I just went with him,” explained Bellomo.
Although he has not competed this summer, Bellomo
admitted that he participated in this event just to see
how he felt and also in preparation for the high school
season which starts at the end of the month.
With respect to the 2014 season, Bellomo
commented on what appears to be a stacked team
and who are, according to Assistant Coach Jeff
DiPrizito, ranked third in D-I pre-season polls. “I
think it’s looking very good. I think our top three is
really solid,” said Bellomo while noting that

Phil Demers (part of the Bronco triumvirate)
was not able to attend the race as he
was working at a running camp in
Bangor, Maine. In his stead, teammate
Kyle Saunders who will also be a strong
component to this year’s Bronco team,
assumed the third position for the day;
finishing with an impressive 18:16.9 effort.
Rounding out the top-five finishers were
Alvirne senior Noah Cote (4th,18:34) and
Frank Cunniff (5th, 19:44).
Representing the AHS girls X-C team on
the Sunday, August 3, race, and finishing
first among female competitors (20:46.4,
9th overall) was Shaylyn Saunders. “I
thought I ran well because my goal was 22
minutes, so I’m really happy,” revealed the
Lady Bronco. Although she has not run
competitively all summer, Saunders did say
that she may compete in the Zach Attack 5K before
the start of the school season.
Finishing first among the adult runners was Chris
Mulligan. The Hudson resident, whose daughter,
Kendra, dons the maroon and gold for the AHS girls
X-C team, has run this race in each of the first three
years finishing 16th overall this year.
After the race, Bronco Head Coach Tom Daigle
voiced his pleasure with the performance of members
of his team, saying; “My top five guys are running
really, really well. Their times are where we need
them to be in order to be competitive this season.”
Westhoff ‘Dings’ his Way to a 5K Win
Former Alvirne X-C star Aaron Bellomo, left,
rides the ‘Pace Deere’ with former Nashua
South track coach Arthur Demers.
AHS senior Noah Cote (gold) grabs the early lead in the
3rd annual Muck-Muck / Ding-Ding 5K fundraiser.
Winners in the Tird Annual Hudson
Community 5K fundraiser -
Shaylyn Saunders (girls’ division);
Chris Mulligan (adult division)
and Kendall Westhof (boys’ division)

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Litchfeld 12U Softball Heads South to World Series
by Marc Ayotte
For the third consecutive year, the
Blast 12U girls’ softball team will be
heading to Alachua, Fla., to compete
in the Babe Ruth World Series. The
annual event, which features the best
22 teams from across the land, is being
held at the Hal Brady Sports Complex,
August 6-14.
The field of competing teams is
comprised of 12 regional champions
and 10 invitational winners. As Head
Coach Bob Wright revealed, the Blast
qualified for this year’s World Series
when they won one of the qualifier
tournaments that took place in
Londonderry earlier in the season. The
Blast reached the World Series for the
first time three years ago in identical
fashion; having won the Londonderry
qualifier, but this will be the first
appearance for Wright as the 12U
coach.
The team is rolling onto the national stage, firing on all cylinders
after going 6-0 just last week in the final regular season tournament
held at Darrah Pond in Litchfield. The Blast went unblemished
and walked away with the heavy hardware after a convincing 11-1
lambasting of Londonderry in the finals. O J Byers and Marissa
Carignan combined for the win in the circle while Byers, Steph
Daigle and Liz Wright led the
bat-attack with multiple hit
games. “We had good hitting
all through the line up,” noted
Coach Wright.
One week earlier, they had a
strong showing as well, finishing second
in the New England Regionals. In pool
play, the Blast posted a perfect 3-0
record resultant from a 10-2 win over
Vermont, a tightly contested 6-4 victory
over Inter-Lakes and a 15-5 pummeling
of Plymouth. In the Inter-Lakes contest,
Steph Daigle was the offensive star,
‘blasting’ a 212 foot shot over the left
field fence for a two run homer, which
gave them a 6-1 lead at the time and
ultimately proved to be the winning
runs.
In the double-elimination bracket
round, Litchfield started nicely by
recording a 9-3 win over Berlin. After
losing game 2 to Stamford, Conn., the
Blast bounced back with an elimination
game win over Raynham, Mass.
However, in the finals, they fell to
Stamford for the second time in as many
attempts, dropping a 9-5 decision.
Regarding the trip to the Sunshine
State, the Blast players and coaching staff are excited and ready
for the challenge. “They’re psyched,” exclaimed Coach Wright
in discussing the overall team approach. The finals win over
Londonderry put the players in a positive frame of mind heading to
the nationals, intimated Wright. “I think they’re ready to go. They
hadn’t been hitting well early Sunday. (Against Londonderry) they
came out on fire – it was a good way to end.”
The week-long experience proves to be action-packed with
softball and other recreational activities. Several of the players and
their parents have post-tournament plans which include the likes of
visiting Disney World and ‘Gator Country,’ a trip to the campus of
the University of Florida, located in Gainesville, less than 20 miles
away.
One of those excited about
visiting UF and spending
some private time with her
family is Steph Daigle. An avid Gator fan, Daigle is ‘chomping at
the bit’ over the prospective visit to the land of orange and blue
as well as enjoying the aftermath of her first home run in a 12U
uniform. “It was a really good feeling. I didn’t know that I could
even hit it that far,” recalled Daigle of her tape-measure job in the
regional finals. As to the trip to the nationals, she said, “I’m really
excited that we’re getting the opportunity to go.”
Echoing similar sentiments was catcher Liz Wright. Enjoying her
role as the everyday catcher, Wright summed up her take on the
opportunity of playing on the big stage by saying: “It feels insane;
that’s pretty much it.”
OJ Byers said the experience means a lot to her, and she
appreciates the opportunities she has had of playing in tournaments
outside of Litchfield. Accordingly, she noted one of the team’s
recent, big wins, “Winning states was real exciting; we lost to
Londonderry the last time we played them.”
Marissa Carignan agreed with her teammates, saying: “It’s a great
experience.” Although they earned the right to compete in the
World Series by winning the regional qualifier, Carignan and the
team still felt they had something to prove to themselves. “It took
a lot of pressure off, but we wanted to earn our way by winning the
regionals.”
After the plane touches down in Florida, players and coaches
face a hectic and busy schedule before play commences. Once
they arrive at their designated hotels (reserved especially for World
Series participants and their families) they will go to an orientation
meeting which includes individual photos, a meeting with the media
as well as being introduced to other team members. The opening
ceremonies, which will feature a light show with fireworks, will
reflect a ‘first in Babe Ruth History’ occurrence, as two World Series
age groups will be taking place at the same time; the Cal Ripken
Major/60 teams along with the 12U Babe Ruth Softball.
Once play begins, the Blast will open up their schedule on Friday,
August 8, with an 8:30 a.m. game against Ormond Beach, Fla. Later
in the day at 5:30, they will face the same Stamford, Conn., team
that bounced them from the N. E. Regionals. On Saturday, pool play
continues when they face another Florida team, Ocala, at 12:30,
and then they close out the day with a game at 5:30 against the West
Coast representative, Lodi, Calif., squad.
Prior to his flight to Florida,
Coach Wright wished to express
his deepest gratitude to the
Litchfield softball family which
has been such an integral part
of the team’s success all season
long. “I’d like to thank all the
coaches, parents and volunteers
for the year-long help. It takes a
big effort, and without them, this
probably wouldn’t happen.”
Members of the World Series Bound Litchfeld Blast 12U team:
(front row from left): Emma Bertrand, Tori Allen Alley McKenna,
Jordan Kanelli and Emily Gamache; (second row from left): Lolli
Brown, Alisa Gonzales, Liz Wright, O J Byers, Steph Daigle and
Marissa Carignan; (Coaches from left): Don Daigle, Mike Byers,
John McKenna, Bob Wright and Mike Carignan.
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