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Its easy to be hard, but its hard to be smart.

Changes in version 3: The periodic testing was changed to include the new Naval Special Warfare Tactical
Athlete Human Performance fitness test. I also added some waviness to the strength repetition schemes,
added some variety to the strength exercises (feedback from users, plus info from the Ranger Athlete Warrior
Program), added a bit more explosive movements, and finally changed up the barbell complex day a bit. Neck
bridges were added. A 5-10 minute treading water warm-up was added to most swim workouts. Additional
notes about using fins were added. Optional swim stroke workouts were added.

















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Copyright Michael C. Prevost, 2014. All rights reserved. Redistribution is authorized as long as the document is not altered
and appropriate credit is given. Cover photo from www.navy.mil/photos. Photographer's Mate 2nd Class Eric S. Logsdon
Disclaimer: The advice and information contained in this document may not be appropriate for all individuals. Therefore, the author,
employees, company, affiliates, or any other parties involved in the creation or promotion of our products are not responsible for any
injuries or health conditions that may result from advice, opinions, and programs represented in this program or any of our training
programs or other products. The information on this website and in the training program are the opinions of the author and are not a
replacement for medical advice. You should consult a physician before starting any diet or exercise program. If you choose to follow the
program without consulting your physician, you are doing so at your own risk. We claim no responsibility for any injuries you might
sustain. The opinions and assertions contained herein are the private opinions of the author and are not to be construed as official or
reflecting the views of the Department of Defense.
Important Note: Please help us improve this product by providing feedback. If
you complete the entire workout, please go to http://prevost-
training.blogspot.com and provide feedback by finding the SEAL Screener PT
Program Post and posting a comment. The program has already been altered
significantly after feedback from several users.
Purpose: The purpose of this program is to prepare physically for a SEAL screener, or for BUD/S and for the
SEAL PST. This is not a year-round type of program. It is designed to provide top off fitness before a
screener or BUD/S. It has been tested at the US Naval Academy with dozens of Midshipmen preparing for the
SEAL Screener and with US Naval Academy graduates preparing for BUD/S.

Disclaimer: I am not a SEAL. I have not been to BUD/S. I am a Ph.D. exercise physiologist who has worked
with athletes for 25 years. I have worked extensively with military personnel, including some who have
prepared for BUD/S, as well as active duty SEALs. However, you should not take what I say about fitness on
blind faith. You should only believe results. It either works or it doesnt. Later, we will discuss how to
measure results.

Assumptions: This program assumes that you have some weight training experience and that you are in
decent shape to begin with. If not, you will need at least 3 months of basic strength training (try Starting
Strength
TM
) and running before beginning this program. If you have not been running consistently for at least 3
months, with at least 15 miles per week for a minimum of two months prior to this program, you are not ready
yet. You should also be proficient in the breast stroke and combat side stroke. This is not a couch to SEAL PT
program. If you are not at point A (see next page), forget it. You are not ready for this program yet.

Warning: This program is more than enough. Do not add additional exercise. Dont take this program lightly.
It is harder than you think. Dont say I did not warn you. Eat well and get plenty of sleep. You are going to
need it.


The first step in fitness programming is to identify point A and point B. Point A is the starting point. Point B is
where you want to be, your goal. The SEAL program is difficult but you already know that. If you are really
serious about it, training and preparing for SEAL programs should be youre A goal. It takes a serious time
commitment. Anything else should be a B or a C goal at best. Strength coach Dan John likes to say, The
important thing is to remember to keep the goal, the goal. Stay focused on what is important.
Let's map out Point A and Point B.

Point B
Point A






Point A: The first important consideration is that you need to start this program at Point A. Point A is not
deconditioned. If you are at Point A, you already have a pretty good fitness base. This is a 12 week finisher
program that puts the finishing touches on fitness that you have been building for many months. This is not
something you should do year round. What should you do before this 12 week program to arrive at Point A?
Focus on these 3 things.
Basic strength: Try a simple program like Starting Strength, Stars 5 X 5, Wendlers 5/3/1 or
something similar. Focus on basic barbell lifts and getting stronger. No extra fancy stuff. Dont destroy
yourself, just make steady progress. The goal is to get stronger, not to test yourself with hard workouts.
There is no need to add work capacity (metabolic conditioning - METCON) yet. Work capacity is
developed quickly and excessive work capacity training interferes with strength development. Keep it
simple during this build up phase. Just get stronger.
Run durability: Steady paced running, trying to build some decent running volume with ABSOLUETLY
NO aches or pains. A gentle increase in mileage is the way to lay down good run durability. Being pain
free is the most important part. You must start the 12 week program completely healthy. Run
frequently, so that your total run mileage is achieved in smaller chunks. Running 5-6 times per week is
ideal. Keep the runs short initially and increase weekly mileage by no more than 10% per week. Don't
worry about getting fast yet. You are simply trying to build some leg durability. The speed will be there
when you need it.
Swim skill: Developing good technique is the key to going faster in the water. Technique is more
important than fitness when it comes to swimming fast. Focus on technique until you hit the 12 week
program. Then you will build fitness on top of good technique. If you have little experience with
swimming with fins, you should consider purchasing some fins and incorporating some finning work into
all of you swim workouts. You should also consider using 5-10 minutes of treading water for your swim
warm up. If you are proficient at treading water, practice with your hands above your head.
Intermediate run fitness
No injuries
Solid strength base
Some swim skill
Physically durable body
Leg durability
Strong core
Strong/stable joints
No injuries
High work capacity
Swim speed
Run speed
Endurance
Athletic strength
12 Weeks
You should feel recovered, motivated and healthy. You dont jack hammer your body into fitness. You gently
nudge it along until you can handle larger and larger training stresses. You should feel good during the
process and remain uninjured. If you have executed that simple plan, you should have arrived at Point A,
ready to start working towards Point B.

Point B: Fitness is not the key to surviving the SEAL Screener and BUD/S. However, being fit can make both
a lot less miserable and can reduce your risk of injury. Here are some of the Point B objectives:
Leg durability to survive heavy running mileage daily
Shoulder durability to survive log PT and countless push-ups
Grip strength, one of the most important upper body strength attributes
Strong core, neck, and lower back for injury prevention
Strong shoulders and muscles around the knee for joint stability
Work capacity for quicker recovery from hard efforts
Optimal body composition
Swim fitness
The most important goal is to build a physically tough and resilient body that is hard to break, so that you can
survive the wear and tear. The secondary goal is to be able to perform at a high level. Point B delivers both.

12 weeks is a long time to stay committed to a prescribed fitness program. It is harder than you think. If this
program is worth starting, it is worth seeing through to the end. Make a commitment to finish what you start.

Measuring Results: Program results will be measured by testing your 3 repetition max in the standing
overhead press and deadlift. These are the king and queen of the strength exercises. Forget bench presses.
You will also test your max pull-ups. We have an additional test that is a brutal workout in itself. It is the
Tactical Athlete Program (TAP) assessment. It is a complete test of the most important physical abilities you
need to excel as a SEAL. It is also an intimidating test that takes mental toughness to complete. You will also
do frequent 500 yard swims for time. The results of these frequent tests will tell you if the program is working.
You MUST keep a daily workout log to record all workout details. Any athlete who is serious about training
keeps a log. Don't kid yourself. No log = not really serious.
Results are what count. The point of the workouts are not to make you tired. The purpose is to produce
results. Do not judge this program based on how tired you are after your workouts. The point is to drive
progress and get results. You should see progress and results continuously through this program provided
that you eat enough and sleep enough. You do not jack hammer your body into fitness. You gently nudge it
there through smart progressive overload. The Marines have a saying, "It is easy to be hard, but it is hard
to be smart." Be smart!


Strength Training

The focus of the strength training program is grip strength, over head pressing strength, hip hinge strength,
and strength of the muscles around the knees. All of these areas are important for injury prevention. Also, the
goal is to have no weak links. Because of the dynamic, whole body movements and challenges you will
encounter, it is more important to have no weak areas, than it is to have impressive single lifts. Isolation
exercises and segmented strength training will not serve those purposes. That is the primary reason for the
inclusion of dynamic, whole body exercises like squat cleans and barbell complexes. We dont care much
about bench presses. Horizontal pushing strength is just not that important for performance. It does not
correlate well with pushup performance, punching power, throwing, or anything we really care about. The
closest thing to a horizontal push strength exercise on our program is dips. Dips are a useful movement. We
use dips to build chest and triceps strength. Weighted dips (bar dips or ring dips) are all that we need. We are
much more concerned with being able to survive lots and lots of pushups. Deficits in horizontal pushing
strength are rare and we have it covered with dips.

Strength training for performance (as opposed to strength training for appearance) is essentially loaded
movement. Proper movement is more important than loading. NEVER load bad movement. All strength
training movements should be done gracefully and athletically. You will notice that we are not organizing the
program around body parts (i.e., biceps and triceps on Monday, back and chest on Tuesday etc...). This
program is about performance, not about building beach muscles. Although bodybuilders may blitz a muscle
with lots of different isolation exercises and then allow a week for recovery, our goal is not bodybuilding.
Research (and real life experience) has shown that training more frequently (2-3 times per week) is more ideal
for building athletic strength. Because strength is loaded movement, and movement is a skill, there is a
significant skill component to strength. Skill responds to frequency. Two to 3 times per week seems to be
optimal. Forget about what you have read in muscle magazines. This is how strength and conditioning
coaches train athletes.

Loading, unless otherwise indicated, is done as sets across, which means that you use the same weight for
all of the sets of an exercise. When you manage to get all of the prescribed reps, you must go up in weight the
next time you do that exercise. If you do not, dont increase until you do. Bodybuilders typically continue most
sets to momentary muscular failure (inability to perform another repetition). This is because the resulting
fatigue stimulus is important for muscle hypertrophy (growth). For strength training, it is more important to
perform more high tension repetitions than it is to produce fatigue. For example, if you perform 10 repetitions
in the bench press with 185 pounds and you fail on the 10th rep, you will likely only be able to perform 6 reps
on your second set (or will have to reduce the load to 160ish pounds to get 10 reps again). However, if you
stop at 8 repetitions (2 shy of failure), you will likely be able to get 8 repetitions again on the second set, and
the third set. That is what is meant by performing more high tension repetitions. This is the reason for the
"sets across" loading scheme. It is a simple and effective loading plan that is popular among powerlifters.

Barbell complexes are done as a series of exercises without putting the bar down between exercises. The
point is to move quickly from one exercise to another. Resting a few seconds to catch your breath is OK, as
long as you dont put the bar down. See www.mountainathlete.com and www.startingstrength.com and
www.nsca-lift.org for videos of the exercises. Barbell complexes are brutal, time efficient, and very effective at
ensuring that you have no weak links in your strength chain. They also provide excellent METCON.

The strength training program is written assuming that you have access to a very basic gym. If you don't have
kettlebells, use dumbbells or sandbags as a substitute. Sandbags can be constructed from heavy duty
garbage bags and duct tape and filled with gravel or sand. Put them in an old duffel bag so that you have a
handle to work with.
Run Training

In our simple program we have only 3 tools: steady pace, tempo, and VO2 max pace. That is all we need.
There is no need for more complexity. Our 3 tools, along with the principle of progressive overload are the
keys to a simple, effective program. Lets discuss the 3 tools.

Steady: This is a steady pace effort. It is not hard and it is not easy. It is the natural pace you would fall into if
you went out for a long but comfortable run. This is not easy pace. If you had to constantly hold yourself back,
that would be easy pace. Steady is comfortable but you would not describe it as easy. For those who train
with a heart rate monitor, steady would be approximately 70-80% of your maximum heart rate. We achieve
progressive overload during steady runs is by increasing volume. You dont run harder over time, you run
faster at the same effort level. You can do this by keeping your heart rate in your target steady zone. As
you become fit, you will have to run faster to achieve the same heart rate. If you dont have a heart rate
monitor, you will have to pace on effort. Most people will run these steady runs too hard. Keep the effort
steady and eventually your steady pace will get faster and faster. Remember, do not increase the effort of
steady runs, only the volume (mileage).

Tempo: This is 10K race pace. This is definitely harder than steady pace but not your max pace. It is also
sometimes described as threshold pace. It is about at 90-95% of your max heart rate. Because we are using
a fixed effort level, we achieve progressive overload by increasing the amount of tempo. You might start with
10 minutes of tempo (i.e., 2 X 5 min) and eventually build up to 30 minutes of tempo (i.e., 3 X 10 min). You
can either use heart rate to pace your tempo intervals, or you can periodically race a 10K and use pace. Ten
minutes is enough tempo work to be effective but would be considered a light tempo dose. Forty minutes is a
heavy tempo dose for a single session.

VO2 max Intervals: Lots of people call these track intervals. That is because they are usually done on the
track. Heart rate is a poor way to pace these intervals because they are too short. It takes your heart rate 2-3
minutes to reach steady state at a new run pace. As a result, you will be done with your interval before your
heart rate catches up. That is why it is best to do these on the track or on a course with marked distances and
use pace to deliver the right intensity. The most common distances to do these are and mile repeats.
These are done at your 1 mile race pace. They are tough! VO2 max intervals are typically done with a 1/1
work to rest ratio. This means that if your run interval takes 2 minutes, you rest 2 minutes. What should you
do during your rest interval? You should rest! Seriously, you can jog slowly or walk or whatever it takes for
you to recover. The point is to recover. If doing mile intervals, unless you are an elite athlete, you dont
need more than 8-10. Six would be fine for most people. For mile intervals, aim for half of that. Run these
hard and push the pace. However, the ideal session would have your pace on your first and last intervals the
same. If you are fading in your last intervals, you are going too hard. Always leave a little gas in the tank and
finish felling like you could have done another one or two. VO2 max intervals are potent medicine. You dont
need many.

Ruck: You can substitute a ruck march for the Sunday long runs. If you do, gradually increase the load.
There is no need to exceed 30% of your bodyweight on these rucks. Wear supportive shoes and comfortable
socks (no cotton!). A good pack goes a long way towards increasing comfort. Our experience has shown that
the ruck training is optional. Candidates who have followed this program who ran on Sunday, rather than
rucking, have done very well at the ruck events.

The goal of the run training program is to increase PST run fitness, while simultaneously increasing leg
durability. Ideally, you would have preceded this program with several months of nothing but steady paced
running with a consistent, slow increase in running mileage. That build up, along with this program is ideal for
improving performance and durability. An occasional run in boots and utilities is OK but you should not do this
often.
Swim Training
Swim (without fins) performance is determined primarily by swim skill, not fitness. The Naval Health Research
Center tested hundreds of Sailors and found that 500 yard swim time correlated poorly with aerobic fitness, but
was highly correlated with swim skill. The lead in period prior to this 12 week program should consist primarily
of steady paced swimming to work on swim skill. It is hard to think about proper skill when you are gasping for
breath from hard intervals. Once you begin this 12 week program, you are working primarily on swim fitness.
Basically, you are putting fitness on top of whatever skill you built previously.
Experienced swimmers can probably skip swimming completely in the lead in period prior to this 12 week
program. They already have the swim skill and this 12 week period is more than enough to get them in top
shape. For experienced swimmers, focusing on swimming in the lead in period would provide less return on
investment than focusing on strength training or running leg durability. Swimmers typically have less leg
durability due to very flexible ankles and lack of weight bearing during swimming. Experienced swimmers may
also omit 1-2 of the swim workouts per week during the 12 week program, depending on their level of swim
experience.
Swimming with fins is different. Although there is a skill component it is lower than that of swimming without
fins. Fin swimming skill develops quickly. Therefore, fast fin swimming quickly becomes more of a fitness
issue than a technique issue after a short time. For inexperienced swimmers, one of your weekly swims on
this 12 week program should be done with fins. For more experienced swimmers, you might consider
doing most, or even all of your swimming with fins.
The optional swims are.optional. Do them if you are a novice swimmer and are recovering well from the
workouts. They can be done at a separate time of the day from the strength workouts, or they can be done as
a cool down from the strength training. Ideally they should be a separate session though, as the fatigue from
strength training can alter your swim form. It does not matter if this swim stroke work is done before or after
strength training.

Body Composition
You don't want to show up at BUD/S or a screener with excess fat. Fat is dead weight that will decrease
performance of any weight bearing activity (i.e., running, pull-ups, obstacle course). However, being too lean
is also a liability. Some fat to draw from for energy reserves, as well as to provide insulation from the cold is
ideal. Showing up with less than 10% body fat is not advised. You will suffer if you show up to BUD/S too lean.
An ideal body fat percentage would be somewhere around 12-14%. Slightly higher is OK. Achieving body fat
goals is accomplished with a nutrition program. Exercise is for fitness, not body composition.
Measuring body fat accurately is difficult. You probably will not have access to expensive technology like
hydrostatic weighing, DEXA or a Bod Pod. Skinfold calipers, circumference measurements, and bioelectric
impedance are notoriously inaccurate. You are probably going to have to estimate based on appearance. For
most people, the point at which the outline of all of the abdominals just starts to become visible when flexed is
about 12% body fat. When the abdominal muscles are visible without flexing, body fat percentage is 10% or
less. If you have "love handles" or a noticeable belly, you are probably over 15% body fat. The goal is to get
to the point where you have a flat stomach, but not so lean that your abs are visible when not flexing. That will
put you in the ballpark.


Work Capacity

Work capacity (metabolic conditioning - METCON) develops quickly. There is no need to do more than 12
weeks of work capacity training. Forget about doing METCON during the lead in period. METCON interferes
with strength and hypertrophy gains. Consider a simple strength training program, along with some steady
paced running and swimming prior to starting this program. METCON workouts are very physically demanding
and will tap into your recovery reserves. Resist the temptation to do more METCON than is prescribed in this
program. It is enough. The ideal METCON session is 5-10 minutes long.
12 Week SEAL Screener PT Program
Week 1 & 2
Monday
Warm Up: light
overhead squats, light
kettlebell windmill (2
rounds of 10 reps
each), neck bridges
Strength: Superset the
pull-ups and pushups
Standing
Overhead Press 5
X 5
Pull-ups 5 X 50%
of max reps
Pushups 5 X 50%
max reps
Front Squat 5 X 5
Core/Work Capacity:
3 rounds: No rest
Heavy suitcase
carry: 15 seconds
per arm
flutter kicks: 2
minutes
Turkish getup: 2
minutes (alternate
sides)

Optional Swim Stroke
Work: 10-20 minutes
of easy, smooth swim
stroke work followed
by some stretching
Tuesday
Run: Max sit-ups, run
35 minutes steady

Swim: 5-10 min
treading water, 200
yard easy warm up.
5 X 200 Yd hard with
30 sec rest, 200 Yd
easy, 200 Yd hard.
Wednesday
Warm Up: light Turkish
getup (5 reps per side),
goblet squat (10 reps)
(Do 2 rounds of each),
neck bridges
Strength: Superset the
pull-ups and dips
Deadlifts 3 X 5
(week 1), 5 X 3
(week 2)
Dips 4 X 5 (loaded)
Pull-ups take double
your single set max
reps and do that
many reps in as few
sets as possible
Pushups 5 X 50% of
max + 1 max set
Core/Work Capacity:
3 rounds: No rest
Kettlebell swings: 25
reps
Plank 2 minutes
Burpees 15
OR
10 minutes of:
Kettlebell swings
and sit-ups. Do 10
kettlebell swings
(heavy), and then
finish the minute
with sit-ups. Repeat
every minute for the
10 minutes.
Thursday
Run: 10 min easy, 10
min tempo, 5 min
easy, 10 min tempo, 5
min easy

Swim: 5-10 min
treading water, 200 Yd
easy, 8 X 100 Yd hard,
500 Yd easy
Friday
Warm Up: unloaded
walking lunges, light
kettlebell swings, Hindu
pushups (3 rounds of
10 reps each)
Strength:
Barbell Complex -
Full squat clean,
followed by push press
5 X 3 (barbell
complexes are done
without putting the bar
down)
Powerclean: 5 X 3
Pushups: 3 rounds of
max reps, followed by
50% of the # you get on
the max reps set
Pull-ups: Ladders until
you fail on a ladder (one
round up and down)
Core/Work Capacity:
Stretch and recover

Optional Swim Stroke
Work: 10-20 minutes of
easy, smooth swim
stroke work followed by
some stretching
Saturday
Run: Max sit-ups in 2
min, run 40 minutes
steady

Swim: 200 Yd easy,
500 Yd for time
Sunday
Run: 80 min steady (or
80 min loaded ruck)

Optional Swim: 5-10
min treading water, 5
X 200 Yd steady pace
Note: Be conservative on your loading in the first week. You have plenty of time. Movement quality is essential. Accept nothing but perfect form. This will be the key to preventing
injury as you progress. You can use a dumbbell or kettlebell for the Turkish get ups and suitcase carry. You can substitute a dumbbell or sand bag in an old duffel bag for the
kettlebell for kettlebell swings. Find something to anchor your feet for the sit-ups. For the pull-up ladder, do 1 rep, then 2, then 3, then 4...until you fail at a rep, then go back down
the ladder to 1 rep. Pick an implement for the standing overhead press and stick with it for at least 6 weeks (i.e., barbell, kettlebell, dumbbell) and increase weight as you are able.
Pick a pull-up grip for the day and stick with it, but you may vary your pull-up grip from workout to workout. For the barbell complex, do a squat clean, then a push press, then a
squat clean, then a push press and finally another squat clean and a push press. This is 1 set of 3 reps. You are doing 5 sets of 3 reps total. Go heavy but keep good form. You
can put the bar down between sets. No hard running during the steady runs. The point is to build leg durability and mileage. Max sit-ups = 1 set of max sit-ups in 2 minutes. Be
conservative on the loading. If you feel like you can do more during the first 2 weeks, great! Don't add anything! If you have done a proper lead in to this program, you are capable
of pulling off more than you can recover from. Saturday is your first fitness test, a 500 yard swim for time. Swim hard. Never run with a ruck.

Overly aggressive loading and sloppy form will eventually catch up with you. Don't do it! Be smart! Any item in bold is a test. Record the results for comparison.

3
rd
Week
Monday
Warm Up: light
overhead squats, light
kettlebell windmill (2
rounds of 10 reps
each), neck bridges

Core/Work Capacity:
3 rounds: No rest
Heavy suitcase
carry: 15 seconds
per arm
flutter kicks: 2
minutes
Turkish getup: 2
minutes (alternate
sides)

Note: This is an easy
day in preparation for
testing on
Wednesday

Optional Swim
Stroke Work: 10-20
minutes of easy,
smooth swim stroke
work followed by
some stretching
Tuesday
Run: Max sit-ups,
run 30 minutes
steady


Swim: 5-10 min
treading water, 200
yard easy warm up.
5 X 200 Yd hard with
30 sec rest, 200 Yd
easy, 200 Yd hard.
Wednesday
Warm Up: light Turkish
getup (5 reps per side),
goblet squat (10 reps)
(Do 2 rounds of each)

TAP PT test
Thursday
Run: 30 minutes
steady

Swim: 5-10 min
treading water, 200 Yd
easy, 8 X 100 Yd hard,
500 Yd easy
Friday
Warm Up: unloaded
walking lunges, light
kettlebell swings, Hindu
pushups (3 rounds of
10 reps each), neck
bridges
Strength:
Barbell Complex -
Hang clean, overhead
press, barbell row, stiff
legged deadlift (4
rounds of 5 reps per
exercise. Keep it light
to shake out the fatigue
from Wednesdays test)
Core/Work Capacity:
10 minutes of:
Kettlebell swings and
sit-ups. Do 10 kettlebell
swings (heavy), then
finish the minute with
sit-ups. Repeat every
minute for the 10
minutes.

Optional Swim Stroke
Work: 10-20 minutes of
easy, smooth swim
stroke work followed by
some stretching
Saturday
Run: Max sit-ups in 2
minutes, run 55
minutes steady

Plyometrics: 40 box
jumps

Swim: 200 Yd easy,
500 Yd for time


Sunday
Run: 85 min steady (or
85 min loaded ruck)


Optional Swim: 5-10
min treading water, 5
X 200 Yd steady pace
Note: We have a bit of a light day on Monday and Tuesday leading up to the TAP PT test on Wednesday. The TAP PT test is at the end of this document. It is designed to be
completed in about an hour. Then we have a recovery day on Thursday. If you hit the PT test hard on Wednesday, you will still need to shake out some fatigue on Thursday, so that
is a bit of a lighter day as well. Then we are back to normal on Saturday and Sunday. This week also serves as a bit of a de-load.Take the easy days whether you feel like you
need them or not. We added plyometric jumps this week. Plyometrics can improve run efficiency and build strength and durability in the ligaments and tendons. Do not exceed the
recommended number. Pay attention to proper landing mechanics. Pick a stable surface for the box jumps. It does not have to be very high. Most people cheat by tucking in their
knees at the top of the jump. If you don't do that, a 2 foot high surface is plenty. Higher than that will risk hitting your shins on the platform, a very common plyometric injury. Do the
plyometrics after the run. On days were you are running and swimming, you can run and swim back to back or separate them (for example, run in the morning and swim in the
afternoon). Resist the urge to do more than is written here. You need to build up slowly. The workout volume will be significantly higher, and tougher in 4 weeks. If you have been
eating poorly or not sleeping enough, you will be feeling it by now. Correct these issues now, before moving on. If you are having a hard time recovering, you might repeat week 2
before moving on to week 4.

Week 4 & 5
Monday
Warm Up: light
overhead squats, light
kettlebell windmill,
kettlebell swings (3
rounds of 10 reps
each), neck bridges
Strength: Superset
pull-ups and pushups
Standing 1 Arm
Overhead Press 5
X 5
Pull-ups 5 X (max
reps minus 2)
Pushups 5 X 60%
max reps
Back Squat 5 X 5
Core/Work Capacity:
3 rounds: No rest
Heavy suitcase
carry: 15 seconds
per arm
flutter kicks: 2
minutes
Turkish getup: 2
minutes (alternate
sides)
OR
Half bodyweight
sand bag get ups
(as many as
possible in 10
minutes)

Optional Swim Stroke
Work: 10-20 minutes
of easy, smooth swim
stroke work followed
by some stretching
Tuesday
Run: Max sit-ups,
run 45 minutes
steady

Swim: 5-10 min
treading water, 200
yard easy warm up.
5 X 200 Yd hard with
30 sec rest, 200 Yd
easy, 200 Yd hard.
Wednesday
Warm Up: light Curtis P
(see
mountainathlete.com),
neck bridges
Strength: Superset
pushups and dips
Deadlifts 3 X 5
(week 4), 5 X 3
(week 5)
Pushups 5 X 50% +
1 max set
Dips 4 X 5 (loaded,
week 4), 2 ladders
up & down (week 5)
Pull-ups take triple
your single set max
reps and do that
many reps in as few
sets as possible
Core/Work Capacity:
3 rounds: No rest
Kettlebell snatch (5
reps each arm)
Dead bugs or hollow
rock (hold 2
minutes)
Mountain climbers
(20 three count)
OR
10 minutes of:
Kettlebell swings
and sit-ups. Do 10
kettlebell swings
(heavy), and then
finish the minute
with sit-ups. Repeat
every minute for the
10 minutes.
Thursday
Run: 10 min easy, 15
min tempo, 5 min
easy, 10 min tempo,
10 min easy

Swim: 5-10 min
treading water, 200 Yd
easy, 8 X 100 Yd hard,
500 Yd easy
Friday
Warm Up: unloaded
walking lunges, light
kettlebell swings, Hindu
pushups (3 rounds of
10 reps each)
Strength:
Barbell Complex -
Full squat clean,
followed by push press
5 X 5 (barbell
complexes are done
without putting the bar
down)
Powerclean: 6 X 3
Pushups: 3 rounds of
max reps, then 50%
max reps
Pull-ups: Ladders until
you fail on a ladder
Core/Work Capacity:
Stretch and recover

Optional Swim Stroke
Work: 10-20 minutes of
easy, smooth swim
stroke work followed by
some stretching
Saturday
Run: Max sit-ups, run
50 minutes steady

Plyometrics: Week 4
50 box jumps, Week 5
40 tuck jumps

Swim: 200 Yd easy,
500 Yd for time
Sunday
Run: 90 min steady (or
90 min loaded ruck)


Optional Swim: 5-10
min treading water, 7
X 200 Yd steady pace
Note: We increased the pushups, the tempo run, and the Saturday steady run as well as the Sunday swim. 3 rounds of - max reps, then 50% of max reps means that you do a max
set, then do a set of half of that number. You repeat this 3 times. If you took the easy days last cycle, you should feel really good in weeks 4 and 5. This is the critical part of the
program. You must ensure that your nutrition is on and that you are getting some extra sleep. Take a nap on Sunday. We move from the less aggressive box jumps to the more
aggressive tuck jumps for plyometrics. Practice good landing mechanics during the plyometrics. Pay attention to foot and knee position. For the dip workout on Wednesday, we
have a different workout on week 4 and 5. Week 5 is two ladders up and down. To do this you start with 1 rep, then 2, then 3 etc until you hit failure. Then you reduce the number
of reps by 1, each set until you get to 1. That is one trip up and down the ladder. Do two trips.
Week 6
Monday
Warm Up: light
overhead squats, light
kettlebell swings (3
rounds of 10 reps
each), neck bridges
Strength:
Work up to 3 rep
max standing
overhead press
Note: 1 rep max is
estimated by dividing
3 rep max weigh by
.93
Test max pull
ups
Split squats 5 X 5
Push-ups 5 X 60%
max
Core/Work Capacity:
Car push: push 30
seconds, rest 30
seconds for 10
minutes
OR
Half bodyweight
sand bag get ups
(as many as
possible in 10
minutes) If no
sandbag,
substitute Turkish
getup.

Optional Swim Stroke
Work: 10-20 minutes
of easy, smooth swim
stroke work followed
by some stretching
Tuesday
Run: Max sit-ups,
run 50 minutes
steady

Swim: 5-10 min
treading water, 200
yard easy warm up.
5 X 200 Yd hard with
30 sec rest, 200 Yd
easy, 200 Yd hard.
Wednesday
Warm Up: barbell
complex - light weight,
clean, front squat,
overhead press, row. 3
rounds of 5 reps., neck
bridges
Strength: Superset
pushups and dips
Kettlebell swings 3
X 15 (or stiff legged
deadlifts)
Pushups 5 X 50% +
1 max set
Dips 4 X 8 (loaded)
Pull-ups take triple
your single set max
reps and do that
many reps in as few
sets as possible
Core/Work Capacity:
3 rounds: No rest
Kettlebell or
dumbbell snatch (5
reps each arm)
Dead bugs (hold 2
minutes)
Mountain climbers
(20 three count)
OR
10 minutes of:
Kettlebell swings
and sit-ups. Do 10
kettlebell swings
(heavy), then finish
the minute with sit-
ups. Repeat every
minute for the 10
minutes.
Thursday
Run: 10 min easy, 15
min tempo, 5 min
easy, 15 min tempo,
10 min easy

Swim: 5-10 min
treading water, 200 Yd
easy, 8 X 100 Yd hard,
500 Yd easy
Friday
Warm Up: unloaded
walking lunges, light
kettlebell swings, Hindu
pushups (3 rounds of
10 reps each)
Strength:
Barbell Complex -
Curtis P (clean,
lunge, push press)
15 X 1

Dumbbell or
kettlebell snatch
6 X 2

Pushups: 4 rounds
of -max reps then
50% max reps

Pull-ups: Max set,
followed by 2 reps
every 20 seconds until
you fail to get 2 clean
reps.
Core/Work Capacity:
Stretch and recover

Optional Swim Stroke
Work: 10-20 minutes of
easy, smooth swim
stroke work followed by
some stretching
Saturday
Run: Max sit-ups, run
55 minutes steady

Plyometrics: 40 tuck
jumps, 5 X 50 yard
sprints

Swim: 200 Yd easy,
500 Yd for time, 200
Yd easy
Sunday
Run: 90 min steady (or
90 min loaded ruck)


Optional Swim: 5-10
min treading water, 7
X 200 Yd steady pace
Note: We are testing for 3 rep max on our 3 benchmark upper body push exercise. Standing overhead presses should be done with the abs tight and knees locked out. No
pushing with the lower body. We are adding some pull-ups this week, and trying a different pull-up workout on Friday. It should be tough. If you do the car push, you obviously
need somebody to steer the car. Dont do that by yourself! The barbell complex on Thursday is called Curtis P (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uLff8fhPIQg). Do this as a
series of single reps. Put the bar down after each rep. For Fridays pushup workout perform as 4 rounds. Each round is a max set (to failure), then a 30 second rest followed by
50% of the number you got on the max set. This number should be less for both sets each round. Half way through. Get some sleep!
This is about the point that people are tempted to get too aggressive with loading and compromise technique. Don't wreck everything you have worked for with a
foolish choice. Be patient.
Week 7
Monday
Warm Up: Goblet
squats, Turkish
getups (3 rounds of
15 reps each), neck
bridges

Core/Work Capacity:
10 minutes of:
Kettlebell swings
and sit-ups. Do
10 kettlebell
swings (heavy),
then finish the
minute with sit-
ups. Repeat
every minute for
the 10 minutes.

Optional Swim
Stroke Work: 10-20
minutes of easy,
smooth swim stroke
work followed by
some stretching
Tuesday
Run: Max sit-ups,
run 30 minutes
steady

Swim: 5-10 min
treading water, 200
yard easy warm up.
6 X 200 Yd hard with
30 sec rest, 200 Yd
easy, 200 Yd hard.
Wednesday
Warm Up: light Turkish
getup (5 reps per side),
goblet squat (10 reps)
(Do 2 rounds of each),
neck bridges

TAP PT test
Thursday
Run: run 30 minutes
steady

Swim: 5-10 min
treading water, 200 Yd
easy, 10 X 100 Yd
hard, 500 Yd easy

Plyometrics: 30 knee
tucks, 20 lateral
bounds (per leg).
Friday
Warm Up: unloaded
walking lunges, light
kettlebell swings, Hindu
pushups (3 rounds of
10 reps each)
Strength:
Barbell Complex -
Hang clean, overhead
press, barbell row, stiff
legged deadlift (4
rounds of 5 reps per
exercise. Keep it light
to shake out the fatigue
from Wednesdays test)

Powerclean: 5 X 2

Core/Work Capacity:
10 minutes of:
Kettlebell swings and
sit-ups. Do 10 kettlebell
swings (heavy), then
finish the minute with
sit-ups. Repeat every
minute for the 10
minutes.

Optional Swim Stroke
Work: 10-20 minutes of
easy, smooth swim
stroke work followed by
some stretching
Saturday
Run: Run: 20 min
easy, 6 X 1/4 mile hard
with a 1/1 work/rest
ratio. Last interval
should be as fast as
the first., then 5 min
easy

Swim: 200 Yd easy,
500 Yd for time
Sunday
Run: 90 min steady (or
90 min loaded ruck)


Optional Swim: 5-10
min treading water, 7
X 200 Yd steady pace
Note: TAP PT test this week. Take the light days.You need the recovery. The whole point of this week is to do well on the TAP PT test. The TAP test alone is enough workout for
the whole week. We started run interval training on Saturday. These are not all out intervals. They are done at slightly faster than your 1.5 mile PRT run race pace. Your last
interval should be as fast as your first. 1/1 work to rest ratio means that you rest as long as the run interval. What do you do for the rest interval? Rest! Walk it off and catch your
breath. Take a nap on the shorter days this week. You will need it! On Thursday, do the plyometrics after the swim.
Week 8
Monday
Warm Up: light
overhead squats, light
kettlebell windmill (2
rounds of 10 reps
each), neck bridges
Strength: Superset
pull-ups and pushups
Push Press 5 X 5
Pull-ups 5 X max
reps - 2
Pushups 5 X 65%
max reps
Lunges 5 X 5
Core/Work Capacity:
3 rounds: No rest
Heavy suitcase
carry: 15 seconds
per arm
flutter kicks: 2
minutes
Turkish getup: 2
minutes (alternate
sides)

Optional Swim Stroke
Work: 10-20 minutes
of easy, smooth swim
stroke work followed
by some stretching
Tuesday
Run: Max sit-ups,
run 20 minutes
steady

Sprints 5 X 50

Swim: 5-10 min
treading water, 200
yard easy warm up.
5 X 200 Yd hard with
30 sec rest, 200 Yd
easy, 200 Yd hard.
Wednesday
Warm Up: light Turkish
getup (5 reps per side),
goblet squat (10 reps)
(Do 2 rounds of each),
neck bridges
Strength: Superset
pushups and dips
Deadlifts 3 X 5
Pushups 5 X 50% +
1 max set
Dips 5 X 3 (loaded)
Pull-ups take triple
your single set max
reps and do that
many reps in as few
sets as possible
Core/Work Capacity:
3 rounds: No rest
Kettlebell swings: 25
reps
Plank 2 minutes
Burpees 15
OR
10 minutes of:
Kettlebell swings
and sit-ups. Do 10
kettlebell swings
(heavy), then finish
the minute with sit-
ups. Repeat every
minute for the 10
minutes.
Thursday
Run: 20 minutes
steady

Swim: 5-10 min
treading water, 200 Yd
easy, 8 X 100 Yd hard,
500 Yd easy

Plyometrics: Double
leg hop front 35,
Double leg hop side
20 each side.
Friday
Warm Up: unloaded
walking lunges, light
kettlebell swings, Hindu
pushups (3 rounds of
10 reps each)
Strength:
Barbell Complex -
Full squat clean,
followed by push press
5 X 6 (barbell
complexes are done
without putting the bar
down)

Jump squats - 15 X 1

Pushups: 5 rounds of
max reps, then 50%
max reps
Pull-ups: Max set, rest 1
minute, then do 2 reps
every 20 seconds until
you fail to get 2 clean
reps.

Core/Work Capacity:
Stretch and recover

Optional Swim Stroke
Work: 10-20 minutes of
easy, smooth swim
stroke work followed by
some stretching
Saturday
Run: 20 minutes
steady


Swim: 200 Yd easy,
500 Yd for time
Sunday
Run: 60 min steady (or
60 min loaded ruck)


Optional Swim: 5-10
min treading water, 8
X 200 Yd steady pace
Notes: We backed off on the runs this week to provide a bit of a de-load. Take the easy week. This is a strategic de-load that will pay off in the next couple of weeks. No hard
running this week! We also added sprint training. Take what recovery you need after each 50 yard sprint. On Tuesday, do the sprints after the run. The jump squats on Thursday
are done with a lightly loaded barbell. You should use approximately 25% of your max barbell squat. Simply squat down and jump as high as you can. Rest a few seconds (10-
15)and do it again. Make sure you land properly and execute excellent form. Try to get some extra sleep this week. Check your weight. If you had a weight loss goal, make sure
that you are not dropping weight too rapidly. If you did not have a weight loss goal and you are losing weight, you need to eat more! You should be trying to get as much sleep as
possible. This is the tough part of the program. If you are experiencing lots of fatigue, you may eliminate two days of workouts this week, but only if you use that time to get extra
sleep. If you are feeling fine, push through.


Week 9
Monday
Warm Up: light
overhead squats, light
kettlebell windmill (2
rounds of 10 reps
each), neck bridges
Strength: Superset
pull-ups and pushups
Standing
Overhead Press 5
X 5
Pull-ups test of
max reps
Pushups test of
max reps
2 sets of 50% max
reps of pull-ups
and pushups
Front Squat 5 X 5
Core/Work Capacity:
3 rounds: No rest
Heavy suitcase
carry: 15 seconds
per arm
flutter kicks: 2
minutes
Turkish getup: 2
minutes (alternate
sides)

Optional Swim Stroke
Work: 10-20 minutes
of easy, smooth swim
stroke work followed
by some stretching
Tuesday
Run: Max sit-ups,
run 1 hour steady

Sprints: 5 X 50, 3 X
15

Swim: 5-10 min
treading water, 200
yard easy warm up.
5 X 200 Yd hard with
30 sec rest, 200 Yd
easy, 200 Yd hard.
Wednesday
Warm Up: light Turkish
getup (5 reps per side),
goblet squat (10 reps)
(Do 2 rounds of each),
neck bridges
Strength: Superset
pushups and dips
Deadlifts 3 X 10
Pushups 5 X 50% +
1 max set
Dips 5 X 3 (loaded)
Pull-ups take triple
your single set max
reps and do that
many reps in as few
sets as possible
Core/Work Capacity:
3 rounds: No rest
Kettlebell swings: 25
reps
Plank 2 minutes
Burpees 15
OR
10 minutes of:
Kettlebell swings
and sit-ups. Do 10
kettlebell swings
(heavy), then finish
the minute with sit-
ups. Repeat every
minute for the 10
minutes.
Thursday
Run: 10 min easy, 15
min tempo, 10 min
easy, 15 min tempo,
20 min easy

Swim: 5-10 min
treading water, 200 Yd
easy, 8 X 100 Yd hard,
500 Yd easy

Plyometrics: Double
leg hop front 40,
Double leg hop side
20 each side.
Friday
Warm Up: unloaded
walking lunges, light
kettlebell swings, Hindu
pushups (3 rounds of
10 reps each)
Strength:
Barbell Complex -
Curtis P 20 X 1

Dumbbell or kettlebell
snatch 10 X 2

Pushups: 3 rounds of
max reps, followed by
50% of the # you get on
each max reps set
Pull-ups: Ladders
Core/Work Capacity:
Stretch and recover

Optional Swim Stroke
Work: 10-20 minutes of
easy, smooth swim
stroke work followed by
some stretching
Saturday
Run: 10 min easy, 5 X
1/2 mile hard with a
1/1 work/rest ratio.
Last interval should be
as fast as the first.,
then 5 min easy

Swim: 200 Yd easy,
500 Yd for time
Sunday
Run: 90 min steady (or
90 min loaded ruck)


Optional Swim: 5-10
min treading water, 5
X 200 Yd steady pace

Note: For Fridays pushup workout, do a max set, rest, then do 50% of that number for a second set. Do this for 3 rounds. By this point you should be absorbing the workouts fine
and you should feel ready for each days training session. If not, you need to look at your sleep patterns and nutrition. You should have seen a significant increase in your basic
strength lifts by now and your steady run pace should be faster at the same heart rate. You should also be significantly faster on your 500 yard swim. If you are using rucks on
Sunday, you should be increasing the weigh that you carry. If you are starting to develop any aches or pains, address them immediately. Take a day off or cut back on loading or
intensity. The most important goal of Point B was to be uninjured.

Week 10
Monday
Warm Up: light
overhead squats, light
kettlebell windmill,
kettlebell swings (3
rounds of 10 reps
each), neck bridges
Strength:
Standing Bar
Overhead Press 5
X 5
Pull-ups 5 X (max
reps minus 2)
Pushups 5 X 60%
max reps
Superset the pull-
ups and pushups
Back Squat 5 X 5
Core/Work Capacity:
3 rounds: No rest
Heavy suitcase
carry: 15 seconds
per arm
flutter kicks: 2
minutes
Turkish getup: 2
minutes (alternate
sides)
OR
Half bodyweight
sand bag get ups
(as many as
possible in 10
minutes)

Optional Swim Stroke
Work: 10-20 minutes
of easy, smooth swim
stroke work followed
by some stretching
Tuesday
Run: Max sit-ups, run
50 minutes steady

Sprints: 5 X 50, 5 X
15

Swim: 5-10 min
treading water, 200
yard easy warm up.
5 X 200 Yd hard with
30 sec rest, 200 Yd
easy, 200 Yd hard.
Wednesday
Warm Up: light Curtis P
(see
mountainathlete.com),
neck bridges
Strength: Superset
pushups and dips
Deadlifts 5 X 3
Pushups 5 X 50% +
1 max set
Dips 4 X 8 (loaded)
Pull-ups take double
your single set max
reps and do that
many reps in as few
sets as possible
Core/Work Capacity:
3 rounds: No rest
Kettlebell snatch (5
reps each arm)
Dead bugs (hold 2
minutes)
Mountain climbers
(20 three count)
OR
10 minutes of:
Kettlebell swings
and sit-ups. Do 10
kettlebell swings
(heavy), and then
finish the minute
with sit-ups. Repeat
every minute for the
10 minutes
Thursday
Run: 10 min easy, 15
min tempo, 5 min
easy, 15 min tempo,
10 min easy

Swim: 5-10 min
treading water, 200 Yd
easy, 8 X 100 Yd hard,
500 Yd easy

Plyometrics: Double
leg hop front 40,
Double leg hop side
20 each side.
Friday
Warm Up: unloaded
walking lunges, light
kettlebell swings, Hindu
pushups (3 rounds of
10 reps each)
Strength:
Barbell Complex -
Full squat clean,
followed by push press
8 X 3 (barbell
complexes are done
without putting the bar
down)

Powerclean: 7 X 2

Pushups: 3 rounds of
max reps, followed by
50% of the # you get on
the max reps set
Pull-ups: Ladders until
you fail on a ladder
Core/Work Capacity:
.Stretch and recover

Optional Swim Stroke
Work: 10-20 minutes of
easy, smooth swim
stroke work followed by
some stretching
Saturday
Run: 10 min easy, 4 X
mile hard with a 1/1
work/rest ratio. Last
interval should be as
fast as the first., then
10 min easy

Swim: 200 Yd easy,
500 Yd for time
Sunday
Run: 90 min steady (or
90 min loaded ruck)


Optional Swim: 5-10
min treading water, 7
X 200 Yd steady pace
Note: Notice that the run interval duration on Saturday is increasing. We are slowly increasing the amount of time you spend at VO2 max intensity without rest, and we are giving
you longer intervals to work on pacing. If things are going well, you should be holding nearly the same pace on your 3/4 mil e intervals as your 1/4 mile intervals. After the end of the
week, take a look back at your training log and compare repetitions and weight across the first 10 weeks. You should have seen a steady increase.

Week 11
Monday
Warm Up: light
overhead squats, light
kettlebell windmill (2
rounds of 10 reps
each)

Core/Work Capacity:
3 rounds: No rest
Heavy suitcase
carry: 15 seconds
per arm
flutter kicks: 2
minutes
Turkish getup: 2
minutes (alternate
sides)

Note: This is an easy
day in preparation for
testing on
Wednesday

Optional Swim
Stroke Work: 10-20
minutes of easy,
smooth swim stroke
work followed by
some stretching
Tuesday
Run: Max sit-ups,
run 30 minutes
steady

Swim: 5-10 min
treading water, 200
yard easy warm up.
5 X 200 Yd hard with
30 sec rest, 200 Yd
easy, 200 Yd hard.
Wednesday
Warm Up: light Turkish
getup (5 reps per side),
goblet squat (10 reps)
(Do 2 rounds of each)

TAP PT test
Thursday
Run: 30 minutes
steady

Swim: 5-10 min
treading water, 200 Yd
easy, 8 X 100 Yd hard,
500 Yd easy
Friday
Warm Up: unloaded
walking lunges, light
kettlebell swings, Hindu
pushups (3 rounds of
10 reps each)
Strength:
Barbell Complex -
Hang clean, overhead
press, barbell row, stiff
legged deadlift (4
rounds of 5 reps per
exercise. Keep it light
to shake out the fatigue
from Wednesdays test)
Core/Work Capacity:
10 minutes of:
Kettlebell swings and
sit-ups. Do 10 kettlebell
swings (heavy), then
finish the minute with
sit-ups. Repeat every
minute for the 10
minutes.

Optional Swim Stroke
Work: 10-20 minutes of
easy, smooth swim
stroke work followed by
some stretching
Saturday
Run: 60 minutes
steady or easy

Plyometrics: Heiden
Hop (Google it) 20
per leg, front hop - 40

Swim: 200 Yd easy,
500 Yd for time


Sunday
Run: 90 min steady (or
90 min loaded ruck)


Optional Swim: 5-10
min treading water, 5
X 200 Yd steady pace
Note: This is another testing week. Do it as prescribed. For the barbell complex, do 5 repetitions of hang clean, then 5 repetitions of overhead press etc.... When complete with
each exercise, that will constitute a round. You are doing 4 rounds.

Week 12
Monday
Warm Up: light
overhead squats, light
kettlebell swings (3
rounds of 10 reps
each)
Strength:
Work up to 3 rep
max standing
overhead press
Work up to 3 rep
max deadlift
Note: 1 rep max is
estimated by
dividing 3 rep max
weigh by .93
Test max pull
ups
Core/Work Capacity:
Car push: push 30
seconds, rest 30
seconds for 10
minutes
OR
Half bodyweight
sand bag get ups
(as many as
possible in 10
minutes) If no
sandbag,
substitute Turkish
getup (35-50 lbs).
Tuesday
Run: Max sit-ups,
run 45 minutes
steady


Swim: 5-10 min
treading water, 200
yard easy warm up.
5 X 200 Yd hard with
30 sec rest, 200 Yd
easy, 200 Yd hard.

Nap
Wednesday
Swim: 200 easy, 500
steady

Nap
Thursday
Run: 20 minutes
steady

Nap
Friday


The only easy day was
yesterday! ; )
Saturday

Sunday


Note: This schedule assumes a Friday evening start for the screener or Monday following this week leaving for BUD/S. Try not to skip the naps.

If you are using this as a BUD/S build up, skip everything after Monday. You could even put in an additional down week with no negative impact on your fitness at
all. This is the approach athletes use to taper for a big race or event. After 12 weeks of hard training, the taper week will improve your fitness by reducing your
built up fatigue. Athletes normally bounce back from taper week (easy week) feeling really good and with improved performance. That is the effect we are looking
for. You want to show up fit, but well rested and recovered. The worst thing you could do is show up tired and over trained. Take the down time.

NSW TAP- HP Fitness Assessment Rules and Regulations
Movements Events Procedures
1. Lower Body Power Standing Long Jump Attempts
The operator will be given 3 attempts.
Start Position: The operator stands behind a line marked on the ground with feet slightly
apart.
Procedure:
1. A two foot take-off and landing is used, with swinging of the arms and bending of the
knees to provide forward drive.
2. The subject attempts to jump as far as possible, landing on both feet without falling
forward or backwards.
3. Maintain landing position following the jump until being freed by the scorer.
2. Upper Body Pull
Strength
25 lbs Max Pull-ups Attempts
The operator will be given 1 attempt
Procedure:
1. Each operator will be equipped with a 25 lbs vest. (for our purposes a backpack is
fine)
2. The operator will grip the bar using a pronated grip and the movement must begin
from a dead hang position.
3. Elbow must start in a straight position, for each rep, with no kipping the operator
must finish the movement by clearing the bar with chin.
4. Both hands must remain on the bar until the final rep of the test is completed
5. Return to the dead hang position, clear the bar with your chin, or maintain dual grips
throughout the movement.
3. Upper Body Push
Strength
Body Weight Bench Press Attempts
The operator will be given 1 attempt
Procedure:
1. Place feet flat on the ground
2. Back and glutes are set firmly on the bench
3. Take the bar from the rack with the aid of a spotter
4. Once the spotter releases the bar the lift will begin.
5. The bar must touch the chest at the bottom and both arms must be locked out at the
top for the rep to count.
6. Touch the chest or lock both arms out at the top of each rep will result in rep
cancelation.
4. Lower Body Strength Body Weight Ratio Max Deadlift Attempts
The operator will be given three attempts to perform up to a 5 rep maximal deadlift
weight. Each attempt can progressively be increased in weight, from 1.5 x body weight;
1.75 x body weight and 2.0 x body weight.
Start Position
Place feet hip-width apart, flat on floor and use an overhand grip or an over/under hand
grip with hands placed outside legs and shoulder-width apart.
Procedure:
1. Slowly extend legs, elevating the bar to just above the knees.
2. Extend hips forward and up.
3. Align shoulders, hips, and knees, as the lift is completed.
4. Return weight to starting position in a controlled manner without dropping weight.
5. Repeat for up to 5 reps. Completed Reps will be counted.
6. Lock the knees straight, stand erect with shoulders back.
30 MIN RECOVERY
5. Agility 5-10-5 Pro Agility

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jBHSOxGNF-U
Attempts
The operator will perform two trials in each direction
Start Position:
1. Three marker cones are placed along a line five yards apart.
2. The operator straddles the middle line and may place one hand down in a three-
point stance.
Procedure:
1. The operator will start either to the right or left direction.
2. The operator is required to touch the line with hand at each turn.
3. At the turns, the operator must be facing the same direction to ensure they do not cut
off the same foot each time.
4. The best time for each direction will be recorded.
6. Anaerobic Capacity 300 yd Shuttle Start Position:
1. Two, 25yd courses, are marked by cones are placed five yards apart.
2. The operator begins behind the line of one course.
Procedure:
1. On the signal, the operators sprint to the 25yr line and return for a total of 6 laps.
2. Testers ensure that each operator touches each line with a foot.
3. On completion of the first trial, record the operators times to the nearest .01sec and
start the 2min recovery period.
4. After 2 min recovery, the pair begins the second trial
5. Take average of the two trials plus the change in time from test 1 to test 2.
6. The difference between the first and second trial should be recorded

30 MIN RECOVERY
7. Multi Event Endurance 3.0 Mile Run + 800 Meter Swim Run Procedure:
The aim of this test is to complete the 3.0 mile course in the shortest possible time. At
the start, all operators line up behind the starting line. On the command go, the clock
will start, and you will begin running at your own pace.
Change Procedures:
5 min change to appropriate swim gear. Mask and fins (Mandatory); wetsuit (Optional).
Swim Procedure:
The aim of this test is to swim 1/2 mile in the fastest time possible. The swim must be
completed using side stroke.

About the Author

Mike Prevost earned a PhD in exercise physiology from Louisiana State University in 1995. He
specialized in muscle physiology and metabolism. Throughout his college years (10 years total) he
worked as a personal trainer in various gyms and fitness centers. He has trained athletes for many
different sports including triathlon, ultra running, surfing, power lifting, bodybuilding, mixed martial
arts, football, basketball and more. After finishing his PhD, he took a commission in the U. S. Navy
as an Aerospace Physiologist in the Navy Medical Service Corps. While serving in the Navy he
developed human performance training material for the U. S. Special Operations Command. He
developed new fitness standards for Navy rescue swimmers. He served as a consultant to the
USMC in evaluating the safety of the USMC Combat Fitness Test. He also served on a Navy
committee tasked with proposing alternatives to the Navy physical fitness test. He trained thousands
of aviators and aircrew on survival techniques, physiology, and human performance. He also served
as the Director of the Human Performance Laboratory at the U. S. Naval Academy, where he
performed physiological testing of athletes to improve performance, developed the Principles of
Strength and Conditioning Course for all Midshipmen, and served as the director of remedial fitness
training programs. He has over 25 years of experience in working with athletes.