River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 21 No.

862 • August 7 - 20, 2014 2 Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com
With a
90%
post-graduation
placement rate,
we help
young alumni
start out strong
and
give our state
the professionals
we need.
#TheUforIOWA
River Cities WK2.indd 1 7/30/14 12:56 PM
River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 21 No. 862 • August 7 - 20, 2014 3 Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com
GUEST COMMENTARY
Davenport’s Planned News Site: A Bold, Unworkable Idea, Repackaged PR, or ... ?
by Jeff Ignatius
jeff@rcreader.com
H
ow would the City of Davenport
have covered the recent vetoes
by Mayor Bill Gluba of the Dock
development plan and the St. Ambrose
University rezoning request for a new
stadium? And how would it have covered
Gluba’s proposal to bring illegal immi-
grants to Davenport, which was – to put
it mildly – poorly received by the city
council?
These were the questions that came to
mind with the revelation by the Quad-
City Times’ Barb Ickes (on the same day
as the vetoes) that the Fiscal Year 2015
city budget includes $178,000 for what
she described as “a news-based Web site
... [to] shine new light on positive and
negative city happenings.”
It’s clear that the site is an attempt to, at
least in part, bypass the traditional news
media and speak directly to constituents
about good things city government is
doing and positive developments in
Davenport – without that pesky “other
side” of the story. And, given our local
television stations’ tendency to air
unsourced and vaguely sourced stories,
one might infer that another motivation
is giving those broadcast news operations
easily adaptable material that would
warmly present Davenport.
But this idea was also pitched by city
staff quoted in the article as “bold” and a
“deep dive,” words that suggest ambition
beyond marketing. As Davenport
Business Development Manager (and
former daily-newspaper reporter) Tory
Brecht said: “As far as we can tell, no U.S.
city has embarked on this effort.”
The news site is supposed to be
launched in the next few months, and of
course it’s impossible to pass judgment on
it without actually seeing the thing.
Yet the twin aims of the initiative seem
fundamentally incompatible, and it’s hard
to envision how the nobler of these goals
can be accomplished given the inherent
lack of independence in a city-run “news”
operation.
And that’s why I return to the Dock,
the St. Ambrose stadium, and the Gluba
immigration proposal. These were the
city’s big stories last month, and one can’t
envision a Davenport news site ignoring
them while retaining its credibility. But
I can’t for the life of me figure out how it
would have covered them.
“Our Story”
and the “Truth”
The Fiscal Year 2015 Davenport
budget vaguely mentioned “a new
communications initiative, Open
Davenport,” with funding for several
new positions: a part-time Web designer,
three part-time “content providers,” and a
“student reporter” – accounting for 2.75
full-time equivalents.
Ickes’ article noted the hiring of
another newspaper reporter – the Quad-
City Times’ Kurt Allemeier – and fleshed
out the idea for the public. (Both Brecht
and Allemeier covered Davenport city
government.) The comments of various
city employees and city-council members
were instructive – and, perhaps inevitably,
contradictory.
On the one hand:
“We do stuff all the time – good stuff,
great stuff, life-changing stuff – that never
sees light of day,” said City Administrator
Craig Malin. “We’re a 24/7 shop with 800
employees.”
“A lot of times, the good-feeling stories
don’t sell so much,” said Alderman Bill
Edmond. “We need to tell them ourselves.
We need to ... tell our story from the city’s
side.”
“We have a positive message,”
Alderman Ray Ambrose said. “We’ve
always struggled to get that message out.”
“You lose too much when you allow
somebody else to tell your story,” Brecht
said.
And on the other hand:
“The city ends up having to tell its bad
news, anyway,” Brecht said. “Why not be
out front?”
“You’ll see the truth being told,” Malin
said.
Here you begin to see the disconnect
of this undertaking – between the stated
goal of marketing (“tell our story”) and
the promise of journalism (“the truth”).
Sometimes those things align; often, they
butt heads.
The concept is still under development,
and information from the city remains
skeletal. A PowerPoint dated July 31
says the initiative is “expected to share
information as events are unfolding”
and that “messages must be clear
and pro-active.” Under the heading
Continued On Page 15
The sandwiches of summer...a cool choice. We start with our famous bread —
baked daily in The Hobo Bakery — then heap on the sliced-to-order meats and
cheeses, and the freshest veggies. So irresistibly cool on a hot summer day.

MOBILE
App
Mobile
ordering
Delivery
Order at
good2goqc.com
Facebook
Like us for
great offers
Twitter
Follow us
@HungryHobo11
Rewards
Text HOBO
to 81018
We accept:
River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 21 No. 862 • August 7 - 20, 2014 4 Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com
Quinn Campaign Spitting
in the Wind
by Rich Miller
CapitolFax.com
ILLINOIS POLITICS
G
overnor Pat Quinn’s new TV ad is 60
seconds of one positive message after
another.
“Pat Quinn sees problems, takes action,
and gets the job done,” the ad claims. “Now,
Illinois is making a comeback,” it continues.
But the spot is being slammed by longtime
campaign insiders in both parties as “spitting
in the wind.”
For instance, a Paul Simon
Public Policy Institute poll
in June found that a mere 30
percent of Illinoisans thought
the state was on the right track,
while a 60-percent majority
thought Illinois was on the
wrong track.
And an infamous poll taken
by Gallup in April found that
50 percent of Illinoisans would
move to a different state if
given the chance. We were first
in the country on that response, according
to Gallup. Just 25 percent of Minnesotans, by
contrast, felt the same way.
In other words, a positive TV ad campaign
is not very likely to change many minds. Way
too many people simply hate the way things
are going here.
Instead, Democratic critics have been
arguing behind the scenes to abandon
positivity in the very near future and launch
a full-on, brutal assault against Bruce
Rauner as soon as possible. And quite a few
experienced Republican operatives were
scratching their heads at the ad, saying they
highly doubted it would move any numbers
at all.
The Quinn campaign obviously tested that
initial message with focus groups and polling.
So, hey, maybe they’re right. But when’s the
last time you heard someone say they were
proud to live in this state or that things were
really starting to turn around?
Meanwhile, the Quinn folks are reportedly
hoping to drive up turnout by more
than 200,000 votes with the nonbinding
minimum-wage referendum this fall, which
asks voters if they support a $10-per-hour
minimum wage.
That turnout projection has long caused
much consternation behind the scenes
among people who believe it’s entirely
unrealistic. What the Quinnsters are
hoping to do has never been done before,
critics point out. The Quinn campaign’s
projections rely heavily on a record off-year
turnout, even though the national and state
headwinds are rapidly nearing hurricane
levels and Democratic interest is quite low.
Democrats are hoping to spend as much
as $5 million on the minimum-wage project
to drive otherwise unmotivated “base” voters
to the polls. U.S. Senator Dick Durbin’s
campaign is reportedly in full agreement,
and pressure from both Durbin and Quinn
has forced the Chicago City Council to
delay a vote on its own $13-minimum-wage
ordinance. The cold calculation was that
a $13-per-hour ordinance
passed in September would
undermine the Democrats’
$10-per-hour efforts in the
fall campaign.
On the other side of
the fence, Bruce Rauner’s
campaign has calculated a
voter-turnout increase of
more than 300,000 just to
be on the safe side. After
Rauner’s unexpectedly
narrow GOP primary win
(despite internal Rauner polls
showing the candidate with greater than a
20-point lead), the Republicans want to be
extra sure that they plan for every possible
contingency.
To some Democrats, that Rauner
projection validates their theory of a turnout
spike. They believe that early voting, same-
day registration, and other new “tools” will
assist them in reaching their goal.
To others, it’s just smart politics by Rauner
and dangerous optimism by Quinn. In other
words, if the spike happens, Rauner will have
prepared himself. If it doesn’t happen, Quinn
is likely toast.
At least in public, however, Rauner is
making some pretty darned inflated claims
himself. He reportedly told a group of
African-American small businessmen last
week that he will get 28 percent of the black
vote in Chicago – something that hasn’t been
done there in a very long time.
But he’s certainly trying hard. ABC 7’s
Charles Thomas reported last week that
Rauner committed at that same meeting to
deposit $1 million of his personal fortune
into a Chicago credit union to be used for
small-business loans.
The Rauner campaign confirmed the
story with Thomas, calling the pledge “one
of many steps Bruce will take to reinvigorate
our communities that have suffered under
the failed policies and broken commitments
of politicians.”
That “one of many” phrase has got to send
chills up the Quinn campaign’s collective
spine.
Rich Miller also publishes Capitol Fax (a daily
political newsletter) and CapitolFax.com.
Turnout-spike
projections
are just smart
politics by Rauner
and dangerous
optimism by
Quinn.
SUNDAY
POINT
MULTIPLIER
August 10 • 10am-6pm
3X POINTS
ALL SLOTS. ALL VIDEO POKER.
NO LIMIT!
FRIDAY & SATURDAY 11am-10pm
Surf ‘N’
Turf
SATISFY YOUR WINNING APPETITE
with the best food at the best prices.
PLAYER’S CHOICE GIVEAWAY!
Saturday, August 9, 16, 23 & 30
Receive ONE free daily entry
Earn additional entries based on play
DEPOSIT ENTRIES EACH DRAWING DAY FROM 4:00PM - 7:55PM • DRAWING TIME 8:00PM
AMAZING PRIZES INCLUDE:
• Designer Coach® purse
• Dyson® DC50 vacuum
• Sony® 40”LED HDTV
Tool kit may
difer from
image shown.
Sunday Slot TournEvent
W|N UÞ 1O

IN IMAGE FREE PLAY
10am-6pm on August 10 and 24
30 WINNERS EACH WEEK!
Each session winner receives $10 IMAGE FREE Play.
Receive one free entry.
Earn up to 3 additional entries based on play.
$
14
99
• DeWALT® 4-tool
combo kit
• $500 CASH!
l| ,-e -. .-¬c--c ,-e |--« |a. a ¿a¬||.-¿ ,.-||c¬, -..... --e-.c|.-¿ a-1 .c|c..a| .c...-c. -a- |c a--c..c1 |, -a||.-¿
l-8OO-G^MBLLl (l-8OO-42ó-2537).
|-28Oa-J H=, 92 • Exit !!-A, Þee| |.la-J, |L
5O9-75ó-4óOO • 8OO-477-7747 O¡e- 7a¬-5amdaily
F O R   Y O U R   E N J OY M E N T , A L WAY S   S M O K E   F R E E !
For all the details, go to jumerscasinohotel.com
or visit the IMAGE Players Club.
River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 21 No. 862 • August 7 - 20, 2014 5 Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com
Lessons from Newspaper Coverage of the Benton Mackenzie Trial and Rock Island County Government
The Forest for the Trees
by Jeff Ignatius
jeff@rcreader.com
T
he July 9 Rock Island Argus/Moline
Dispatch article announcing a ver-
dict for Benton Mackenzie on drug
charges began like this: “Even as the 12
jurors shuffled into the courtroom to an-
nounce their verdict, Benton Mackenzie
could already sense his fate. Guilty.”
As storytelling journalism quickly
establishing a mood and then getting to
the point, it’s pretty good.
Yet with the basic facts of the case
never in dispute, the verdict had long
been almost a foregone conclusion
because of a pre-trial ruling in May –
which the Illinois-based newspapers
mentioned in trial coverage but didn’t
actually cover. Judge Henry Latham ruled
that Mackenzie couldn’t claim he grew
marijuana out of medical necessity to
treat his cancer.
The Quad-City Times, on the other
hand, did cover that ruling, and did a
decent job explaining the precedent
behind it.
But the Benton Mackenzie coverage
from both entities, while voluminous,
overlooked or ignored frameworks
in which daily events could be
understood, processed, and put into a
more-meaningful context. The story is
ultimately not just about one man with
terminal cancer facing a criminal trial.
Nor does it merely illuminate the general
issue of medical marijuana.
Rather, it’s a heart-wrenching,
complicated example of something larger:
how the justice system deals with an area
of rapidly changing law – one that is itself
chasing a swift change in public attitudes
following decades of calcified prohibition
policy.
And within that are smaller “big
picture” stories: critically ill people in the
justice system, the difficult choices faced
by prosecutors when straightforward law
comes into conflict with human tragedy,
questions about how and to what extent
judges, prosecutors, and even juries may
interpret and essentially change the law
in executing their duties.
These issues were missed opportunities
for our daily papers – institutions with
the reporting resources, frequency,
and space to explain, enlighten, and
contextualize what’s happening in our
community.
There’s a similar gap in Rock Island
County between daily reporting
and creating an understanding of
its importance: the self-evidently
dysfunctional inner workings of the
county board, resulting in inaction on
key issues and revelations about behavior
indicating something between corruption
and the absence of common-sense
oversight.
Ripe for Exploration
These two topics are illustrations of
how long-running stories dealing with
important issues are covered by our daily
newspapers – sometimes well, but often
with critical questions left unanswered
and perhaps unasked.
I’ve reviewed recent coverage from
both the Quad-City Times and the Argus/
Dispatch on both the Benton Mackenzie
prosecution and Rock Island County
government – some 45,000 words in
total. (That’s the equivalent of roughly
180 double-spaced typed pages.)
My goal was to see how well reporting
and writing over a period of time
captured what I believe are essential
issues.
And my ultimate purpose is to show
how our dailies might better allocate
their reporting and space resources to
explore key angles that sometimes get
lost in day-to-day coverage. My hope
is that by highlighting both strengths
and promising paths not taken in local
coverage, there can be improvements
moving forward – on these specific
stories but also in reporting generally.
A few notes on the outset:
• I initially had a handful of target
topics/stories to include in this analysis,
but after collecting articles from both
newspapers, it became apparent that
several of them weren’t going to bear
much fruit. That’s because there’s a
standard way to cover certain topics
– highlighting obvious conflict and
answering the basic who, what, when,
where, why, and how questions. There
was the additional problem that obvious
conflict doesn’t change (or change much)
over the course of a topic’s run in the
media, so coverage tends to be repetitive.
• Ultimately, I chose these two topics
– one from Scott County and one from
Rock Island County, with the “home”
paper providing the vast majority of
coverage but the other paper doing
significant reporting. Both deal with
typical grist for daily newspapers: a
criminal trial and good government.
• Most crucially, both lend themselves
to enterprise reporting – that is,
contextual and/or in-depth coverage
beyond the unfolding of daily events.
These two national topics – medical
marijuana and government accountability
– are ripe for exploration using local
news as a springboard for coverage with
broader relevance and meaning. And as
daily newspapers struggle to find their
ways in 24-hour news cycles and the
digital world, the type of reporting I’m
suggesting would be good business –
widening the potential audience beyond
the borders of the jurisdictions being
covered.
• These topics were covered by only
a few reporters at each paper, and the
analysis and commentary here applies
specifically and only to stories on these
topics. I mean them as examples rather
than evidence supporting some blanket
conclusion.
Benton Mackenzie
Since Benton Mackenzie was arrested
and charged last year, the Quad-City
Times has devoted somewhere in the
neighborhood of 20,000 words exploring
his case. Argus/Dispatch coverage was
roughly half that.
Mackenzie was charged after marijuana
plants were seized at his residence in
Long Grove, Iowa. He has never denied
growing marijuana, which he used
to create cannabis oil to treat lesions
resulting from his angiosarcoma – cancer
of the blood vessels.
At heart, his story is an accident of
time and geography. Given the facts of his
case, it’s clear that he would have been in
violation of the law pretty much wherever
he lived because he was growing his own
marijuana. But what if he lived in a state
that had a more expansive allowance
for medical marijuana – and where
marijuana (or the oil derived from it
that he used for relief) was legally and
locally available for purchase? What if
his situation had come up in Iowa in five
or 10 years – when it’s possible or even
likely that the state will have broadened
its medical-marijuana law?
In that sense, the story is about
medical marijuana. And on that front,
the Quad-City Times did a reasonably
strong job presenting a context in which
to understand his case.
In late September, the newspaper
published a pair of articles (by Times
bureau reporters) on the status of
medical marijuana in Iowa and Illinois.
The stories didn’t specifically tie that
coverage to Benton Mackenzie, but
they were presented with a 1,900-word
article on his situation titled “Medical
marijuana heads for trial in Iowa.” The
package represents the best of what our
daily papers can do – an in-depth story
on Mackenzie flanked by background-
information articles giving the broader
context.
But that’s just the start of what
insightful coverage should have entailed.
The key event in the saga was that May
29 pre-trial ruling in which Latham
forbade Mackenzie from employing a
medical-necessity defense.
The legal issue was clear. At the time of
his arrest, Iowa didn’t allow the medical
use of cannabis. And while the Iowa
legislature did pass a medical-marijuana
law that was signed by Governor Terry
Branstad prior to Mackenzie’s trial,
the statute is narrow, applying only to
epileptic patients and not permitting
a person to grow their own pot. (If a
medical-marijuana law had been on
the books for Mackenzie’s condition, of
course he could have gotten his cannabis
legally.)
Again, the Times did a good job
presenting this. In a May 30 article titled
“Cancer patient: ‘If I’m found guilty, I’m
a dead man,’” the paper noted the 2005
Iowa Supreme Court decision in State V.
Bonjour, “a case similar to Mackenzie’s.
Lloyd Bonjour, an AIDS patient, was
convicted of growing marijuana, and the
Supreme Court upheld the conviction.”
And the Times referenced the
prohibition against a medical-necessity
defense at every appropriate opportunity.
Although the Argus/Dispatch didn’t
report on the ruling itself, its trial
coverage regularly noted it.
So both papers emphasized the single
most important legal factor leading to
Mackenzie’s conviction.
But neither dealt with the questions
raised by Latham’s ruling.
Is the judge bound by the letter of
the law? And, if so, is he equally bound
when the legal climate is so clearly in
flux around the country – and when the
Iowa legislature is dipping its toes into
medical marijuana? Could the judge
have sidestepped the law and allowed
Mackenzie’s circumstances to be heard by
the jury, with clear instructions that they
were not relevant to the law? If the judge
did allow a medical-necessity defense
COVER STORY
Continued On Page 16
River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 21 No. 862 • August 7 - 20, 2014 6 Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com
F
or the fact that
Los Lonely Boys
are around to
headline this year’s
River Roots Live
festival, some people
might thank God –
and the trio of broth-
ers Garza certainly
does that. But bassist/
singer JoJo also
thanked his brother
Henry’s pliability.
“I think it would’ve killed anybody else,”
JoJo said of Henry’s horrific fall from a stage
in February 2013. “I would have been dead.
... From the moment he fell in the hole, I
thought it was completely over. ...
“We give a lot of thanks for Henry’s natural
ability to be very flexible as part of the reason
why he didn’t just crunch in half there.”
But Henry’s recovery has been slow.
“Quite honestly,” JoJo said in a phone
interview last week, “he’s not 100 percent
still, and a lot of people don’t know that. ...
“There really wasn’t a time frame until
the end of the year when there was a lot
more rest going on,” he added. “We tried to
play a couple gigs here and there, and every
time ... he’d swell back up and he’d be down
for another three days.”
Even singing was a problem: “The
vibrations of his own voice are not very
comforting.”
The injury, JoJo said, put Los Lonely Boys
on hold for much of the year, and delayed
completion of the new album Revelation,
which was released in January. He noted that
while many fans talked about getting the
guitarist/singer back on stage, it was more
important to simply get him healthy: “A lot
of things are really minuscule compared to
the life. ... We were concerned more for him
than the music.”
The album was roughly half-finished at
the time of the accident, and there’s a line on
“Give a Little More” that directly references
the incident: “If your brother falls down ... .”
But more importantly, JoJo said, the
experience provided an urgency to finish
the album and realign the band’s outlook:
“You’ve got a lot more drive. ... There’s a lot
more appreciation for what we have, who
we are – not just as bandmates but family
members. ...
“As people, we tend to start in a sense to
go on autopilot – walking around every day
doing the same thing, going to work, getting
up, paying the man, paying bills, eating, over
and over, repeat. There’s a diminishing of
appreciation and really knowing what you
have and believing that it’s really special.”
by Jeff Ignatius
jeff@rcreader.com
Natural Flexibility
Los Lonely Boys, August 16 at River Roots Live
And that
renewal is
evident on the
album, which
has everything
from pure pop
to funky blues
rock to roots
music owing
a debt to Los
Lobos. AllMusic.
com said the
record finds Los Lonely Boys “revitalized.
The Texan trio has never been constrained
by genre, but here they let their imagination
[run] wild, dabbling in every sound or style
that’s ever tickled their fancy, easing into
proceedings with a teasing bit of traditional
Tex-Mex ... before diving into every roots or
rock style they’ve ever hinted at in the past.”
Revelation marks the first time the band
has employed outsider writers – which is
surprising given that for nearly two decades
Henry, JoJo, and drummer Ringo Jr. have
written all the songs themselves, including
their double-platinum self-titled album from
2004 and its hit single “Heaven.”
“Where we come from, it’s all in-house, it’s
all about the family, you don’t bring in a lot
of outsiders ... ,” JoJo said. But “we feel like
we proved ourselves to the point that we felt
comfortable enough in our own skin to say,
‘Hey, we’ve done enough on our own. Let’s
see what we can do with other people.’”
And while JoJo said it’s gratifying that
people still want to hear songs from the
trio’s breakthrough album, it can also be
frustrating.
“Music is about being able to capture
growth and maturation ... ,” he said. “The
music is about creating. It’s not about
staying solidified in one place in one time.
Show me a tree that does that, and I’ll act
like that tree.”
Los Lonely Boys will perform at 9:30 p.m.
on Saturday, August 16, at River Roots Live
in Davenport’s LeClaire Park. Admission is
free before 5 p.m. and $10 after. For more
information on the two-day music and rib
festival, visit RiverRootsLive.com.
For more information on Los Lonely Boys, visit
LosLonelyBoys.com.
The River Cities’ Reader has previously
interviewed other performers at this year’s
River Roots Live: Robert Randolph (http://
RCReader.com/y/robertrandolph), Cracker’s
David Lowery (RCReader.com/y/lowery), and
North Mississippi AllStars’ Luther Dickinson
(RCReader.com/y/allstars).
MUSIC
JOB FAIR
August 6th-8th at Thunder Bay Restaurant
from 11AM to 6PM in the Lower Level 6511
North Brady Street, IA
ONLINE
the-jbar.com
AT THE JOB SITE
Monday - Friday from 9AM to 6PM
Saturday from 9AM to 1PM
OPENING SEPTEMBER 2014
BRING IT!
GOT A GREAT ATTITUDE?
OVER THE TOP CUSTOMER SERVICE?
Photo by Gabriella McSwann
River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 21 No. 862 • August 7 - 20, 2014 7 Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com
Vol. 21 · No. 862
August 7 - 20, 2014
River Cities’ Reader
532 W. 3rd St.
Davenport IA 52801
RiverCitiesReader.com
(563)324-0049 (phone)
(563)323-3101 (fax)
info@rcreader.com
Publishing since 1993
The River Cities’ Reader is an independent
newspaper published every other Thursday,
and available free throughout the Quad Cities
and surrounding areas.
© 2014 River Cities’ Reader
AD DEADLINE:
5 p.m. Wednesday prior to publication
PUBLISHER
Todd McGreevy
EDITOR
Kathleen McCarthy
EDITORIAL
Managing Editor: Jeff Ignatius • jeff@rcreader.com
Arts Editor, Calendar Editor: Mike Schulz • mike@rcreader.com

Contributing Writers: Amy Alkon, Rob Brezsny, Rich
Miller, Frederick Morden, Bruce Walters, Thom White
ADVERTISING
Account Executives:
Roseanne Terrill • roseanne.terrill@rcreader.com
Karie John • karie.john@rcreader.com
Advertising Coordinator: Nathan Klaus
Advertising rates, publishing schedule, demographics,
and more are available at
QCAdvertising.com
DESIGN/PRODUCTION
Art Director, Production Manager: Shawn Eldridge •
shawn@rcreader.com
Graphic Artist: Nathan Klaus • nathan@rcreader.com
Design/Production Interns:
ADMINISTRATION
Business Manager: Kathleen McCarthy
Office Administrator, Classifieds Manager, Circulation
Manager: Rick Martin • rick@rcreader.com
Distribution: William Cook, Ron Thompson, Cheri DeLay,
Greg FitzPatrick, Daniel Levsen,
Jay Strickland, Doug Wilming
switched bottles of pills. Visual-gag
costumes and props. (Brad Hauskins, as
Beatrice’s elderly beau Alfred, gets one of
each in designer Gregory Hiatt’s bellydance
outfit and a strategically placed towel.)
Double entendre. Double-casting. (James
Fairchild plays two comically distinct
working stiffs.) A plumber presumed to
be a gigolo. A hooker presumed to be a
psychic. Living-room chases. An off-stage
barking dog. And three characters, as
such characters are oftentimes required to,
shouting the same words in unison. (“The
phone!!!” Twice.)
So how did all this go over with July 24’s
preview audience? Pretty darned well, I have
to say. There were times when you could feel
the material slipping away from the heavily
senior crowd; I sensed audible discomfort
at the rather shockingly racy gags toward
the end of Act I, and several of the less
obvious punchlines, including one that was
simply “LGBT,” fell on figuratively (or not)
deaf ears. (Patrons did, however, roar at
the inevitable “I’ve fallen and I can’t get up”
reference.) Yet they appeared to adore most
of LL&TL, and, I thought, had mostly
good reason to.
Hesselman’s pacing was sharp and
brisk without being frenzied; even
though the show was still technically a
rehearsal before the next day’s official
opening-night performance, I registered
only one mildly tardy entrance in
a show with a lot of entrances. And
happily, Hesselman has a real way with
a one-liner. I may have been one of only
a few to roar at Beatrice’s attempted
compliment to Peter (“Speaking
of gay sons, the table looks really
nice”), but the endearing Brucken
delivers, sensationally, at least a dozen
additional laugh-out-loud rejoinders,
and Hesselman gives each of his other
characters a goodly share of witty, biting
jabs. Hell, there’s even a hilarious lawyer
joke that I’d never heard before, and that
I’m now planning to tell at every given
opportunity.
But as LL&TL is a work receiving
the benefit of audience response for
the first time, it’s not surprising that
the results feel somewhat unfinished,
despite the beautifully lived-in quality
of Susan D. Holgersson’s scenic design.
(Set in Wisconsin, this detailed, lodge-style
domicile boasts a stuffed deer head center-
stage, along with a mounted fish that looks
ready to sing “Don’t Worry, Be Happy”
if you clap at it.) I wish, for instance, that
more had resulted from Beatrice’s mistaken
belief that her son was planning to kill
her, and that there was more consistency
regarding Beatrice’s “need” for a walker.
(She frequently toddles around the house
without it, but if Brucken’s doing so isn’t
merely a directorial oversight, it should be
made clear that Beatrice doesn’t really need
the walker, and only uses it to appease Peter,
or for comic sympathy, or for something.)
While Ythier does get in a riotous bit
about Rachel’s marital status in Singapore,
her character has been designed as too
mean-spirited to ever be really enjoyable.
And Tristan Layne Tapscott, unfortunately,
appears stuck with a currently impossible
role as Peter’s devoted best friend who’s also
M
aybe you’ll need to have seen
a lot of stage farces, or feel like
you’ve seen every stage farce, to
appreciate what writer/director Jim Hes-
sleman is doing in the Circa ’21 Dinner
Playhouse’s world-premiere presentation
Love, Lies, & the Lottery. Because this isn’t
just, as its title implies, a traditional, door-
slamming slapstick, despite the numerous
doors to be slammed. (Or rather, here,
gently closed.) This energetic, sometimes
hilarious, incredibly busy production is
more accurately a comedic greatest-hits
package, and one boasting a larger num-
ber of recognizable genre conceits than
you would’ve thought squeezable into two
hours of stage time. You could teach a
semester on Intro to Modern Farce using
Hesselman’s play as your textbook and still
not cover everything in time for the final.
In general outline, LL&TL concerns the
resulting complications after exterminator
Peter Oostendorp (the manic yet
recognizably human Marc Ciemiewicz)
finds himself in possession of a year-old
but still-valid lottery ticket worth $510
million, with the prize needing to be
claimed before the ticket’s impending
expiration date, and before shrewish
ex-wife-to-be Rachel (Tamarin K. Ythier)
learns of Peter’s newfound wealth. That’s
what the show is “about.” But what it seems
to actually be about are the conventions
of theatrical comedy all but guaranteed to
make audiences – especially audiences of
a certain age – deliriously happy. So take a
deep breath as we dive into what you can
expect.
Farcical adultery. Slapstick beatings.
Goofy accents. (Peter’s mom Beatrice,
played by Janet Ellen Brucken, speaks
in a comically thick Norwegian dialect
with occasional Italian, Irish, and Jewish
cadences.) Misunderstandings based on
hearing loss. Misunderstandings based on
eavesdropped phone calls. Men in drag –
three of ’em. (Out of a cast featuring four
men.) Jokes about failing elderly bodies.
Jokes about active elderly libidos. A pretty
girl (the sweetly dizzy Erin Clark) showing
up in a nightie. The family patriarch
showing up in an urn. Characters hiding in
closets and behind couches. Accidentally
(Clockwise from top left) Tamarin K. Ythier,
James Fairchild, Erin Clark, Tristan Layne
Tapscott, Brad Hauskins, Janet Ellen Brucken,
and Mark Ciemiewicz
Love, Lies, & the Lottery, at the Circa ’21 Dinner Playhouse through September 6
Dough, a Deer, a Female Seer ...
by Mike Schulz
mike@rcreader.com
Continued On Page 17
THEATRE
River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 21 No. 862 • August 7 - 20, 2014 8 Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com
T
he District
Theatre’s
Monty
Python’s Spamalot
seems like an ama-
teur talent show,
particularly due to
the limitations of
the company’s new
performance space
in Rock Island’s
former Grape Life
venue. (The new
locale is so small, it redefines “intimate theatre”
in the Quad Cities.) Yet while the limited move-
ment due to the lack of stage space creates an
amateurish feel, I’m happy to say that much
of the rest of Friday’s production emphasized
talent. If it was an intentional decision to pres-
ent the material as a novice attempt to recreate
Monty Python’s (arguably) best-loved film,
Monty Python & the Holy Grail, it was a smart
one on director Tristan Tapscott’s part. Space
doesn’t allow for a big production, so Tapscott
embraces the limitations of the new stage area,
and it works.
Impressively dressed in Arthur-ian and
French costumes by designers Deborah Shippy,
Cheri Lyman, Lexi Holtzer, and Cathy Marsoun,
the actors perform within spitting distance of
the back-row (among two rows) of seats. This
adds an air of inclusion to the proceedings,
as if we’re all in on the fun of gathering to
recreate favorite Monty Python bits. (For those
unfamiliar with Python humor, Eric Idle’s book,
lyrics, and music – co-composed by John De
Prez – include plenty of satiric nods to musical
theatre, such as the Andrew Lloyd Webber
power-ballad parody “Whatever Happened to
My Part?”, and a delightfully period-appropriate
spoof on Stephen Sondheim’s “Another Hundred
People.”)
Bob Manasco is our King Arthur, who
gathers a band of knights, attempts to declare
his legitimacy as leader of the land, and sets
off to find the Holy Grail. Manasco takes a
welcome, sincere approach to the role, acting
as a sort of “straight man” to many of the
others’ “funny man” styles. The latter includes
Doug Kutzli as Arthur’s constant and coconut-
clapping companion Patsy. Kutzli walks a
fine line between silliness and avoidance of
caricature, with just a touch of the “nudge
nudge, wink wink” delivery prevalent in
Tapscott’s presentation. (Most of the audience
probably already knows most of the jokes, so
the show’s “Hey, remember how funny this bit
is?” sensibility seems fitting.)
New to this Holy Grail re-telling, though,
is the Lady of the Lake, portrayed as a
commanding diva by the highly capable Sara
Wegener. In her first entrance, as she rises
from behind Tapscott’s wall of castle-shaped
cutouts, Wegener demands attention with
her domineering presence and high sense of
THEATRE
By Thom White
thomasjasonwhite@gmail.com
Knight Lite
Monty Python’s Spamalot, at the District Theatre through August 17
self-worth. She
then continues
to own the
stage whenever
present, not only
through her
countenance, but
also by beautifully
belting out some
of the musical’s
best numbers,
including the
hilariously self-
referential “The Song That Goes Like This” and
the play’s anthem “Find Your Grail.”
The rest of Spamalot’s cast takes on multiple
roles, with Abbey Donohoe carving out a
comedic notch for herself with her frail yet
effervescent Not Dead Fred, the person who
is, well, not yet dead even though he’s being
offered to a gatherer of corpses. She also
delights with her Minstrel’s delivery of “Brave
Sir Robin,” a song filled with horrendous
experiences that frighten Chris Tracy’s Sir
Robin, whom the actor plays as a constantly
giggle-worthy, unabashedly effeminate dandy,
but with a sincerity that brought a smile to my
face whenever he pranced across the stage or
shook the hair out of his face.
Joining Donohoe in portraying characters
of the opposite sex, Wendy Czekalski skillfully
takes on Sir Dennis Galahad, Prince Herbert’s
Father, and the Black Knight, while Mike
Kelly, as Sir Dennis’ mother, deserves laughs
simply for his apparent amusement at wearing
a dress and speaking in a high-pitched voice.
Yet if anyone excels at emulating the original
Monty Python crew, it’s Lancelot portrayer Matt
Holmes. He also delivers a falsetto-ed Knight
of Ni and a perfectly accented French Taunter
who “farts in [Arthur’s] general direction” with
a glee that suggests he’s a fan of the material and
overjoyed to play such iconic characters.
There are some issues with the space beyond
its diminutive size that will require time to
figure out how best to handle. Tapscott’s
lighting design barely registers; I could
see intended lighting shifts, but the overall
illumination levels barely changed. And the
live band, aptly led by musical director Randin
Letendre and hidden well off-stage, might
as well be pre-recorded given the quality of
sound emanating from the speakers. But
otherwise, the District Theatre’s Spamalot is
loads of fun, and left me hoping that, should the
organization find a better performance space,
Tapscott produces the musical again so the set
design, choreography, and staging can better
match this production’s exceptional talent.
Monty Python’s Spamalot runs at the District
Theatre (1623 Second Avenue, Rock Island)
through August 17, and more information and
tickets are available by calling (309)235-1654 or
visiting DistrictTheatre.com.
Doug Kutzli, Chris Tracy, Matt Holmes, Wendy Czekalski,
Mike Kelly, and Bob Manasco
River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 21 No. 862 • August 7 - 20, 2014 9 Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com
River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 21 No. 862 • August 7 - 20, 2014 10 Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com
A
fter
recently
updating
the list of movies
I’ve seen this
year, I scanned
my current 10
favorites and
thought, “For
July, a pretty
great lineup.”
Of course, that’s
only because
five of its titles
are 2014 films I
caught on home
video and through streaming services.
If not for the movies below, Hercules
would’ve made the cut, making the lineup
somewhat less great.
Therefore, a huge thumbs-up to Life
Itself, director Steve James’ fascinating,
wildly entertaining, extraordinarily
moving
documentary on
the late Roger
Ebert. James, who
also helmed the
masterful high-
school-basketball
doc Hoop Dreams
(one of Ebert’s all-
time favorites), gives
fans of the legendary
Chicago Sun-Times movie reviewer all the
factoids and found footage we could’ve
asked for: Ebert’s editorial battles as a
journalistic tyro; tales of booze-fueled ego
and his lightning-quick decision to stay
sober; Cannes Film Festival anecdotes;
legitimately vicious squabbles, both
on-air and off-, with eternal friend/foe
Gene Siskel. (Life Itself’s funniest segment
shows the TV reviewers so visibly irritated
during a promo taping that you half-
expect them to use their famous thumbs
to gouge each other’s eyes out.) There
are also excellent new interviews with
Ebert’s professional colleagues, admirers,
and old drinking buddies, plus several
touching recollections by the critic’s widow
Chaz. Yet what makes the film essential,
if frequently painful, viewing are its
scenes of later-years Ebert – interspersed
throughout the entire film – after thyroid
cancer forced the removal of his lower
jaw. Ebert’s obvious physical struggle is
heart-wrenching, but the alertness and
passion in his eyes are unmistakable; he
continually looks at the camera, at us, with
an expression of profound gratitude and
deep love that suggests that this was where
by Mike Schulz
mike@rcreader.com
Independents Day
Five Home-Viewing Options Worth Checking Out
his life lived in darkened movie houses
was leading all along, and he’s at peace
with that. At last, Ebert became the star
of his very own movie, and not even he
could have hoped for a more tender, spiky,
satisfying cinematic obituary.
Another wonderful celebrity
documentary is director Chiemi
Karasawa’s Elaine
Stritch: Shoot
Me, and as with
Ebert, you could
say that Stritch –
bless her irascible
heart – saved the
best for last. (An
opinion that the
iconic performer,
who made no
bones about detesting the aging process,
would likely counter with “Bullshit.”)
A less-thorough work than Life Itself,
possibly because so many of Stritch’s best
stories were already served up in her
one-woman show Elaine Stritch at Liberty,
Karawasa’s movie is still a fabulous look
at its subject’s astonishing career, and an
even better look at the subject herself in
her mid-80s, a tireless, capital-T Trouper
and unapologetic truth-teller for whom
the phrase “piss and vinegar” may have
been invented. As with Life Itself, however,
this movie’s finest moments are oftentimes
its most uncomfortable to watch. Those of
us who hoped Stritch might actually beat
the odds and never die (which she did on
July 17) can’t help but be taken aback by
Shoot Me’s scenes of its star looking pale
and fragile in bed, and beating herself
up for her failing health and forgetting
Sondheim lyrics she’s known for decades;
Stritch is livid about this whole getting-old
thing. Yet it’s that sort of piss and vinegar
that kept Elaine Stritch so dynamically,
inspiringly unsentimental, a quality she
MOVIES
Continued On Page 17
Life Itself
Elaine Stritch: Shoot Me
River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 21 No. 862 • August 7 - 20, 2014 11 Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com
one type of movie I absolutely do not want
to be late for, it’s a complex tale of global
espionage based on a John le Carré novel.
But this Hamburg-set tale of warring
spy agencies and a Russian expatriate
(the marvelous Grigoriy Dobrygin) who
may be a terrorist is so lucidly presented,
intelligently crafted, and emotionally
gripping that I get right on board, and
happily stay there for the next two hours.
There’s almost no violence in the film,
but the shiver-inducing threat of it seeps
into every understated exchange and
cagey portrayal (Willem Dafoe and Robin
Wright are especially strong); Corbijn
even laces the mere signing of papers with
exquisite dread. The movie is so good
that I don’t even spend any undue time
mourning, yet again, the shattering loss
of lead Philip Seymour Hoffman, who
radiates so much professional integrity,
subdued intensity, and actorly satisfaction
in his last major screen role that it’s
almost as if he never left us. As long as
Hoffman’s many, many exceptional screen
performances remain in existence, I guess,
in a way, he won’t have.
9:15-ish: Now home, and realizing that
by Saturday, I’ll have reviewed 27 movies
in 31 days. What are those things other
people have? “Hobbies”? I should really get
me one of those.
For reviews of Lucy, Hercules, And So It
Goes, Begin Again, the Putnam Museum’s
Pandas: The Journey Home, and other
current releases, visit RiverCitiesReader.com.
Follow Mike on Twitter at Twitter.com/
MikeSchulzNow.
Movie Reviews
by Mike Schulz • mike@rcreader.com
F
riday, August 1, 9:50 a.m.-ish: Movies
based on Marvel comics are routinely,
sometimes annoyingly formula-driven.
But 10 minutes into Guardians of the Galaxy,
I really hope every subsequent Marvel release
steals from this one, because all the studio’s
films – hell, all films period – should open
with Chris Pratt doing a Singin’ in the Rain
soft-shoe to Redbone’s “Come & Get Your
Love.”
Unfortunately, director James Gunn’s
sci-fi adventure about an uncouth team of
miscreants trying to locate and dispose of an
all-powerful metallic orb proves too slavish
to previous formulas. We get meaninglessly
protracted exposition, generically manic
action, spectacularly uninteresting villains,
et cetera, and I’m frequently bored by both
the story and its genre particulars. (A hero’s
guilt-ridden past? A heart-tugging death? A
climactic girl-on-girl battle? Check, check,
and check.) Happily, though, the bountiful
jokes and inspired cast make the experience
feel relatively fresh. There are smart, hilarious
nods to everything from Jackson Pollock
to the Jackson 5, and Pratt, Zoe Saldana,
WWE star Dave Bautista (excellent as the
hopelessly literal Trax), and Bradley Cooper,
voicing the comically abrasive raccoon
Rocket, make a supremely winning team of
losers. Best of all is Vin Diesel vocalizing the
ambulatory tree Groot, who earns empathy
and big laughs with a vocabulary confined
to three words. (Groot also gets a kick-ass
scene reminiscent of Hulk’s lightning-quick
smack-down of Loki in The Avengers.) Diesel
proves as unexpectedly lovely and funny here
as he was as The Iron Giant. Any chance that
Hollywood, from now on, might pay the man
to only perform off-screen?
12:30
p.m.-ish: I’m
surprised to
see that the
James Brown
bio-pic Get
on Up begins
in 1988,
because so did
Guardians of
the Galaxy.
I’m eventually
less surprised, because as director Tate Taylor’s
narrative quickly lands in 1968, then 1939,
then 1964, then 1954, then 1972, the odds
were pretty good. With its chronological
leapfrogging barely making sense, and
the film only scratching the surface of the
Godfather of Soul’s career highs and well-
documented lows, Taylor’s follow-up to The
Help isn’t very satisfying. Yet with Chadwick
Boseman channeling the icon’s speaking
voice and bearing, and mimicking Brown’s
loosey-goosey dance moves (plus lip-synching
to his vocals) with expert precision, it’s a
mediocre work boasting a truly thrilling Star
Performance. Although the movie proves
underwhelming, I love its exciting and alive
concert re-enactments, and while Nelsan
Ellis’ Bobby Byrd and Brandon Smith’s Little
Richard are wonderful, Get on Up’s finest
non-musical sequence is a dressing-room
heart-breaker that pits Brown against his
wayward mother, played by a ravaged Viola
Davis. You know Davis’ signature acting effect
in which she cries from her eyes and her nose
simultaneously? Boseman can do it, too! Like
mother, like son!
5-ish: After a welcome two-hour break
in Quadruple-Feature Day, I enter director/
co-writer/
star Zach
Braff ’s Wish
I Was Here, a
comedic tear-
jerker funded,
in large part,
through a
Kickstarter
campaign.
Nearly 105
minutes later,
I consider starting one of my own to fund
Braff ’s cinematic banishment. It really is the
most infuriating movie, because while there
are touching, truthful moments involving
Kate Hudson as Braff ’s put-upon spouse,
Mandy Patinkin as his dying father, and Joey
King as his religiously devout daughter, nearly
everything involving Braff ’s insufferably
whiny, needy, and talentless wannabe-actor
character feels maddeningly forced and false.
(Josh Gad’s scenes as Braff ’s ne’er-do-well
brother, a slacker genius who attends Comic-
Con to get laid, are similarly embarrassing.)
Most of those around me sniffle on cue and
chortle at the aggressive punchlines that make
everyone on-screen – even Looper prodigy
Pierce Gagnon – sound like interchangeable
wiseacres from an unpublished Neil Simon
script. I’m glad they’re having fun. As for me,
I’m just hypnotized by the sight of Braff, for
no reason beyond the visual gag, routinely
lugging around an enormous swear jar filled
with cash. Given the number of expletives
I find myself muttering under my breath, I
think I could’ve filled it all by myself.
6:50-ish: Wish I Was Here makes me a
couple minutes late for writer/director Anton
Corbijn’s A Most Wanted Man, and if there’s
One for the Funny, Two for the Shows, Three to Get Red-Eyed,
and Four – Just Go
Guardians of the Galaxy
by Mike Schulz • mike@rcreader.com by Mike Schulz • mike@rcreader.com
River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 21 No. 862 • August 7 - 20, 2014 12 Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com
Music
The Devil Makes Three
The Redstone Room
Wednesday, August 13, 8 p.m.
T
he Devil Makes Three performs
as Davenport’s Redstone Room on
August 13, and if you’re unfamiliar with
the band, AllMusic.com writes, “The
trio’s sound combines bluegrass, primitive
country music, folk, rockabilly, Piedmont
blues, and ragtime, played with a blazing
post-punk attack.” The Web site also
states that the group’s musicians “inhabit
a hardscrabble working-class world full of
problem drinkers, tellers
of tall tales, pirates, and
troublemakers.” That’s odd.
I haven’t seen them around
the Reader offices ... .
Composed of guitarist
Pete Bernhard, guitarist
and banjo player Cooper McBean, and
upright bassist Lucia Turino, all of them
Vermont natives and friends from high
school, The Devil Makes Three originated
in 2001, after its trio left the East Coast
and landed in Santa Cruz, California.
Following a series of club and festival
performances, they independently
released a self-titled album in 2002,
followed by another recording in 2003,
and another in 2006.
By 2007, though, the growing
popularity of the acoustic band – whose
live shows AllMusic.com describes as
“marked by impressive energy, mordant
humor, and timeless lyrics” – led to the
re-release of their The Devil Makes Three
CD hitting number seven on Billboard’s
bluegrass charts. And that’s actually the
lowest Billboard ranking the group has
reached since: Stomp & Smash hit number
four, I’m a Stranger Here landed at
number two, and Do Wrong Right sailed
all the way to the bluegrass chart’s top.
Based on their recent tourmates and
accolades, the top is also where they just
might stay. Having opened for the likes of
Willie Nelson and Emmylou Harris, The
Devil Makes Three’s unique genre blend
What’s Happenin’
Event
Ya Maka My Weekend
The District of Rock Island
Friday, August 8, and Saturday, August 9
Y
a Maka My Weekend, the District of Rock
Island’s annual outdoor celebration of
Caribbean culture, will take place on August
8 and 9, and if you’ve been to even one of
the previous 22 Ya Makas over the years, you
already know that there are plenty of reasons
to attend.
There is, of course, the music, with the
infectious sounds of Jamaican-dance-hall
reggae filling the air. Among the performers
scheduled for this year’s Ya Maka are the
exuberant and gifted Taj Weekes & Adowa,
Akasha, Raw Dawg, Universal Expression,
Remnance, Yard Squad, Ricky Rych, Zion, Turbulence,
sowFLo, and Indika. (Weather reports have it that
the District will also be hit by DeHurricane, but don’t
Theatre
Blame It on the Movies
Circa ’21 Dinner Playhouse
Thursday, August 7, through
Thursday, August 28
E
very two years, the Circa ’21 Dinner
Playhouse’s performing wait staff
of Bootleggers gets to stage their own
full-length musical production, and as
a major fan of the Booties and a major
fan of cinema, I was overjoyed to learn
that this year’s presentation was a 1989
off-Broadway revue titled Blame It on the
Movies. I was even more stoked when I
checked out the song list for this August
7 debut, and saw that it features, among
dozens of additional tunes, Act II’s
“Theme from Psycho.” Dunno about you,
but I am dying to hear Brad Hauskins’
and Marc Ciemiewicz’s spirited duet on
the lyrics “Eee! Eee! Eee! Eee! Eee!”
I kid. But I don’t kid about Bernard
Herrmann’s famed musical shriek
appearing in Blame It on the Movies,
which also boasts the themes from Jaws,
Rocky, and The Pink Panther. And I really
don’t kid about how much I’m looking
forward to watching Jennifer Diab,
Sarah Hayes, Antoinette Holman, Chris
Galván, Morgan Griffin, Andrea Moore,
Nicholas Munson, Sara Nicks, Sunshine
Ramsey, and Kirsten Sindelar – plus my
aforementioned pals Brad and Marc –
owning the Circa ’21 stage for the full
two hours of the Bootleggers’ latest
showcase.
With beloved
numbers from
Casablanca, Meet
Me in St. Louis,
The Way We Were,
Footloose, and even
Blazing Saddles in
the mix, there’s sure to be something for
everything in Blame It on the Movies. But
as a longtime movie reviewer and even
longer-time movie fan, I’m embarrassed
to admit how many songs in the show –
hell, how many movies in the show – I’d
never heard of before. How ’bout you?
Try matching some of these unfamiliar
tunes with the films they hailed from.
1) “I’ll Buy that Dream”
2) “Aurora”
3) “You’ll Never Know”
4) “In Love in Vain”
5) “Shoo-Shoo Baby”
6) “I Get the Neck of the Chicken”
A) Hold That Ghost
B) Follow the Boys
C) Sing Your Way Home
D) Seven Days Leave
E) Centennial Summer
F) Hello, ’Frisco
Blame It on the Movies runs each
Thursday evening of the month (August
7, 14, 21, and 28), and more information
and tickets are available by calling
(309)786-7733 extension 2 or visiting
Circa21.com.
A n s w e r s : 1 – C , 2 – A , 3 – F , 4 – E , 5 – B , 6 – D . A n d b a s e d o n i t s s o n g t i t l e a l o n e , t h a t
l a s t m o v i e h a s j u s t s h o t t o t h e t o p o f m y N e t f l i x q u e u e .
River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 21 No. 862 • August 7 - 20, 2014 13 Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com
By 2007, though, the growing
popularity of the acoustic band – whose
live shows AllMusic.com describes as
“marked by impressive energy, mordant
humor, and timeless lyrics” – led to the
re-release of their The Devil Makes Three
CD hitting number seven on Billboard’s
bluegrass charts. And that’s actually the
lowest Billboard ranking the group has
reached since: Stomp & Smash hit number
four, I’m a Stranger Here landed at
number two, and Do Wrong Right sailed
all the way to the bluegrass chart’s top.
Based on their recent tourmates and
accolades, the top is also where they just
might stay. Having opened for the likes of
Willie Nelson and Emmylou Harris, The
Devil Makes Three’s unique genre blend
has earned the band spots at Lollapalooza
and Bonnaroo, and music critics continue
to be wowed, with the Washington Post
raving about the trio’s “string-busting
rhythms charging with a garage beat
and a fiddle running furious enough
for a most pit.” So plan on a helluva
show at the Redstone Room, where in
addition to recent tunes, you’ll likely hear
compositions from early Devil Makes
Three albums such as 2003’s Longjohns,
Boots, & a Belt – which, ironically, is
the staff uniform for Reader employees.
Maybe they have been here.
For more information on, and
tickets to, The Devil Makes Three’s area
concert, call (563)326-1333 or visiting
RiverMusicExperience.org.
FESTIVALS
Thursday, August 7, through
Saturday, August 9 – 2014 Tug
Fest. Annual event featuring a tug-
of-war over the Mississippi River
between LeClaire, Iowa, and Port
Byron, Illinois, with carnivals, live
music, vendors, and more. LeClaire
and Port Byron levees. August 9
tug-of-war beginning at 12:30 p.m.
For information, visit TugFest.com
(LeClaire) and TugFest.org (Port
Byron).
Friday, August 15, and
Saturday, August 16 – River
Roots Live. Annual celebration
of ribs and roots music, with
performances by Los Lonely Boys,
Robert Randolph & the Family Band,
North Mississippi Allstars, ZZ Ward,
Ben Kweller, Cracker, The Jayhawks,
Foxy Shazam, and more. LeClaire
Park (River Drive and Ripley Street,
Davenport). 11 a.m. gates. Free
admission before 5 p.m., $10 after.
For information, visit RiverRootsLive.
com.
MUSIC
Thursday, August 7 – Dailey
& Vincent. Grammy-nominated
bluegrass duo in concert. Englert
Theatre (221 East Washington
What Else
Is Happenin’
What’s Happenin’
by Mike Schulz
mike@rcreader.com
Continued On Page 14
sowFLo, and Indika. (Weather reports have it that
the District will also be hit by DeHurricane, but don’t
worry about being flooded out; you can always
climb aboard the Ark Band.)
Then, of course, there’s the Ya Maka My
Weekend activities and arts-and-crafts
vendors. Little kids, and big kids, can have a
ball making castles and digging for treasure in
the downtown “Ya Maka Beach,” and you can
bring a bit of Jamaica home with you through
the jewelry, clothing, wood carvings, incense
and oils, and other Caribbean wares on sale at
numerous open-air booths.
Yet if you’re like me, look to the left to
see the one reason above all to spend your
weekend Ya Maka-ing ... .
If you can still read this from under your
pool of saliva, Ya Maka My Weekend’s gates
open at 5 p.m. on Friday and 3 p.m. on
Saturday, admission is $9 for one day or $14
for two days (with ages 12 and under free),
and more information is available by calling
(309)788-6311 or visiting YaMakaMyWeekend.com.
Theatre
Oklahoma!
Prospect Park Auditorium
Friday, August 8, through Sunday,
August 17
(To be sung to the tune of “Oh,
What a Beautiful Mornin’.”)
Music Guild is to stage Oklahoma!
August eight is the date – Oklahoma!
This musical show is a classic, you know,
An’ the Prospect Park venue is where you must go!
Oh, what a beautiful cast list!
Oh, what a beautiful play!
My, director Harold Truitt
Must be in Heaven today!
David Miller’s performing as Curly
With Jen Sondgeroth’s Laurey – his girly!
John Dieter is Jud, Scott Peake’s Ali sells crud,
An’ then Jacob Ruchotzke’s Will Parker – that stud!
Rodgers and Hammerstein wrote it
An’ won a Pulitzer Prize!
Deb Holmes is doing the costumes –
Plan on a feast for the eyes!
Can’t wait to see Oklahoma!
Soaking in Prospect Park air!
An’ “What a Beautiful Mornin’”
Will sound much better out there!
Oklahoma! will be staged on Thursdays through Sundays
from August 8 through 17, and more information and
tickets are available by calling (309)762-6610 or visiting
QCMusicGuild.com.
River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 21 No. 862 • August 7 - 20, 2014 14 Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com
Street, Iowa City). 8 p.m. $30. For
tickets and information, call (319)688-
2653 or visit Englert.org.
Saturday, August 9 – An Intimate
Evening with the Stylistics. Concert
with the Philadelphia-based pop
stars, hosted by Good Times star
Jimmie Walker. Quad-Cities Waterfront
Convention Center (2021 State
Street, Bettendorf ). 8 p.m. $35-55. For
information, call (800)724-5825 or visit
Bettendorf.IsleOfCapriCasinos.com.
Sunday, August 10, through
Wednesday, August 13 – 2014 Black
Hawk Chamber Music Festival.
Annual event featuring the concerts
Four Centuries Flute & Keyboard (August
10 at 3 p.m.), Little Concert for Louis XIV
(August 12 at 7 p.m.), and Beethoven’s
Flute, Viola, & Guitar (August 13 at 7
p.m.). Trinity Cathedral (121 West 12th
Street, Davenport). $15-20 suggested
donation. For tickets and information,
call (563)323-9989 or visit BHCMF.org.
Sunday, August 10 – Milk Carton
Kids. Grammy-nominated folk duo
in concert. Englert Theatre (221
East Washington Street, Iowa City).
7:30 p.m. $20-23. For tickets and
information, call (319)688-2653 or visit
Englert.org.
Tuesday, August 12 – The
Baseball Project. Concert with the
super-group composed of Linda
Pitmon, Steve Wynn, Peter Buck, Scott
McCaughey, and Mike Mills, with an
opening set by Hugh Bob & the Hustle.
Codfish Hollow Barn (3437 288th
Avenue, Maquoketa). 8 p.m. $15-20.
For tickets and information, visit
CodfishHollowBarnstormers.com. For a
2011 interview with McCaughey, visit
RCReader.com/y/baseballproject.
Saturday, August 16 – The Holmes
Brothers. Concert with the Blues
Music Award-winning performers.
The Muddy Waters (1708 State
Street, Bettendorf ). 8 p.m. $15. For
information, call (563)355-0655 or visit
TheMuddyWaters.com. For a 2006
interview with Sherman Holmes, visit
RCReader.com/y/holmes.
Wednesday, August 20 – The
Handsome Family. Folk-rock concert
with married singers/songwriters
Brett and Rennie Sparks. Englert
Theatre (221 East Washington Street,
Iowa City). 8 p.m. $20. For tickets and
information, call (319)688-2653 or visit
Englert.org.
THEATRE
Friday, August 8, through Sunday,
August 17 – Alice in Wonderland.
Debuting adaptation of the Lewis
Carroll fable, created by Kristin Katsu
and members of the theatre’s intern
company. Clinton Area Showboat
Theatre (311 Riverview Drive, Clinton).
Thursdays through Saturdays 7:30
p.m., Sunday and Wednesday
3 p.m. $16-23. For tickets and
information, call (563)242-6760 or visit
ClintonShowboat.org.
Saturday, August 9, and Sunday,
August 10 – Annie Jr. One-act version
of the Tony-winning Broadway musical.
Ohnward Fine Arts Center (1215 East
Platt Street, Maquoketa). Saturday 7
p.m., Sunday 2 p.m. $5-10. For tickets
and information, call (563)652-9815 or
visit OhnwardFineArtsCenter.com.
Thursday, August 14, through
Sunday, August 24 – Leading Ladies.
Farcical comedy by Ken Ludwig,
directed by Tom Vaccaro. Richmond
Hill Barn Theatre (600 Robinson
Drive, Geneseo). Thursdays through
Saturdays 7:30 p.m., Sundays 3 p.m.
$10. For tickets and information, call
(309)944-2244 or visit RHPlayers.com.
Thursday, August 14, through
Sunday, August 24 – Shout! Musical
revue of girl-group hits from the 1960s,
directed by Courtney Crouse. Timber
Lake Playhouse (8215 Black Oak
Road, Mt. Carroll). Tuesdays through
Saturdays 7:30 p.m., Sundays and
Wednesdays 2 p.m. $17-23. For tickets
and information, call (815)244-2035 or
visit TimberLakePlayhouse.org.
Thursday, August 14, through
Sunday, August 31 – Tuna Does Vegas.
Two-man, multi-character comedy
by Jaston Williams, Joe Sears, and Ed
Howard. Old Creamery Studio Theatre
(3023 220th Trail, Amana). Fridays and
Saturdays 7:30 p.m., Thursdays and
Sundays 2 p.m. $18.50-28. For tickets
and information, call (319)622-6262 or
visit OldCreamery.com.
Friday, August 15, through
Saturday, August 30 – ‘Art.’ Yasmina
Reza’s Tony Award-winning comedy,
directed by Tyson Danner. QC Theatre
Workshop (1730 Wilkes Avenue,
Davenport). Fridays and Saturdays
7:30 p.m., Sundays 3 p.m. “Pay what it’s
worth” ticket pricing. For tickets and
information, call (563)650-2396 or visit
QCTheatreWorkshop.org.
Friday, August 15, through
Sunday, August 17 – Chicago. Tony-
winning Broadway musical in the
debut presentation by Old Capitol
Opera. Englert Theatre (221 East
Washington Street, Iowa City). Friday
and Saturday 7:30 p.m., Sunday 2 p.m.
$15-35. For tickets and information, call
(319)688-2653 or visit Englert.org.
VISUAL ARTS
Saturday, August 16, through
Sunday, October 26 – Living Proof
Exhibit: Cancer Survivor Art. Exhibit
celebrating the creative spirit of cancer
survivors, featuring 50 works by artists
residing within a 150-mile radius of
the Quad Cities. Figge Art Museum
(225 West Second Street, Davenport).
Tuesdays through Saturdays 10 a.m.-5
p.m., Thursdays 10 a.m.-9 p.m., Sundays
noon-5 p.m. Free with $4-7 mu-
seum admission. For information, call
(563)326-7804 or visit FiggeArt.org.
EVENTS
Saturday, August 9, and Sunday,
August 10 – 2014 Quad City Air
Show. The 28th-annual outdoor
event featuring aerial demonstrations,
displays, vendors, children’s activities,
and more. Davenport Municipal
Airport (9010 North Harrison Street,
Davenport). 8 a.m.-5 p.m. $5-20,
$25 weekend pass. For tickets and
information, call (563)322-7469 or visit
QuadCityAirShow.com.
Saturday, August 9 – 2014 Xstream
Cleanup. The Quad Cities’ annual
volunteer-based cleanup of area
waterways, hosted by River Action. 8
a.m. Free. For information, call (563)468-
4218 or visit XstreamCleanup.org.
Saturday, August 16 – 2014
Floatzilla. River Action’s fifth-annual
paddle-sport festival, featuring kayak
and canoe demonstrations, live music,
food, vendors, and more. Sunset Park
(18th Avenue and Sunset Road, Rock
Island). 8 a.m.-4 p.m.; 2 p.m. world-
record attempt ($15-20 registration
for participants). For information, call
(563)322-2969 or visit Floatzilla.org.
Saturday, August 16 – Village
of East Davenport Wine Walk.
Annual fundraiser for Gilda’s Club
Quad Cities in which participating
businesses will offer one-ounce
samples of their featured wines, with
more than 25 available. Village of East
Davenport. 3-6 p.m. $10 donation
to Gilda’s Club. For information, visit
VillageOfEastDavenport.com.
Continued From Page 13
What Else Is Happenin’
River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 21 No. 862 • August 7 - 20, 2014 15 Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com
UIU - QUAD CITIES CENTER
1401 Kimberly Road, Bettendorf, IA 52722
563-359-7111 • uiu.edu/quadcities
UPPER IOWA UNIVERSITY – QUAD CITIES CENTER
Your Degree.
Your Way.
• Courses that ft your busy
lifestyle – classroom,
online and self-paced
• Regionally accredited,
not-for-proft university
• Year-round schedule
with 8-week terms
• Easy transfer of up
to 90 college credits
What happens the next time an
alderman faces a DUI or weapons
charge? This is news in the sense of one’s
suitability for public office, but ... .
Or what happens if there’s an
investigation into some misuse of city
funds or property? Or allegations of
police-department mistreatment of
citizens? How would the municipal news
agency deal with lawsuits against the City
of Davenport?
Malin told Ickes that there are things
the site won’t cover – such as city-council
campaigns.“I think we’ll lose credibility ...
if this is a political undertaking,” he said.
“This isn’t a political arm we’re creating.
Campaigns are theatre. Elections are
news.”
Campaigns are indeed theatre:
opinions and positions and posturing
and accusations, all of which can inflame.
Election returns, on the other hand, are
inoffensive, safe facts.
But the news site, to be bold and
innovative, cannot be safe, and the city
administrator is – beyond the superficial
distinction he’s drawing – misguided on
several fronts. Campaigns are news, and
and I want to see how long it takes to
blow up or reveal its irrelevance.
Dealing with the Mess
I can certainly see situations when
the City of Davenport, with its internal
professional expertise, could tell its
stories better than media outlets
with limited resources and generalist
reporters. Explanations of byzantine
processes that illuminate how they
produce desired results. Long-term
analyses of public-safety, budget,
and economic-development trends.
Layperson-friendly discussions of
revenues, taxation, expenditures, and
staffing. Retrospective studies of the
economic impacts of major projects such
as River Renaissance. Evaluations of the
concrete returns on investment of city
incentives such as TIF. Comparisons of
different municipal policies in the Quad
Cities area, and how those correlate
with outcomes. Explorations of how
innovations from other governments
might work in Davenport.
Thoughtful, thorough public-service
pieces such as these would inform the
public and the city council and help guide
them toward progressive policy.
Yet I present these well-intentioned
(if largely dry) ideas in part because
they would avoid controversy. I can’t see
Davenport’s news service doing much of
anything else without getting in trouble
with the people holding the purse strings.
This new operation will be under the
city administrator’s purview, and he
answers to the city council, which decides
on a budget. If the news operation doesn’t
tread lightly, it endangers its long-term
funding. To put it bluntly, reporters will
know that their city income depends on
not pissing off city-council members.
And while aldermen were receptive to
the idea of the news site in approving the
budget, they – and future city councils –
might be far cooler to the actual practice
of it.
That’s not a recipe for good journalism;
it’s a recipe for pandering to and not
angering the bosses – likely an impossible
task given the number of them.
The St. Ambrose stadium? The Dock?
Gluba’s immigration initiative? What
angles could be taken on these major
news stories that would both enlighten
and not offend the city council? The first
two are policy questions that hinge on
what people will believe might happen
– for better or worse. The last one is an
emotional issue of deeply held beliefs.
Continued From Page 3
“Communications Strategy,” there’s
a promise that the city will “provide
updates as events happen; good and bad;
controversies.”
Last week, I asked Davenport
Communications Director Jennifer Nahra
if Ickes’ article still “remains true to the
spirit of what you’re trying to do.” She
wrote: “At this time, it really is impossible
for us to say specifically what elements
the new Web site will contain ... . Our
intent with the new portal is to improve
internal and external communications by
providing citizens with an opportunity
to receive, on one platform, more
Davenport-specific information while
engaging in the conversation.”
That cagey reply suggests that
Davenport’s staff might be struggling with
the practical challenges of news presented
by city government.
I also allow that perhaps our definition
of “news” is different – what journalism
entails, and our beliefs about whether
insightful, relevant, and incisive coverage
requires or benefits from the adversarial
relationship between independent
news-gathering organizations and their
subjects. Maybe Malin and company
define “news” merely as offering the city’s
side of the story unfiltered by outside
parties. Or presenting “just the facts” –
which is undoubtedly an element of news,
but one that’s mostly meaningless without
context and interpretation.
Still, I’ll take their comments at face
value – that this is something “bold”
(Nahra’s word) and unprecedented
(Brecht’s statement) – and a news-like
packaging of marketing just doesn’t fit
those claims. So let’s proceed with the
idea that the City of Davenport wants to
create an authentic news site held to the
standards of independent journalism –
which would be bold and unprecedented.
I’m intrigued by the idea in theory
– although the price tag seems awfully
steep for what amounts to an experiment.
(The budget says the new positions
under the city administrator are paid for
by the elimination of the assistant-city-
administrator position, but there’s a new
assistant-to-the-city-administrator slot
being created another department.)
Part of my interest is good-natured:
I’m curious to see whether this thing
works, and how it works, and the types
of reporting and writing about city
business that people paid by the city can
accomplish. Maybe it will will surprise
me.
And part of it is akin to my baser
interest in car crashes: This can’t work,
Davenport’s Planned News Site: A Bold, Unworkable Idea, Repackaged PR, or ... ?
by Jeff Ignatius
jeff@rcreader.com
GUEST COMMENTARY
you can’t have election returns without
them. Policy and politics are hopelessly
intertwined. And much news is also
contrived theatre – press releases, sound
bites, and spin typically presented by
the media in an artificial formula pitting
one side against the other, with both
viewpoints offered as equally valid.
Most importantly, the news site’s
credibility actually depends on dealing
with the city’s controversial subjects
and drama and conflict and opposing
arguments and lawsuits and arrests and
other messy, ugly stuff – and handling
them fairly and intelligently. The answer
is not to sidestep them.
But Malin’s comment alludes to the
core reality that a news operation under
his control has to answer to the city
council – and is therefore hamstrung at
the outset with one of its core missions.
There’s only one way around that
central problem, and it’s complete
independence from the city administrator
and the city council. And the way to do
that is ... ummmm ... an entity outside
city government that receives no funding
from city government?
River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 21 No. 862 • August 7 - 20, 2014 16 Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com
The Forest for the Trees
despite the clarity of present law, would
prosecutors have had a recourse? And
does the judge at this post-conviction
point have latitude to allow Mackenzie’s
medical condition and medical use of
marijuana to be mitigating factors in
sentencing – perhaps even sparing him
incarceration?
Attorneys, retired judges, court-
watchers, and law professors could have
weighed in, and spoken to the judge’s
options. Some of my questions might
be stupid to lawyers and other experts
in law, but they’re the types of questions
that real people might ask. Think of how
much readers would learn from this type
of coverage – not just what happened in
the courtroom, but how a courtroom and
the law actually operate. And if it turns
out that the judge is legally and ethically
bound by the law – however inhumane
it might be in this situation – that would
help readers understand the rigidity of
the legal system, and how it doesn’t allow
for the nuances that the Mackenzie case
offered.
There’s another critical issue that
neither paper dealt with at the time of its
greatest relevance: the initial decision to
prosecute Mackenzie.
Following the jury’s verdict, on
July 10 the Times did run an article
titled “Walton defends prosecution of
Mackenzie family.” In it, Scott County
Attorney Mike Walton claimed: “I don’t
see we had a choice.”
He elaborated: “If he’s not prosecuted,
do I prosecute anyone who claims to
grow medical marijuana?Aren’t I just
changing the law for Scott County?
And is that right, or should the law be
changed in Des Moines for the whole
state? Essentially, I’d be legalizing the
growing of marijuana in Scott County on
my own.”
(The Argus/Dispatch had no equivalent
article.)
I wish Walton would have spoken prior
to the trial about his office’s decision to
prosecute, but the timing of the article
likely lies with him and not the Times.
And I wish Walton’s quotes in the story
weren’t so few – although that’s probably
a function of his simple argument that
the law is the law.
Yet the article still left many questions
hanging for readers. Mackenzie
reportedly rejected plea bargains offered
to him, but what precisely were they?
(I found no newspaper account of his
most recent prosecution that was specific
on that front.) Have any other twice-
convicted nonviolent drug felons been
spared incarceration for a third offense
in Walton’s tenure through a plea deal?
Did Walton personally sign off on the
decision to prosecute, and on any plea
deals that were offered? Given that, prior
to trial, Mackenzie was released from
Scott County’s jail without bond because
of his medical condition and the cost
of his care, were there any efforts made
at prosecution that would have secured
a conviction but saved the county and
state the costs of a trial, medical care, and
incarceration? And would Mackenzie’s
highly unusual case truly have created a
precedent?
Walton should have been given the
opportunity to answer those questions,
and disinterested expert sources might
have helped support or undermine his
answers. They could have also spoken to
his claim that he had little choice in the
matter.
Meanwhile, the Times editorial board,
while far more forceful than the Argus/
Dispatch’s on the Mackenzie case, has still
been too indirect. An October 6, 2013,
editorial bemoaned the Mackenzie case
and hinted that the prosecution should
not move forward. But it was only a hint.
The article said that “the Scott
County justice system enforces the
letter of a law that is doing much more
harm than good,” and “prosecution
continues under an unforgiving Iowa
drug law that is far behind the rest of
the nation,” and “county authorities
have spent tens of thousands of taxpayer
dollars in investigation, raids, and court
appearances that will lead to even higher
incarceration costs upon conviction.”
As you might expect, the Times
editorial board advocated for greater
allowances for medical marijuana in
Iowa, with the bitter-pill admission
that “reform at this point can’t spare
the Mackenzie family or restore the tax
dollars squandered in his prosecution.”
But if the tax dollars have been
squandered, shouldn’t the board have
held Walton’s office explicitly accountable
for the prosecution? The editorial
plainly says the prosecution is unjust
and wasteful; so why not fault Walton
directly? Or encourage some creative
thinking – or, God forbid, some messy,
potentially-precedent-setting compassion
– to save taxpayer dollars and let free
a man who nobody thinks presents a
public-safety threat?
In the July 14 editorial “Mackenzie
verdict indicts drug war,” the Times
board let Walton’s I-had-no-choice claim
fly without challenge or supporting
evidence. Perhaps the county attorney is
correct, but the editorials and reporting
should have given outside perspectives
with which readers could evaluate
Walton’s defense of his office.
Both Scott County judges and its
attorney are elected officials, after all, so
explorations of Latham’s and Walton’s key
choices in the high-profile Mackenzie
case are matters of great civic interest and
importance.
Rock Island County
Government
Unlike the clearly defined scope of
the Benton Mackenzie narrative, what’s
happening in Rock Island County
government is nebulous. By my count,
the Argus/Dispatch has devoted well over
10,000 words to various components,
while the Times has done roughly a third
of that.
In truth, I don’t have any idea what
the Argus/Dispatch spot coverage on the
inner workings of Rock Island County
government means. I know it has nothing
to do with the actual performance of the
county in terms of delivering services to
taxpayers. And I know the smell coming
off it ain’t pleasant.
Four basic themes emerge, and the
biggest question is to what extent they’re
related.
First – and the only thing even
remotely related to the performance
of government in service of the
taxpayers – is a failure of leadership,
as the county seems to be getting no
closer to resolution on the major issues
of replacing or updating aged and
inefficient buildings and the financial
problems plaguing Hope Creek nursing
home.
Second is a lack of clarity in the
handling of reimbursements – for
mileage and comp time – that results
in the appearance of county employees
inappropriately (and perhaps illegally)
lining their pockets at taxpayer expense.
Third are accusations in whistle-
blower lawsuits of illegal activity.
And fourth is interpersonal and
political conflict, and the question of
whether the previously noted issues have
been raised with genuine concern or
something less altruistic.
The common denominator in all of
these has been County Board Chair Phil
Banaszek, who is also the de facto county
administrator.
And underlying all of it is Rock Island
County’s longstanding Democratic rule,
which has had the effect of little or no
accountability and oversight – either
externally at the ballot box or through
the media or internally from within the
county board.
I suspect that Banaszek, in his first
term as chair following a 10-year
tenure by Jim Bohnsack, has found
himself in a perfect storm of crises,
inexperience, a Republican party trying
to get a foothold in county government,
intraparty squabbles among Democrats,
and a legacy of (shall we charitably say)
generous-to-county-employee practices.
And I further suspect based on my
limited dealings with him that Banaszek
might be in over his head, at this point
lacking the skills to navigate admittedly
treacherous waters.
What I’m less sure of – and I think this
is the key issue – is whether Banaszek
is in the wrong place at the wrong time
(and is perhaps also the wrong person)
or if he’s the source of these problems.
Determining that has not traditionally
been the purview of daily newspapers
– although there’s no reason it couldn’t
be. Daily journalism has an established
model of “objectivity,” of presenting facts
and opposing sides and letting readers
decide for themselves.
The problem with the coverage of
Rock Island County government is that
while we see the opposing sides, the
facts are notably absent. I – and readers
– can’t possibly come to any reasonable
conclusions based on the reporting that’s
been done. Even with the relatively low
bar of standard “objective” journalism,
there are so many holes that the big
picture cannot possibly be grasped.
Ironically, despite devoting
significantly fewer resources and space
to the topic, the Quad-City Times has
done a better job presenting the larger
narrative.
Its May 27 editorial “Rock Island
County needs outside help” concisely
sketched out the situation in 10 bullet
points, collecting in one article the
largest indications of serious disease.
It concluded: “These developments
suggest Rock Island County is declining
under a board incapable of professional
management and consumed by
compensation disputes easily managed
by other local governments. The county’s
workforce, courthouse, and nursing-
home management are creating scandals
where none existed.”
Contrast this with the Argus/Dispatch’s
June 13 editorial titled “RICO voters: Ask
for real, meaningful, systemic change,”
COVER STORY
Continued From Page 5
River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 21 No. 862 • August 7 - 20, 2014 17 Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com
Franck falling for
Christophe Paou’s Michel
after watching the man,
from a discreet distance, in
the act of drowning his lover.
(This sequence, by the way,
is a terrifying, bravura piece
of filmmaking. With the
victim’s drowning shown in
an unbroken long shot that
lasts a good two minutes,
you find yourself, after the
initial shock of the scene’s
casual brutality, wondering how that
actor could hold his breath for so long.)
Eventually, Jérôme Chappatte’s inspector
arrives on the scene, and it’s hinted that
a serial killer may be on the loose, and
Franck still falls deeper and deeper in love,
and through it all, Guiraudie maintains
the film’s ever-thickening suspense and
fatalistic dread.
With no music
employed, and
only ambient
sounds used
to ratchet up
the tension,
Stranger by the
Lake casts a
magnificently
eerie spell. It
also culminates
in a queasy yet giddy game of cat-and-
mouse followed by, to date, the year’s most
haunting final shot, a lengthy one implying
that the only thing more dangerous for
Franck than having a murderer nearby is
not having a murderer nearby.
Continued From Page 10
shares in abundance here – and a quality
shared by Karasawa’s documentary. So
here’s to the lady who lunched. Everybody
rise! Or, at least, make immediate plans to
see her doc.
Another streaming title hovering near
the top of my 2014 favorites is writer/
director Alain Guiraudie’s French-language
thriller
Stranger by
the Lake,
which feels
like something
Alfred
Hitchcock
might’ve
come up with
if he spoke
French and
was allowed
to sneak in
the occasional money shot. (This film
truly puts the “cock” in “Hitchcock.”) Set
almost entirely on a lakeside beach where
clothing, for the gay men who frequent it,
is less an option than an inconvenience,
this evocatively creepy, sneakily funny
outing finds Pierre Deladonchamps’
Independents Day
by Mike Schulz
mike@rcreader.com
MOVIES
ambulatory senior citizen with a walker
and a serious balance issue? The guy was
my freshman-year college roommate. We
shared bunk beds, for Pete’s sake. The
laughter at Love, Lies, & the Lottery may
have suggested that Thursday’s audience
was feeling youthful again, but seeing Brad
in that role made me feel older than hell.
Love, Lies, & the Lottery runs at the Circa
’21 Dinner Playhouse (1828 Third Avenue,
Rock Island) through September 6, and more
information and tickets are available by
calling (309)786-7733 extension 2 or visiting
Circa21.com.
Continued From Page 7
a vicious back-stabber who’s also a cunning
lawyer who’s also too dumb to open a pill
bottle with a child-proof cap.
I’m hoping, however, that these problems
are resolved through what I’m guessing
will be a long shelf life for Hesselman’s
comedy, because the script, and Circa ’21’s
production of it, are already in pretty fine
shape. The cast is game, the direction is
terrifically polished (Hesselman’s best bit
has Ciemiewicz speaking in tandem with
the lottery announcer on TV), the jokey
retorts are solid, and the crowd I saw it with
appeared to have a ball. But in a personal
aside, although Hauskins is very funny
here, did he really need to be cast as a barely
Dough, a Deer, a Female Seer ...
by Mike Schulz
mike@rcreader.com
THEATRE
by Jeff Ignatius
jeff@rcreader.com
which vaguely alluded to “financial
crises, costly management problems, and
... the absence of long-range planning.”
Put simply, the Argus/Dispatch’s
editorial-page bully pulpit has been far
meeker in the face of deep problems in
Rock Island County government that are
readily discernible within its own pages.
Discernible, but not clear in the news
reporting of either paper.
The most serious allegation against
Banaszek has appeared in multiple
newspaper reports in various forms. This
one comes from the July 29 Times article
“McGehee asks state to probe county
pension case,” dealing with a whistle-
blower lawsuit filed in May by Margaret
Hoskins: “In her lawsuit, Hoskins claims
she was fired last August for refusing
to submit information to the Illinois
Municipal Retirement Fund that would
have allowed members of the county’s
Forest Preserve Committee to collect
pension benefits illegally. Hoskins said
County Board chairman Phil Banaszek,
through county administrative assistant
Shelly Chapman, encouraged her to
submit information to the retirement
fund in the hopes it would not notice.”
Some dots appear obvious for
connecting. Chapman’s payment for
comp time – approved by Banaszek –
was, according to an opinion from Rock
Island State’s Attorney John McGehee,
against official policy. He also said the
IRS hadn’t been notified of payments
– as the law requires – to Banaszek for
his mileage from his home to his office
(whose appropriateness had also been
questioned). A second whistle-blower
lawsuit from three former county
employees “alleges they were fired for
reporting financial corruption at a
job-training agency controlled by Rock
Island County,” according to the Argus/
Dispatch; Banaszek is also named as a
defendant in that suit.
Banaszek’s name keeps popping up, yet
you’d never see the pattern reading any
individual article.
That’s exacerbated by Banaszek not
being pressed about this apparent pattern,
or about any individual charge involving
him. The chair says not much of anything
in these articles, and what he does say
screams for clarification and expansion.
(Of course, defendants often decline to
comment on pending litigation, so we’ll
give a pass on the lawsuits.)
Consider these statements attributed to
Banaszek in the daily newspapers, none
showing evidence of being challenged by
reporters for evading the larger issues:
• The May 19 Argus/Dispatch article
“McGehee: Policy ignored in Chapman
OT, IRS should know Banaszek mileage
pay” related: “Mr. Banaszek said he was
open to encouraging the county board
to make policy changes based on the
state’s attorney’s opinion.” But wasn’t
the policy already there? (I couldn’t find
any reference to the policy in either
newspaper until McGehee’s opinion.)
• On the comp-time issue, Banaszek
said in a May 9 Argus/Dispatch article:
“We’ve been doing it this way for years.
All of a sudden these things have become
an issue, which is rather curious.” Does
past practice make it right?
• In an April 16 Argus/Dispatch article
on his decision to stop claiming mileage
after it had been questioned by another
county-board member: “I like to lead by
example.” But only after it’s been made a
public issue?
• In a May 28 Times article on
Republican calls for a special prosecutor
on the pension-fund issue: “It does
sound, on their part, like a little partisan
and ... election-year grandstanding.” But
does that necessarily mean the request is
unfounded or inappropriate?
The most insightful coverage of all this
came from the Argus/Dispatch in the June
28 news story “Pension could be factor
in whether Banaszek retires or stays
on RI Co. Board.” The article begins:
“Embattled Rock Island County Board
Chairman Phil Banaszek could face a real
quandary in December: retire from the
board and cash in on a sizable pension
or stay put and lose a small fortune.”
Readers get more wisdom from that
sentence than from the remainder of the
paper’s recent reporting on Rock Island
County government – mostly because
the paper has not done a good job of
connecting seemingly related events and
asking better follow-ups.
More-direct questioning of Banaszek
by reporters would, hopefully, cut
through some of his bullshit answers. At
a minimum, those questions – and his
answers or lack thereof – could be noted
in articles.
And the Argus/Dispatch in particular
needs to be less circumspect in its
editorials. Answers might be hard to
come by at this point, but the questions
and their implications are plenty obvious.
If the county’s daily newspaper can’t
point out the stinks of corruption, lax
oversight, and reactionary management
coming from the Rock Island County
Board and its chair, something is
seriously amiss.
Continued On Page 18
Stranger by the Lake
Nymphomaniac: Volume One
River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 21 No. 862 • August 7 - 20, 2014 18 Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com
find her opinion between the pillows – at least
not any time soon. Chances are she has little
innate curiosity and has maybe spent much
of her life under the mistaken impression that
you can keep a man by keeping mum and
nodding yes. In the future, when you meet
a woman, instead of just taking stock of all
the reasons you’d work as a couple, look for
reasons you wouldn’t – like if her peers as
political thinkers appear to be your hamster
and the paperweight that fell behind your
desk. A woman who’s right for you will take
your thoughts, political and otherwise, and
run with them and sometimes bring back
something better – making you better for
being with her instead of making you suspect
her skull contains only a goldfish swimming
around a little castle and a couple of plastic
plants.
Grate Expectations
I am dating a guy in his early 20s who
is very nice, very fun, very cute – and very
much in the habit of mentioning that he
went to Harvard. He finds a way to weave it
into all sorts of conversations it really has no
place in.
– Not Impressed
He probably mentions Harvard a lot
because it seems more tasteful than the
alternative – having his diploma laminated
and wearing it around his neck. Guys in their
early 20s have it rough. Just as girls their age
are coming into their prime hot-itude, the
guys are entering a work environment where
they are the gum on the pavement that the
30-year-old successful guy runs over in his
Mercedes. If your guy is feeling this way, it
may explain why no subject is too far-flung or
random to connect to a reminder of where he
went to school. (“Pass the milk? I sometimes
passed the milk at Harvard.”)
Ask whether you can give him your opinion
about something you’ve noticed. Assuming he
says yes, say something like, “I have no doubt
you’re going places, but you seem to mention
Harvard a lot. This might make you sound
like you need to ride on the name, which you
clearly don’t.” If he’s got more than school
smarts, he’ll recognize that it says something
about him that he went to Harvard, but not
when he advertises it so often that it starts to
sound like the DeVry of the Ivy League.
Got A Problem? Ask Amy Alkon.
171 Pier Ave, #280, Santa Monica, CA 90405
or e-mail AdviceAmy@aol.com (AdviceGoddess.com)
©2014, Amy Alkon, all rights reserved.
Ask
the
Advice
Goddess
BY AMY ALKON
Empty Shelly
My girlfriend of a year is really pretty
and sweet, and we love all the same outdoor
activities. However, I feel there’s a ceiling
on our connection because she lacks a
strong personality of her own. Whenever we
discuss something to do, she defers to me.
Also, I care deeply about politics and ideas,
but she doesn’t read newspapers or books
or develop her own opinions. Two days ago,
I asked about something we’d just heard
on the news, and she basically parroted my
opinion back to me. I pressed her, saying,
“But what do you think?” She couldn’t
answer. This led to my suggesting that
maybe she needs to see a therapist to learn
to open up more. She was pretty offended,
and we haven’t talked much since.
– Politically Concerned
So when you say to your girlfriend, “What
are your thoughts on the Middle East?”, you’d
rather she didn’t respond, “Like, you mean,
Philadelphia?”
It is nice that you both enjoy the same
outdoor activities. Having shared interests
can sometimes be essential. For example, a
guy who lives to sail would find it a downer
to date me. As I wrote in Good Manners for
Nice People Who Sometimes Say F---, I have
motion-sickness issues, “which is to say I get
carsick on any street with more than five turns
in it – for example, the winding mountain
roads of Washington, DC.”
But barring an obsessive attachment by
one partner to a sport that, say, makes the
other hurl her insides into the ocean for days,
people put too much emphasis on having a
lot of interests in common. You just need to
have enough in common. And in addition to
physical chemistry, you need to have what I
call a crush on your partner as a human being.
This means having respect and admiration
for them and a sense of excitement about who
they are and how they go about life. Respect
is the opposite of contempt – the sneering
disgust for a partner that marriage researcher
John Gottman finds is the biggest predictor
a couple will divorce. And unfortunately,
respect is also the antithesis of what you, as
a guy who cares about politics, have for a
woman whose favorite Supreme Court justice
is probably Judge Judy.
The reality is that your girlfriend isn’t going
to lean back on some therapist’s couch and
Set in 2031, the setup finds all life forms
on Earth extinct after a misguided, 2014
attempt to curtail global warming. (Oops!)
All life forms, that is, except about a
thousand human survivors – and quite
a few insects – who are left constantly
circling the globe on a locomotive that
never stops, with the well-to-do resting
comfortably in the front cars, and the
other, oh, 99 percent or so relegated to the
back. In other words, everyone’s riding
together on a giant rolling metaphor as
Chris Evans’ caboose-leader and his fellow
insurrectionists steady their nerves, pack
their weaponry, and make their way to the
head of the train. I’ll say no more about
the narrative, but if you’re a similar fan
of Bong’s 2006 monster epic The Host,
know that his latest is equally suspenseful,
unnerving, and scary/funny, just without
the tentacles. Know that the stuntwork
is fantastic, the staging superb, and the
production design topnotch. Know that
the laughs are plentiful, and almost always
unanticipated. And know that despite their
comic-book-bubble dialogue, the cast
boasting John Hurt, Jamie Bell, Octavia
Spencer, Alison Pill, and the vibrant South
Korean performers Song Kang-ho and
Ko Ah-Sung is marvelous – and that none
of those actors is more marvelous than
the forceful and fearless and cheerfully
weird Tilda Swinton. We may not be
getting her on the screen size she deserves
in Snowpiercer, but thankfully, as ever,
Swinton doesn’t need a cineplex to be
gloriously larger-than-life.
For the full-length version of this article
– including reviews of four additional
indie movies – visit “Ten Little Indies” at
RCReader.com/y/indies.
Continued From Page 17
Meanwhile, leave it to that wily Danish
mischief-maker Lars von Trier to come
up with a hardcore tale so epic that is
had to be released (in the U.S., at least)
in two parts: Nymphomaniac: Volume
One and Volume Two. Through the
course of this new-to-home-video saga’s
sometimes embarrassing, sometimes
exhilarating, not-for-a-minute boring
four hours, Charlotte Gainsbourg’s sex
addict regales Stellan Skarsgård’s expert
listener with tales of her erotic past,
and if von Trier has an idea or attitude
about sex that he’s somehow failed to
express here, I can’t imagine what it
could be. Of the two volumes, One is the
much better time. Skarsgård’s analogies
regarding Gainsbourg’s conquests, and
her blasé rebuttals of those analogies,
are legitimately funny – his middle-
aged-virgin character has a penchant for
religious-icon and fly-fishing metaphors
– and there are spectacular brief
performances by Christian Slater and,
especially, a memorably grief-stricken and
wrathful Uma Thurman. (There’s also a
lot – a lot – of Shia LaBeouf in both films.
You’ve been warned.) Things, however,
get more expectedly grim in Two, and in a
particular bit of perversion, it all ends with
a sick-joke capper that you just know made
the writer/director cackle while many of
the rest of us feel like throwing rocks at
him. But all told, this energetic, visual-
style- and genre-hopping, deeply probing
(in more ways than one) work is an
amazing achievement – not on the level of
von Trier’s 2011 masterpiece Melancholia,
but certainly not a wrist-slitter à la Dancer
in the Dark or Antichrist.
Finally, there’s South Korean director
Joon-ho Bong’s futuristic action thriller
Snowpiercer. What a blast this movie is!
Independents Day
by Mike Schulz
mike@rcreader.com
MOVIES
Snowpiercer
River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 21 No. 862 • August 7 - 20, 2014 19 Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com
like this: “I want Jupiter to help me expand my
faith in myself, my power to do what I love, and
my ability to draw on the resources and allies
I need. Meanwhile, I will prune my desires for
things I don’t really need and cut back on my
involvement with things that don’t inspire me. I
don’t want those to expand.”

VIRGO (August 23-September
22): TV comedian Stephen
Colbert confesses that his “safe
word” is “pumpkin patch.” Does that mean
he participates in actual BDSM rituals? Are
these the code words he utters when he doesn’t
want the intensity to rise any further, when he
doesn’t want his next boundary crossed? I don’t
know. Perhaps he’s simply joking or speaking
metaphorically. Whether or not you engage in
literal BDSM, Virgo, there’s an aspect of your life
right now that has metaphorical resemblances
to it. And I suggest that you do the equivalent
of using your “safe word” very soon. Nothing
more can be gained from remaining embroiled
in your predicament. Even if the ordeal has been
interesting or educational up until now, it won’t
be for much longer. Escape your bondage.

LIBRA (September 23-October
22): If you’re planning to hurl a
thunderbolt, make sure you are all warmed up
and at full strength before you actually unleash
it. It would be sad if you flung a half-assed
thunderbolt that looked like a few fireflies and
sounded like a cooing dove. And please don’t
interpret my wise-guy tone here as a sign that
I’m just kidding around. No, Libra. This is
serious stuff. Life is offering you opportunities
to make a major impression, and I want you to
be as big and forceful and wild as you need to
be. Don’t tamp down your energy out of fear
of hurting people’s feelings. Access your inner
sky god or sky goddess, and have too much fun
expressing your raw power.

SCORPIO (October 23-November
21): In your dreams you may travel
to Stockholm, Sweden, to accept the
Nobel Prize or to Hollywood to pick up your
Oscar. There’s a decent chance that in your
sleepy-time adventures you will finally score
with the hot babe who rejected you back in high
school, or return to the scene of your biggest
mistake and do things right this time. I wouldn’t
be surprised if in one dream you find yourself
riding in a gold chariot during a parade held in
your honor. I’m afraid, however, that you will
have to settle for less hoopla and glamor in your
waking life. You will merely be doing a fantastic
job at tasks you usually perform competently.
You will be well-appreciated, well-treated, and
well-rewarded. That’s not so bad, right?

SAGITTARIUS (November
22-December 21): Lake Superior
State University issues a “Unicorn
Questing Privilege” to those people who are
interested in hunting for unicorns. Are you one
of them? I wouldn’t be surprised if you felt an
Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny's
EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES
& DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES
The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at
1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700
FREE WILL ASTROLOGY by Rob Brezsny
ARIES (March 21-April 19): Don’t
just be smart and articulate, Aries.
Dare to be wildly wise and prone to
unruly observations. Don’t merely be kind and
well-behaved. Explore the mysteries of healing
through benevolent mischief. Don’t buy into the
all-too-serious trances. Break up the monotony
with your unpredictable play and funny
curiosity. Don’t simply go along with the stories
everyone seems to believe in as if they were the
Truth and the Way. Question every assumption;
rebel against every foregone conclusion; propose
amusing plot twists that send the narratives off
on interesting tangents.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Breve
orazione penetra is an old Italian idiom.
Its literal translation is “short prayers
pierce” or “concise prayers penetrate.” You
can extrapolate from that to come up with the
meaning that “God listens best to brief prayers.”
In the coming week, I invite you to apply this
idea whenever you ask for anything, whether
you are seeking the favors of the Divine Wow
or the help of human beings. Know exactly
what you want, and express it with no-nonsense
succinctness.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Every
February, you go through a phase when
it’s easier to see the big picture of your
life. If you take advantage of this invitation,
your experience is like being on a mountaintop
and gazing into the vastness. Every August, on
the other hand, you are more likely to see the
details you have been missing. Transformations
that have been too small and subtle to notice
may become visible to you. If you capitalize
on this opportunity, the experience is like
peering through a microscope. Here’s a third
variation, Gemini: Around the full moons of
both February and August, you may be able
to alternately peer into the microscope and
simulate the view from a mountaintop. I think
that’s about to happen.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): You
wouldn’t sip dirty water from a
golden chalice. Am I right? Nor
would you swig delicious poison from a fine
crystal wine glass or 10-year-old vinegar from a
queen’s goblet. I’m sure you will agree that you’d
much rather drink a magical elixir from a paper
cup, or a rejuvenating tonic from a chipped
coffee mug, or tasty medicine out of a kids’
plastic soup bowl you bought at the thrift store.
Don’t you dare lie to yourself about what’s best
for you.

LEO (July 23-August 22): Every 12
years, the planet Jupiter spends about
a year cruising through the sign of
Leo. It’s there with you now, and will be with
you through early August 2015. What can you
expect? Expansion! That’s great, right? Yes and
no. You might love to have some parts of your
life expand; others, not so much. So I suggest
you write down your intentions. Say something
urge like that in the coming weeks. Unusual
yearnings will be welling up in you. Exotic
fantasies may replace your habitual daydreams.
Certain possibilities you have considered to be
unthinkable or unattainable may begin to seem
feasible. Questions you have been too timid to
ask could become crucial for you to entertain.
(You can get your Unicorn Questing License
here: TinyURL.com/unicornlicense.)

CAPRICORN (December
22-January 19): Your ethical code
may soon be tested. What will you
do if you see a chance to get away with a minor
sin or petty crime that no one will ever find out
about? What if you are tempted to lie or cheat
or deceive in ways that advance your good
intentions and only hurt other people a little
bit or not at all? I’m not here to tell you what
to do, but rather to suggest that you be honest
with yourself about what’s really at stake. Even
if you escape punishment for a lapse, you might
nevertheless inflict a wound on your integrity
that would taint your relationship with your own
creativity. Contemplate the pleasures of purity
and righteousness, and use them to enhance
your power.

AQUARIUS (January 20-February
18): “The thorn arms the roses,”
says an old Latin motto. The astrological omens
suggest you’ll be wise to muse on that advice in
the coming weeks. How should you interpret it?
I’ll leave you to draw your own conclusions, of
course, but here are a few hints. It may be that
beauty needs protection, or at least buffering. It’s
possible that you can’t simply depend on your
sincerity and good intentions, but also need to
infuse some ferocity into your efforts. In order
for soft, fragile, lovely things to do what they do
best, they may require the assistance of tough,
strong, hearty allies.

PISCES (February 19-March 20): If
you go to an American doctor to be
treated for an ailment, odds are that
he or she will interrupt you no more than 14
seconds into your description of what’s wrong.
But you must not tolerate this kind of disrespect
in the coming days, Pisces – not from doctors,
not from anyone. You simply must request
or, if necessary, demand the receptivity you
deserve. If and when it’s given, I urge you to
speak your truth in its entirety. Express what has
been hidden and suppressed. And this is very
important: Take responsibility for your own role
in any problems you discuss.

Homework: Tell what techniques you’ve
discovered about feeding honey to crocodiles.
E-mail truthrooster@gmail.com and visit FreeWill
Astrology.com.
River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 21 No. 862 • August 7 - 20, 2014 20 Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com
July 24 Answers: Right
STYLIST'S SECRET · August 7, 2014
ACROSS
1. Wrongs
5. Like a bete noire
10. A berry
15. Mean
19. Colorful fsh
20. Express a thought or belief
21. Rest
22. Paris suburb
23. Province in Italy
24. Fruit of a vine
25. Swiftly
26. Cyma reversa
27. Start of a quip by Dolly Parton: 5
wds.
31. Coconut extract
32. Promising
33. _ re nata
34. With care
37. Barrie’s Tink, e.g.
39. Balanced
44. “The _ and the Ecstasy”
45. Old court dance
46. Beat
47. Dir. letters
48. Origin
49. Bottom-line concern
50. Explorer’s ship
51. Proceedings
52. _ nouveau
53. Homo sapiens, e.g.
54. Part 2 of quip: 3 wds.
57. Rushed
59. Washes
60. Most precious
61. Shelters of a kind
62. Feasted
63. Deep sleep
64. Unhealthy in color
66. Plot
67. Checks and _
70. Part 3 of quip: 5 wds.
72. Reindeer accessories
73. Topper
74. Burnett of CNN
75. Sky bear
76. Expense report items
77. City in Tuscany
78. Abbr. on a map
79. Monastery
81. “_ Rotten Scoundrels”
82. Mass of cheese
83. First
85. Wound marks
86. No big deal
87. Abbr. in commerce
88. Giant goddess (Var.)
89. San _ Obispo
90. End of the quip: 5 wds.
99. Charge
100. Red dye
101. Water brand
102. Object of infatuation
103. Vaulted area
104. Vestige
105. Kitchen utensil
106. Famed wine region
107. Sound loudly
108. Weeds
109. _ statesman
110. Agents (Hyph.)
DOWN
1. Daytime fare
2. _ dixit
3. Alliance acronym
4. Goods on a truck
5. Plain
6. In a vertical position
7. Cash drawer
8. Sufciently, archaically
9. Old Roman coin
10. Verdant
11. Settle a debt
12. Mournful cry
13. Cram
14. Lets of the hook
15. Sobbing sound
16. Ship of myth
17. Did in
18. Kind of candy
28. Potter or Munster
29. Yesteryear
30. Toledo’s waters
34. Mother of Isaac
35. Marketplace
36. Enlisted man: 2 wds.
37. Pigeonholed
38. Like Methuselah
39. Crosspieces
40. Jai _
41. Scarf of a kind
42. Poker stakes
43. Slate anagram
45. Stares
46. Ached
49. Strong and lean
50. Ofbeat
51. Brother of Moses
53. Crude broom
54. The “Pineapple Isle”
55. Creatures of legend
56. Spanish fare
58. Claw
59. Star sign
62. “Driving Miss _”
63. Retort
64. Metric unit
65. Trunk artery
66. Mark used in proofreading
67. Bests
68. Atelier item
69. Hackneyed
71. Some airports
72. Jansch or Kaempfert
76. Natives of Italy
77. Internet scam
79. Grammatical gafe
80. “Waiting for Godot”playwright
81. Consider
82. Holy _
84. Beam over a door
85. Gripes
86. Lathe operator
88. Doubly
89. Time of
90. Inside info
91. Peak in Thessaly
92. Girl in an anorak
93. Eskers
94. Source of harm
95. Competed
96. Cheese variety
97. Hawser
98. Dash
99. Majuscule, for short
July 24 Crossword Answers
River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 21 No. 862 • August 7 - 20, 2014 21 Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com
Live Music Live Music Live Music
Email all listings to calendar@rcreader.com • Deadline 5 p.m. Thursday before publication
2014/08/09 (Sat)
ABC Karaoke -Creekside Bar and Grill,
3303 Brady St. Davenport, IA
Alyx Rush -RME Community Stage, 131
W. 2nd St. Davenport, IA
Blues Rock-It -Casey’s Tavern, 1512 15th
St Moline, IL
Caught in the Act -LeClaire Levee, Down-
town LeClaire LeClaire, IA
Cody Road -Circle Tap, 1345 Locust St.
Davenport, IA
Community Folk Sing (3pm) - Jennifer
Danielson (7pm) -Uptown Bi l l ’s
Coffee House, 730 S. Dubuque St.
Iowa City, IA
Corporate Rock -Onion Grove Bar, 602
Lombard St. Clarence, IA
Cosmic -11th Street Precinct, 2108 E 11th
St Davenport, IA
Danika Holmes (4pm) -Wide River Win-
ery - Clinton, 1776 East Deer Creek
Rd. Clinton, IA
Davina & the Vagabonds -CSPS/Legion
Arts, 1103 3rd St SE Cedar Rapids, IA
Diana Chettester (2pm) -Creeksi de
Vineyards Winery & Inn, 7505 120th
Ave. Coal Valley, IL
Divebomb -Rascals Live, 1418 15th St.
Moline, IL
DollaMiiite Live Dance Mix -The Smok-
ing Dog Pub, 1800 2nd Ave. Rock
Island, IL
Jason D. Williams (8pm) - The Rivieras
(9:30pm) -Riverside Casino and Golf
Resort, 3184 Highway 22 Riverside, IA
Joe Tingle’s DJ Entertainment -Barrel
House Moline, 1321 5th Ave. Moline, IL
Karaoke Night -Boozie’s Bar & Grill, 114
1/2 W. 3rd St. Davenport, IA
Kristy’s Birthday Celebration w/ the Hal
Reed Band (8pm) - The Terry Quiett
Band (9pm) -The Muddy Waters, 1708
State St. Bettendorf, IA
2014/08/07 (Thu)
ABC Karaoke -The Rusty Nail, 2606 W
Locust Davenport, IA
Billy Peiffer & Collin Keemle Jam Night
-On the Rock Grille & Bar, 4619 34th
St Rock Island, IL
Bob Bucko Jr. - Mystic Dolphin - KAB
-Rozz-Tox, 2108 3rd Ave. Rock Island, IL
Buoyant Sea - Alex Brody -Gabe’s, 330 E.
Washington St. Iowa City, IA
Cobra Kai Karaoke -Rumors Lounge &
Nightclub, 1704 Second Ave. Rock
Island, IL
Dailey & Vincent -Englert Theatre, 221
East Washington St. Iowa City, IA
Danika Holmes -Barrel House 211, 211
E. 2nd St. Davenport, IA
Earth Ascending -RIBCO, 1815 2nd Ave.
Rock Island, IL
Fablos Karaoke Night -RME Community
Stage, 131 W. 2nd St. Davenport, IA
Karaoke Night -Applebee’s - Moline,
3805 41st Ave. Moline, IL
Lewis Knudsen Live Lunch (11am)
-Mama Compton’s, 1725 2nd Ave
Rock Island, IL
Open Mic Night -Rookies, 2818 N. Brady
St. Davenport, IA
Open Stage Night -Theo’s Java Club, 213
17th St. Rock Island, IL
River Glen -Iowa City Yacht Club, 13 S
Linn St Iowa City, IA
Sidewalk Chalk - ION -The Mill, 120 E
Burlington Iowa City, IA
Soulshake - Mixology -Gabe’s, 330 E.
Washington St. Iowa City, IA
Stardust Talent Night -The Old Stardust
Sports Bar, 1191 19th Street Moline, IL
The Awful Purdies (noon) -University of
Iowa Hospitals & Clinics, 200 Hawkins
Dr Iowa City, IA
Tug Fest: Imperfect Silence (5pm)
-Port Byron Gazebo, 120 S. Main St
Port Byron, IL
Lynn Allen -River House, 1510 River Dr.
Moline, IL
Oakbrook -Peachwave Frozen Yogurt,
3431 Devil's Glen Rd., Bettendorf, IA
Open Mic Night -Downtown Central
Perk, 226 W. 3rd St. Davenport, IA
Paa Kow’s By All Means -Iowa City Yacht
Club, 13 S Linn St Iowa City, IA
Pierced Productions Karaoke & DJ
featuring Leigh Timbrook -The
Old Stardust Sports Bar, 1191 19th
Street Moline, IL
Rally The Rock Motorcycle Rally: Hap
Hazard (4pm) - Wolf & Gypsy (7pm) -
The Knockoffs (9:30pm) -On the Rock
Grille & Bar, 4619 34th St Rock Island, IL
Songwriters All-Original Open Mic
(3pm) -RME (River Music Experience),
131 W. 2nd St. Davenport, IA
Southern Thunder Karaoke -Hollar’s
Bar and Grill, 4050 27th St Moline, IL
Steve McFate Acoustic Show -Rhythm
City Casino, 101 W. River Dr. Dav-
enport, IA
The Blue Notes - Avey Brothers - The
Harris Collection -The Redstone
Room, 129 Main St Davenport, IA
The Fry Daddies -Bier Stube LeClaire,
1001 Canal Shore Dr. LeClaire, IA
The Knockoffs -On the Rock Grille & Bar,
4619 34th St Rock Island, IL
The Stylistics -Quad-Cities Waterfront
Convention Center, 2021 State St.
Bettendorf, IA
The Tailfins -The Rusty Nail, 2606 W
Locust Davenport, IA
Tug Fest: 7 Sins Side Shows (3, 7, &
9pm) - Dirt Road Rockers (4pm) -
Caught in the Act (8pm) -LeClaire
Levee, Downtown LeClaire, IA
Tug Fest: Resurrgent (3:30pm) - Meet
the Press (6pm) - Cheese Pizza
(8:30pm) -Port Byron Gazebo, 120 S.
Main St Port Byron, IL
Live Lunch w/ Tony Hoeppner (noon)
- Mike Cochrane (7pm) -RME Com-
munity Stage, 131 W. 2nd St. Dav-
enport, IA
Lojo Russo (5pm) -Wide River Winery -
LeClaire, 106 N. Cody Rd. LeClaire, IA
Mark Avey Band -The Muddy Waters,
1708 State St. Bettendorf, IA
Night People (6:30pm) -The Rusty Nail,
2606 W Locust Davenport, IA
Open Mic Coffeehouse -First Lutheran
Church - Rock Island, 1600 20th St.
Rock Island, IL
Past Masters -Riverside Casino and Golf
Resort, 3184 Highway 22 Riverside, IA
Pierced Productions Karaoke & DJ
featuring Leigh Timbrook -The Old
Stardust Sports Bar, 1191 19th Street
Moline, IL
Southern Thunder Karaoke -Hollar’s
Bar and Grill, 4050 27th St Moline, IL
Steve McFate Acoustic Show -Rhythm
City Casino, 101 W. River Dr. Dav-
enport, IA
The Fiyah -Rozz-Tox, 2108 3rd Ave. Rock
Island, IL
Tug Fest: Modality (4:30pm) - 7 Sins
Side Shows (6pm) - Meredosia
Road (7pm) -LeClaire Levee, Down-
town LeClaire, IA
Wicked Liz & the Bellyswirls -Bass Street
Landing Plaza, Moline, IL
2014/08/08 (Fri)
Aaron Kamm & the One Drops -Iowa
City Yacht Club, 13 S Linn St Iowa
City, IA
ABC Karaoke -Circle Tap, 1345 Locust St.
Davenport, IA
ABC Karaoke -Creekside Bar and Grill,
3303 Brady St. Davenport, IA
ABC Karaoke -Moose Lodge - Davenport,
2333 Rockingham Rd Davenport, IA
Beaker Brothers (6:30pm) -Sheraton
Iowa City Hotel, 210 S. Dubuque St.
Iowa City, IA
Caught in the Act -Len Brown’s North
Shore Inn, 700 N. Shore Dr. Moline, IL
Cody Road -Broken Saddle, 1417 5th
Ave. Moline, IL
DollaMiiite Live Dance Mix -The Smok-
ing Dog Pub, 1800 2nd Ave. Rock
Island, IL
Funkastic Five -River House, 1510 River
Dr. Moline, IL
Hap Hazard -On the Rock Grille & Bar,
4619 34th St Rock Island, IL
Jerry Beauchamp Dance -Wal cott
Coliseum, 116 E Bryant St Walcott, IA
Joe Seng -Joe’s Club, 1402 W. 7th St.
Davenport, IA
Justin Morrissey & Band -11th Street
Precinct, 2108 E 11th St Davenport, IA
Karaoke Night -Bowlmor Lanes, 2952 N.
Brady St. Davenport, IA
Karaoke Night -Rooster’s Sports Bar &
Grill, 2130 3rd Ave. Rock Island, IL
Live @ Five: Minus Six (5pm) -RME
Courtyard, 131 W. 2nd St. Daven-
port, IA
The Manny Lopez Big Band (6pm) -The
Circa ‘21 Speakeasy, 1818 3rd Ave.
Rock Island, IL
Tug Fest: Moonshine Run (5pm) - Dirt
Road Rockers (8 & 10pm) -Port
Byron Gazebo, 120 S. Main St Port
Byron, IL
Tug Fest: North of 40 (7:30pm) -LeClaire
Levee, Downtown LeClaire, IA
Vagabond Entertainment presents
Kooby’s Karaoke - Bi er St ube
LeCl ai re, 1001 Canal Shore Dr.
LeClaire, IA
Wild Oatz -Cascade River View Park, 101
Pierce St. SW Cascade, IA
Ya Maka My Weekend: Akasha
(5:30pm) - Raw Dawg (7:45pm)
- Universal Expression (10pm)
-District of Rock Island Great River
Plaza Stage, 2nd Ave., between 17th
& 19th Sts. Rock Island, IL
Ya Maka My Weekend: DeHurricane
(6:30pm) - Taj Weekes & Adowa
(8:45pm) - Ark Band (11pm) -Dis-
trict of Rock Island Jumer’s Casino &
Hotel Stage, 2nd Ave., between 17th
& 19th Sts. Rock Island, IL
The Holmes Brothers @ The Muddy Waters – August 16
30
9 SATURDAY
00
8 FRIDAY
Continued On Page 22
00
7 THURSDAY
Davenport, Iowa • 563.326.7804
www.figgeartmuseum.org
Living Proof Exhibit: Cancer Survivor Art
August 16-October 21, 2014
Living Proof Exhibit, which celebrates the creative spirit of cancer survivors, will
have a display of art by cancer survivors and patients within a 150-mile radius
of the Quad Cities in the Mary Waterman Gildehaus Community Gallery.
EXHIBITION OPENING
Exhibition and programs
sponsored by
B
o
n
n
i

H
u
g
u
n
i
n
,

W
e
a
t
h
e
r
e
d
,

p
h
o
t
o
g
r
a
p
h

o
n

c
a
n
v
a
s
.
Supported by the Brand Boeshaar Foundation Fund
and the Hubbell-Waterman Foundation
River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 21 No. 862 • August 7 - 20, 2014 22 Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com
Live Music Live Music Live Music
Email all listings to calendar@rcreader.com • Deadline 5 p.m. Thursday before publication
Open Mic for Originals
Onl y (noon) -Mama
Compton’s, 1725 2nd
Ave Rock Island, IL
Open Mic Night w/ Rob
Dahms (5pm) -Rustic
Ridge Golf Course Grille
& Pub, 1151 East Iowa
St. Eldridge, IA
Spoken Nerd -Gabe’s, 330
E. Washington St. Iowa
City, IA
Sunday Jazz Brunch (8:30
& 10:30am, 12:30pm)
-Bix Bistro, 200 E. 3rd St.
Davenport, IA
Trish Bruxvoort Colligan
- Jonathan Rundman - Jake Armer-
ding -CSPS/Legion Arts, 1103 3rd St
SE Cedar Rapids, IA
2014/08/11 (Mon)
ABC Karaoke -The Muddy Waters, 1708
State St. Bettendorf, IA
Chain & the Gang -The Mill, 120 E Burl-
ington Iowa City, IA
Live Lunch w/ Lewis Knudsen (noon)
-RME Community Stage, 131 W. 2nd
St. Davenport, IA
The Homel ess Open Mi c Proj ect
(1pm) -The Center, 1411 Brady St.
Davenport, IA
2014/08/12 (Tue)
ABC Karaoke -Creekside Bar and Grill,
3303 Brady St. Davenport, IA
ABC Karaoke -The Muddy Waters, 1708
State St. Bettendorf, IA
ABC Karaoke -The Rusty Nail, 2606 W
Locust Davenport, IA
Acoustic Music Club (4:30pm) -RME
(River Music Experience), 131 W. 2nd
St. Davenport, IA
Billy Peiffer & Collin Keemle Jam Night
-On the Rock Grille & Bar, 4619 34th
St Rock Island, IL
C.J. the D.J. -RIBCO, 1815 2nd Ave. Rock
Island, IL
Carlos Nunez -CSPS/Legion Arts, 1103
3rd St SE Cedar Rapids, IA
Cobra Kai Karaoke -Rumors Lounge &
Nightclub, 1704 Second Ave. Rock
Island, IL
Dirty Water Band -Barrel House Moline,
1321 5th Ave. Moline, IL
Fablos Karaoke Night -RME Community
Stage, 131 W. 2nd St. Davenport, IA
Karaoke Night -Applebee’s - Moline,
3805 41st Ave. Moline, IL
Lewis Knudsen Live Lunch (11am)
-Mama Compton’s, 1725 2nd Ave
Rock Island, IL
Open Mic Night -Rookies, 2818 N. Brady
St. Davenport, IA
Open Stage Night -Theo’s Java Club, 213
17th St. Rock Island, IL
Soulshake - Mixology -Gabe’s, 330 E.
Washington St. Iowa City, IA
Stardust Talent Night -The Old Stardust
Sports Bar, 1191 19th Street Moline, IL
The Curtsi Hawkins Band -Bass Street
Landing Plaza, Moline, IL
2014/08/15 (Fri)
ABC Karaoke -Circle Tap, 1345 Locust St.
Davenport, IA
ABC Karaoke -Creekside Bar and Grill,
3303 Brady St. Davenport, IA
ABC Karaoke -Moose Lodge - Daven-
port, 2333 Rockingham Rd Daven-
port, IA
AsBigAsAMouse - Battle Red - 9th St.
Memory -Bier Stube Moline, 417 15th
St Moline, IL
Ben Sol tau’s Bi g Funk Guarantee
-Iowa City Yacht Club, 13 S Linn St
Iowa City, IA
Ya Maka My Weekend: Remnance
(4:30pm) - Yard Squad featuring
Richy Rych & Zion (7:45pm) - Yard
Squad featuring Turbulence (9pm)
- Taj Weekes & Adowa (11pm) -Dis-
trict of Rock Island Jumer’s Casino &
Hotel Stage, 2nd Ave., between 17th
& 19th Sts. Rock Island, IL
Ya Maka My Weekend: sowFLo
(3:30pm) - DeHurricane (6:45pm)
- Indika (10pm) -District of Rock
Island Great River Plaza Stage, 2nd
Ave., between 17th & 19th Sts. Rock
Island, IL
2014/08/10 (Sun)
ABC Karaoke -11th Street Precinct, 2108
E 11th St Davenport, IA
ABC Karaoke -The Rusty Nail, 2606 W
Locust Davenport, IA
Alan Sweet & Friends (6pm) -The
Muddy Waters, 1708 State St. Bet-
tendorf, IA
Buddy Olson (3pm) -Ducky’s Lagoon,
13515 78th Ave Andalusia, IL
Cedar River Gentry featuring Ron
Hillis -Pearl Plaza, 208 W. 2nd St.
Muscatine, IA
Charlie Hayes and “Detroit”Larry Davi-
son (6pm) -On the Rock Grille & Bar,
4619 34th St Rock Island, IL
Chuck T. Murphy -Parksi de Gri l l &
Lounge, 2307 5th Ave Moline, IL
Danika Holmes & Jeb Hart (4pm) -Riv-
erside Casino and Golf Resort, 3184
Highway 22 Riverside, IA
Don Peachey Band (1pm) -Wal cott
Coliseum, 116 E Bryant St Walcott, IA
Jim Ryan (3pm) -Len Brown’s North
Shore Inn, 700 N. Shore Dr. Moline, IL
Milk Carton Kids -Englert Theatre, 221
East Washington St. Iowa City, IA
Corporate Rock -11th Street Precinct,
2108 E 11th St Davenport, IA
DollaMiiite Live Dance Mix -The Smok-
ing Dog Pub, 1800 2nd Ave. Rock
Island, IL
Doug Brundie's Big Acoustic Show
-Kilkenny's, 300 W. 3rd St., Daven-
port, IA
Flat Top (5pm) -Wide River Winery -
LeClaire, 106 N. Cody Rd. LeClaire, IA
Gray Wolf Band -On the Rock Grille & Bar,
4619 34th St Rock Island, IL
Identity Crisis -Len Brown’s North Shore
Inn, 700 N. Shore Dr. Moline, IL
IRRMA Dance Music -Riverside Casino
and Golf Resort, 3184 Highway 22
Riverside, IA
Joe Seng -Joe’s Club, 1402 W. 7th St.
Davenport, IA
Karaoke Night -Bowlmor Lanes, 2952 N.
Brady St. Davenport, IA
Karaoke Night -Rooster’s Sports Bar &
Grill, 2130 3rd Ave. Rock Island, IL
Kevin Gordon -The Mill, 120 E Burlington
Iowa City, IA
Kronos Resistor - The Archimedes
Death Ray - Crater -RIBCO, 1815 2nd
Ave. Rock Island, IL
Lyle Beaver Trio Dance -Walcott Coli-
seum, 116 E Bryant St Walcott, IA
Milk & Eggs - Brooks Strause & the Gory
Details (6:30pm) -Sheraton Iowa City
Hotel, 210 S. Dubuque St. Iowa City, IA
Pierced Productions Karaoke & DJ
featuring Leigh Timbrook -The
Old Stardust Sports Bar, 1191 19th
Street Moline, IL
River City Radio Hour (5:30pm) -Mo-
line Commercial Club, 513b 16th St
Moline, IL
River Roots Live: The Dawn (5pm) -
The Ballroom Thieves (6:10pm)
- Cracker (7:20pm) - North Mis-
sissippi Allstars (8:45pm) - Rob-
ert Randolph & the Family Band
Glenn Hickson (5pm) -Jake O’s Grille,
2900 Blackhawk Rd. Rock Island, IL
Open Jam Session -Brady Street Pub,
217 Brady St. Davenport, IA
Open Mic Night (6:30pm) -Cool Beanz
Coffeehouse, 1325 30th St. Rock
Island, IL
Open Mic Nite w/ Alan Sweet -Van’s
Pizza, Pub, & Grill, 3333 Harrison St.
Davenport, IA
Open Mic w/ Corey Wallace & Friends
-11th Street Precinct, 2108 E 11th St
Davenport, IA
The Baseball Project - Hugh Bob & the
Hustle -Codfish Hollow Barn, 3437
288th Ave. Maquoketa, IA
Twins - Crystal City - Midwest Charm
-Gabe’s, 330 E. Washington St. Iowa
City, IA
2014/08/13 (Wed)
ABC Karaoke -11th Street Precinct, 2108
E 11th St Davenport, IA
ABC Karaoke -Circle Tap, 1345 Locust St.
Davenport, IA
Acoustic Jam Night w/ Steve McFate
-McManus Pub, 1401 7th Ave Moline, IL
Burlington Street Bluegrass Band -The
Mill, 120 E Burlington Iowa City, IA
Cody Road Unpl ugged (6pm) -Go
Fish Marina and Bar, 411 River Dr.
Princeton, IA
Doug Brundie's Big Acoustic Show
-Valley Inn Ale House, 24575 Valley
Dr., Pleasant Valley, IA
Jam Session w/ Ben Soltau -Iowa City
Yacht Club, 13 S Linn St Iowa City, IA
Karaoke Night -RIBCO, 1815 2nd Ave.
Rock Island, IL
Kristen Ford -Gabe’s, 330 E. Washington
St. Iowa City, IA
Live Lunch w/ Lojo Russo (noon) -
Acoustic Open Mic Night (6:30pm)
-RME Community Stage, 131 W. 2nd
St. Davenport, IA
Open Mic Night -Rumors Lounge &
Nightclub, 1704 Second Ave. Rock
Island, IL
Open Mic Night w/ Karl Beatty & Mike
Miller -Boozie’s Bar & Grill, 114 1/2 W.
3rd St. Davenport, IA
The Chris & Wes Show -Ubriaco’s Trat-
toria, 1029 Mound St. Davenport, IA
The Devil Makes Three -The Redstone
Room, 129 Main St Davenport, IA
The Harris Collection Open Jam Ses-
sion -Brady Street Pub, 217 Brady St.
Davenport, IA
The Hitman (6pm) - Karaoke King
(9:30pm) -The Rusty Nail, 2606 W
Locust Davenport, IA
2014/08/14 (Thu)
ABC Karaoke -The Rusty Nail, 2606 W
Locust Davenport, IA
Alpha Consumer -Rozz-Tox, 2108 3rd
Ave. Rock Island, IL
Andy Avery (4, 7, & 9pm) -Riverside
Casino and Golf Resort, 3184 Highway
22 Riverside, IA
Jack Lion @ Rozz-Tox – August 16
14 THURSDAY
Continued From Page 21
00
15 FRIDAY
13 WEDNESDAY
11 MONDAY
12 TUESDAY
10 SUNDAY
Call: 563 355 0766
Hours: M-F: 8.30 am - 6.00 pm, Sat. : 9.00 am - 4.00 pm.
PREMIER
JEWELRY & LOAN
We Sell, Buy & Loan
875 Middle Road, Bettendorf. (Opposite Duck Creek Plaza)
on a wide selection of quality
electric and acoustic guitars &
amps, including vintage, custom,
rare and collectible models.
www.pjlqc.com
*
P
r
e
m
ie
r
d
e
a
ls

&
s
e
r
v
ic
e
Check out our great deals on:
l Band & orchestral instruments
l Electronics l Text Books
l Sports Equipment l Power Tools
l Gold, Silver & Diamond Jewelry
l Designer Watches l Collectibles & more.
reader1/8_Layout 1 4/17/14 12:31 PM Page 1
River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 21 No. 862 • August 7 - 20, 2014 23 Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com
Live Music Live Music Live Music
Email all listings to calendar@rcreader.com • Deadline 5 p.m. Thursday before publication
2014/08/20 (Wed)
ABC Karaoke -11th Street Precinct, 2108
E 11th St Davenport, IA
ABC Karaoke -Circle Tap, 1345 Locust St.
Davenport, IA
Acoustic Jam Night w/ Steve McFate
-McManus Pub, 1401 7th Ave Moline, IL
Acoustic Open Mic Night (6:30pm)
-RME Community Stage, 131 W. 2nd
St. Davenport, IA
Cody Road Unpl ugged (6pm) -Go
Fish Marina and Bar, 411 River Dr.
Princeton, IA
Deer Tick - The Weeks - The Lonely-
hearts -Gabe’s, 330 E. Washington
St. Iowa City, IA
Greg & Rich Acoustic Duo -Valley Inn
Ale House, 24575 Valley Dr., Pleasant
Valley, IA
Holly’s Buddies (6pm) - Karaoke King
(9;30pm) -The Rusty Nail, 2606 W
Locust Davenport, IA
Jam Session w/ Ben Soltau -Iowa City
Yacht Club, 13 S Linn St Iowa City, IA
Josh Duffee & and the Graystone
Monarchs -The Quarter Welcome
Center, bottom of 7th Street, along
the riverfront East Moline, IL
Karaoke Night -RIBCO, 1815 2nd Ave.
Rock Island, IL
Open Mic Night -Rumors Lounge &
Nightclub, 1704 Second Ave. Rock
Island, IL
Open Mic Night w/ Karl Beatty & Mike
Miller -Boozie’s Bar & Grill, 114 1/2 W.
3rd St. Davenport, IA
The Chris & Wes Show -Ubriaco’s Trat-
toria, 1029 Mound St. Davenport, IA
The Handsome Family -Englert Theatre,
221 East Washington St. Iowa City, IA
The Harris Collection Open Jam Ses-
sion -Brady Street Pub, 217 Brady St.
Davenport, IA
Greg & Rich Acoustic Duo -Village Pub
& Grill, 426 1st Ave. West Milan, IL
Hap Hazard -11th Street Precinct, 2108
E 11th St Davenport, IA
Identity Crisis -River House, 1510 River
Dr. Moline, IL
IRRMA Dance Music -Riverside Casino
and Golf Resort, 3184 Highway 22
Riverside, IA
Jack Lion - Id Pyramid - 1-2-1-2 -Rozz-
Tox, 2108 3rd Ave. Rock Island, IL
Jeff Jackson & Rob Dahms (7pm) - Dirty
Water Boys (9pm) -Broken Saddle,
1417 5th Ave. Moline, IL
Joe Tingle’s DJ Entertainment -Bar-
rel House Mol i ne, 1321 5th Ave.
Moline, IL
Karaoke Night -Boozie’s Bar & Grill, 114
1/2 W. 3rd St. Davenport, IA
Left Coast Country -Iowa City Yacht
Club, 13 S Linn St Iowa City, IA
North of 40 -Downtown Durant, Du-
rant, IA
Open Mic Night -Downtown Central
Perk, 226 W. 3rd St. Davenport, IA
Pierced Productions Karaoke & DJ
featuring Leigh Timbrook -The Old
Stardust Sports Bar, 1191 19th Street
Moline, IL
Powell -The Rusty Nail, 2606 W Locust
Davenport, IA
River Roots Live: One Night Stan-
dards (noon) - Twins (1: 15pm)
- Mr. Baber’s Neighbors (2:35pm)
- The Jayhawks (3:55pm) - ZZ Ward
(5:20pm) - Foxy Shazam (6:45pm)
- Ben Kweller (8pm) - Los Lonely
Boys (9:30pm) - Robert Jon & the
Wreck (11pm) -LeClaire Park, River
Dr & Ripley St Davenport, IA
Scott Helmer -Hardacre Theatre, 112 E
5th St Tipton, IA
Southern Thunder Karaoke -Hollar’s
Bar and Grill, 4050 27th St Moline, IL
Open Mic w/ J. Knight -The Mill, 120 E
Burlington Iowa City, IA
Rusty Belle - Thelma & the Sleaze
-Gabe’s, 330 E. Washington St. Iowa
City, IA
2014/08/19 (Tue)
ABC Karaoke -Creekside Bar and Grill,
3303 Brady St. Davenport, IA
ABC Karaoke -The Muddy Waters, 1708
State St. Bettendorf, IA
ABC Karaoke -The Rusty Nail, 2606 W
Locust Davenport, IA
Acoustic Music Club (4:30pm) -RME
(River Music Experience), 131 W. 2nd
St. Davenport, IA
Corporate Rock (6pm) -Isle of Capri,
1777 Isle Parkway Bettendorf, IA
Glenn Hickson (5pm) -Jake O’s Grille,
2900 Blackhawk Rd. Rock Island, IL
Mississippi Valley Country & Western
Music Association Concert: Quad
City Countrymen - Midnight Rid-
ers - Mississippi Valley Country
& Western Friends (6pm) -Lincoln
Park - DeWitt, DeWitt, IA
Open Jam Session -Brady Street Pub,
217 Brady St. Davenport, IA
Open Mic Night (6:30pm) -Cool Beanz
Coffeehouse, 1325 30th St. Rock
Island, IL
Open Mic Nite w/ Alan Sweet -Van’s
Pizza, Pub, & Grill, 3333 Harrison St.
Davenport, IA
Open Mic w/ Corey Wallace & Friends
-11th Street Precinct, 2108 E 11th St
Davenport, IA
Quad City Kix Band -RME Community
Stage, 131 W. 2nd St. Davenport, IA
Sur -Gabe’s, 330 E. Washington St. Iowa
City, IA
Greg & Rich Acoustic Duo (4pm) -Mul-
ligan’s Valley Pub, 310 W 1st Ave
Coal Valley, IL
Open Mic for Originals Only (noon)
-Mama Compton’s, 1725 2nd Ave
Rock Island, IL
Open Mic Night w/ Rob Dahms (5pm)
-Rustic Ridge Golf Course Grille & Pub,
1151 East Iowa St. Eldridge, IA
Randy Swift & Friends -Riverside Casino
and Golf Resort, 3184 Highway 22
Riverside, IA
Sunday Jazz Brunch (8:30 & 10:30am,
12:30pm) -Bix Bistro, 200 E. 3rd St.
Davenport, IA
2014/08/18 (Mon)
ABC Karaoke -The Muddy Waters, 1708
State St. Bettendorf, IA
Live Lunch w/ Lewis Knudsen (noon)
-RME Community Stage, 131 W. 2nd
St. Davenport, IA
Mississippi Valley Country & Western
Music Association Concert & Open
Jam (6pm) -East Moline American
Legion, 829 16th Ave. East Moline, IL
The Back Road Music Festival: Frankie
Ballard - Joe Diffie - Jon Pardi -
Rodney Atkins -Galva Park District,
SE 6th St. Galva, IL
The Holmes Brothers -The Muddy
Waters, 1708 State St. Bettendorf, IA
Them Som’Bitches (3pm) - Dirt Road
Rockers (8pm) -Bier Stube Moline,
417 15th St Moline, IL
The Savage Hacks - Pets with Human
Names - Velcro Moxie -Gabe’s, 330 E.
Washington St. Iowa City, IA
Wild Oatz -New Windsor Depot Bar &
Grill, 110 S. 5th Ave. New Windsor, IL
2014/08/17 (Sun)
ABC Karaoke -11th Street Precinct, 2108
E 11th St Davenport, IA
ABC Karaoke -The Rusty Nail, 2606 W
Locust Davenport, IA
Alan Sweet & Friends (6pm) -The Muddy
Waters, 1708 State St. Bettendorf, IA
Brett Newski - Emjay -Rozz-Tox, 2108
3rd Ave. Rock Island, IL
Buddy Olson (3pm) -Ducky’s Lagoon,
13515 78th Ave Andalusia, IL
(10:15pm) -LeClaire Park, River Dr &
Ripley St Davenport, IA
Satan’s God - Sinjo Thraw Mash - Blue
Movies -Rozz-Tox, 2108 3rd Ave.
Rock Island, IL
Southern Thunder Karaoke -Hollar’s
Bar and Grill, 4050 27th St Moline, IL
The Knockoffs -Jimbo’s Knucklehead
Saloon, 902 16th Ave. East Moline, IL
Twisted Mic DJ -Broken Saddle, 1417 5th
Ave. Moline, IL
Vagabond Entertainment presents
Kooby’s Karaoke - Bi er St ube
LeCl ai re, 1001 Canal Shore Dr.
LeClaire, IA
Vocal Expressions (5:30pm) - The Old
57’s (8pm) -The Rusty Nail, 2606 W
Locust Davenport, IA
2014/08/16 (Sat)
ABC Karaoke -Creekside Bar and Grill,
3303 Brady St. Davenport, IA
Blues Rock It Band -City Limits Saloon
& Grill, 4514 9th St. Rock Island, IL
Chickadees (4pm) -Wide River Winery
- Clinton, 1776 East Deer Creek Rd.
Clinton, IA
DollaMiiite Live Dance Mix -The Smok-
ing Dog Pub, 1800 2nd Ave. Rock
Island, IL
Doug Brundie's Big Acoustic Show
-Kilkenny's, 300 W. 3rd St., Daven-
port, IA
E11eventh Hour -RIBCO, 1815 2nd Ave.
Rock Island, IL
Flashpoint -On the Rock Grille & Bar,
4619 34th St Rock Island, IL
Floatzilla: The Tangents (11am) -Sunset
Marina, Rock Island, IL
Gayla Drake & Natalie Brown -Uptown
Bill’s Coffee House, 730 S. Dubuque
St. Iowa City, IA
Gray Wolf Band -Third Street Bar, 831 W.
3rd St. Davenport, IA
20 WEDNESDAY
18 MONDAY
19 TUESDAY
30
16 SATURDAY
17 SUNDAY
The Archimedes Death Ray @ RIBCO – August 15
TICKETS: $30 IN ADVANCE | $35 AT THE EVENT
NEW BREWERIES!
Featuring
September 20th
Saturday 1-5 PM
LECLAIRE PARK, DAVENPORT | BEER & ENTERTAINMENT
VISIT DAVENPORTJAYCEES.COM FOR TICKETS AND BEER LISTING!
River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 21 No. 862 • August 7 - 20, 2014 24 Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful