You are on page 1of 42

Data ONTAP® 7.

2
Brocade 200E and Brocade 5000
Switch Configuration Guide

NetApp, Inc.
495 East Java Drive
Sunnyvale, CA 94089 U.S.A.
Telephone: +1 (408) 822-6000
Fax: +1 (408) 822-4501
Support telephone: +1 (888) 4-NETAPP
Documentation comments: doccomments@netapp.com
Information Web: http://www.netapp.com

Part number 215-03809_A0


Updated for Data ONTAP 7.2.5 on 5 May 2008
Copyright and trademark information

Copyright Copyright © 1994–2008 NetApp, Inc. All rights reserved. Printed in the U.S.A.
information No part of this document covered by copyright may be reproduced in any form or by any means—
graphic, electronic, or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, taping, or storage in an
electronic retrieval system—without prior written permission of the copyright owner.

Portions of this product are derived from the Berkeley Net2 release and the 4.4-Lite-2 release, which
are copyrighted and publicly distributed by The Regents of the University of California. Copyright ©
1980–1995 The Regents of the University of California. All rights reserved.

Portions of this product are derived from NetBSD, copyright © Carnegie Mellon University.
Copyright © 1994, 1995 Carnegie Mellon University. All rights reserved. Author Chris G. Demetriou.

Permission to use, copy, modify, and distribute this software and its documentation is hereby granted,
provided that both the copyright notice and its permission notice appear in all copies of the software,
derivative works or modified versions, and any portions thereof, and that both notices appear in
supporting documentation.

CARNEGIE MELLON ALLOWS FREE USE OF THIS SOFTWARE IN ITS “AS IS” CONDITION.
CARNEGIE MELLON DISCLAIMS ANY LIABILITY OF ANY KIND FOR ANY DAMAGES
WHATSOEVER RESULTING FROM THE USE OF THIS SOFTWARE.

Software derived from copyrighted material of The Regents of the University of California and
Carnegie Mellon University is subject to the following license and disclaimer:

Redistribution and use in source and binary forms, with or without modification, are permitted
provided that the following conditions are met:

1. Redistributions of source code must retain the above copyright notices, this list of conditions,
and the following disclaimer.

2. Redistributions in binary form must reproduce the above copyright notices, this list of
conditions, and the following disclaimer in the documentation and/or other materials provided
with the distribution.

3. All advertising materials mentioning features or use of this software must display this text:
This product includes software developed by the University of California, Berkeley and its
contributors.

4. Neither the name of the University nor the names of its contributors may be used to endorse or
promote products derived from this software without specific prior written permission.

THIS SOFTWARE IS PROVIDED BY THE REGENTS AND CONTRIBUTORS “AS IS” AND
ANY EXPRESS OR IMPLIED WARRANTIES, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, THE
IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR
PURPOSE ARE DISCLAIMED. IN NO EVENT SHALL THE REGENTS OR CONTRIBUTORS
BE LIABLE FOR ANY DIRECT, INDIRECT, INCIDENTAL, SPECIAL, EXEMPLARY, OR
CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES (INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, PROCUREMENT OF
SUBSTITUTE GOODS OR SERVICES; LOSS OF USE, DATA, OR PROFITS; OR BUSINESS
INTERRUPTION) HOWEVER CAUSED AND ON ANY THEORY OF LIABILITY, WHETHER
IN CONTRACT, STRICT LIABILITY, OR TORT (INCLUDING NEGLIGENCE OR
OTHERWISE) ARISING IN ANY WAY OUT OF THE USE OF THIS SOFTWARE, EVEN IF
ADVISED OF THE POSSIBILITY OF SUCH DAMAGE.

ii Copyright and trademark information


This software contains materials from third parties licensed to NetApp, Inc. which is sublicensed, and
not sold, and title to such material is not passed to the end user. All rights reserved by the licensors.
You shall not sublicense or permit timesharing, rental, facility management or service bureau usage of
the Software.

Portions developed by the Apache Software Foundation (http://www.apache.org/). Copyright © 1999


The Apache Software Foundation.

Portions Copyright © 1995–1998, Jean-loup Gailly and Mark Adler


Portions Copyright © 2001, Sitraka Inc.
Portions Copyright © 2001, iAnywhere Solutions
Portions Copyright © 2001, i-net software GmbH
Portions Copyright © 1995 University of Southern California. All rights reserved.

Redistribution and use in source and binary forms are permitted provided that the above copyright
notice and this paragraph are duplicated in all such forms and that any documentation, advertising
materials, and other materials related to such distribution and use acknowledge that the software was
developed by the University of Southern California, Information Sciences Institute. The name of the
University may not be used to endorse or promote products derived from this software without
specific prior written permission.

Portions of this product are derived from version 2.4.11 of the libxml2 library, which is copyrighted
by the World Wide Web Consortium. NetApp modified the libxml2 software on December 6, 2001, to
enable it to compile cleanly on Windows, Solaris, and Linux. The changes have been sent to the
maintainers of libxml2. The unmodified libxml2 software can be downloaded from
http://www.xmlsoft.org/.

Copyright © 1994–2002 World Wide Web Consortium, (Massachusetts Institute of Technology,


Institut National de Recherche en Informatique et en Automatique, Keio University). All Rights
Reserved. http://www.w3.org/Consortium/Legal/

Software derived from copyrighted material of the World Wide Web Consortium is subject to the
following license and disclaimer:

Permission to use, copy, modify, and distribute this software and its documentation, with or without
modification, for any purpose and without fee or royalty is hereby granted, provided that you include
the following on ALL copies of the software and documentation or portions thereof, including
modifications, that you make:

The full text of this NOTICE in a location viewable to users of the redistributed or derivative work.

Any pre-existing intellectual property disclaimers, notices, or terms and conditions. If none exist, a
short notice of the following form (hypertext is preferred, text is permitted) should be used within the
body of any redistributed or derivative code: “Copyright © [$date-of-software] World Wide Web
Consortium, (Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Institut National de Recherche en Informatique
et en Automatique, Keio University). All Rights Reserved. http://www.w3.org/Consortium/Legal/”

Notice of any changes or modifications to the W3C files, including the date changes were made.
THIS SOFTWARE AND DOCUMENTATION IS PROVIDED “AS IS,” AND COPYRIGHT
HOLDERS MAKE NO REPRESENTATIONS OR WARRANTIES, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED,
INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO, WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS
FOR ANY PARTICULAR PURPOSE OR THAT THE USE OF THE SOFTWARE OR
DOCUMENTATION WILL NOT INFRINGE ANY THIRD PARTY PATENTS, COPYRIGHTS,
TRADEMARKS OR OTHER RIGHTS.

COPYRIGHT HOLDERS WILL NOT BE LIABLE FOR ANY DIRECT, INDIRECT, SPECIAL OR
CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES ARISING OUT OF ANY USE OF THE SOFTWARE OR
DOCUMENTATION.

Copyright and trademark information iii


The name and trademarks of copyright holders may NOT be used in advertising or publicity
pertaining to the software without specific, written prior permission. Title to copyright in this
software and any associated documentation will at all times remain with copyright holders.

Software derived from copyrighted material of NetApp, Inc. is subject to the following license and
disclaimer:

NetApp reserves the right to change any products described herein at any time, and without notice.
NetApp assumes no responsibility or liability arising from the use of products described herein,
except as expressly agreed to in writing by NetApp. The use or purchase of this product does not
convey a license under any patent rights, trademark rights, or any other intellectual property rights of
NetApp.
The product described in this manual may be protected by one or more U.S.A. patents, foreign
patents, or pending applications.

RESTRICTED RIGHTS LEGEND: Use, duplication, or disclosure by the government is subject to


restrictions as set forth in subparagraph (c)(1)(ii) of the Rights in Technical Data and Computer
Software clause at DFARS 252.277-7103 (October 1988) and FAR 52-227-19 (June 1987).

Trademark NetApp, the Network Appliance logo, the bolt design, NetApp—the Network Appliance Company,
information DataFabric, Data ONTAP, FAServer, FilerView, FlexClone, FlexVol, Manage ONTAP, MultiStore,
NearStore, NetCache, NOW NetApp on the Web, SecureShare, SnapDrive, SnapLock, SnapManager,
SnapMirror, SnapMover, SnapRestore, SnapValidator, SnapVault, Spinnaker Networks, SpinCluster,
SpinFS, SpinHA, SpinMove, SpinServer, StoreVault, SyncMirror, Topio, VFM, and WAFL are
registered trademarks of NetApp, Inc. in the U.S.A. and/or other countries. Cryptainer, Cryptoshred,
Datafort, and Decru are registered trademarks, and Lifetime Key Management and OpenKey are
trademarks, of Decru, a NetApp, Inc. company, in the U.S.A. and/or other countries. SANScreen is a
registered trademark of Onaro, Inc., a NetApp, Inc. company, in the U.S.A. and/or other countries.
gFiler, Network Appliance, SnapCopy, Snapshot, and The evolution of storage are trademarks of
NetApp, Inc. in the U.S.A. and/or other countries and registered trademarks in some other countries.
The NetApp arch logo; the StoreVault logo; ApplianceWatch; BareMetal; Camera-to-Viewer;
ComplianceClock; ComplianceJournal; ContentDirector; ContentFabric; EdgeFiler; FlexShare;
FPolicy; Go Further, Faster; HyperSAN; InfoFabric; LockVault; NOW; ONTAPI; RAID-DP;
ReplicatorX; RoboCache; RoboFiler; SecureAdmin; Serving Data by Design; SharedStorage;
Simplicore; Simulate ONTAP; Smart SAN; SnapCache; SnapDirector; SnapFilter; SnapMigrator;
SnapSuite; SohoFiler; SpinMirror; SpinRestore; SpinShot; SpinStor; vFiler; VFM Virtual File
Manager; VPolicy; and Web Filer are trademarks of NetApp, Inc. in the U.S.A. and other countries.
NetApp Availability Assurance and NetApp ProTech Expert are service marks of NetApp, Inc. in the
U.S.A.

IBM, the IBM logo, AIX, and System Storage are trademarks and/or registered trademarks of
International Business Machines Corporation.

Apple is a registered trademark and QuickTime is a trademark of Apple, Inc. in the U.S.A. and/or
other countries. Microsoft is a registered trademark and Windows Media is a trademark of Microsoft
Corporation in the U.S.A. and/or other countries. RealAudio, RealNetworks, RealPlayer,
RealSystem, RealText, and RealVideo are registered trademarks and RealMedia, RealProxy, and
SureStream are trademarks of RealNetworks, Inc. in the U.S.A. and/or other countries.

All other brands or products are trademarks or registered trademarks of their respective holders and
should be treated as such.

NetApp, Inc. is a licensee of the CompactFlash and CF Logo trademarks.

NetApp, Inc. NetCache is certified RealSystem compatible.

iv Copyright and trademark information


Table of Contents

Preface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . vii

Chapter 1 Brocade Metrocluster Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1


Brocade 200E and Brocade 5000 MetroCluster . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

Chapter 2 Brocade Switch Cabling. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5


Cabling a Brocade 200E and Brocade 5000 switch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
How switches are divided . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
Brocade 200E and Brocade 5000 switches . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8

Chapter 3 Virtual Channel Cabling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11


About virtual channels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
Cabling for virtual channels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Mapping virtual channels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15

Chapter 4 Brocade Switch Configurations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17


Configuring Brocade switches . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
Completing the configuration. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21

Chapter 5 Brocade Switch Zoning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23


Zoning overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
Configuring zones on the primary and secondary fabric . . . . . . . . . . . . 25

Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31

Table of Contents v
vi Table of Contents
Preface

About this guide This guide describes how Brocade 200E and Brocade 5000 switch models
operate with a MetroCluster, how to configure a Brocade switch in a fabric-
attached MetroCluster, and how to set up a fabric-attached MetroCluster. The
guide also describes how to cable virtual channels and how to use zoning.

Audience This guide is for system administrators who are familiar with operating systems
that run on the storage system’s clients, such as UNIX®, Linux®, and Windows®
2003. It also assumes that you are familiar with how to configure the storage
system and how the NFS, CIFS, and HTTP protocols are used for file sharing or
transfers. This guide does not cover basic system or network administration
topics, such as IP addressing, routing, and network topology; it emphasizes the
characteristics of the storage system.

Terminology Storage systems that run Data ONTAP® are sometimes also referred to as
appliances, storage appliances, or systems. The name of the graphical user
interface for Data ONTAP (FilerView) reflects one of these common usages.

FilerView as an As a storage system administrator, you can perform tasks by entering commands
alternative to at the console, in configuration files, or through a Telnet session or Remote Shell
commands connection.

Another method of performing common tasks is to use the FilerView® graphical


management interface for viewing and managing a storage system from a Web
browser. FilerView is easy to use, and it includes Help that explains FilerView
features and how to use them.

For more information about accessing a storage system using FilerView, and
about FilerView Help, see the Storage Management Guide.

Command You can enter storage system commands on the system console or from any client
conventions that can obtain access to the storage system using a Telnet session. In examples
that illustrate commands executed on a UNIX workstation, the command syntax
and output might differ, depending on your version of UNIX.

Preface vii
Formatting The following table lists different character formats used in this guide to set off
conventions special information.

Formatting
convention Type of information

Italic type ◆ Words or characters that require special attention.


◆ Placeholders for information you must supply.
For example, if the guide requires you to enter the
fctest adaptername command, you enter the
characters “fctest” followed by the actual name of
the adapter.
◆ Book titles in cross-references.

Monospaced font ◆ Command and daemon names.


◆ Information displayed on the system console or
other computer monitors.
◆ The contents of files.

Bold monospaced Words or characters you type. What you type is


font always shown in lowercase letters, unless your
program is case-sensitive and uppercase letters are
necessary for it to work properly.

Keyboard This guide uses capitalization and some abbreviations to refer to the keys on the
conventions keyboard. The keys on your keyboard might not be labeled exactly as they are in
this guide.

What is in this guide… What it means…

hyphen (-) Used to separate individual keys. For example,


Ctrl-D means holding down the Ctrl key while
pressing the D key.

Enter Used to refer to the key that generates a carriage


return; the key is named Return on some
keyboards.

type Used to mean pressing one or more keys on the


keyboard.

enter Used to mean pressing one or more keys and then


pressing the Enter key.

viii
Special messages This guide contains special messages that are described as follows:

Note
A note contains important information that helps you install or operate the
system efficiently.

Attention
An attention notice contains instructions that you must follow to avoid damage to
the equipment, a system crash, or loss of data.

Preface ix
x
Brocade Metrocluster Overview 1
About this chapter This chapter introduces the MetroCluster configuration and provides an overview
of virtual channels and switch fabric.

Topics in this This chapter discusses the following topic:


chapter ◆ “Brocade 200E and Brocade 5000 MetroCluster” on page 2

Chapter 1: Brocade Metrocluster Overview 1


Brocade 200E and Brocade 5000 MetroCluster

Description of a The MetroCluster configuration uses two storage systems that are connected to
MetroCluster provide high availability and data mirroring. You can place these two systems in
configuration different locations. When the distance between the two systems is greater than
500 meters, use four Brocade Fibre Channel switches in a fabric configuration to
connect the two systems. This configuration is called a fabric-attached
MetroCluster.

Switch fabrics A fabric-attached MetroCluster contains two switch fabrics. A switch fabric
consists of a switch on the local half of the cluster connected to a switch on the
remote half of the cluster. The two switches are connected to each other through
long-distance Inter-Switch Link (ISL) cables, as shown in the following
illustration.

When you are using a Brocade 200E switch, the maximum ISL distance is 50
kilometers at 4 gigabits, but with a Brocade 5000 switch, the distance increases to
100 kilometers.

For example, consider a MetroCluster configuration in which the first fabric


begins at Switch 1 on the local node and is completed by connecting the ISL
cable to the first switch (Switch 3) on the remote node. The second fabric is
created using Switch 2 on the local node, connected through a second ISL cable
to the second switch (Switch 4) on the remote node.

Note
Each fabric supports only one ISL.

2 Brocade 200E and Brocade 5000 MetroCluster


Dual Fabric Metro Cluster

Fabric 1
SW1 SW3

Fabric 2
SW2 SW4

Virtual channels If your storage systems support software-based disk ownership, you can use
Brocade’s virtual channel technology to isolate interconnect traffic from the
storage traffic stream and prevent port blocking.

Chapter 1: Brocade Metrocluster Overview 3


4 Brocade 200E and Brocade 5000 MetroCluster
Brocade Switch Cabling 2
About this chapter This chapter illustrates how to cable a Brocade 200E and Brocade 5000 switch.

Topics in this This chapter discusses the following topics:


chapter ◆ “Cabling a Brocade 200E and Brocade 5000 switch” on page 6
◆ “How switches are divided” on page 7
◆ “Brocade 200E and Brocade 5000 switches” on page 8

Chapter 2: Brocade Switch Cabling 5


Cabling a Brocade 200E and Brocade 5000 switch

Diagram of a The following illustration shows how the local storage system and the remote
Brocade 200E and storage system are cabled together through the switch fabric. This diagram is for
Brocade 5000 storage systems that support hardware-based disk ownership.
switch cabled
through the switch
fabric
Local Node Remote Node

Pool Pool
0 1 2 3 0 8 9 10 11 0 1 2 3 0 8 9 10 11
4 5 6 7 1 12 13 14 15 4 5 6 7 1 12 13 14 15

SW1 SW3
Long
Haul
FC
Pool Equipment Pool
0 1 2 3 0 8 9 10 11 0 1 2 3 0 8 9 10 11
4 5 6 7 1 12 13 14 15 4 5 6 7 1 12 13 14 15

SW2 SW4

Out In Out In
Local A Pool Local A Pool
Shelf 0 Shelf 0
B B
1 In Out 1 In Out

Out In Out In
Local A Pool Local A Pool
Shelf 0 Shelf 0
B B
2 In Out 2 In Out

Out In Out In
Remote A Pool Remote A Pool
Shelf 1 1 Shelf 1 1
B B
Mirror In Out Mirror In Out

Out In Out In
Remote A Pool Remote A Pool
Shelf 2 1 Shelf 2 1
B B
Mirror In Out Mirror In Out

6 Cabling a Brocade 200E and Brocade 5000 switch


How switches are divided

Switch banks and The Fibre Channel switches are divided into banks and quadrants. Each switch
quadrants has two banks that divide the switch into two equal parts. (See the switch
illustrations that follow.)

The banks are further divided into two quadrants of two or four ports each
(depending on the number of ports in the switch). These quadrants combine to
form pools, which function identically in a fabric-attached MetroCluster and a
mirrored cluster. Quadrants 1 and 3 belong to Pool 0, while Quadrants 2 and 4
belong to Pool 1. Each switch bank contains a Pool 0 and a Pool 1.

Note
Do not mix Brocade 200E and Brocade 5000 switches within a single fabric-
attached MetroCluster or across a fabric-attached MetroCluster.

Chapter 2: Brocade Switch Cabling 7


Brocade 200E and Brocade 5000 switches

Switches in The Brocade 200E switch has16 ports and the Brocade 5000 switch has 32 ports.
Brocade 200E and
Brocade 5000

32-port switches The Brocade 5000 switch has ports 0 through 31 licensed and operational.

16-port switches The Brocade 200E has ports 0 through 15 licensed and operational, as shown in
the following 16-port switch illustration.

200E
Bank 1 Bank 2

Pool 0 Pool 0
Quad 1 0 1 2 3 8 9 10 11 Quad 3
Pool 1 4 5 6 7 12 13 14 15 Pool 1
Quad 2 Quad 4

8 Brocade 200E and Brocade 5000 switches


8-port switches You can use the Brocade 200E switch as an 8-port switch by licensing only ports
0 through 7, as shown in the following illustration.

Note
Do not install Small Form Pluggables (SFPs) in unlicensed ports 8 through 15.
This might cause Data ONTAP to operate as if the switch is a 16-port switch and
erroneously assign pools to the unlicensed ports, preventing the MetroCluster
from functioning correctly.

Chapter 2: Brocade Switch Cabling 9


10 Brocade 200E and Brocade 5000 switches
Virtual Channel Cabling 3
About this chapter This chapter introduces Brocade virtual channel technology and describes
cabling for virtual channels.

Topics in this This chapter discusses the following topics:


chapter ◆ “About virtual channels” on page 12
◆ “Cabling for virtual channels” on page 13
◆ “Mapping virtual channels” on page 15

Chapter 3: Virtual Channel Cabling 11


About virtual channels

Virtual channel Brocade virtual channel technology logically partitions bandwidth within each
overview ISL into eight virtual channels. Storage system platforms that support software
disk ownership enable you to move away from quadrant cabling (as described
in“Diagram of a Brocade 200E and Brocade 5000 switch cabled through the
switch fabric” on page 6) and use virtual channel technology to isolate
interconnect traffic from the storage traffic stream.

Virtual channels ensures ISL reliability by preventing port blocking. When you
use virtual channel technology, no single node can monopolize all the bandwidth
of an ISL and block out traffic from other nodes.

Virtual channel technology applies only to ISLs. Each of the eight virtual
channels within an ISL includes a physical circuit as well as components for flow
control and buffer credit management. The eight virtual channels are numbered 0
through 7. You can use virtual channels 2 through 5 for either Class 2 or Class 3
data traffic.

12 About virtual channels


Cabling for virtual channels

Diagram of virtual The following illustration shows how to cable storage systems using software
channel 16-port disk ownership for virtual channel technology. This diagram applies to Brocade
cabling 200E switches.

Local Node Remote Node

0 1 2 3 8 9 10 11 0 1 2 3 8 9 10 11
4 5 6 7 12 13 14 15 4 5 6 7 12 13 14 15
SW1 SW3
Long
Haul
FC
Equipment
0 1 2 3 8 9 10 11 0 1 2 3 8 9 10 11
4 5 6 7 12 13 14 15 4 5 6 7 12 13 14 15
SW2 SW4

Out In Out In
Local A Pool Remote A Pool
Shelf 0 Shelf 0
B B
1 In Out 1 In Out

Out In Out In
Local A Pool Remote A Pool
Shelf 0 Shelf 0
B B
2 In Out 2 In Out

Out In Out In
Remote A Pool Local A Pool
Shelf 1 1 Shelf 1 1
B B
Mirror In Out Mirror In Out

Out In Out In
Remote A Pool Local A Pool
Shelf 2 1 Shelf 2 1
B B
Mirror In Out Mirror In Out

VC 2

Chapter 3: Virtual Channel Cabling 13


Diagram of virtual The following illustration shows how to cable storage systems using software
channel 32-port disk ownership for virtual channel technology. This diagram applies to Brocade
cabling 5000 switches.

Local Node Remote Node

0 1 2 3 8 9 10 11 16 17 18 19 24 25 26 27 0 1 2 3 8 9 10 11 16 17 18 19 24 25 26 27

4 5 6 7 12 13 14 15 20 21 22 23 28 29 30 31 4 5 6 7 12 13 14 15 20 21 22 23 28 29 30 31

SW1 SW3

Long
Haul FC
Equipment

0 1 2 3 8 9 10 11 16 17 18 19 24 25 26 27 0 1 2 3 8 9 10 11 16 17 18 19 24 25 26 27

4 5 6 7 12 13 14 15 20 21 22 23 28 29 30 31 4 5 6 7 12 13 14 15 20 21 22 23 28 29 30 31

SW2 SW4

Out In Out In
Local A Pool Remote A Pool
Shelf 0 Shelf 0
B B
1 In Out 1 In Out

Out In Out In
Local A Pool Remote A Pool
Shelf 0 Shelf 0
B B
2 In Out 2 In Out

Out In Out In
Remote A Pool Local A Pool
Shelf 1 1 Shelf 1 1
B B
Mirror In Out Mirror In Out

Out In Out In
Remote A Pool Local A Pool
Shelf 2 1 Shelf 2 1
B B
Mirror In Out Mirror In Out

VC 2

14 Cabling for virtual channels


Mapping virtual channels

Virtual channels You can map each virtual channel up to four destination ports—two on an 8-port
and their Brocade 200E switch, four on a 16-port Brocade 200E switch, and eight on a 32-
destination ports port Brocade 5000 switch. The following tables show how to map virtual
channels to specific destination ports.

Mapping virtual Use the following table to map virtual channels to an 8-port switch.
channels to an 8-
port switch Virtual
channel (VC) Destination port

2 0, 4

3 1, 5

4 2, 6

5 3, 7

Mapping virtual Use the following table to map virtual channels to a 16-port switch.
channels to a 16-
port switch Note
You can also use this configuration for a Brocade 5000 switch licensed for 16
ports.

VC Destination port

2 0, 4, 8, 12

3 1, 5, 9, 13

4 2, 6, 10, 14

5 3, 7, 11, 15

Chapter 3: Virtual Channel Cabling 15


Cable the interconnect and ISL ports into a dedicated virtual channel. For
example, cable VC2 into ports 0, 4, 8, and 12 on a 16-port switch. Cable the
remaining disk shelves and onboard storage host bus adaptors (HBAs) into the
other ports for VCs 3, 4, and 5. This ensures that any stalled node, typically disk
shelves, will not block interconnect traffic.

Mapping virtual Use the following table to map virtual channels to a 32-port switch.
channels to a 32-
port switch VC Destination port

2 0, 4, 8, 12, 16, 20, 24, 28

3 1, 5, 9, 13, 17, 21, 25 29

4 2, 6, 10, 14, 18, 22, 26, 30

5 3, 7, 11, 15, 19, 23, 27, 31

Note
Virtual channels for a Brocade 200E switch and a Brocade 5000 switch work
only at distances of less than 10 kilometers. If the ISL port is configured for a
distance greater than 10 kilometers on these switches, all four virtual channels (2
through 5) collapse into one channel.

16 Mapping virtual channels


Brocade Switch Configurations 4
About this chapter This chapter explains how to configure a Brocade 200E and a Brocade 5000
switch.

Topics in this This chapter discusses the following topics:


chapter ◆ “Configuring Brocade switches” on page 18
◆ “Completing the configuration” on page 21

Chapter 4: Brocade Switch Configurations 17


Configuring Brocade switches

Points to know To configure a Brocade 200E or Brocade 5000 switch for a fabric-attached
before you begin MetroCluster configuration, complete the procedures in this chapter.

Note
These procedures must be performed on each switch in the MetroCluster
configuration.

Use these procedures instead of the switch configuration procedures in the


Cluster Installation and Administration Guide or the Active/Active Configuration
Installation and Administration Guide.

Configuring a To configure a switch, complete the following steps.


switch
Step Action

1 If this switch has not been configured before, log in to the switch,
using the console port and your Windows HyperTerminal application
(not available in Windows Vista versions), and set the following
values, as described in the Brocade switch hardware reference
manual for your switch:
◆ IP address
◆ Default account passwords (administrator and user)
◆ Date and time

Note
Use the Telnet command for subsequent switch login sessions, using
the switch IP address.

18 Configuring Brocade switches


Step Action

2 Display the licenses installed on the switch by entering the following


command:
licenseshow

Result: You should have the following licenses:


◆ Fabric License (or two Domain Licenses)
◆ Extended Fabric License (for ISL distances over 10 km)
If you do not have these licenses, contact your sales representative
before proceeding.

3 Set the switch name, if needed, by entering the following command:


switchname switch_name

Note
Use a name that is meaningful, such as node name and switch.

4 Determine the switch firmware by entering the following command:


version
Result: The currently installed switch firmware is displayed.

5 Access the MetroCluster Compatibility Matrix on the NOW (NetApp


on the Web)®site at now.netapp.com to get the currently supported
version of the switch firmware.

Note
You can find this document under the Interoperability heading on the
Product Documentation page.

6 If your switch firmware is not the supported version, complete the


following steps:

a. Download the switch firmware from now.netapp.com and


install it, as described in the Brocade switch hardware
reference manual for your switch.

b. Reboot the switch.

Chapter 4: Brocade Switch Configurations 19


Setting the switch After configuring the switch, set the switch parameters by completing the
parameters following steps.

1 Disable the switch by entering the following command:


switchdisable

2 Clear any preexisting configuration by entering the following


commands:
cfgclear
cfgdisable
cfgsave

3 Configure the switch with default settings by entering the following


command:
configdefault

4 Set the switch parameters by entering the following command:


configure

Note
The domain ID might be specified by your system administrator. If
not, you can use any unique number, for example, 1, 2, 3, or 4.

You should set only the following parameters:


◆ Fabric parameters = y
❖ Domain_id = XXX
❖ Disable device probing = 1
◆ Arbitrated Loop parameters = y
❖ Send FAN frames = 0

20 Configuring Brocade switches


Completing the configuration

Steps for After the parameters are set, complete the configuration by performing these
completing the steps.
switch
configuration 1 After you have set the parameters listed in Step 4 in “Setting the
switch parameters” on page 20, exit the configuration utility by
entering the following command:
ctrl-d

2 Reboot the switch so that the new settings take effect, by entering the
following command:
fastboot

3 Log in to the switch and disable it by entering the following


command:
switchdisable

4 Perform the following commands only for the ports to which disks
are attached:

a. Set all ports attached to disk loops to half duplex by entering


the following command for each port number:

portCfgLPort <disk_port>,0,0,1

b. Set all ports attached to disk loops to Locked L-Port by


entering the following command for each port number:

portCfgLPort <disk_port>,1,0,1

5 Ensure that the disk loop port is showing ON in both the Locked
L_Port and Locked Loop HD fields by entering the following
commands:
portCfgShow
portCfglport
Result: ON is displayed in both the Locked L_Port and Locked
Loop HD fields.

Chapter 4: Brocade Switch Configurations 21


6 If your switch has the trunking license installed, disable trunking on
the ISL port by entering the following command:
portcfgtrunkport <ISL_port#> 0

7 To configure the long-distance ISL port for your ISL length, enter the
following command:
portcfglongdistance [slotnumber/portnumber]
[distance_level] [VC_Translation_Link_Init]
[desired_distance]
distance_level is one of the following values:
◆ As a normal switch port, use LO.
◆ For distances up to 10 km, use LE.
◆ For distances beyond 10 km, use LS. Specify 1 to activate long-
distance link initialization sequence, or specify 0 to deactivate
this mode. Then specify the distance.

Example: If your ISL length is 18 km, and your ISL is connected to


port 13, use the following command:
portCfgLongDistance 13 LS 1 18

8 Enable the switch by entering the following command:


switchenable

9 Verify that the switch settings are correct by entering the following
command:
configshow

22 Completing the configuration


Brocade Switch Zoning 5
About this chapter This chapter describes how to configure zones on the primary and secondary
fabric of a Brocade 200E switch and a Brocade 5000 switch.

Topics in this This chapter discusses the following topics:


chapter ◆ “Zoning overview” on page 24
◆ “Configuring zones on the primary and secondary fabric” on page 25

Chapter 5: Brocade Switch Zoning 23


Zoning overview

Brocade switch The Brocade switch zoning feature is available on the Brocade 200E and the
zoning feature Brocade 5000 switch. You can use it to set up two or more zones on the same
switch. Zones let you arrange fabric-connected storage devices into logical
groups, or zones, over the physical configuration of the fabric.

Zone members can access only other members of the same zone. You can use
zones to provide controlled access to fabric segments and to establish barriers
between operating environments. For example, you can isolate systems with
different uses or protect systems in a heterogeneous environment.

Note
No additional license is needed for zoning. The zoning license is enabled by
default when the switches are shipped.

24 Zoning overview
Configuring zones on the primary and secondary fabric

Configuration You need to create two zones on a Brocade 200E switch and a Brocade 5000
switch —one for a Fibre Channel Virtual Interface (FCVI) from a local node to a
remote node, and the second from the local node to local storage shelves.

Note
You must configure the primary and the secondary fabric separately.

Configuring zones To configure zones on the primary fabric of a Brocade 200E or Brocade 5000
on the primary switch, follow these steps.
fabric
Step Action

1 Use the Telnet command to connect to port 1 of the switch in the


primary fabric.

For example, use Telnet to log in to switch DOMAIN ID 1.

2 Create a zone for the FCVI traffic by entering the following


command:
zonecreate "zonename", member;member
"zonename" is the name of the zone, and member is the switch ID
and port number you want to include in this zone.

Example
The following example creates a zone called "FCVI" that includes switch 1,
port 15 on the local node, and switch 2, port 15 on the remote node.
zonecreate "FCVI", "1,15; 2,15"

Chapter 5: Brocade Switch Zoning 25


Step Action

3 Create a zone for the storage traffic from the local node to local
storage shelves by entering the following command:
zonecreate "zonename", member;member
"zonename" is the name of the zone, and member is the switch ID
and port number you want to include in this zone.
Example
The following example creates a zone "STOR" that includes switch
1, port 0; switch 1, port 4; switch 1, port 8; switch 2, port 0; switch 2,
port 8; and switch 2, port 12, all on your local node.
zonecreate "STOR", "1,0; 1,4; 1,8; 2,0; 2,8; 2,12"

4 Create the zoned configuration by entering the following command:


cgfcreate "Zone_<name>" <zonename>; <zonename>
Enter the zoned configuration name followed by the names of the
zones you created in the previous steps.
Example
The following example creates a zoned configuration named
"Zone_netapp" that includes the zones named FCVI and STOR.
cfgcreate "Zone_netapp", FCVI; STOR

5 Save and enable the zoned configuration by entering the following


command:
cfgenable "Zone_<name>"
Example
The following example saves and enables the Zone-netapp zoned
configuration.
cfgenable "Zone_netapp"

Note
Alternatively, you can save the zoned configuration into flash
memory using the command sfgsave instead of cfgenable.

26 Configuring zones on the primary and secondary fabric


Step Action

6 You can view the effective zoned configuration at any time by


entering the following command:
cfgshow

Note
The ISL port is not zoned. You can use any other port in any of the four
quadrants. For more information, see the Active/Active Configuration Guide for
Data ONTAP 7.2.5 or later.

Configuring zones Repeat the previous procedure to configure zones on the secondary fabric. Follow
on the secondary these steps.
fabric
Step Action

1 Use the Telnet command to connect to port 1 of the switch in the


secondary fabric.
For example, use Telnet to log in to switch DOMAIN ID 4.

2 Create a zone for the FCVI traffic by entering the following


command:
zonecreate "zonename", member;member
"zonename" is the name of the zone, and member is the switch ID
and port number you want to include in this zone.
Example
The following example creates a zone called "FCV12" that connects
switch 3, port 15 on your local node and switch 4, port 15. on your
remote node.
zonecreate "FCV12", "3,15; 4,15"

Chapter 5: Brocade Switch Zoning 27


Step Action

3 Create a zone for the storage traffic from the local node to local
storage shelves by entering the following command:
zonecreate "zonename", member;member
"zonename" is the name of the zone, and member is the switch ID
and port number you want to include in this zone.
Example
The following example creates zone "STOR2" that includes switch 3,
port 0; switch 3, port 4; switch 3, port 8; switch 4, port 0; switch 4,
port 8; and switch 4, port 12, all on your local node.
zonecreate "STOR2", "3,0; 3,4; 3,8; 4,0; 4,8; 4,12"

4 Create the zoned configuration by entering the following command:


cgfcreate "Zone_<name>" <zonename>; <zonename>
Enter the zoned configuration name followed by the names of the
zones you created in the previous steps.
Example
The following example creates a zoned configuration named
"Zone_netapp2" that includes the zones named FCVI2 and STOR2.
cfgcreate "Zone_netapp2", "FCVI2; STOR2"

5 Save and enable the zoned configuration by entering the following


command:
cfgenable "Zone_<name>"
Example
The following example saves and enables the Zone-netapp2 zoned
configuration.
cfgenable "Zone_netapp2"

Note
Alternatively, you can save the zoned configuration into flash
memory using the command sfgsave instead of cfgenable.

28 Configuring zones on the primary and secondary fabric


Step Action

6 You can view the effective zoned configuration at any time by


entering the following command:
cfgshow

Chapter 5: Brocade Switch Zoning 29


30 Configuring zones on the primary and secondary fabric
Index

Numerics destination ports 15


disabling a switch 21
16-port switch 8
disk loops 21
32-port switch 16
disk shelves 16
domain ID 20
A
access 24 E
audience, intended for this book vii
effective zoned configuration,viewing 27
Extended Fabric License 19
B
banks 7 F
Brocade 200E 8
Fabric License 19
Brocade 200E switch 15, 24
fabric-attached MetroCluster 2, 7
Brocade 5000 8, 15
Fibre Channel Virtual Interface (FCVI) 25
Brocade Fibre Channel switches 2
FilerView vii
buffer credit management 12

C H
half duplex 21
cfgenable 26, 28
host bus adaptors 16
cfgshow 27, 29
cgfcreate 26, 28
commands I
cgfcreate 28
interconnect ports 16
configshow 22
interconnect traffic 12
configure 20
Inter-Switch Link (ISL) cables 2
switchdisable 20
ISL 12
switchenable 22
ISL length 22
switchname 19 ISL ports 16
version 19
configuration 21
configuring zones 27 L
conventions license 24
command vii local node 25, 26, 27, 28
formatting viii logical groups 24
keyboard viii long-distance ISL port 22

D M
default 24 MetroClusters
default settings 20 configuring the switches in 17

Index 31
fabric-attached 2 switch firmware 19
switch ID 27, 28
switch parameters 20
N switch settings 22
node name 19 switch zoning feature 24
switches
banks 7
O checking firmware revision 19
operating environments 24 configuring for MetroCluster 17
disabling 20
P pools 7
quadrants 7
parameters 20, 21
setting the parameters 20
physical circuit 12
system administrator 20
pools 7
port blocking 12
port number 21, 27, 28 T
ports 7, 21 Telnet 25, 27
primary fabric 25 terminology vii
trunking license 22
Q
quadrant cabling 12 V
quadrants 7 virtual channel technology 11, 12
virtual channels
R mapping 15
overview 12
remote node 25, 27

S Z
zonecreate command 25, 27, 28
secondary fabric 27
zoned configuration 26
software disk ownership 12
zoned configuration name 28
special messages ix
zoning feature, Brocade switch 24
stalled node 16
zoning license 24
storage traffic 12
zoning overview 28
switch fabric 2

32 Index