You are on page 1of 28

INSDSG 684 Syllabus-

Design and Instruction of Online Courses


Fall
2014

Updated: August 10, 2014 Page 1
This Course Syllabus is licensed under a
Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

University of Massachusetts Boston
College of Advancing and Professional Studies (CAPS)
Instructional Design Graduate Program

Instructor Information

Apostolos Koutropoulos, MBA, MSIT, MEd, MA
a.koutropoulos@umb.edu
Phone (W): 617-287-5990
Office Hours: virtual office hours by request

Note: Throughout the semester, I will communicate with you via your UMB email account. Please review
the following website for a job aid that will assist you in forwarding your UMB email account to your
personal account if you prefer:
http://howto.wikispaces.umb.edu/Forward+Student+UMB+Email+to+Personal+Account

Classes begin Monday September 8, 2014 and ends Friday December 5, 2014
Spring 2014 Academic Calendar: http://www.umb.edu/registrar/academic_calendar
Course Information

Course Title: Design and Instruction of Online Courses

Prerequisites: INSDSG 601, INSDG 640, Instructional Design Master or Certificate degree student; or
permission of instructor.

Prerequisite Skills:

1. Application-level knowledge of instructional design principles and practices
2. Basic computer skills, which include:
Operating system skills (e.g.: opening applications, file management)
Microsoft Word and Microsoft PowerPoint application knowledge
Internet Skills (e.g.: ability to navigate the Internet, search, upload/download files)
Some knowledge of a course management system would be useful
Some HTML authoring, graphics, and multimedia expertise.
Helpful: Teaching/training experience


INSDSG 684 Syllabus-
Design and Instruction of Online Courses
Fall
2014

Updated: August 10, 2014 Page 2
This Course Syllabus is licensed under a
Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

Course
Description: This course is for instructors, teachers, trainers, or instructional designers who want to
explore the critical success factors in designing and delivering online instruction. Through
readings, discussion, and various activities, we will examine the pedagogical implications of
technology-mediated learning, the dynamics of the virtual classroom, the elements of
effective online course design, as well as the tools and technologies available to create and
deliver online instruction design, and to assess student performance. Through group-based
and individual project work, we will design and create online modules. This course will use
a range of interactive and collaborative instructional techniques in an effort to provide
current or potential online instructors rich firsthand experience of what it is like to be a
student learning in an online environment.

Technical Requirements:
This course has the option to use Blackboard Collaborate web conferencing system. It is a
good idea to go through Blackboard Collaborate at the beginning of the semester to make
sure you can access the service and work out any bugs before you really need to use it for
work. One cautionary note: some students who have attempted to participate in a
Blackboard Collaborate session from their work sites have found that firewalls block their
access so this is something to check out before your session.
You will also need a headset with microphone to fully participate and can also use a
webcam if you have one. If you experience difficulty with the audio over the web then
there is an opportunity to also call in via phone (phone charges may apply depending on
your location). There is also the capability to upload PowerPoint presentations, use a group
whiteboard and utilize text chat. All group Blackboard Collaborate sessions are recorded
and archived for future reference
This course will also employ a variety of media that will require the presence of free plugins
like Flash, Adobe Acrobat Reader, Real Player and Windows Media Player. All necessary
plug-ins to accommodate the different types of media can be found in the Course Content-
Resources Plug-Ins folder.
Students will be developing content for their online course project during the semester
however there is no requirement to use specific applications for development. This choice
is up to the student and is often driven by what is available at the worksite or owned
personally. At the end of this syllabus I have included some links to free Learning
Management Systems that you can use as part of this course.
INSDSG 684 Syllabus-
Design and Instruction of Online Courses
Fall
2014

Updated: August 10, 2014 Page 3
This Course Syllabus is licensed under a
Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

Required Text(s):
Anderson, Terry,(ed.) 2008. The Theory and Practice of Online Learning. 2
nd
edition.
Online book: Athabasca University. Weekly chapters of the e-book can be downloaded
at no cost from: http://www.aupress.ca/index.php/books/120146 by clicking on the
Free PDF tab towards the bottom of the page. Note that the entire book is over 400
pages so you may wish to hold off and just download the chapters for the week as
needed.
Palloff, Rena M. and Pratt, Keith, 2007. Building Online Learning Communities: Effective
Strategies for the Virtual Classroom, 2
nd
Ed. Jossey-Bass.
ISBN-978-0-7879-8825-8 (Papeback) or 2009 e-book ISBN: 978-0-470-60546-2
Other Reading: Other readings as assigned, articles included in the course each week.

Recommended but not required
Ko, Susan and Rosen, Steve, 2010. Teaching Online: A Practical Guide. 3
rd
ed. Boston:
Houghton Mifflin. ISBN-13: 978-0415997331.

Course
Objectives: By fully participating in this course, you should be able to master the following Course
Objectives (CO):
1. Describe the pedagogical/andragogical implications of learning in an online
environment and relate them to your own student populations
2. Explain at least one model of instructional design in addition to the Dick and Carey
model
3. Develop content with a universal design approach that will consciously address the
needs of different types of learners with a range of learning styles
4. Scaffold an online or hybrid, instructor-led course to support collaboration and
communication in an online, global environment using the Conrad and Donaldson
Phases of Engagement model
5. Identify the key success factors for delivering effective online instruction in your own
online or hybrid course design
6. Evaluate a range of tools, techniques, and technologies available to develop content,
manage instruction, and assess student performance in online courses and implement
those most effective for their own course design
7. Design at least six modules, fully implement a minimum of three of those modules and
conduct at least one module in an instructor-led, online/hybrid course within a course
management system
INSDSG 684 Syllabus-
Design and Instruction of Online Courses
Fall
2014

Updated: August 10, 2014 Page 4
This Course Syllabus is licensed under a
Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

IBSTPI Core
Competencies: If you are looking to align this course with some professional competencies, the objectives
for this course focus on the following IBSTPI (International Board of Standards in Training
and Performance Improvement) Core Competencies (I) for Instructional Designers:

1. Professional Foundations
a. Communicate effectively in visual, oral and written form. (Essential)
b. Apply current research and theory to the practice of instructional design.
(Advanced)
c. Update and improve one's knowledge, skills and attitudes pertaining to
instructional design and related fields. (Essential)
2. Planning and Analysis
a. Select and use a variety of techniques for determining instructional content.
(Essential)
b. Identify and describe target population characteristics. (Essential)
c. Analyze the characteristics of the environment. (Essential)
d. Analyze the characteristics of existing and emerging technologies and their
use in an instructional environment. (Essential)
e. Reflect upon the elements of a situation before finalizing design solutions and
strategies. (Essential)
3. Design and Development
a. Select, modify, or create a design and development model appropriate for a
given project. (Advanced)
b. Select and use a variety of techniques to define and sequence the
instructional content and strategies. (Essential)
c. Select or modify existing instructional materials. (Essential)
d. Develop instructional materials. (Essential)
e. Design instruction that reflects an understanding of the diversity of learners
and groups of learners. (Essential)
f. Evaluate and assess instruction and its impact. (Essential)

Required
Assignments: Final Project deliverables will include three parts:
1. A complete design for an online or blended course that makes clear the overall
online strategy in addition to the content goals of the course. A design document
template will be provided that will include a detailed module and content plan for
the online course with a minimum of 6 modules.
INSDSG 684 Syllabus-
Design and Instruction of Online Courses
Fall
2014

Updated: August 10, 2014 Page 5
This Course Syllabus is licensed under a
Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

2. Implementation of a minimum of 3 modules in a course management system
3. Peer review reports
Deliverables are due by the Sunday of any given week, by 12:00 EST (Noon EST)

Assignment/Deliverable Course
Objective

ID PLO
(see Bb)
IBSTPI Points
(or %)
0. Week1 Join UMassID.com if you havent
joined already (tip: join with an address that is
not your school address. This will allow you
access to the network after you graduate).
Post a blog post introducing yourself and
participate in the community. This is part of
your participation grade.
7.1
7.4
7.5
I1a
1. Week 2a - Jigsaw project working in
dyads on course discussion forum, build an
understanding of other ID models with each
team researching and working on assigned ID
models. Included are a summary of main
components, underlying learning theory,
application to online instructional design
including resources and additional links.
CO 2
CO 3


1.2
1.4
7.1
7.3
7.4
7.5
8.2

I1a
I1b
I1c
I2c
100
Week 2b Submit project proposal for Final
Project
CO 1


2.1
2.2
2.3
2.4
2.6
8.1
I1a 100
2. Week 3 Complete activities on Learning
Styles including writing a learner
characteristic statement for proposed final
course project
CO 1
CO 3

2.2
2.6
I1a
I1b
I1c
I2b
60
3. Week 4 Using supplied design document
template, create and sequence an outline of a
minimum of six modules for the final course
project; write a minimum of three course
level objectives.
CO 6

3.1
3.2
4.5
5.1
7.1
7.2
7.6
8.1
8.5
I3a
I3b
100
4. Week 5 Access LMS course shell created CO 3 3.1 I3b 100
INSDSG 684 Syllabus-
Design and Instruction of Online Courses
Fall
2014

Updated: August 10, 2014 Page 6
This Course Syllabus is licensed under a
Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

for final course project; based on Week 4
assignment work, add module headings
corresponding to topical outline; add single
web page for course objectives to your
course; write at least two learning objectives
for a minimum of three modules on your
design document.


3.6
4.5

5. Week 6a Inventory available content,
applications and skills and select/create/add
content for at least three modules on your
design document.
CO 6


3.2
3.3
3.5
4.1
4.2
4.3
4.4
4.5
4.6
6.1
I2d
I3a
I3b
I3c
I3d
100
6. Week 6b. Access LMS course shell for final
course project and, based on your revised
design document from last week, add learning
objectives to at least three modules; add one
web page to a module that combines at least
two types of media
CO 5


3.2
3.3
3.5
4.1
4.2
4.3
4.4
4.5
4.6
5.4
6.1
I3d 100
7. Week 6c Complete Citing and Fair Use
Knowledge Quiz to demonstrate knowledge
of copyright and fair use guidelines
CO 6


1.2
1.3
1.4
I3c 100
8. Week 7 Add at least one discussion
question to three of your modules on your
design document and then add to your
course.
CO 4

3.1
3.2
3.3
3.6

I1a
I2d
I3b
I3e
50
9. Week 8a Begin group assignment with
your peer reviewers group to design at least
one activity for each of the Conrad and
Donaldsons Four Phases of Engagement for a
fictional online course about leadership
development. You would need to develop a
phase activity for each member of the group.
For example if there are three members, you
CO 4


4.1
4.2
4.6
5.1
5.3
5.4
7.1
7.2
I2a
I2d
I3a
I3b
I3c
I3d
I3e
25
INSDSG 684 Syllabus-
Design and Instruction of Online Courses
Fall
2014

Updated: August 10, 2014 Page 7
This Course Syllabus is licensed under a
Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

would develop activities for three out of the
four phases.
7.3
7.4
7.5
8.2
10. Week 8b Revise your design document
to include interactive activities for at least
four topics that illustrate the Four Phases of
Engagement. Add at least three interactive
activities from this list to your LMS course
shell.
CO 4


8.5 I2a
I2d
I3a
I3b
I3c
I3d
I3e
100
12. Week 9 Design and develop a rubric to
evaluate student performance on one of the
assignments from your design document.
Upload and link this rubric to your LMS course
shell.
CO 6

3.1
3.2
3.4
3.5
3.6
I3f 100
13. Week 10a Design and develop at least
one orientation material to help prepare your
students for your course. Add this material to
your LMS course shell.
CO 5

4.2
4.3
4.4
4.5
4.6
8.5
I3a
I3b
I3e
100
14. Week 10b Create a syllabus to add to
your course based on your design document
and upload/link it to your LMS course shell
CO 7


8.5 I3d
I3e
100
15. Week 11a Complete the design
document for a minimum of six topics.
CO 7


3.2-3.6
4.1-4.6
5.1
5.3-5.5
6.1
7.1-7.2
8.5
I1b
I2a
I2d
I2e
I3a
I3b
I3e
100
16. Week 11b Complete full development of
a minimum of three modules in the LMS
course shell
CO 7


3.2-3.6
4.1-4.4 & 4.6
5.1
5.3-5.5
6.1
7.1-7.2
8.5
I3a
I3b
I3c
I3d
I3e
I3f
100
17. Week 12 Peer Group Review In
groups, review each others courses, complete
at least one full module in each course and
use a provided rubric to assess each others
LMS courses.
CO 1
CO 3
CO 4
CO 5
CO 6
7.1
7.2
7.3
7.4
7.5
I2d
I2e
I3f
100
INSDSG 684 Syllabus-
Design and Instruction of Online Courses
Fall
2014

Updated: August 10, 2014 Page 8
This Course Syllabus is licensed under a
Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

CO 7


7.6
8.2
18. Week 13 Final project presentations
create a narrated presentation to explain each
course project, address challenges, reflections
on learning and share plans for next steps.
The software you use is up to you, however
your fellow students need to be able to click a
link and view and hear you describe whats
going on; like watching a YouTube video.
Blackboard Collaborate is one of the
technology options for this assignment.
CO 1
CO 3
CO 4
CO 5
CO 6
CO 7


4.4
5.4
7.1
7.4
7.6

I1a
I1c
I2c
I2d
I2e
I3e
I3f
50
Total Weekly Assignments/Activities 25%
Participation (as defined above)
Discussions/Reflections
25%

Course
Policies: Participation - Attendance and presence are required for this class. The Discussion Board
and selected posts on umassid.com make up our "classroom" so logging in defines your
presence. I expect you to let me know ahead of time if you will be unable to participate for a
week, or if this is not possible, to be in touch with me as soon as you can thereafter. E-mail
is the best way to notify me.
You are expected to log on to the course website a minimum of three times a week and to
post a substantive contribution to the discussion at that time. You are expected to post an
original reflection by Thursday of each week and then reply to at least two of your peers by
Sunday. Simply saying "I agree" is not considered a substantive contribution! You must
support your position or add somehow to the discussion when logging on. Try to relate the
topic to your own experience if possible. Please review the rubric for discussion board
postings in the Getting Started module so you can see how I will evaluate your
contributions.
Group Work This course depends on your involvement with online discussion and
activities. Be aware that the responses and learning of your peers depend on your timely
contributions, especially for the group assignments in the course. You will be directed each
week whether to post your assignments/reflections in either the Discussion Board to a
specific topic or to another communication/collaboration site or designated folder.
Please review the descriptions of the assignments while you work on them and before you
post the finished product. A common mistake is to become intrigued with a wonderful
tangential idea and not address the assignment requirements. It may be fun to do but you
may lose points.
INSDSG 684 Syllabus-
Design and Instruction of Online Courses
Fall
2014

Updated: August 10, 2014 Page 9
This Course Syllabus is licensed under a
Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

Norms to ponder: timeliness, confidentiality within your group, dealing with group issues
within the group, and civility and supportive criticism only. We want this to be an
intellectual "safe" zone. For specific assignments that require you to work in a group I
dont specify internal group deadlines. There is one assignment deadline and your group
should negotiate amongst its members what should be done and by what time.
Late Work Adhering to proven characteristics of andragogy, there will be an emphasis on
the exploratory and experiential. We will utilize discussion, small group work, and
individual activities to engage with the material. For this reason, it is very important that
you keep up with the reading assignments and log in a minimum of three times per week,
which includes posting your weekly reflection question by Thursday 6 p.m. EST so that
there will be sufficient time to interact with your peers. Discussion topics will be turned off
one week following the end of the discussion in order to keep the class moving. Lack of
preparation and failure to engage in the many learning opportunities in this course will be
taken into account in your final grade. Course deliverables are expected to be on time
unless there is some extenuating circumstance. Points will be deducted for late work at a
rate of 5-points for every day a deliverable is late. This includes discussion forum
assignments and work. No late work will be accepted five days after the due date.
(Example: if an assignment is due on Sunday, the last possible day to submit it is the
following Friday. Your maximum grade for the assignment at that point will be 75%)



Grading

Grading: Grade type for the course is a whole or partial letter grade. (Please see table below)
Note: the lowest passing grade for a graduate student is a C. Grades lower than a C
that are submitted by faculty will automatically be recorded as an F.
Course Rubric:
Grade Type: Whole Letter Grade (A - F)
Grade Percentages for Final Course Grade:
50% - Final Project (25% for plan [completed design document], 25% for development and implementation)
25% - Discussion/Reflection Postings
25% - Weekly Assignments and Activities
Please see the Graduate Bulletin for more detailed information on the Universitys grading policy.

INSDSG 684 Syllabus-
Design and Instruction of Online Courses
Fall
2014

Updated: August 10, 2014 Page 10
This Course Syllabus is licensed under a
Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

UMass Boston Graduate Grading Policy

Letter
Grade
Percentage
Quality
Points
A 93-100% 4.0
A- 90-92% 3.7
B+ 87-89% 3.3
B 83-86% 3.0
B- 80-82% 2.7
C+ 77-79% 2.3
C 73-76% 2.0
F 0-72% 0.0
INC
Given under very restricted terms and only when satisfactory work has been accomplished in
majority of coursework. Contract of completion terms is required.
N/A
INC/F Received for failure to comply with contracted completion terms. N/A
W Received if withdrawal occurs before the withdrawal deadline. N/A
AU Audit (only permitted on space-available basis) N/A
NA
Not Attending (student appeared on roster, but never attended class. Student is still responsible for
tuition and fee charges unless withdrawal form is submitted before deadline. NA has no effect on
cumulative GPA.)
N/A

INSDSG 684 Syllabus-
Design and Instruction of Online Courses
Fall
2014

Updated: August 10, 2014 Page 11
This Course Syllabus is licensed under a
Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

Methods of Instruction

Methods: This course is an instructor-facilitated, fully online asynchronous course conducted via the
Blackboard Learn course management system. Weekly discussion, small group work, and
individual activities will provide opportunities for student-to-content, student-to-student
and student-to-instructor involvement. Although the course will be conducted
asynchronously, there can be opportunities for synchronous sessions during the semester
to provide real-time interaction. A variety of multimedia will be incorporated including
podcasts, video clips, narrated streaming PowerPoint presentations, articles, weekly
discussion forums, interactive games, and weekly formative assessments. Hands-on
development for the final course project will take place in either the Moodle LMS or the
students organizational LMS and will include materials developed with a range of
multimedia chosen by the student.

Accommodations

Section 504 and the American with Disabilities Act of 1990 offer guidelines for curriculum modifications and
adaptations for students with documented disabilities. If applicable, you may obtain adaptation
recommendations from the UMass Boston Ross Center (508-287-7430). You need to present and discuss
these recommendations with me within a reasonable period, prior to the end of the Drop/Add period.

You are advised to retain a copy of this syllabus in your personal files for use when applying for future
degrees, certification, licensure, or transfer of credit.

Code of Student Conduct

Students are required to adhere to the Code of Student Conduct, including requirements for the Academic
Honesty Policy, delineated in the University of Massachusetts Boston Graduate Studies Bulletin and
relevant program student handbook(s).
http://media.umassp.edu/massedu/policy/3-08%20UMB%20Code%20of%20Conduct.pdf

Other Pertinent and Important Information
Incomplete Policy: Incompletes will be assigned only in cases of illness, accident, or other catastrophic
occurrences beyond a student's control. Incompletes are given under very restricted terms and only when
satisfactory work has been accomplished in majority of coursework. A contract of completion terms is
required for all incompletes with concrete deliverables on specific due dates.
Coursework Difficulties: Please discuss all coursework matters with me sooner than later.

INSDSG 684 Syllabus-
Design and Instruction of Online Courses
Fall
2014

Updated: August 10, 2014 Page 12
This Course Syllabus is licensed under a
Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

Course Schedule

Week 1
Topic Introduction to Online Design
Course Begins February 3, 2014
Objectives Upon completion of this module, students should be able to:
1. Explain the course goals, format, and requirements
2. Navigate Blackboard and successfully post to the discussion board
3. Add a student profile picture and information within Blackboard
4. Add a personal introduction blog post on umassid.com
5. Explain a little about your classmates
6. Demonstrate understanding of some online learning terminology
7. Explain some key variables that interact to create online educational experiences
and context
8. Describe several delivery models of distance education
Readings/Media Please read the content in the Getting Started link on the course home page and post any
questions you may have to the discussion board under the Questions/Help Topic.
Please read Chapter 2: Towards a Theory of Online Learning from The Theory and Practice of
Online Learning edited by Terry Anderson
Please read The Sloan Consortium Quality Framework and the Five Pillars article (.pdf) which
outlines quality standards for online learning.
Activities Review all Orientation materials
Browse the E-Learning Consulting site and review the e-learning definitions. This
page contains some straightforward definitions that help clarify some of the terms
we'll be using this term. You'll also find more definitions on the Glossary on the
course menu for future reference. If you notice anything that is missing let me
know and I'll add it.
Assignments 1. Complete readings
2. Complete pre-assessment
3. Complete Student Profile (on Blackboard)
4. Post Introduction to umassid.com
5. Respond to fellow classmates introductions on umassid.com
6. Complete discussion post activity
7. Sign up for the Dyad group activity on the sign-up sheet.
8. Complete Week 1 Feedback

INSDSG 684 Syllabus-
Design and Instruction of Online Courses
Fall
2014

Updated: August 10, 2014 Page 13
This Course Syllabus is licensed under a
Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

Week 2

Topic
Instructional Design Models for Online Learning
Objectives Upon completion of this module, students should be able to:
Summarize the characteristics and components of a particular instructional design
model in addition to the Dick and Carey model
Explain the potential of utilizing an instructional system design model in an e-
learning environment
Describe the connection between a learning theory and an instructional design
model
Recognize a variety of instructional system design models
Identify some of your peers
Identify a topic for your final project
Readings/Media Please read Chapters 1 and 2 (pages 21-37) from Survey of Instructional Design Models 4th
Edition by Gustafson and Branch
Please read Design and development research: a model validation case by Monica W. Tracey
What is Backward Design? by Grant Wiggins and Jay McTighe. A different approach to
instructional design.
Optional but interesting
Two studies at Washington State University explored the impact of investing in up-front
instructional design of online courses on the cost of their subsequent development and
teaching, and on the quality of the resulting courses. The findings suggest that instructional
design pays off in both ways.
The Instructional System Design Manual from Don Clark's Performance, Learning,
Leadership and Knowledge website. A really comprehensive overview of the ADDIE model
that underlies most ID models.
The Future of Course Redesign and the National Center for Academic Transformation: An
Interview with Carol A. Twigg by William H. Graves and Carol A. Twigg discusses the
possibility of redesigning courses using technology to improve learning while simultaneously
reducing instructional costs.
Activities Review any remaining peer profiles (on Blackboard)
Participate on umassid.com discussions
INSDSG 684 Syllabus-
Design and Instruction of Online Courses
Fall
2014

Updated: August 10, 2014 Page 14
This Course Syllabus is licensed under a
Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

Assignments 1. Complete readings
2. Respond to weekly discussion
3. Jigsaw project - dyads participate in building an index of ID Model characteristics in
discussion forum
4. Submit proposal for Final Project topic
5. Sign-up for Design-Document Outline Group in the sign-up sheet
6. Complete Week 2 Assessment
Week 3
Topic Learner Characteristics
Objectives Upon completion of this module, students should be able to:
1. Explain why learning styles may or may not be applicable to course design
2. Apply what you've learned by suggesting three activities that involve different
modes of processing to help students learn about the same topic,
3. Explain the requirements of the final project
4. Complete learner characteristics for your final project
Readings/Media Please read
Have a look at Kolbs Learning Styles
Have a look at the VARK categories
Read Do Generational Differences Matter in Instructional Design? by Thomas Reeves
View Learning Styles Don't Exist by Daniel Willingham
Read Stop Wasting Time on Learning Styles but Ruth Colvin-Clark
Read Do Learners Really Know Best? Urban Legends in Education by Kirschner & van
Merrienboer.
Read Digital Natives, Digital Immigrants by Marc Prensky
Read Do they really think differently? By Marc Prensky
Read Digital Natives: 10 years after by Apostolos Koutropoulos

Optional but interesting:
Brain Rules videos by John Medina
Activities Complete Activities relating to knowledge and learning
Assignments 1. Complete readings
2. Respond to weekly discussion
3. Complete the three exercises and post as directed
4. Using the supplied design document template, write the learner characteristics
statement for projected participants in your Final Project course
INSDSG 684 Syllabus-
Design and Instruction of Online Courses
Fall
2014

Updated: August 10, 2014 Page 15
This Course Syllabus is licensed under a
Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

5. Complete Week 3 Assessment

Week 4
Topic Designing Your Online Course
Objectives Upon completion of this module, students should be able to:
1. Describe considerations in organizing and sequencing online course content
2. Inventory available resources for final project
3. Identify necessary components of course objectives
4. Write at least three course objectives for Final Project
5. Create a topical outline for an online course
Readings Read
Chapter 13: Planning Your Online Course by Kaminski and Currie in Education for a Digital
World
How to Write Great Learning Objectives by Kevin Kruse
View Curtis Bonk planning your online course
Peruse through the resources in this module

Activities Listen/watch mini lecture on designing your online course
Inventory available resources for final project
Critique dyad partner's topical outline and sequencing
Respond to discussion question
Assignments 1. Using the supplied design document template, write at least three course
objectives for Final Project course
2. Using the supplied design document template, create an outline of at least six
topics for your Final Project course with at least two learning objectives per topic
3. Sign-up for Peer Review groups
4. Complete Week 4 Assessment
Week 5
Topic Overview of Learning Management Systems (LMS)
Objectives Upon completion of this module, students should be able to:
1. Define what a learning management system (LMS) is and explain its role
2. Describe the features available within a common LMS and explain how they can be
INSDSG 684 Syllabus-
Design and Instruction of Online Courses
Fall
2014

Updated: August 10, 2014 Page 16
This Course Syllabus is licensed under a
Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

used to support instructional methods
3. Provide an overview of the Moodle (or other) LMS
4. Log into Moodle (or your own LMS), build a simple course page, and add some
content

Readings/Media Please read Course Management Systems versus Learning Management Systems. For those
of you who work in corporate settings and are more familiar with an LMS, no more sleepless
nights pondering this one.
Envisioning the Post-LMS Era: The Open Learning Network
Fiedler & Valjataga: Personal learning environments: a conceptual landscape revisited
Lisa Lane Insidious Pedagogy: How course management systems impact teaching
Optional but interesting
If you purchased the Susan Ko & Steve Rossen, Teaching Online: A Practical Guide, reading
Chapters 5 & 6 would be helpful this week.
Read Dabbagh & Kitsantas: Personal Learning Environments, social media, and self-
regulated learning: A natural formula for connecting formal and informal learning.
Select any of the resources listed below to learn about Moodle. (Note: if you will be using
your own LMS, review the resources available on that LMS.)
Watch:
Overview of Moodle a very brief visual overview by Alja Sulcic
Getting Started with Moodle: A brief overview of Moodle 2.0
Peruse the Instructor Training for Blackboard on Atomic Learning
Read:
Peruse the pages in the About Moodle section of the Moodle documentation. Note that
Moodle documentation is created in a wiki--you can edit it or add comments if you want
to....

You can also peruse the Canvas Getting Started pages, if you will be using canvas as your
LMS.
Activities 1. Identify the course management system you will use for your final project
2. Access Moodle account for Final Project (you may substitute organization's LMS if
you have access to one)
3. Create Moodle course shell (may substitute organization's LMS if you have access
to one)
INSDSG 684 Syllabus-
Design and Instruction of Online Courses
Fall
2014

Updated: August 10, 2014 Page 17
This Course Syllabus is licensed under a
Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

4. Respond to discussion question
Assignments 1. Add module headings to your course for each of your topics in your final project
2. Add a simple text page containing your course objectives to your course (tip: you
can copy/paste from your design document)
3. Add an initial discussion topic to your course inviting your students to introduce
themselves to the class
4. Complete readings/media
5. Complete Week 5 Assessment
Week 6
Topic Choosing Digital Content
Objectives Upon completion of this module, students should be able to:
1. Identify range of media for delivering content
2. Explain benefits and challenges for incorporating different types of media into an
online environment
3. Design and create/convert content for an online module using at least two media
that support the module's learning objectives and instructional methods
4. Explain copyright and fair use considerations for online materials
5. Add content to a module in your LMS course
6. Explain the four main guidelines of copyright law
7. Describe fair use considerations for utilizing materials
Readings/Media Read
Chapter 6: Media Characteristics and Online Learning Technology by Patrick J. Fahy.
In Theory and Practice of Online Learning.
Copyright and Fair Use from Intellectual Property in the Information Age. ASHE Higher
Education Report, 2008, Vol. 34 Issue 4, p31-52.
Copyright and You - Fair Use Analysis Tool: Empowering ECT Professionals to Make Fair Use
Decisions by Christine Greenhow, JD Walker, Daniel Donnelly, and Bradley Cohen.
Try out the tool at: http://www.lib.umn.edu/copyright/checklist.phtml
Test your comprehension with the Citing and Fair Use Knowledge Quiz
Review Creative Commons process to license, share, remix, and reuse your own material
and that of others.
Watch
Lawrence Lessig: Laws that choke creativity
INSDSG 684 Syllabus-
Design and Instruction of Online Courses
Fall
2014

Updated: August 10, 2014 Page 18
This Course Syllabus is licensed under a
Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

Optional but interesting:
Copyright Clearance Center
The UT System Crash Course in Copyright
Activities Watch/listen to the Digital Content mini-lecture
Respond to discussion question
Assignments 1. Inventory available content, applications and skills and select/create/add content
for at least three modules on your design document
2. Access LMS course shell for final course project and, based on your revised design
document from last week, add learning objectives to at least three topical modules
(tip: copy/paste from your design document; add one web page to a module that
combines at least two types of media (e.g. text, graphic, video clip, audio clip, etc.)
3. Complete Citing and Fair Use Knowledge Quiz to demonstrate knowledge of
copyright and fair use guidelines
4. Add two favorite resources to the appropriate discussion forum
5. Complete Week 6 Assessment

Week 7
Topic Communication Strategies for Engaging Learners
Objectives Upon completion of this module, students should be able to:
1. Identify available communication tools and strategies for online courses
2. Explain the difference between asynchronous and synchronous communication
tools
3. Describe the strengths and weaknesses of synchronous communication tools and
strategies
4. Compare the strengths and weaknesses of asynchronous communication tools and
strategies.
Readings/Media Read
Please read Chapters 2, 3 and 4 in our text Building Online Learning Communities: Effective
Strategies for the Virtual Classroom by Palloff and Pratt
Karen Swan, Relationships between Interactions and Learning in Online Environments

Watch
Using Discussion Boards to Engage Students
A brief reflection by a faculty member on the use of discussion boards to engage students
INSDSG 684 Syllabus-
Design and Instruction of Online Courses
Fall
2014

Updated: August 10, 2014 Page 19
This Course Syllabus is licensed under a
Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

after her first semester teaching at a distance.
Optional but interesting:
Computer-mediated discussion, self-efficacy and gender
iLED: Interactive Learning Experience Design
Communities of Practice
Adding Social Media to e-Learning in the Workplace: Instilling an Interactive
Learning Culture
Activities Watch/listen to mini lecture on communication strategies
Sign up for peer review group
Add reviewers to your own course
Assignments 1. Add at least one discussion question to three of your modules on your
design document and then add to your course.
2. Complete Week 7 Assessment
3. Post to Discussion
Week 8
Topic Collaboration Strategies for Engaging Learners
Objectives Upon completion of this module, students should be able to:
1. Describe strategies and techniques that foster a supportive collaborative online
learning community
2. Explain Phases of Engagement and how they fit into an online course design
3. List instructional methods that can engage learners and enhance interactivity
4. List the Web 2.0 technologies that can be used to enhance interactive and
collaborative online learning.
5. Design at least one collaborative activity for online learning
Readings/Media Read
Please read Chapter 8 in our text Building Online Learning Communities: Effective Strategies
for the Virtual Classroom by Palloff and Pratt
J. Ana Donaldson, Ed.D. and Rita-Marie Conrad, Ph.D., Developing Learner-Led Knowledge
Generating Online Communities.
Watch
Learning and Working in the Collaborative Age: A New Model
INSDSG 684 Syllabus-
Design and Instruction of Online Courses
Fall
2014

Updated: August 10, 2014 Page 20
This Course Syllabus is licensed under a
Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

Fostering Online Collaboration and Teaming
Optional but interesting:
Videos:
Promoting Collaborative Learning Using Wikis
Salman Khans TED Talk
Twitter and the World Simulation
Connecting Students Globally Through Video-Conference Pedagogy
Using Skype to Teach: Learn New Languages
Collaborize Classroom for Online Education and Collaboration
Teaching with Online Discussion Forums
Michael Wesch: TED Talk on Media and Teaching Students to Become Knowledge-Able
Building eLearning and Blended Learning Communities
Helping design educators foster collaborative learning amongst design students
Using Online Discussion to Foster Communication in Onsite Classes
Articles:
Building eLearning and Blended Learning Communities
Helping design educators foster collaborative learning amongst design students
Palloff & Pratt Collaborating Online: Learning Together in Community, Part 2
Conrad & Donaldson Engaging the Online Learner: Activities and Resources for Creative
Instruction
Kathleen Iverson eLearning Games: Interactive learning strategies for digital delivery
Ryan Watkins 75 e-Learning activities: Making Online Learning more interactive
Assignments Group assignment
In your peer review group, design activities for each of Conrad and Donaldson's four phases
of engagement for a sample online course using group dynamics as your topic. Each group
member should design an activity for one phase.
Activities 1. Revise your design document to include interactive activities for at least four topics
that illustrate the Four Phases of Engagement.
2. Add at least three interactive activities from this list to your LMS course shell.
3. Complete Week 8 Assessment
Week 9
Topic Assessment in the Online Environment
Objectives Upon completion of this module, students should be able to:
1. Describe strategies and tools for assessment in online learning
2. Design and create an assessment tool for online instruction
INSDSG 684 Syllabus-
Design and Instruction of Online Courses
Fall
2014

Updated: August 10, 2014 Page 21
This Course Syllabus is licensed under a
Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

3. Explain ways to combat cheating in an online course
Readings/Media Read
Read Chapter 10 in the Building Online Learning Communities by Rena M. Palloff and Keith
Pratt.
Assessment at a Higher Level: An Instructor's Perspective by Vicki Galloway Harsh.
Evaluating Online Learning by Clive Shepherd.
Videos
Calculating the Return on Investment for Training and Development
Optional but Interesting:
Readings:
Ways to Prevent Cheating in Online Tests
7 Things You Should Know Assessing Online Team-Based Learning
UNSW Assessment Toolkit
JISC Effective Assessment in the Digital Age
Videos:
Authentic Assessment - Brief video on the shift to performance based assessment used in a
Seattle High School.
Authentic Assessment and Learner-Centered Digital Story a short student presentation on
learner centered assessment.
Training Impact Evaluation that Senior Managers Believe and Use
E-Portfolios to recognize learning
E-Portfolios: Digital Stories of Deep Learning
Badges for Life Long Learning
Using Assessment to Improve Instruction
Activities Respond to discussion question
Assignments 1. Design and develop a rubric to evaluate student performance for one assignment
or activity in your own course and upload as an assignment to our class
2. Complete Week 9 Assessment

Week 10
Topic Teaching Online
Objectives or Goals Upon completion of this module, students should be able to:
1. Explain administrative strategies key to successful online courses
INSDSG 684 Syllabus-
Design and Instruction of Online Courses
Fall
2014

Updated: August 10, 2014 Page 22
This Course Syllabus is licensed under a
Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

2. Describe strategies for keeping students on track
3. Identify requirements for student preparation for online learning
4. Describe recommended guidelines for classroom management
5. Identify cultural/global considerations in teaching online
6. Assemble a syllabus
Readings


Read
Chapter 7: Building Foundations from Building Online Learning Communities by Palloff and
Pratt
Transition from the Classroom to the Web: Successful Strategies for Teaching Online by
Helen Zsohar and Jackie A. Smith
Reflections on Teaching Online: The Myths and Realities of One Instructor's Journey by Lisa
Kirtman
Choose at least ONE of the following media depending on your area of interest:
Higher Education
Efficient Online Teaching Part 1 by Beth Dobler, a University faculty member (video - 9
minutes)
Efficient Online Teaching Part 2 by Beth Dobler (video 9:19 minutes)
Efficient Online Teaching Part 3 by Beth Dobler (video 6:18 minutes)
Corporate Training
Virtual Employee Training Guide in a Wiki - getting employees started in a corporate online
training program (video 5:25 minutes)
The Virtual Facilitator by Cynthia Clay (especially for those corporate instructors planning on
teaching synchronously)
K-12 Online
Teaching the World Skype Blog An online blog on using Skype to teach online.
Optional but interesting:
Using Transformative Pedagogy When Teaching Online by Steven A. Myers
Chapter 14: Teaching in an Online Learning Context from The Theory and Practice of Online
Learning edited by Terry Anderson
Chapter 24 Evaluating and Improving Your Online Teaching Effectiveness by Kevin Kelly
in Education for a Digital World.
Time Management Strategies. (UW Stout)
Time Management Strategies for Online Teaching (ITDL.org)

INSDSG 684 Syllabus-
Design and Instruction of Online Courses
Fall
2014

Updated: August 10, 2014 Page 23
This Course Syllabus is licensed under a
Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

Videos
Why I Teach Online - University faculty discuss why they teach online and what benefits
they see for students (video 5:07 minutes).
Efficient Online Teaching Part 4 three minutes more of Beth Dobler
Quick Tips for Online Teaching - Online University faculty share their thoughts (video 5:11
minutes).

Assignments Design and develop your own "Getting Started" orientation and preparation
materials for prospective students in your final project course. These materials can
be in any form you choose.
Create a syllabus for your course and submit as an assignment
Add the syllabus to your own course in Moodle or LMS of choice
Add all orientation materials to your course (either in Moodle or your own LMS)
Assignments 1. Respond to discussion
2. Complete Week 10 Assessment
Week 11
Topic UDL & Final Project Implementation
Objectives Demonstrate mastery of design, development and assessment of quality online
courses
Demonstrate a basic understanding of the principles of Universal Design for
Learning
Readings Universal Design for Learning: Meeting the needs of all students by Patricia Kelly
Ralabatte
Browse thought the UDL resource
library: http://www.udlcenter.org/resource_library
Download, browse through and familiarize yourself with the UDL
guidelines: http://www.udlcenter.org/aboutudl/udlguidelines/downloads

Activities 1. Using the revised design document as a map, students will complete
implementation of at least three fully developed course modules in a course
management system and notify peer reviewers of completion
2. Upload finalized design document for a minimum of six modules for your final
INSDSG 684 Syllabus-
Design and Instruction of Online Courses
Fall
2014

Updated: August 10, 2014 Page 24
This Course Syllabus is licensed under a
Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

project as an assignment
Week 12
Topic Final Peer Reviews
Objectives Demonstrate understanding of concepts and components of successful online
course design by participating in and reviewing a final project developed by a peer
Activities Students will review each peer review member's course
Students will complete one module in the course of each member of their peer
review group
Assignments Students will complete a supplied rubric for each reviewed course and e-mail the
completed rubric to the course developer
Students will upload copies of completed rubrics to instructor as an assignment
Week 13
Topic
Course ends
Summative Course Review
May 10, 2013
Objectives or Goals Review of what worked and what could be improved for the course
Student reflections on their experiences in designing and developing a course for
an online environment
Activities Reflect on this journey
Share plans for next steps
Assignment Complete course evaluation



INSDSG 684 Syllabus-
Design and Instruction of Online Courses
Fall
2014

Updated: August 10, 2014 Page 25
This Course Syllabus is licensed under a
Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

Bibliography
Alkhalifa, E. (2007). Influencing the self-efficacy of Middle Eastern women through the use of a bulletin
board. AACE Journal, 16(2), 95-114. Retrieved from
http://www.editlib.org/d/24256/article_24256.pdf
Anderson, T. (ed.) ( 2008). The theory and practice of online learning. Athabasca University. Retrieved from
http://www.aupress.ca/index.php/books/120146
Armenta-Cota, J. (2011). Multiple perspectives on the influence of gender in online interactions. Sociology
Compass (5)1, 2336.
Astin, A. W., Banta, T.W., Cross, K. P., El-Khawas, E., Ewell, P. T., Hutchings, P., Marchese T. J., Wright, B.
D. (1996). 9 principles of good practice for assessing student learning, AAHE. Retrieved from
http://ultibase.rmit.edu.au/Articles/june97/ameri1.htm#9
Clay, C. (2008). The virtual facilitator. ASTD Learning Circuits. Retrieved from
http://www.astd.org/lc/2008/0908_clay.html
Cole, J. (2007). Using moodle: Teaching with the popular open source course management system, 2nd Ed.
O'Reilly Press. Available from: http://docs.moodle.org/en/Using_Moodle_book
Copyright and Fair Use (2008). Intellectual Property in the Information Age. ASHE Higher Education Report,
34 (4), 31-52.
Carliner, S. (2005). Course management systems versus learning management systems. ASTD Learning
Circuits. Retrieved from http://www.astd.org/LC/2005/1105_carliner.htm
Dabbagh, N. & Kitsantas, A. (2012) Personal Learning Environments, social media, and self-regulated
learning: A natural formula for connecting formal and informal learning. The Internet and Higher
Education. 15(1) p. 3-8. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.iheduc.2011.06.002.
Donaldson, J.A. and Conrad, R. (2005, August). Developing learner-led knowledge generating online
communities. Paper presented at the 20thAnnual Conference on Distance Teaching and Learning,
Madison, WI. Retrieved from
http://www.uwex.edu/disted/conference/Resource_library/proceedings/04_1351.pdf
Fiedler, S.H.D. & Vljataga, T. (2013). Personal Learning Environments: A conceptual landscape revisited.
eLearning Papers. 35. Retrieved from: http://openeducationeuropa.eu/mt/node/131184

INSDSG 684 Syllabus-
Design and Instruction of Online Courses
Fall
2014

Updated: August 10, 2014 Page 26
This Course Syllabus is licensed under a
Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

Graves, W., and C. Twigg. 2006. The future of course redesign and the national center for academic
transformation: An interview with Carol A. Twigg. Innovate 2 (3). Retrieved from
http://www.innovateonline.info/index.php?view=article&id=218
Greenhow, C., Walker, J.D., Donnelly, D., & Cohen, B. (2008). Fair use education for the twenty-first
century: A comparative study of students' use of an interactive tool to guide decision making.
Innovate, 4(2). Retrieved from http://www.innovateonline.info/index.php?view=article&id=443
Gustafson, K.L., & Branch, R.M. (1997). Survey of instructional development models: Fourth edition.
Syracuse, NY: ERIC Clearing house of Information & Technology.
Harper, D. (ed.),( 2008). Education for a digital world: Advice, guidelines, and effective practice from around
the globe. Available from http://www.col.org/resources/crsMaterials/Pages/edDigitalWorld.aspx
Harsh, V. G. (2008). Assessment at a Higher Level: An Instructor's Perspective. Educators Voice. Retrieved
from http://www.ecollege.com/Newsletter/EducatorsVoice/EducatorsVoice-Vol10Iss1.learn
Kirschner, P.A. & van Merrinboer, J.J.G. (2013). Do Learners Really Know Best? Urban Legends in
Education. Educational Psychologist. 43(3).
Kirtman, L. (2008). Reflections on teaching online: The myths and realities of one instructor's journey.
Diverse Issues in Higher Education. Retrieved from http://diverseeducation.com/article/11954/
Ko, Susan and Rosen, Steve, 2010. Teaching Online: A Practical Guide. 3
rd
ed. Boston: Houghton Mifflin.
ISBN-13: 978-0415997331. Also available in Kindle format.
Krovitz, G. (2007). Ways to Prevent Cheating in Online Tests. Educators Voice (8) 6. Retrieved from
http://www.ecollege.com/Newsletter/EducatorsVoice/EducatorsVoice-Vol8Iss6.learn
Kruse, K. (2005). How to Write Great Learning Objectives. e-Learning Guru.com. Retrieved from
http://www.e-learningguru.com/articles/art3_4.htm
Lin, S. & Overbaugh, R. C. (2009). Computer-mediated discussion, self-efficacy and gender. British Journal
of Educational Technology, 40 (6) 999-1013.
Meyers, S. A. (2008). Using transformative pedagogy when teaching online. College Teaching (56), 219-224
Palloff, R. M. & Pratt, K. (2007). Building Online Learning Communities: Effective Strategies for the Virtual
Classroom. Jossey-Bass. ISBN-13: 978-0-7879-8825-8
Reeves, T. (2006), Do generational differences matter in instructional design? Retrieved from
http://it.coe.uga.edu/itforum/Paper104/ReevesITForumJan08.pdf
INSDSG 684 Syllabus-
Design and Instruction of Online Courses
Fall
2014

Updated: August 10, 2014 Page 27
This Course Syllabus is licensed under a
Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

Rovai A. P., (2002). Building a sense of community at a distance. International Review of Research in Open
and Distance Learning, ( 3) 1. 1-12
Shepherd, C. (1999). Evaluating online learning. Retrieved from http://www.fastrak-
consulting.co.uk/tactix/Features/evaluate/evaluate.htm
Shepherd, C. (2008). Learning styles don't exist. [web log]. Retrieved from http://clive-
shepherd.blogspot.com/2008/08/learning-styles-don-exist.html
Swan K., (2004). Relationships between interactions and learning in online environments. Retrieved from
http://www.yccd.edu/documents/viewdocument.php?id=1786
Tracey, M. W. Design and development research: a model validation case. Educational Technology Research
and Development (57) 4, 553-571. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11423-007-9075-0
Wiggins, G. & McTighe, J. (1998). What is backward design from Understanding by Design. Association of
Supervision and Curriculum Development.
Zsohar H., Smith J.A. (2008). Transition from the classroom to the web: Successful strategies for teaching
online. Nursing Education Perspectives, (29) 2328.

Learning Management Systems (partial list)

For the semester project you may want to use Moodle (supported by UMass Boston), or you may
want to use another LMS. The following is a partial list of where you can look for a learning management
system that you can use free of charge for your semester project. You are most certainly encouraged to use
an LMS that you are most familiar with, especially if you have time constraints with work or family that
prevent you from experimenting with new systems. There is, however, also something to be gained by
experimenting with a system that you have limited, or no exposure, to; this way you can learn a new
system to add to your growing body of professional skills.
This partial list of Free LMS should be good enough to get you started:
1. Moodle (offered through UMass Boston, ask AK)
2. Blackboard Learn: http://www.coursesites.com
3. Instructure Canvas: http://www.instructure.com/
4. Lore (formerly CourseKit): http://lore.com/
INSDSG 684 Syllabus-
Design and Instruction of Online Courses
Fall
2014

Updated: August 10, 2014 Page 28
This Course Syllabus is licensed under a
Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

5. Sakai (through rSmart): http://www.rsmart.com/
6. Haiku LMS (K-12 focus): http://www.haikulearning.com/
7. Pearson OpenClass (ask AK, available through umassid.com Google apps)
8. Claroline: http://www.claroline.net/
9. Schoology: https://www.schoology.com
Standing on the shoulders of giants!
This syllabus is based on, and a continuation the work of Brenda Meyers and Linda Beith. Thank you!