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August 7, 2014 Gazette Calvert Priceless Living the Dream Sam Grow Returns from Nashville for Southern
August 7, 2014
Gazette Calvert
Priceless
Living the Dream
Sam Grow Returns
from Nashville for Southern
Maryland Performance
Attention Readers: The Calvert Gazette Will be Refreshing it’s Look in the
Near Future, Starting With a Name Change to The Calvert County Times.
S
tory
P
age
13
Photo by Mike Batson

The Calvert Gazette

Thursday, August 7, 2014

2

In a career span- ning five decades, Journey is blazing hotter than ever with the lineup of Neal Schon (guitars, backing vocals), Jonathan Cain (keyboards, backing vocals), Ross Valory (bass, backing vocals), Deen Castronovo (drums, percussion, backing vocals) and Arnel Pineda (lead vocals). The band has reached heights that likely no artist can hit these days. It is not luck; it is persistent, hard work over the years; and Southern Mary- land, they will be performing live at the Calvert Marine Museum on Aug. 24 at 7:30 p.m.

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Thursday

August 7, 2014

The Calvert Gazette Thursday, August 7, 2014 2 In a career span- ning five decades, Journey
Also Inside
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  • 23 Games

  • 20 Health

  • 14 Obituaries

  • 17 Senior

  • 10 Education

  • 23 Classifieds

  • 19 Entertainment

  • 22 Out & Ab out

    • 3 County News

      • 16 Community

      • 13 Feature Story

      • 21 Library Calendar

      • 18 Letters

        • 8 Crime

        • 7 Business

Sam Grow, a Southern Maryland native, recently moved to Nashville, Tenn., to further pursue his lifelong dream in the music industry. Being of the area, Sam Grow can be seen performing at local events and venues, bringing his county roots and his talented voice to each performance.

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county news Local line dancing group Southern Maryland Boot Scooters recently performed for the music video
county news Local line dancing group Southern Maryland Boot Scooters recently performed for the music video

county news

county news Local line dancing group Southern Maryland Boot Scooters recently performed for the music video

Local line dancing group Southern Maryland Boot Scooters recently performed for the music video for “Southern Maryland Thang,” a song about the tri-county area. Above, dancers perform the routine for “Southern Maryland Thang.” “Even though we perform all the time, it's very different when you know there's a camera on you,” said dancer Sari Pickerall. “We perform at nursing homes, car shows and all the fairs but this was just totally different.”

  • 3 Thursday, August 7, 2014

The Calvert Gazette

Campaign Signs Become Targets

By Sarah Miller Staff Writer

With more time between the primary and general elec- tions, campaign signs are being left up for months. They are becoming targets for theft and vandalism. “It’s unusual to have this much vandalism and theft,” said Calvert County Sheriff Mike Evans. The length if time they’ve been up is likely a contributing factor, he said. Candidates are allowed to begin putting signs up 45 days before the primary election and signs can remain up through the general election. In the past, the primary and general elections were much closer together. This year, signs are being left up too long but there is no law requiring they be removed between the primary and

general elections.

There is nothing the Board of Elections can do, according

to Board of Elections Office Specialist Mary DePelteau. Signs

can be on private property for an unlimited period with the

property owners permission. The Board of Elections can only pass on regulations governing state and county right of ways.

District 27C Delegate Candidate Mark Fisher has had a

number of signs stolen and is offering a reward for their recov- ery, according to Evans. Evans personally had a number of signs stolen. One was even shot, he said. The persons responsible for the damage were juveniles and they came forward and admitted what they did. They will be helping replace the signs, Evans said, and he believes the actions to be simple mischief and not politically

COUNTY NEWS
COUNTY
NEWS

motivated. Nothing can be done if candidates don’t report theft and

vandalism, Evans said. He encouraged candidates to report it of signs are purposefully damaged or stolen. “It is unfortunate that things like this happen, and it is my hope that everyone respects campaign signs as personal prop-

erty,” said District 27C Delegate Candidate Sue Kullen

According to Kullen’s campaign manager Duwayne Rag- er, yard signs can be anywhere from $3 to $10 bucks each and big signs are $50 to $100 each.

sarahmiller@countytimes.net

Commissioners Consider Changes to Flood Plain Regulation

By Sarah Miller Staff Writer

To retain county-wide flood insurance, the Calvert Board of County Commissioners adopted revised Flood Insurance Rate Maps (FIRMs) and floodplain regulations based on the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) updates to

the maps and new model floodplain ordinance in December

2011.

Since adopting the regulations, FEMA has completed a Coastal Study for Calvert County, updated its Flood Insurance Rate Maps and updated the model floodplain ordinance, ac- cording to a presentation by Department of Community Plan- ning and Building Principal Planner David C. Brownlee.

The County held an open house on the map update on Jan.

22. On May 19 the County received a “Letter of Final Deter-

mination” on the County F1RMs from FEMA. The County FIRMs become effective Nov. 19. By this adoption date, the County must also update its floodplain regulations to be con- sistent with the National Flood Insurance Program regulations. Based on the changes to the model floodplain ordinance, some

amendments to the Zoning Ordinance are necessary to being

the county into compliance with current FEMA regulations,

Brownlee said. Brownlee outlined some of the negative consequences

facing the county if the new maps and regulations are not ad-

opted by Nov. 19. The county could be suspended from the National Flood Insurance

Program, flood insurance would no longer available to local

property owners and there would be no federal grants, loans or disaster assistance available, Brownlee said. The Board of County Commissioners voted to approve the changes for the next step in the process. The changes will

go before the Planning Commission during their Aug. 20 meet- ing and to a joint public hearing on Oct. 21. The changes will be back before the Board of County Commissioners on Oct. 28 for final approval, Brownlee said. For more information, visit www.co.cal.md.us.

sarahmiller@countytimes.net

Making Communities Safe

3 Thursday, August 7, 2014 The Calvert Gazette Campaign Signs Become Targets By Sarah Miller Staff
3 Thursday, August 7, 2014 The Calvert Gazette Campaign Signs Become Targets By Sarah Miller Staff

Photos by Sarah Miller

Communities all over Calvert County celebrated National Night Out on Aug. 5. According to the National Night Out website, “the introduction of National Night Out,

“America’s Night Out Against Crime”, in 1984 began an effort to promote involvement in crime

prevention activities, police-community partnerships, neighborhood camaraderie and send a

message to criminals letting them know that neighborhoods are organized and fighting back.”

Communities had fun activities for children, such as moon bounces, free food and informa-

tional booths. Calvert Alliance Against Substance Abuse, the Sheriff’s Office and local fire and

rescue departments were represented at each event.

For more informaiton about National Night Out, visit natw.org

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The Calvert Gazette

Thursday, August 7, 2014

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PLAYLIST
COUNTY NEWS
COUNTY
NEWS

Calvert Hospice Welcomes New

Director of Development

The Calvert Gazette Thursday, August 7, 2014 4 First in Customer Service ... Three Locations to

Photo by Sarah Miller

New Calvert Hospice Director of Development Claire Piason is ready to get to work.

By Sarah Miller Staff Writer

Calvert hospice welcomed a new Director of Development, Claire Piason, on Aug. 4. Piason heard about the opening from a member of the board of directors, who thought of her when the position became available. She comes to Cal- vert Hospice with more than 20 years of experience working for non-profit or- ganizations and 15 years of experience in chairing and organizing events. She has lived in Calvert County since 1991. She and her husband owned and ran the Sears catalogue store until 2004. Piason has worked with the World Wildlife Fund, Defenders of Wildlife and the Children’s National Medical Center. Locally, she has co-chaired the Relay for Life, helped coordinate the Hospital Harvest Ball and was involved

in the very first Mardi Gras event for the

United Way of Calvert County. When Piason and her husband moved from Huntingtown to Solomons Island, she decided it was time to stop

commutating to Washington, D.C., ev- ery day. Not one to simply sit back and let the world go by, Piason began vol- unteering with the Calvert Marine Mu -

seum and worked as the office manager

for The Ruddy Duck while looking for

an opportunity to work for a local non-

profit organization.

“I was ecstatic when Brenda offered

me the position,” Piason said, referring to Calvert Hospice Executive Director Brenda Laughhunn. Laughhunn is pleased to welcome

Piason aboard. Her vision and experi- ence are a good match for Calvert Hos - pice, she said, adding that Piason’s pre- existing network in the community is a

benefit.

Calvert Hospice has a wonderful reputation in the community, Piason said, and she looks forward to using her skills in marketing and fundraising to raise awareness about hospice’s place in the community and how the organiza - tion serves others. She will be working closely with Media and Marketing Coor- dinator Anne Stavely in this goal. Piason has jumped right into her work. She is helping to tie up last minute details for the Aug. 14 Luau for Hospice and beginning to work on the local Fes - tival of Trees, scheduled for Nov. 28 to

30.

For more information about Calvert Hospice, visit calverthospice.org.

sarahmiller@countytimes.net

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The Calvert Gazette

Thursday, August 7, 2014

6

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“Calvert County…Can I Hear Ya?’

By Madeleine Buckley Contributing Writer

Mid spin, with their hands in the air, a group of dancers shouted in response. Clad in red and white, with cowboy boots on their feet, they also remem - bered to smile for the cameras. The members of the Southern Maryland Boot Scooters, a local line

dancing group, were filming their dance

to “Southern Maryland Thang,” a song about the tri-county area. When the

song and music video were first released,

Leslie Wholers, the leader of the Boot Scooters, had interest in dancing to it.

“When the video was online, I put a comment on there saying that we really like to dance, that we’re a dance team, and that we would love to create a dance to it,” Wholers said.

Donovan Farrell, the songwriter, re - sponded the next morning with not only an approval for the dance, but with a re -

quest to film it.

“Personally, I think it is a huge honor that they would select that song,” Farrell said. “We put a lot of time and effort into it, and to see it used like this is such an honor. They did an amazing job with it. It’s pretty special to see how great they did with it, and it’s all such a humbling experience.” From that point, the Boot Scooters

started to create a dance to go with the

song. Although the group has existed for

19 years, this is the first dance they had

choreographed entirely on their own. “For the past three months or so, team members would come a little bit early before practice, and we would work on different steps for the dance,” Wholers said. “We did a lot of revisions

and we came up with our final product.”

Once the dance was completed,

they made plans to film it at the Cal- vert County fairgrounds. Donovan and a friend, Ed Delmoro, worked together

to shoot it. When they first arrived, they

ran into some issues with the setup. “So many of our team members were there, 21 of them, that we could

not all fit up on the stage the way we

practiced the dance,” Wholers said. “We needed to quickly come up with a plan B, and that’s how we ended up with half of the team on the stage and half of the

team on the concrete [in front of the stage].”

Once the dancers were lined up, Donovan set up the equipment for the shots he needed. “A challenge was not knowing the dance personally. As I got to see more and do more takes, we kind of got to zoom in on some specific parts,” Far- rell said. “Another is trying to get equal amounts of footage for each person. You

The Calvert Gazette Thursday, August 7, 2014 6 COUNTY NEWS “Calvert County…Can I Hear Ya?’ By

Photos by Madeleine Buckley

Mid step, some of the dancers perform the routine for “Southern Maryland Thang.” “Even though we perform all the time, it’s very different when you know there’s a camera on you,” dancer Sari Pickerall said. “We perform at nursing homes, car shows and all the fairs but this was just totally different.”

don’t want anybody left out, because ev- erybody did such an excellent job.” After shooting with both handheld and aerial cameras, the filming was com - pleted. The dancers celebrated together

after their final take, and took time for

some group photos. “We’re just a group of friends that like to dance and hang out together and just have a good time,” said Michael Badson, a team member who has been

ers and Farrell considered the tap - ing to be a success. The video will show the dancers performing during the song, followed by an instructional video outlining the steps to the dance. “Hopefully as many people learn the dance as possible,” Farrell said. “And we’ll see it all over the place. Maybe at the Blue Crabs stadium people will be dancing it in the seventh inning stretch or something.”

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The Calvert Gazette Thursday, August 7, 2014 6 COUNTY NEWS “Calvert County…Can I Hear Ya?’ By

Climbing on top of the sound booth, Farrell tries to get a good angle for the shot. “By climbing on top, I wanted to get angle that could get everybody in one shot,” Farrell said. “That was another challenge, the size of the group.”

in the group for about 15 years. “But it was nerve-racking, you know? We had to be on step and put together, but other than that it was good. I wish we could do it again.” Badson was not the only dancer

who was nervous going into the filming.

“We’ve done, like, the fairs and stuff and had people in the audience tape us, but nothing like this,” said Glenda White, one of the dancers. “It was exciting, but everyone was nervous. For me, staying calm and remembering the steps, where to stand and what part is next was the hardest.” In the end, both the Boot Scoot-

If you are interested in joining the Boot Scooters, visit their website, www. bootscootersofsomd.blogspot.com. The group is self-proclaimed as “a group of friends that like to dance,” and accepts members of all ages and skill levels. To download the song “South - ern Maryland Thang,” featuring John Luskey, Lindz Owen, Donald Quade and Wes Ryce on vocals, or to watch the original music video, visit www.donovanfarrell.com. The Boot Scooters video will also be available when it is completed.

news@countytimes.net

  • 7 Thursday, August 7, 2014

The Calvert Gazette

Breaking Down Food Barriers

By Kaitlin Davis Contributing Writer

The Lotus Kitchen, located at 14618 Solomons Island Rd

S., offers customers a casual environment to enjoy different, but affordable food and drinks and their famous key-lime pies. The Lotus Kitchen was opened in April 2010 by two local chefs, Amanda Rutledge Comer and Kelly Guilfoyle. With a huge passion for food, Comer and Guilfoyle share very similar ideas about food. “We both had had different backgrounds in cooking, but Amanda had been down here running the bed-

and-breakfast after working in Baltimore and I had done fine

dining down in Southern Maryland. When we met and started

cooking together, we were like ‘This is what it’s supposed to be like!’ It’s not about us or our egos, it’s about the food and the experience that the diners have,” said Guilfoyle. Guilfoyle and Comer had been working together at a local B&B catering events and working private parties when they met Kim Mowrer. At the time, Mowrer was becoming ill and had decided to give up her business to spend time with her fam- ily. Kim’s Keylime Pies had been in business for 7 years, offer- ing pies, coffee and retail items, so Guilfoyle and Comer decid- ed to carry on Mowrer’s legacy by carrying over her business into the Lotus Kitchen. They simply removed the retail portion of the business and added food. “We will always retain the tra- dition of her pies,” said Comer. Twenty to thirty key-lime pies are made fresh daily and are quite popular among customers. When walking into the restaurant, customers are em- braced with an approachable, casual, fun, eclectic and simple atmosphere. Comer explains the restaurants atmosphere as “ ... ”

comfortably elegant

The menu changes quarterly to match

... with the seasons and everything on the menu uses as many lo-

cally grown ingredients as possible. Chesapeake Bounty gath- ers all the locally grown products and makes them available to everyone, businesses and individuals alike! Using locally grown ingredients allows for customers to learn to use such in-

gredients to make the same foods served in the business. Guil-

foyle stated that the Lotus Kitchen wants to mix it up and break

down customers traditional eating barriers. They want people to be curious about how certain foods are made and if custom- ers ask, both chefs are willing to explain the recipes!

“We want to bring different food to people

....We

are break-

ing people’s barriers

...

It’s

so easy to eat fun, exciting food in a

different way!” said Guilfoyle. The Lotus Kitchen is also involved in the community in many ways! They are a part of the SBA and Chamber of Commerce. Lotus Kitchen also works with the Calvert Marine Museum, Wine and Design and Annmarie Gardens. They host fundraisers, wine tastings and help with Chamber Dinners.

Guilfoyle even hosts a book club every first Wednesday of the

month, which is free to anyone who wishes to attend. Within the next month, The Rex will be opening in the Leonardtown Square. Joe Curley, the manager of the Tiki Bar,

expressed an interest and wanted the Lotus Kitchen’s food to be involved in The Rex. Instead of opening a brand new fran- chise and having to split their time, both Comer and Guilfoyle will be designing the menu for The Rex and will be includ- ing items from their restaurant as well additional items. “It was

the timing, we weren’t really seeking it out

...We

have to evolve

with the changes thrown to us,” said Guilfoyle. Comer also said when talking about the opportunity to work with The Rex, “It’s a perfect match!” “We have been very blessed with an amazing support from the community. We have awesome regular guests and they just keep supporting us with every move we make,” said Comer. The Lotus Kitchen is open Wednesday through Monday; Wednesday and Thursday, 9 a.m. to 8 p.m.; Fridays, 9 a.m. to 10 p.m. with live music 6:30 to 9:30 p.m.; Saturday through Monday, 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. with live music on Sundays 2:30 to 5:30 p.m. For more information, contact Lotus Kitchen featur- ing Kim’s Keylime Pies at 410-326-8469, by email at kaguil-

7 Thursday, August 7, 2014 The Calvert Gazette Breaking Down Food Barriers By Kaitlin Davis Contributing

Photos by Kaitlin Davis

foyle@gmail.com, visit their Facebook page at www.face-

book.com/pages/Lotus-Kitchen-featuring-Kims-Keylime-

Pies/109249039120785 or stop in at 14618 Solomons Island Rd

S., Solomons, Md. 20688!

news@countytimes.net

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Crime The Calvert Gazette Thursday, August 7, 2014 8 & Punishment Maryland State Police Blotter SHERIFF’S
Crime
The Calvert Gazette
Thursday, August 7, 2014
8
&
Punishment
Maryland State Police Blotter
SHERIFF’S BLOTTER
The following information is compiled
directly from publicly released police reports.
The following information is compiled directly from publicly released police reports.
Theft/Shoplifting: On July 28 at 03:25
p.m., Trooper Palumbo responded to
the Walmart in Prince Frederick for
a shoplifting complaint. Wendy L.
Bartlett, 48 of Solomons, placed sev-
eral items in her handbag and exited
the store without paying for them. She
was confronted in the parking lot by
the Loss Prevention Officer and was
Esnes stopped a vehicle on Rt. 260 near
St. Andrews Dr. in Chesapeake Beach
for traffic violations. Investigation re-
vealed Ryan E. Tavenner, 27 of Chesa-
peake Beach, was driving on a sus-
pended license. Initially Tavenner gave
a false identity to TFC Esnes. He was
arrested and incarcerated at the Calvert
County Detention Center.
During the week of July 28 through August 3 deputies of the Calvert County Sher-
iff’s Office responded to 1,396 calls for service throughout the community.
Citizens with information on the following crimes or any criminal activity in Cal-
vert County who wish to report it anonymously can now access the Calvert County
Crime Solvers link through the Sheriff’s Office website.
Go to http://www.co.cal.md.us/residents/safety/law/sheriff/ and click on the Crime
Solvers link to leave an anonymous tip on-line. Information leading to the arrest and
conviction of a suspect could result in a $1,000 reward.
detained until police arrived. She was
arrested and incarcerated at the Calvert
County Detention Center.
Open Warrant / Possession of Crack
Cocaine: On Aug. 1 at 12:11 a.m.,
Trooper First Class Esnes stopped to
Destruction of Property Case #14-42332:
Two eleven-year-old boys and one
DUI & Morphine Pills: On July 28 at
09:01 p.m., Trooper First Class Bar-
low stopped a vehicle on Rt. 4 near
Rt. 402 in Prince Frederick for traffic
violations. TFC Barlow detected the
thirteen-year-old boy, all of Lusby, were
charged with destruction of property on
youth reports by DFC J. Hardesty on July
28 at noon. Numerous victims on Stock
Drive in Lusby observed the juveniles
breaking mailboxes along the residential
faint odor of alcohol emitting from
street. They identified the youths after
Niland
Rathbone
the driver.
A field sobriety test was
straddle or cross over the center and left
performed. Lamonte L. Cox Jr., 48 of
Huntingtown, was arrested for driving
assist a disabled driver on Rt. 4 prior to
Broomes Island Rd. in Prince Freder-
ick. A passenger, Melody L. Bowen,
47 of Lexington Park, was placed un-
der arrest for an open warrant through
St. Mary’s County. A search of the rear
cargo area of the vehicle revealed drug
paraphernalia and Crack Cocaine. The
driver, after giving a false name, Sher-
edge lines. They attempted a traffic stop
under the influence. A search revealed
man L. Mackall, 54 of no fixed address,
DFC Hardesty and DFC R. Weems located
them riding bikes through the neighbor-
hood and stopped them for questioning.
The boys were released to a parent.
numerous Morphine pills for which he
did not have a prescription. Cox was
incarcerated at the Calvert County De-
tention Center.
Theft Cases #14-42336, 42419, 42539:
Possession of Marijuana: On July 29 at
10:18 p.m., Trooper First Class Lewis
stopped a vehicle on Rt. 4 and Sherry
Lane in Prince Frederick for a suspend-
ed registration. The odor of marijuana
was emitting from inside the vehicle. A
probable cause search revealed suspect-
ed marijuana and drug paraphernalia.
Javin J. Price, 29 of Lusby, was arrested
for possession of marijuana and CDS
paraphernalia. He was incarcerated at
the Calvert County Detention Center.
was found to have three open warrants
through Calvert and St. Mary’s County.
He was charged with possession of
Crack Cocaine and drug paraphernalia.
Both Bowen and Mackall were incar-
cerated at the Calvert County Deten-
tion Center.
Open Warrant / Possession of PCP:
All the mail from three mailboxes that
had been delivered between July 18 and 27
at three homes on Birch Drive in Hunting-
town was stolen during that timeframe.
All three victims had been away from their
homes during that time period. The inves -
tigation by Dep. L. Kelly continues.
Possession of Marijuana: On July 30 at
1:22 a.m., Trooper First Class Oles re-
sponded to the Super 8 Motel in Prince
Frederick for a reported odor of mari-
juana emitting from one of the rooms.
The room occupants were questioned
and stated they had smoked all of the
marijuana and there was none left. The
manager requested they be removed
from the building. After the suspects
left, TFC Oles noticed a damaged win-
dow screen and observed a clear plastic
bag containing suspected marijuana on
the ground below. A broadcast lookout
for the suspect’s vehicle was given and
they were located on rt. 4 near Steeple
Chase in Prince Frederick. Ozzie L.
Turner 3rd, 38 of Bowie, was arrested
for possession of marijuana and addi-
tionally charged for malicious destruc-
tion of property. He was incarcerated
at the Calvert County Detention center.
On Aug. 1 at 12:43 p.m., Trooper First
Class Smith contacted Nathan O.
White, 32 of Hyattsville, at the Papa
John’s in Chesapeake Beach and served
an open warrant through the Maryland
State Police. He was arrested and in-
carcerated at the Calvert County De-
tention Center. During processing,
PCP was found on White. He was ad-
ditionally charged with Possession of a
Controlled Dangerous Substance.
Burglary Case #14-43153:
Unknown suspect(s) burglarized a
home in the 600 block of Texoma Lane in
Lusby between July 29 and August 1. Two
decorative mirrors were stolen and $160 in
damage was done. DFC M. Velasquez is
investigating.
on the vehicle, however, the driver contin -
ued to drive another two hundred yards be -
fore stopping at Plum Point Road in Hun -
tingtown. The driver, Tyler James Niland,
22 of Chesapeake Beach, was arrested and
charged with possession of marijuana less
than 10 grams and possession of drug par-
aphernalia; a plastic bag, DUI, driving on
a suspended license and negligent driving
in addition to several other traffic viola -
tions. The passenger, Christopher Joseph
Rathbone, 24 of North Beach, was charged
with possession of marijuana less than 10
grams and possession of drug parapherna -
lia, a plastic bag.
Destruction of Property Case #14-43536:
Theft Case #14-43234:
Warrant Service / Possession of Mari-
juana: On Aug. 1 at 2 p.m., Trooper
First Class Casarella responded to the
3700 block of Sixes Rd. in Prince Fred-
erick in an attempt to locate Andrew M.
Brooks, 32 of St. Leonard. Brooks was
located and arrested on an open war-
rant through the Maryland State Police.
A search incident to the arrest revealed
marijuana. He was incarcerated at the
Calvert County Detention Center.
Sometime during the day on August 1,
someone stole a red and black Mongoose
bicycle and a pink and black mountain
bike from the front yard of a home on Field
Drive in Lusby. Dep. C. Idol is continuing
Dep. L. Kelly responded to a home on
Salisbury Place in Prince Frederick for the
report of a broken glass door. The home -
owner advised that on August 3 at about
11:00 a.m. he heard a loud noise in the
basement area of his home. He went down
there and saw that the outside pane of glass
on his sliding door had been shattered.
Dep. Kelly is continuing the investigation.
the investigation.
Burglary Case #14-43599:
CDS Violation Case #14-43284:
On August 2 at 2:16 a.m. Dep. M.
Trigg and Cpl. A. Moschetto observed a
vehicle drifting back and forth into travel
lanes on Md. Rt. 4 northbound near Stoak-
ley Road in Prince Frederick. They fol-
lowed the vehicle and saw it continue to
Someone broke the lock off the door
to a shed behind a home in the 12000 block
of Century Manor Drive in Dunkirk some -
time between July 30 and August 3. Noth -
ing was taken from inside the shed. DFC J.
Lord is investigating.
Runaway Juvenile / Possession of Mar-
ijuana: On Aug. 1 at 7:26 p.m., Ser-
geant Payne located a juvenile match-
ing the description of a runaway juve-
DUI Arrests -
nile. After confirming that he was the
Name
Lamonte L. Cox
Age
Date of Arrest
Address
Arresting Trooper
48
07/28/14 @ 08:56
p.m.
Huntingtown, MD
TFC S. Barlow
Possession of Marijuana: On July 30
at 4:47 p.m., Trooper First Class Lewis
stopped a vehicle at Calvert Town Rd.
juvenile, he was searched; marijuana
and drug paraphernalia were located on
his person. He was transported to the
MSP Barrack for processing. He was
released to his parent.
Alfredo M.
Ayala
Steven J. Hartle
30
08/01/14 @ 01:32
a.m.
Prince Frederick,
TFC J. Oles
MD
east of Main St. in Prince Frederick for
49
Lusby, MD
TFC C. Esnes
traffic violations. There was a strong
08/02/14 @ 12:03
a.m.
odor of raw marijuana emitting from
inside the vehicle. A probable cause
search revealed marijuana and drug
paraphernalia. Andrew M. Holland,
46 of Huntingtown, was arrested and
transported to the MSP Barrack for
processing.
Unauthorized Use of MV / Assault: On
Aug. 2 at 5:56 a.m., Corporal Stern re-
sponded to the 300 block of Mason Rd.
for a report of a stolen vehicle. The vic-
tim reported that following an assault,
Donnie Richardson, 39 of Prince Fred-
erick, had taken her vehicle without
permission. Richardson returned with
the vehicle approximately an hour later.
He was arrested and incarcerated at the
Calvert County Detention Center.
Terrence A.
34
Plater
08/02/14 @ 12:10
a.m.
Prince Frederick,
TPR. J. Palumbo
MD
Adam C.
48
Kelson
08/02/14 @ 02:24
p.m.
Huntingtown, MD
TFC W. Smith
Rebecca L.
55
Lelkowitz
08/02/14 @ 02:29
p.m.
Lusby, MD
TFC B. Wiesemann
False Statement to Police Officer: On
Jimbo T.
21
08/03/14 @ 01:13
a.m.
Lexington Park,
TFC J. Oles
July 31 at 3:27 a.m., Trooper First Class
Leckliter
MD
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The Calvert Gazette

Thursday, August 7, 2014

10

The Calvert Gazette Thursday, August 7, 2014 10 Spotlight On A Swimming Good Time By Madeleine

Spotlight On

The Calvert Gazette Thursday, August 7, 2014 10 Spotlight On A Swimming Good Time By Madeleine

A Swimming Good Time

By Madeleine Buckley Contributing Writer

Each day, millions of people visit the national aquarium,

go scuba diving or go snorkeling to see the fish and coral in a

reef. But imagine getting to see that every day, from the com- fort of your home. That is what the members of the Southern Maryland Ma- rine Aquarium Society (SMMAS) have a passion for- raising

salt-water fish.

“It’s so relaxing just to watch the fish,” society member Lynne Caplinger said. ”It’s a lot of work but it’s very reward- ing.” Caplinger, who claims that the hobby is “addicting,” found

the group by chance while searching the web. “The reason I joined is that I was having trouble with my

tank,” Caplinger said. “I started with a small tank and I needed

help. So, I saw the club website and joined the discussion fo-

rums. I think that’s how a lot of clubs get members, just to get help and hang out with people. But the club does more than

that.”

In addition to the members providing help to each other,

they offer educational presentations about caring for aquariums. For example, at the most recent meeting, the members

The Calvert Gazette Thursday, August 7, 2014 10 Spotlight On A Swimming Good Time By Madeleine

often have “frag swaps,” where they trade coral, fish and equipment.

“When corals grow they’ll get too big so

you need to break a piece off, and that is called a

frag, and sometimes we trade them,” Caplinger

said. “You can go to a meeting and buy coral

that, in a store, would be really expensive. But from another club member you can get it really

cheap or just trade for something.”

The Calvert Gazette Thursday, August 7, 2014 10 Spotlight On A Swimming Good Time By Madeleine

Photos courtesy of Southern Maryland Marine Aquarium Society

Some of the club members visit an aquarium behind the scenes. “We do a lot of educational trips,” Brunke said. “We talked to the curator up there, and had a discussion with him. He showed us the whole facility and got a backroom tour.”

filter systems,” Brunke said. “Or if they need a bigger tank, we

will purchase stuff for them. Plus we donate food from our food

learned about photographing their fish through the glass.

Having swaps like this also has a positive impact on the

making events.”

“We try to teach to a variety of members,” said SMMAS

environment.

The goal of the school tanks, as well as the group as a

President Eric Brunke. “Not just new people in the hobby but

“Because we help propagate coral species, there’s less cor-

whole, is to educate people about marine aquariums and create

the old guys like myself as well. I try to learn things all the

al being taken from the wild,” Brunke said. “The more we can

interest.

time.”

produce, the less desire there is to actually farm them from the

“We invite anybody to come to the meetings and check us

Not only do the members learn at meetings; they also take

environment. Coral reefs are getting seriously overfished and

out, or to become a registered user on the forum,” Brunke said.

educational field trips.

destroyed because of the aquarium trade, and if we can help

“Becoming a registered user is free. If you’ve got a reef tank, I

“One of the club members has a contact for the Wash-

ington aquarium, and he arranged for us to have a behind-the- scenes tour,” Caplinger said. “Recently, we went to two differ- ent aquarium stores up around the beltway. We do stuff like

that together.”

When they are not learning or providing support, they will

knock that down a little bit, that would be great.”

Along with helping the environment, the society helps the

community. They have installed fish tanks in four local schools

and have plans for more. “We’ll dedicate all of our remaining funds from the year to schools to see what they need as far as upgrades, lighting or

don’t care if you’re just starting in the hobby or if you’ve been in the hobby for 40 or 50 years. We could use the experience and

we would love to teach other people about it.”

For more information about the club, visit www.smmas.org.

news@countytimes.net

The Calvert Gazette Thursday, August 7, 2014 10 Spotlight On A Swimming Good Time By Madeleine
  • 11 Thursday, August 7, 2014

The Calvert Gazette

11 Thursday, August 7, 2014 The Calvert Gazette Spotlight On Children’s Aid, Inc. Collecting Schools Supplies

Spotlight On

11 Thursday, August 7, 2014 The Calvert Gazette Spotlight On Children’s Aid, Inc. Collecting Schools Supplies

Children’s Aid, Inc. Collecting Schools Supplies for Operation Backpack 2014

Children’s Aid, Inc.’s Operation Backpack provides Calvert County chil-

dren in need with a backpack filled with

new school supplies and a new, age-ap - propriate book. Our goal is to highlight

the importance of education as well as help the students approach the begin - ning of the school year with a greater

sense of confidence and hope. Operation

Backpack is open to any Calvert County student (pre-k-12) in need. Registra - tion closes when the program capacity is met (125 registrants), which this year,

occurred within the first two weeks of

registration. “Although recently ranked as one

of the wealthiest counties in the nation, roughly 23 percent of Calvert County’s

public school students qualified for

the free or reduced lunch program last school year. In five districts, the per- centage was 38 percent or more of the school’s students qualify for free or re - duced lunch. Although these percentages are lower than our neighboring counties, I think many county residents would be surprised to learn these statistics.” said Krista Brezina, Executive Director of Children’s Aid, Inc. 281 Calvert County students have received school supplies through Opera -

tion Backpack during the first six years

of the program. This year, they are seek- ing the community’s support in provid - ing 125 local children with school sup - plies they need to succeed in the new school year. Children’s Aid, Inc. will be collect- ing school supply donations outside the

Office Depot store in Prince Frederick

on Saturday Aug. 9 from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. In addition, the following busi-

nesses have partnered with Children’s Aid, Inc. for Operation Backpack 2014 and will accept school supply dona -

tions at their locations through Aug. 14:

American Legion Post 206 (Chesapeake

Beach), Dunkirk Hardware and Home

Center (Dunkirk), Office Depot (Prince Frederick), Wilson Ennis Clubhouse

(Huntingtown) and World Gym (Owings and Prince Frederick locations).

Supplies that are most needed in - clude backpacks, composition books,

pencils, crayons, spiral notebooks,

wide-ruled filler paper, highlighters

and glue sticks. All donations should be new and unopened. Backpacks will be packed and distributed on Saturday

August 16, 2014. For more information

about Children’s Aid, Inc., to volunteer to help pack backpacks or to donate on - line, please visits www.TheChildren - sAid.org.

Sixteenth Annual Eric and Cara Thorn Memorial Scholarships

Four winners of the Eric and Cara

Thorn were presented to the Calvert County Board of Commissioners on August 5. Han- nah Aris (Calvert), Casey Young (Calvert), Collin McKenny (Huntingtown) and Timo- thy Murin (Huntingtown) were selected

from a field of more than fifty applicants

from all four Calvert County high schools. Three of the applicants were able to join the commissioners for this recognition of their accomplishments. The scholarship winners must demon- strate not only high academic achievement, but participate in school and sport activities and be involved in projects that serve oth- ers and their community. The criteria are demanding, and the awardees must be stu- dents who have achieved the academic and personal excellence that Eric and Cara epit- omized. This year four scholarships were presented to deserving Calvert County’s high school students. Since 1999, the Eric and Cara Thorn Memorial Fund has given out over a hun- dred scholarships to graduating seniors at all four of the County’s high schools. This year the scholarship amount was raised to $2000, given annually for four years.

The scholarships are given in honor

of Eric and Cara Thorn who were killed

on November 17, 1998. 16-yr-old Eric and

13-yr-old Cara were involved in a single-

vehicle car accident on their way to Calvert High School. To keep alive the memory of what outstanding students and caring peo - ple they were, a scholarship fund was set

up to benefit worthy graduation seniors in

Calvert County. Each year we raise money for the scholarships through the Eric and Cara

Thorn Memorial Golf Tournament. This

was the sixteenth year of the event. The

tournament was held on Friday, June 20, at Twin Shields Golf Club in Owings.

This is the second year that the Eric

and Cara Thorn Memorial Fund has op- erated as part of the Calvert Community

Foundation, a nonprofit organization that

supports deserving causes and giving in Calvert County. If you wish more informa-

tion from CCF, please contact: the Calvert Community Foundation, PO Box 3366, Prince Fredrick, Maryland; 410-414-5997; calvertcommunity@gmail.com or find them on Facebook.

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The Calvert Gazette

Thursday, August 7, 2014

12

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The Calvert Gazette Thursday, August 7, 2014 12 Only $ 119 88 NEW LOW PRICE! LeafGro

Safety Improvements

Made Before

School Begins

By Sarah Miller

local funds, according to George Leah.

Staff Writer

The work done over the summer

Construction workers have been busy making improvements before the

is the first stages of a number of im - provements planned to improve safety at schools.

first day of school, especially in ways

Superintendent Daniel Curry

addressing student safety. Schools with open lobby plans have

praised the efforts, saying the construc - tion crew has done a great job.

been modified to funnel visitors to the

The first day of school for students

main office before going to a classroom.

Windows have been treated to make

them shatter resistant.

The work being done is funded

through a combination of federal and

is Aug. 19.

For more information visit www.

calvertnet.k12.md.us.

sarahmiller@countytimes.net

3D Tech Coming to The Calverton School

The Calvert Gazette Thursday, August 7, 2014 12 Only $ 119 88 NEW LOW PRICE! LeafGro

Photo courtesy of The Calverton School

Calverton School Director of Information Technology, Sean Polk, provides and update to R.G. Lare, of The Chaney Foundation, on the progress of The Calverton School’s new 3D Innovation Lab, made pos- sible through a grant by the foundation. The lab is expected to open for students this fall.

The Calverton School, through a $20,000 grant awarded by The Chaney Foun- dation, will be opening a 3D Innovation Lab this September. The 3D Innovation Lab will be available to all Calverton students so that they may apply critical thinking skills to real-

life applications and design.

“3D printing technology is revolutioniz-

ing so many industries. Whether it’s printing

a custom heart to study defects and better plan for surgery, or printing the car part at your lo-

cal repair shop - the ability of our students to engage in the design and application of this technology will prepare them for not only ca- reers of the future, but to think critically about solving real world problems,” said Calverton Head of School Dr. Spence Taintor. The 3D Innovation Lab will be equipped with two MakerBot 3D Printers, a 3D Scan- ner, new computers with with CAD software, and much more.

  • 13 Thursday, August 7, 2014

The Calvert Gazette

STORY
STORY

County Artist Heads to Nashville

By Kaitlin Davis “ The cool thing about Hotel Charles is you start in the Contributing
By Kaitlin Davis
The
cool thing about Hotel Charles is you start in the
Contributing Writer
little front room there and they have a big room in the back and
you have to earn your way to the back room
...
Every
time I go

Sam Grow, a Southern Maryland native, recently moved

to Nashville, Tenn., to further pursue his lifelong dream in

the music industry. Being of the area, Sam Grow can be seen

performing at local events and venues, bringing his county

roots and his talented voice to each performance. Though he

is currently in Nashville, he will never forget where he started

and his appreciation for the Southern Maryland community

continues to grow as he continues on his journey.

Grow graduated from La Plata High School and has lived

in St. Mary’s County for the last six years. At a young age,

Grow was inspired by his dad, mom and sister to be involved

in the music world. His dad and mom sang, while his sister

played the piano, sparking an interest in Grow early on. “I

just grew up in a family that enjoyed music, so I wanted to do

what they did,” said Grow. By age 5, Grow was performing

in church and at the age of 16, he started at Hotel Charles in

Hughesville. Grow’s father visited there often after work and

was able to land Grow a gig on Wednesday nights performing

for tips. He played the audiences’ requests and collected his

tips out of a tip jar.

there I’m just reminded of my roots and where I come from

and what it all means and why I’m doing this,” said Grow.

Due to Grow being born later in his father life, Grow

would be exposed to the music his father enjoyed while they

would drive in the car. His father exposed him to a mixture of

genres, from soul music to southern rock. Artists like Con-

way Twitty, Willy Nelson, Elvis, the Temptations, the Allman

Brothers and Marvin Gaye influenced Grow musically, begin-

ning in his early years.

Shortly thereafter, the Sam Grow Band started to come

together. Gene Quade and Mike Stacey, both who have been

playing music in the county for 25 years, were the first to join

Grow. Joe Barrick joined the band about 5 years ago, when the

original drummer, Ernie Freda, decided to leave the band to

spend more time with his family. All members are native to

the area: Barrick is from Calvert County, Stacey is from North

Beach, and Quade is from Charles County.

“We are a family,” said Grow.

In late 2013, Sam Grow made the move to Nashville,

where he has landed his first publishing deal with ole and be-

came a part of Creative Artists Agency, a booking agency out

of Nashville. Grow spends his days writing and working on

new songs, “

which

...

is awesome because now I get paid to

write songs, which I would do it for free forever!” said Grow.

He’s been working on his new record and on July 31, he had

the opportunity to listen to the final mixes. Along with finish-

ing his new record, comes meetings and just general prepara-

tions. “I am crossing my fingers to be able to at least put a

single out by the end of the month,” said Grow when asked

about the release date of his new record.

When asked what he wishes to accomplish in Nashville,

Grow replied, “You know, that’s such a tricky question be-

cause to me, I’ve already accomplished what I’ve set out to,

to get to do this as a job is awesome. Everything else is kind

of in God’s plan, but you know I would love for my record to

come out and I would love for it to do well only because I’ve

worked really, really hard on it and I’ve have some really good

writers I’ve gotten to write with and gotten to work with on

this project, so that would probably be my most immediate

goal for the future.”

In the future also, Grow wishes to get invited to the

Grand Ole Opry. According to Grow, all the band members

went on a tour of the Grand Ole Opry and some even stood on

the stage, but Grow refused that trip because “

...

the first time I

step on that stage I want to be there because I earned it.” Per-

forming at the Grand Ole Opry is not only a big opportunity,

but a huge honor to those artists who are given the invitation.

Even though Grow has ventured to another state, he will

never forget his Southern Maryland roots and the support that

the Southern Maryland community has and continues to give

him through his music career. “I wouldn’t be anywhere with-

out them and that’s my whole story

...

It’s a family,” said Grow.

Southern Maryland has a big spot in Grow’s heart and

the community has had such a big impact on Grow and his

music. “You know, it’s not so much how I impact them, but

it’s how much they impact me. I’m lucky enough to get to

represent an area through music and everyday I try to give

the best representation of my hometown and my home state,”

said Grow.

For anyone, being away from your hometown and home

state is tough. According to Grow, leaving their families was

the hardest part for Grow and his fellow band members. Luck-

ily, Robert Ott, the CEO of ole, is a family man. Grow ex-

pressed his concerns to Ott and he gets to come home to see

his daughter every weekend, at no cost to Grow.

...

I enjoy being in Nashville and being a representation

of where I’m from and I just hope everyday that I’m able to

be a good representation and kind of show people what we do

have to offer,” said Grow.

Coming up on Aug. 15, is the Country Stars and Hot

Cars benefit concert and car show, which the Sam Grow Band

will be preforming in. Love and Theft and Danielle Bradbery

will also be there to preform! Bradbery was the 2013 winner

of “The Voice” television show and Love and Theft was nomi-

nated vocal duo of the year at the ACM Awards for 2014. Love

and Theft is a duo from Nashville and both are on Grow’s

booking agency, CAA out of Nashville. This event is hosted

by Maryland International Raceway, but the benefit concert

and car show is going to be presented by Friends of Cedar

Line. Rain or shine, come on out to 27861 Budds Creek Road,

Mechanicsville, at 7 p.m. to enjoy the show! Doors open at 5

p.m. Tickets are $40 for reserved seating and $30 for general

admission (standing), according to the event’s website www.

countrystarshotcars.com/. Proceeds from the event help pay

for supportive services and facility improvements for senior

and disabled adult residents at Cedar Lane. “It’s going to be a

cool event with some really good music and fresh acts and re-

ally nice cars!” said Grow. For more information on this event,

please contact 301-884-9833 or by email at info@mirdrag.

com. For sponsorships, group sales and media, contact 301-

475-8966 or email friends@cedar-lane.com.

news@countytimes.net

The Calvert Gazette Thursday, August 7, 2014 14 The Calvert Gazette runs complimentary obituaries as submitted
The Calvert Gazette
Thursday, August 7, 2014
14
The Calvert Gazette runs complimentary obituaries as submitted by funeral homes
and readers. We run them in the order we receive them. Any submissions that come to
news@countytimes.net after noon on Mondays may run in the following week’s edition.

Earl Robert Montour, “Chief,” 72

Earl Robert Montour, “Chief,” age 72, of Chesapeake Beach, Md., passed away suddenly July 23 at his residence. Earl was born Jan. 27, 1942, in Ohsweken, Ontario, Can - ada to Thomas Pierce and Luella (Tobicoe) Montour. Bobby was a re - tired Union Iron Worker. Surviving are his daughters Tammy Montour Amedure and Jennifer Montour Wickham; brothers Thomas, Lloyd, Floyd and his wife Ruby, Larry and Daniel and his wife Judith Montour all of Ontario, Canada and a close special friend Margaret White of Punta Gorda, Fl., and her grand - son James who Earl watched when he was young. Services and inurn - ment will be in Ontario, Canada. Arrangements by Rausch Funeral Home, P.A., Owings.

Shannon Marie Kirk, 31

The Calvert Gazette Thursday, August 7, 2014 14 The Calvert Gazette runs complimentary obituaries as submitted

Shannon Marie Kirk, 31, of Chesa - peake Beach, passed away July 28. She was born Nov. 25, 1982, in Washington, D.C.

to Douglas Raymond Kirk and Bonnie El - len (Aisquith) Kirk. Shannon was raised in Lothian and attended Lo - thian Elementary, Southern Middle and Southern High School, gradu - ating in 2000. She was employed as a waitress in local restaurants. She enjoyed singing karaoke, ani - mals and spending time with her daughter, Savannah. Shannon was preceded in death by her father Douglas R. Kirk. She is survived by her mother Bonnie Wolfe, daughter Savannah Rae Kirk, both of Chesa - peake Beach, grandfather William Aisquith of Bowie, grandmother Jean Cannon of Crossett, Ar., and several aunts, uncles, cousins and

friends. Family and friends were received at Rausch Funeral Home, P.A., Owings Md., on Friday, Au - gust 1, from 12 p.m. until the time of service at 1 p.m. Interment was private. Memorial donations may be made to Chrysalis House or a substance abuse program of one’s choice. To leave condolences visit www.rauschfunerlahomes.com.

William Apperson Cooke,

89

The Calvert Gazette Thursday, August 7, 2014 14 The Calvert Gazette runs complimentary obituaries as submitted

William Apper- son Cooke, age 89, of Solomons, formerly of Accokeek, Md., and Franconia, Va., passed

away Saturday, July

19, at his home with his family by his side.

His wife of 56 years, Glenna (Molleur) Cooke passed away in 2006. He is the

loving father of Diane Ruth Boyd and her husband John, Dawn Adelyn Mill- er and William James Cooke. He is

also survived by eight grandchildren,

five great-grandchildren, a brother

Robert George Cooke and a sister Bev- erly Ann Lordi. He was predeceased by a brother, James David Cooke and a sister Jacqueline Walker. Mr. Cooke

retired from the U. S. Navy in 1964

and then went to work for the U. S. Census Bureau retiring in 1983. Mr. Cooke then served as a consultant to the federal government for a few more years. He was quite a master crafts- man and handyman and enjoyed doing mechanical work on his cars. Other interests included gardening, camping and traveling. He especially enjoyed his cruises to Hawaii and watching

baseball. You could find Mr. Cooke

strumming his 12 string guitar and playing beautiful music. He was also a member of the VFW Post 9619, Morn- ingside. Two Memorial Services will be held at Christ Episcopal Church, 600 Farmington Rd, W, Accokeek, Md. 20607, on Saturday, Aug. 16, at

noon and Asbury-Solomons, 11100 Asbury Circle, Solomons, Md. 20688 on Friday, Aug. 29, at 2 p.m. Burial at Arlington National Cemetery at a later date.

Francis Josiah Wilson, Jr. “Joe”, 79

The Calvert Gazette Thursday, August 7, 2014 14 The Calvert Gazette runs complimentary obituaries as submitted

Francis Josiah

Wilson, Jr. “Joe,” 79,

of Upper Marlboro,

passed away July 29, at

Anne Arundel Medical

Center in Annapolis.

He was born October

17, 1934, at Providence

Hospital in Washington, D.C. to Fran -

cis J. and Helen (Wright) Wilson. Joe

was raised in Upper Marlboro, and at-

tended Marlboro Elementary, and was

a member of the first class to graduate

from Frederick Sasscer High School.

He served in the United States Navy.

Joe was employed as a diesel me -

chanic with the Washington Metro -

politan Transit Authority, retiring in

1990 after thirty years of service. He

was a member of the Marlboro VFD,

America Trucking Historical Soci -

ety Baltimore-Washington Chapter,

Antique Automobile Club and the

REO Club of America (Oldsmobile).

In his leisure time, Joe enjoyed re -

storing and showing antique trucks

and steam and gas engines, using his

computer and surfing the internet. Joe

was preceded in death by his parents.

He is survived by sons Steven Josiah

Wilson and wife Brenda of Sunder-

land, and Patrick Joseph Wilson of

Upper Marlboro, sisters Patricia “Pat-

sy” Cressy of Chambersburg, Pa., and

Donna “Honey” Block of Santa Fe,

N.M., and a brother Gregory Wilson

of Corolla, Nc. Family and friends

were received Aug. 3 from 2 to 4

p.m. at Rausch Funeral Home, P.A.,

Owings. A Mass of Christian Burial

was celebrated Monday at 11 a.m. at

St. Mary of the Assumption Catholic

Church in Upper Marlboro. Interment

followed in Mt. Carmel Cemetery.

Memorial donations may be made

to the American Cancer Society. To

leave condolences visit www.rausch -

funeralhomes.com.

Eleanor Miriam mine, 81

Pale -

The Calvert Gazette Thursday, August 7, 2014 14 The Calvert Gazette runs complimentary obituaries as submitted

Eleanor Miriam Palemine of Lus - by, passed away on Wednesday, July 30, at the age of 81. She was born in New

York, N.Y, on March 26, 1933, to the late Torquato and Amabile (Brocchi) Berti. Eleanor was the youngest of four children, all raised in New York. At the age of 17, she met the love of her life, Anthony Palemine, and they were married in 1953. In 1969, the family moved to Mary - land for Anthony’s work. Eleanor was a stay-at-home Mom until her sons started school, at that time she started working for Prince Georges Schools in the cafeteria. Eleanor enjoyed a variety of hob - bies, baking, cooking, cruising with her family and friends, trav - eling to Italy and loved spending time with her grandchildren. She also was very active at the senior center in Solomons and for over 35 years, she took care of her Mother. Eleanor was a very caring and lov - ing Mother, daughter and grand - mother. Eleanor is the beloved wife of the Anthony Palemine and lov - ing mother to Anthony J. Palemine and his wife Lorelei and John A. Palemine and his wife Anna. She was the devoted grandmother of Ashley, Brooke, Shelby, Justin and Anthony Palemine and Rdrilean DelaVega; and great-grandmother of Anthony Blake. She is also sur- vived by brothers – Ferruccio and Joseph Berti and sister – Catherine LuPari and numerous other family

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  • 15 Thursday, August 7, 2014

The Calvert Gazette

The Calvert Gazette runs complimentary obituaries as submitted by funeral homes and readers. We run them
The Calvert Gazette runs complimentary obituaries as submitted by funeral homes
and readers. We run them in the order we receive them. Any submissions that come to
news@countytimes.net after noon on Mondays may run in the following week’s edition.

and friends. Family invited friends to Lee Funeral Home Calvert,

  • 8200 Jennifer Lane (Rt 4 & Fowler

Road), Owings, Md. 20736 on Sun - day, Aug. 3, from 2 to 4 p.m. and 6 to 8 p.m. A Mass of Christian Buri - al was celebrated, Monday, Aug. 4, at 12 p.m. at Our Lady of Perpetual Help, 515 Loch Haven Road, Edge - water, Md. 21037. Interment was at Maryland Veterans Cemetery 1080 Sunrise Beach Road, Crownsville, Md. 21032. Memorial contributions may be made to the IDSA – Infec - tious Diseases Society of America,

  • 1300 Wilson Boulevard, Suite 300,

Arlington, Va. 22209.

Melba Phelps Hennigar, “Nana,” 90

15 Thursday, August 7, 2014 The Calvert Gazette The Calvert Gazette runs complimentary obituaries as submitted

Melba Phelps Hennigar, “Nana,” of Prince Frederick, passed away on July 26, at the age of 90.

She was born on Aug.

19, 1923, at home in Seat Pleasant, Md., to Agnes Ruth and Pembrooke Richardson. She was one of nine children and at - tended school in a two room school house. She was nicknamed “Aunt

Granny” by her siblings. At the age of 17 she married and proceeded to

have six children, whom she raised in Capitol Heights, Md. Melba be - came a single Mom when it wasn’t fashionable and worked hard rais - ing her children on her own. In 1980, Melba married Robert Hen - nigan and moved to Lothian, Md. She was very independent and hard working…very valuable traits to have while she worked for Prince Georges County Schools as a pay - roll clerk. After her retirement, she was able to really enjoy her many

hobbies, which included making

porcelain dolls and their clothes,

crocheting, taking advantage of her “green thumb” in her garden, spending time with her pets and

having a shot of gin and tonic on

occasion. But the most enjoyment

came from her family

...

they

were

her life. She is the beloved wife of

the late Robert Hennigar, the loving mother to – Helen L. “Sue” Marsh,

the late Charles R. “Butch” Phelps,

Kenneth W. Phelps, John E. Phelps, Brenda J. Randall and Deborah J. Faulkner. She is also survived by her brother George Bachman and is the grandmother of 13 and great- grandmother of 22…plus two on

the way. A memorial service will be held at Epiphany Church, 3123 Ritchie Road, Forestville, Md. 20747, on Saturday, August 2, at 11 a.m. Memorial contributions may be made to the Wounded War- rior Project, 4899 Belfort Road, Ste 300, Jacksonville, Fl. 32256.

of Worshipful Master at Collington Lodge in Bowie, Md. He was also an avid model train fan and regu - larly set up train layouts at places like Brookside Gardens with the Washington, Virginia and Mary - land Garden Railway Society. He

attended Navy football games and

Robert Emmett Madel,

had a regular group he tailgated with. He always cheered for Navy,
74

except when they played Air Force. He delivered for Meals on Wheels,

15 Thursday, August 7, 2014 The Calvert Gazette The Calvert Gazette runs complimentary obituaries as submitted

Robert Emmett Madel, known as Robert, Rob, Dad and Grandpa, age 74, of Dunkirk, passed away

July 22, at Washington

Hospital Center. Bob was born March 13, 1940, in New Haven, Ct., to Fred - erick Edward and Enid Elizabeth (Clarkson) Madel. Bob lived his life in service. He spent 20 years in the Air Force achieving the rank of Technical Sergeant and spend - ing the majority of those years with Nightwatch. After he retired from the Air Force, he continued his service to the country for another 20 years with the Secret Service, Technical Services Division. He was a mason, achieving the rank

was an election judge and liked to ski regularly. He was one of the best theater parents the Calverton School ever had. He never met a stranger and was always willing to

help someone in need. He was pre -

ceded in death by his parents and a brother Peter E. Madel. Surviving are his wife Judy A. Madel, daugh - ters Kathy Madel Juckett of Dunkirk and Robin Madel of New York, Ny. and grandson Zak Juckett of New York, Ny. He was a stand up guy. He had many friends throughout the world and will be greatly missed by us all. Services were held 1:00 p.m. on Tuesday, July 29, at St. James Parish, Lothian. Inurnment will be at Arlington National Cemetery at a later date. To leave a condolence vis - it www.RauschFuneralHomes.com.

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The Calvert Gazette

Thursday, August 7, 2014

16

Community

SMECO Receives Approval to Reduce Customer Rates

Southern Maryland Electric Cooperative (SMECO) received approval from the

Maryland Public Service Commission (PSC) on July 23 to reduce its residential

Standard Offer Service (SOS) energy charges. SMECO also received approval for its

proposal to change how May and October are designated as summer rate and winter

rate months.

SMECO will reduce the residential SOS energy charge for summer months from

8.83 cents per kilowatt-hour (kWh) to 8.61 cents per kWh, a reduction of 2.5 percent.

The new rate will go into effect on August 1, 2014. SMECO received approval to

change the summer rate months to May through September and winter rate months

to October through April. Residential SOS energy charges for winter months will

decrease from 9.62 cents per kWh to 9.25 cents per kWh, a reduction of 3.9 percent.

The winter rate will go into effect on October 1, 2014.

The total SOS rate in August will be the combination of the new reduced energy

charge and the PCA, which changes monthly. For a residential bill of 1,300 kWh, the

average monthly base SOS rate will be $4.00 less. SMECO’s SOS rate covers the

cost of electric supply only. Costs incurred for maintaining the electric system are

covered by distribution service charges and do not affect the SOS rate.

“The average customer-member who uses 1,300 kWh per month will realize a

savings of nearly $50 a year on the SOS energy charge,” said Austin J. Slater, Jr.,

SMECO president and CEO. He added, “We encourage customers who want to save

money on their energy costs to control the amount of energy they use. Rather than

setting the thermostat on 72, turn it up to 78 degrees in summer and down to 68 in

winter. The co-op does not make a profit on energy charges, but customers can profit

by saving energy.”

SMECO also received approval to revise commercial rates for general service

non-demand, general service demand, and large power customers. General service

non-demand customers will be charged base rates of 8.51 cents per kWh for all en -

ergy used for summer months and 9.22 cents per kWh for winter months. General

service demand customers will be charged base rates of 6.99 cents per kWh for sum -

mer, 7.49 cents per kWh for winter, and $4.28 per kilowatt (kW) for demand. Base

rates for large power customers will be 7.14 cents per kWh for summer, 7.64 cents

per kWh for winter, and $5.40 per kW for demand.

SMECO is a customer-owned electric cooperative, and we are proud to be a J.D.

Power 2014 Customer Champion. We are one of an elite group of 50 U.S. companies

to be named to this list.

SMECO provides electricity to more than 156,000 services in southern Prince

George’s County, and in Charles County, St. Mary’s County, and all but the north -

east portion of Calvert County. Co-ops are distinctly different from investor-owned

utilities because co-ops are owned by their customers, and these members elect the

men and women who serve on the Board of Directors.

Co-ops also issue capital credits to their members. What are capital credits?

They are the member’s share of the co-op’s margins, based on how much electric -

ity the member purchased and the rate at which the account was billed. SMECO’s

margins—revenue less expenses—are used as working capital for new construction

and system improvements. When SMECO’s Board of Directors determines that a

percentage of the capital credits can be distributed to members through a general

refund, capital credits will be issued by check or credited to members’ electric bills.

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to From My Backyard to Our Bay A St. Mary’s Improving County Resident’s Our Environment and
to
From My Backyard to Our Bay
A St. Mary’s
Improving
County Resident’s
Our Environment
and Drinking
Guide Water
From my Backyard to our Bay
A St. Mary’s County Resident’s Guide to Improving Our Environment and Drinking Water
From My Backyard
Are you a Bay-Wise Homeowner?
are you
are you
to Our Bay was first
Bay-Wise?
Bay-Wise?
developed by the Baltimore
County Soil Conservation
The Chesapeake Bay is a national treasure and a vital part
The University of Maryland’s Bay-Wise “yardstick” measures
Bay-Wise landscapes
District. From there, the
of the state of Maryland. Yet, the Bay is in trouble due to
how your yard protects the Chesapeake Bay. With the help
minimize negative impacts
booklet was given to each
population pressures from pollution and sediment runoff
of trained Master Gardeners, you will learn more about:
on our waterways by using
of the Soil Conservation
which affect its watershed. Most Maryland residents live
smarter lawn management
Districts in the Chesapeake
4
Controlling Stormwater Runoff;
within a half-mile of a drainage ditch, storm drain, stream
techniques and gardening
Bay watershed area for
or river. Most of those waterways eventually drain into the
4
Encouraging Wildlife;
practices. The University
customization. If the 17.5
Chesapeake Bay.
million residents who live in
4
Protecting the Waterfront;
of Maryland Extension
the watershed area of the
Master Gardener Bay-Wise
4
Mowing Properly;
Chesapeake Bay read this
program in St. Mary’s
4
Watering Efficiently;
booklet, and took to heart
What we do to maintain our own landscapes can affect the
health of our local waterways, the Chesapeake Bay and our
environment.
County offers hands-on
its suggestions and best
4
Managing Yard Pests with Integrated Pest Management
(IPM);
help with managing your
practices, the Chesapeake
landscape by providing
The overuse and misuse of pesticides and fertilizers, soil
Bay would see a dramatic
information, a site visit, and
erosion and poor plant selection have all damaged Maryland’s
4
Mulching Appropriately;
increase in health. Obtain
landscape certifications.
a FREE copy of the
4
Recycling Yard Waste;
Our yardstick checklist is
booklet by going to the St.
4
Fertilizing Wisely; and
easy to understand and
Mary’s River Watershed
streams, rivers and the Bay. Environmentally sound gardens
and yards combined with sustainable gardening practices
can help improve water quality and conserve our natural
resources for future generations.
follow, and our team of
4
Planting Wisely.
Association, smrwa.org and
trained Master Gardeners
downloading it. The booklet
We all need to do our part to take care of our waterways and
environment.
When your yard “measures
can help guide you
is available at Wentworth
up,” you’ll be proud to display
through it while offering
Nursery in Charlotte Hall;
this Bay-Wise sign in your yard!
suggestions to improve
Chicken Scratch in Park
By changing a few simple landscape practices, you and your
both the appearance
Hall; The Greenery in
family can help keep Maryland communities healthy.
and sustainability of your
Hollywood; Good Earth
landscape.
Natural Food; and the St.
Mary’s Soil Conservation
For more information about Bay-Wise in your county contact
your local University of Maryland Extension office. Resi-
District in Leonardtown.
dents may find contact information for their local UME office
Call Now &
Schedule a Visit!
at http://extension.umd.edu/ or extension.umd.edu/baywise.
301-475-4120
Join your local watershed
association and make a
difference for Our Bay!
extension.umd.edu/baywise
smrwa.org
This is the thirty-fourth and final article that Mary Ann Scott (scottmaryann9@gmail.com) has adapted from From My Backyard to Our Bay
in the hopes of increasing awareness of the powerful booklet that could do so much to help the Chesapeake Bay and its tributaries.
Thank you, County Times, for dedicating this space to help the Chesapeake Bay!
Start a Movement in Your
Neighborhood…Be the First
to be Certified Bay-Wise!
  • 17 Thursday, August 7, 2014

The Calvert Gazette

Community

End Hunger In Calvert County Hosts 3rd Annual FoodStock

End Hunger In Calvert County Set To Distribute 100,000 lbs. of Food In Three Hours To Nearly 1,000 Calvert County Families

End Hunger In Calvert County will host

FoodStock 14 on Saturday, August 9th from

8:30AM – 11AM at the End Hunger Warehouse

in Prince Frederick.

That morning, over 100,000lbs of food will

be sorted and distributed to over 1,000 needy

families and local food pantries. They will re -

ceive nonperishable food items as well as fresh

produce.

“Hunger in Calvert County has never been

a food issue,” says Rev. Robert P. Hahn CEO of

End Hunger In Calvert County. “We have nev-

er run out of food nor have we come close. The

problem lies in helping those in need access the

right kinds of food. issue. On August 9th, every

person will leave with groceries, fresh produce

and we will restock the shelves of our local food

pantries.”

Calvert County is the 13th wealthiest county

in the United States, yet over 10% of our popu -

lation utilizes food pantries. On average, End

Hunger’s Partner Food Pantries serve over 850

families every week.

In addition, FoodStock will be a great dis -

play of neighbor helping neighbor as hundreds of

volunteers embody the #givewhereyoulive value

and serve their own community.

The community is invited to be part of FoodStock by volunteering or making a donation. All donations made will directly support FoodStock efforts. Volunteer op - portunities such as sorting and packing food at the End Hunger Warehouse are scheduled the week prior to the event as well as on August 9th from 8:30am – 11am. To sign up, please volunteer@endhun - gercalvert.org for more information and to get involved.

About End Hunger In Calvert County

End Hunger In Calvert County (EHCC) is

an association of over 100 business, 25 churches,

13 food pantries and countless volunteers and

community leaders united behind the idea that

hunger can be defeated in our county. The long-

term purposes of EHCC is to able the willing and

move those from dependency to self sufficiency.

Visit their website endhungercalvert.org for more

information.

2nd Annual Luau for Calvert Hospice

Stoney’s Broomes Island will again host a

Luau for Hospice Thursday, August 14, 2014 at 6

p.m. Delicious seafood and heavy hors d’oeuvres

will be served with an open bar from 6 to 7:30

p.m. General admission tickets are $100 per per-

son prior to the event and $125 at the door. Spon -

sorships are available which include general ad -

mission tickets and VIP seating and parking for

participating sponsors.

“We are grateful to Jeannie and Phillip Stone

for hosting this awesome event once again,” stated

Brenda Laughhunn, Executive Director of Calvert

Hospice. “As a nonprofit organization, we rely on

the community to financially support our mission

of caring for patients and their families here in

Calvert County,” Laughhunn concluded.

Sponsorships are available ranging from the

Platinum Level ($3,000) which includes 10 VIP

Event Tickets, VIP parking, reserved seating, gift

bags and recognition prior to and at the event to

the Copper Level ($500) which includes 2 VIP

Event Tickets, VIP parking, reserved seating, gift

bags and recognition prior to and at the event.

For more information, to become a sponsor

or to reserve your general admission tickets, call

Jeannie Stone at 410-586-1888 or Calvert Hospice

at 410-535-0892. All checks should be made pay-

able to Calvert Hospice.

SENIOR LIVING Senior Citizen News
SENIOR LIVING
Senior
Citizen
News

Maryland Energy Assistance Program (MEAP)

MEAP assists eligible individuals and families with

a one-time-per-year grant to help pay heating and electric

bills. Grants are usually applied to accounts beginning

in December. You must be income-eligible to apply. Ap -

pointments are now being scheduled at each senior center.

If eligible, please be prepared to provide the following for

every person in the home: proof of all monthly income, a

social security card, and a photo identification card. You

will also need a current heating bill, electric bill, and lease

(if renting).

For more information, call: Calvert Pines Senior Cen -

ter, 410-535-4606 or 301-855-1170; North Beach Senior

Center, 410-257-2549; or Southern Pines Senior Center,

410-586-2748.

Annual Crab Feasts

The Annual Crab Feasts will be held at Calvert

Pines, Friday, August 15, 12:45 p.m. and at Southern

Pines, 1 p.m. Fee is $25 per person, aged 50 and over.

Pre-registration and payment are required by August 8.

North Beach will hold a Crab Feast at Skippers Pier, Au -

gust 22, 12:30 p.m. Price will be determined due to crab

season. Pre-register by August 15.

Calvert Pines Senior Center (CPSC)

A Basic Computer Skills class will be held Tuesdays,

August 19 and 26, September 2 and 9, 10 – 11:30 a.m.

This beginners class will focus on email and internet use.

There are only five available slots per class. Contact the

senior center to register.

Celebrate National Senior Citizens Day, Thursday,

August 21, 12:45 p.m. with a hotdog and your favorite fix-

ings. Pre-register by August 14.

North Beach Senior Center (NBSC)

This Decade in Music History will have you enjoying

the music and dancing while dressed in clothing of that

period. Dress in a 1940’s outfit Tuesday, August 12 and a

1950’s outfit Thursday, August 14, 11 a.m.

Join the Increase the Beat aerobics exercise program and

get your blood pumpin’ Mondays, 9 a.m., Tuesdays and

Thursdays, 9:30 a.m.

Southern Pines Senior Center (SPSC)

Come to the Grief Workshop, Tuesday, August 12, 1

p.m. This workshop is for those who want the opportu -

nity to share feelings and get support from others who are

experiencing loss. There will be refreshments and a craft

activity.

Lorraine Hartley from the University of MD will

present Fabulous As We Mature, an overview of tips for

looking and feeling our best, Thursday, August 14, 12:30

p.m.

EATING TOGETHER MENU

Lunches are served to seniors aged 60-plus and their

spouses through Title IIIC of the Older Americans Act.

Suggested donation is $3. To make or cancel a reservation

call: Calvert Pines Senior Center at 410-535-4606 or 301-

855-1170, North Beach Senior Center at 410-257-2549, or

Southern Pines Senior Center at 410-586-2748.

Monday, August 11

Cold Roast Beef Sandwich, Macaroni Salad, Bean Salad,

Red Grapes

Tuesday, August 12

Baked Ziti, Salad, Broccoli, Wheat Bread, Sliced Peaches

with Cottage Cheese

Wednesday, August 13

Chicken Rotisserie, Wild Rice, Oriental Vegetables, Lima

Beans, Bread, Pears

Thursday, August 14

Meat Lasagna, Caesar Salad, Italian Bread, Pineapple

Friday, August 15

Catfish Nuggets, Cooked Carrots, Pineapple Bean Salad,

Cornbread, Assorted Juices

R S Editor to the The Calvert Gazette Thursday, August 7, 2014 18 Dear Editor ....
R
S
Editor to the
The Calvert Gazette
Thursday, August 7, 2014
18
Dear Editor ....
Mileage Tax Will
Bust My Budget
Commissioner Susan Shaw’s comments in her column in last week’s “Cal-
vert Gazette” lavished praise on Commissioner Clark, who was a loser in the
primary last month. If he was as good as Mrs. Shaw stated, why did he lose? The
Wake up Calvert County! The Vehicle
to drive over an hour to work each day to sup-
answer is easy, as Clark himself admitted when he stated after losing in the pri-
Miles Travelled Tax is very real and headed for
port our families? If you work in Washing-
mary that his pro-Dominion stance probably hurt him. True. But, more than that,
Maryland. Don’t let the Maryland Democrats
ton, DC, driving from the southern part of the
he failed to even meet with and listen to listen to his constituents who voted him
fool you. It has already been implemented
county is approximately 65 miles. Let’s say
into office. We asked for a “town hall” meeting with County Commissioners so
in Oregon and a pilot program is planned in
the VMT tax is 5 cents per mile. That’s $6.50
we could present our issues and concerns on the proposed Dominion expansion.
California.
a day / $32.50 per week / $130.00 per month
Clark, who represents our County District one, home of the Dominion site, was
Can you imagine having a GPS tracker
/ $1,560 per year in addition to the gas taxes
not at all interested in hearing from us. Worse yet, he attended a couple of meet-
installed in your car that would monitor every
you’re already paying. Can you afford $130.00
ings/hearings and, after speaking, he left the room showing no interest in staying
mile you drive so that Maryland can charge
per month of your hard earned money going to
to hear what opponents of the Dominion plan might have to say. So, Shaw’s Mr.
you a mileage tax? How many of you com-
the state of Maryland?
good guy would not meet with us, nor would he even just sit for an hour to hear
mute over an hour to work each day?
In 2014, Maryland Republicans sup-
our comments. So, we voted him out. Shaw made no reference to this glaring
We already pay more than 27 cents per
ported House Bill 277, which prohibits a mile-
tactical error made by Clark.
gallon in gas tax to the State with another 3.5
age tax. Maryland Democrats wouldn’t even
If Mrs. Shaw had run, she would have met the same fate as did Clark since
cent increase in January 2015. By 2020, the
let it out of committee – so nobody could vote
she too is pro-Dominion and unwilling to meet with us at a open community
Maryland Democrats want to track, monitor,
on it! The Democrats want to tax hard work-
meeting
..
Those of us “locals” that live near the Dominion property have not
and charge us for the miles we drive in addi-
ing Marylanders for the miles we drive. This
been happy that the BOCC has ignored us. We realize that we have no right to
tion to this ridiculously high gas tax!
VMT tax is no good for Maryland.
prevail, but we firmly believe that we have every right to be heard.
The Maryland Democrats who support
It is worth noting that we are absolutely for more jobs in the County as well
the VMT tax say it would help cut emissions
Stephanie Coddington
as possible additional tax revenue that might be generated and paid to the County
and discourage driving. How many of us need
Prince Frederick
by Dominion. However, their proposed $3.8 billion expansion of their facility
that would process millions of cubic feet of liquefied natural gas (LNG) every
day, clearly does not belong in a residential neighborhood where there are also
schools, parks and churches. The potential risk of a gas leak/explosion demands
that any facility of this type be located in a rural area. To do otherwise is a crass
display of ignorance and dereliction of duty by all officials involved in the ap -
Calvert County
Supports Her Children
proval process.
Owen V. Cummings
Lusby, Md.
On Sunday, August 3 rd , I had the plea-
sociates, Inc., Engineers-Surveyers & Land
sure of attending the Twin Beach Players
Planners; Lighthouse Market & Signs; Me-
E
Mike Batson Photography Freelance Photographers Events Weddings Family Portraits 301-938-3692 mikebatsonphotography@hotmail.com https://www.facebook.com/mikebatsonphotography
Mike Batson Photography
Freelance Photographers
Events
Weddings
Family Portraits
301-938-3692
mikebatsonphotography@hotmail.com
https://www.facebook.com/mikebatsonphotography

presentation of the 9 th Annual Kids’ Play-

writing Festival at the Boys and Girls Club

& Recreation Center Bldg in North Beach.

You can go, too because it continues until

August 10 th .

The Playwriting Festival is comprised

of 6 short plays written by children. Sub-

missions are judged by an accomplished

group of local theater professionals. Prizes

are awarded to two elementary students, 2

middle school, and 2 high school. To state

that it was impossible to tell the difference

based on the quality of the scripts is a fact!

The 6 award-winning plays are: The Sec-

ond Portal by Abigail Kennedy; One Cat 2

Worlds by Sarah Fox; More Time by Travis

Lehnen; The Big Secret by Ava Jabara; Fi-

nally Found You by Sarah Rannacher; and

Jack of Hearts by Anna Gorenflo. All the

plays are suitable for audiences above age

3 or 4, though the adults were laughing the

hardest. There is one 15

dart Galleries. Sponsors include: the Town

of Chesapeake Beach; Sneade’s Ace Home

Center; Town of North Beach; Dr. Michael

Shisler; John Jabara; Elizabeth McWilliams;

Bob Snider; and MD Theater Guide and

MANY volunteers, including the Producers

& Directors: Rob & Valerie Heckart.

The Twin Beach Players 2014 Season

continues with the Legend of Sleepy Hollow

for Halloween with auditions on Aug. 24 &

25 from 7 to 9 p.m. Babes in Toyland will be

the Christmas play with auditions on the 5 th

and 6 th of October.

The Twin Beach Players also have

plans to build a theater in North Beach. Yes,

you can help. Contact Mayor Mark Fraser

for details. Check their website.

It is fitting that the Twin Beach Players

are meeting in and using the North Beach

Boys & Girls Club and Recreation Center

because the building was built with in-kind

donations from the architect, Tom Reineck-

Publisher Associate Publisher Editorial Production Manager Junior Designer

Thomas McKay Eric McKay Angie Stalcup Kasey Russell

Office Manager

Tobie Pulliam

Advertising

sales@somdpublishing.net

Email

info@somdpublishing.net

Phone

301-373-4125

Publisher Associate Publisher Editorial Production Manager Junior Designer Thomas McKay Eric McKay Angie Stalcup Kasey Russell

Staff Writers

Guy Leonard

Law Enforcement

Sarah Miller

Government, Community

Contributing Writers

Laura Joyce

Susan Shaw

Publisher Associate Publisher Editorial Production Manager Junior Designer Thomas McKay Eric McKay Angie Stalcup Kasey Russell

Calvert Gazette

P. O. Box 250 • Hollywood, MD 20636

The Calvert Gazette is a weekly newspaper providing news and information for the residents of Calvert County. The Calvert Gazette will be available on newsstands every Thursday. The paper is published by Southern Maryland Publishing Company, which is responsible for the form, content, and policies of the newspaper. The Calvert Gazette does not espouse any political belief or endorse any product or service in its news coverage.

To be considered for publication, articles and letters to the editor submitted must include the writer’s full name, address and daytime phone number. Submissions must be delivered by 4 p.m. on the Monday prior to our Thursday publication to ensure placement for that week. After that deadline, the Calvert Gazette will make every attempt possible to publish late content, but cannot guarantee so. Letters may be condensed/edited for clarity, although care is taken to preserve the core of the writer’s argument. Copyright in material submitted to the newspaper and accepted for publication remains with the author, but the Calvert Gazette and its licensees may freely reproduce it in print, electronic or other forms. We are unable to acknowledge receipt of letters. The Calvert Gazette cannot guarantee that every letter or photo(s) submitted will be published, due to time or space constraints.

minute intermission.

er, to subcontractors, the towns, the State

As I noted, this is the

of Maryland, and Calvert County all coor-

9 th time the Calvert Coun-

dinated originally by the Northern Calvert

ty Community has sup-

Rotary Club and especially Phil and Joyce

ported this effort through

Pfanschmidt, who had managed to locate a

voluntarism, contribu-

Boys & Girls Club in North Beach on the

tions, and attendance.

same site in a trailer. I will be forever grate-

Advertisers in the profes-

ful for all those Rotary Club volunteers who

sionally produced play-

have made a safe place for a generation of

book include the Town

children and now a wonderful venue for lo -

of North Beach; Sneade’s

cal recreation activities, including former

Ace Home Center; Philly

Mayor Michael Bojokles and current Mayor

Flash; Roland’s, Little

Mark Fraser. Before their efforts, youth

Panda Chinese Restau-

vandalism was a problem due to the lack of

rant; Metropolitan Ap-

an indoor venue and due to the lack of or-

pliance Repair; Richie’s

ganized programs. The small North Beach

Handyman Services;

Community Center had very little room for

Old Town Candy Com-

the myriad of activities that wished to use

pany; R. L. Cranford, Inc.

it.

Senator Mike Miller passed a bond bill

Plumbing Contractor;

in the Legislature and the County Commis-

Lucky Duck Pet Stuff,

sioners provided matching funds along with

Food and Grooming;

the towns.

Nice & Fleazy Antiques;

DeCaro, Doran, Siciliano,

Gallagher & DeBlasis,

LLP; Bob Snider, Percus-

sion & Piano Instruction;

Collinson, Oliff & As-

I attended the 9 th Annual Kids’ Play-

writing Festival today with a friend who

recently moved here from AZ to teach high

school math. His take on the event: “Wow!

Calvert County really supports her kids.” I

agree!

  • 19 Thursday, August 7, 2014

The Calvert Gazette

The Calvert Gazette is always looking for more local talent to feature! To submit art or band information for our entertainment section, e-mail info@somdpublishing.net. Please submit calendar listings by 12 p.m. on the Monday prior to our Thursday publication.

The Calvert Gazette is always looking for more local talent to feature! To submit art or
Tickets available at Calvert Hospice 410-535-0892 or any Stoney’s location. $100 per person in advance/$125 at
Tickets available at Calvert Hospice 410-535-0892
or any Stoney’s location.
$100 per person in advance/$125 at the door.
vert Hospice.
said, adding that she was impressed last
community about the processes that accompany death
and loss. Calvert Hospice promotes quality of life,
respect and dignity for the individual, and a recognition
of the significance of loss throughout life.
spiritual support to residents of Calvert County who
are dying or in need of palliative care; to provide
emotional, psychosocial and spiritual support to those
in Calvert County grieving the loss of a loved one; and
to provide educational services to the entire
medical care and psychosocial, emotional, and
comprehensive, interdisciplinary services focused on
community-based organization, is to provide
The mission of Calvert Hospice, a not for profit,
rimac Court in Prince Frederick, or any
Staff Writer
Calvert Hospice, located at 238 Mer-
By Sarah Miller
year by the band’s ability to match their mu-
Entertainment
Calendar
A fundraising event, hosted by Stoney’s Broomes Island, will be held on Thursday,
August 14 at 6 PM. Open Bar will be from 6-7:30 PM.
Friday, Aug. 8
Saturday, Aug. 9
Thursday, Aug. 7
$125 at the door. Sponsorships are avail-
at the event to the Copper Level ($500)
tickets a re $100 per person in advance or
($3,000) which includes 10 VIP event
and a silent auction. The majority of the
American Cancer Society. As this event is no longer held,
Stoney’s has agreed to host an annual fundraising event for
Calvert Hospice.
Steve and Rusty
Road, Dowell) – 8 p.m.
Ruddy Duck Brewery (13200 Dowell
Some Assembly
Avenue, North Beach) – 7:30 p.m.
The Westlawn Inn (9200 Chesapeake
Against Grace
Stoney’s to Host Second
Annual Luau For Hospice
Jeannie & Phillip Stone
Owners, Stoney’s Seafood
We hope you will join us in supporting this important
organization.
If you are not familiar with Calvert Hospice, please read their
mission statement below.
gift bags and recognition prior to and
Reel held a cancer gala at their restaurant for the benefit of the
For many years, Gerald and Mary Donovan of the Rod &
Calvert Hospice.
holding the 2nd annual fundraising event for the benefit of
This year Stoney’s Seafood House of Broomes Island will be
Platinum Sponsor: $3,000 (10 VIP)
Gold Sponsor: $2,000 (8 VIP)
Silver Sponsor: $1,500 (6 VIP)
Bronze Sponsor: $1,000 (4 VIP)
Copper Sponsor: $500 (2 VIP)
VIP Sponsors will receive VIP Parking,
Name Recognition in the Old Town Crier, Reserved Seating,
Gift Bags and Banner Recognition.
calverthospice.org.
quiet background music and getting louder
pice. For more information, visit www.
sic to the mood of the evening, starting with
All proceeds benefit Calvert Hos-
7:30 p.m.
able ranging from the Platinum Level
Ruddy Duck Brewery (13200 Dowell
for the second annual Luau for Hospice.
items in the auction are sports related, from
Road, Dowell) – 8 p.m.
Dennis Point Marina (465555 Dennis
or Calvert Hospice at 410-535-0892. All
For more information, to become a spon-
A Hot Happening for Hospice ...
sarahmiller@countytimes.net
– 8 p.m.
tickets, VIP parking, reserved seating,
DJ Mango
able, which include tickets and VIP seat-
which includes two VIP event tickets,
memorabilia to tickets, Cousineau-Stone
ets, call Jeannie Stone at 410-586-1888
Seafood & heavy appetizers will be served.
Stone said.
feature a craft beer station with Bob Hall
Tickets for the luau are available at
Jill and Shaun
Damion Wolfe
Following a successful Hawaiian-
Point Way, Drayden) – 6 p.m.
Stoney’s owner and luau coordinator Jean-
food House of Broomes Island is gearing up
said. Those were they types of items that
themed fundraiser last year, Stoney’s Sea-
went best at last year’s event, Cousineau-
the entertainment again this year. They are
VIP parking, reserved seating, gift bags
back by popular demand, Cousineau-Stone
nie Cousineau-Stone. This year’s event will
and more dance-friendly.
3939 Broomes Island Road • 410-586-1888
The Nightlife Band will be providing
Last year’s event was a trial run, said
(16810 Piney Point Road, Piney Point) –
and recognition prior to and at the event.
(16810 Piney Point Road, Piney Point)
Ruddy Duck Seafood and Alehouse
sor or to reserve general admission tick-
Ruddy Duck Seafood and Alehouse
checks should be made payable to Cal-
Stoney’s Location. General admission
ing and parking. Sponsorships are avail-

Journey To Perform At The Calvert Marine Museum

In a career spanning five decades, Journey is blazing

hotter than ever with the lineup of Neal Schon (guitars, back-

ing vocals), Jonathan Cain (keyboards, backing vocals), Ross

Valory (bass, backing vocals), Deen Castronovo (drums, per-

cussion, backing vocals) and Arnel Pineda (lead vocals). The

band has reached heights that likely no artist can hit these

days. It is not luck; it is persistent, hard work over the years;

and Southern Maryland, they will be performing live at the

Calvert Marine Museum on August 24 at 7:30 p.m.!

Don’t miss this once in a lifetime opportunity to see

Journey perform live in Solomons on the PNC Waterside Pa-

vilion. Tickets are $124/$84/$74/$64 (additional fees apply)

and go on sale to members of the Calvert Marine Museum on

Tuesday, July 22 at 10:00 a.m. If you are not a member of the

museum and would like an opportunity to buy the best seats

in the house, then visit www.calvertmarinemuseum.com or

call 410-326-2042, ext. 16 to get signed up before tickets go

on sale. Any remaining tickets will go on sale to the general

public on Tuesday, July 29 at 10:00 a.m.

Since the group’s formation in 1973, the band has earned

19 Top 40 singles and 25 Gold and Platinum albums. “Don’t

Stop Believin’,” Schon said, “has become this national an -

them, world anthem. It’s really wild. If somebody plays it, no

matter where, everybody sings it.” With s ongs like «Open

Arms”, “Faithfully”, “Separate Ways (Worlds Apart)” and

“Anyway You Want It”, Journey holds a special place in the

hearts and memories of so many people.

Proceeds from the Waterside Concert Series support the

education and preservation efforts of the Calvert Marine Mu -

seum. This event would not be possible without the generous

support of many local businesses. Journey sponsors include:

Prince Frederick Ford/Jeep/Dodge, PNC Bank, Bozick Dis-

tributors, Inc., Tidewater Dental, Directmail.com, Holiday

Inn Solomons, All American Harley-Davidson, Quality Built

Homes, Roy Rogers, 98.3 Star FM, Bay Weekly, Quick Con -

nections, Southern Maryland Newspapers, Isaac’s Restau -

rant, Papa John’s Pizza, The McNelis Group, LLC, Southern

Maryland Blue Crabs, United Rentals and World Gym.

Chairs and coolers are not permitted. For additional in -

formation or to purchase tickets, please visit the website at

www.calvertmarinemuseum.com. To reach a staff member,

please call 410-326-2042, ext. 16 or 18.

Londontowne Road, Edgewater) – 7:30 p.m.

California Applenbee’s (45480 Miramar

Dennis Point Marina (465555 Dennis

Blair’s Londontowne Pub and Grill (726

Ruddy Duck Brewery (13200 Dowell

Ruddy Duck Brewery (13200 Dowell

The Westlawn Inn (9200 Chesapeake

Avenue, North Beach) – 7:30 p.m.

Not So Modern Jazz Quartet

Point Way, Drayden) – 5 p.m.

Way, California) – 9 p.m.

Road, Dowell) – 7 p.m.

Road, Dowell) – 8 p.m.

Wednesday, Aug. 13

Thursday, Aug. 14

Piranhas Acoustic

Monday, Aug. 11

Wolf’s Blues Jam

Team Trivia

DJ Mango

Karaoke

The Calvert Gazette

Thursday, August 7, 2014

20

Presenting the professionals' favorite properties on the market. Featured Homes of Realtor’s Choice the Week 15
Presenting the professionals' favorite properties on the market.
Featured
Homes of
Realtor’s Choice
the Week
15 Slip marina, with dock master’s
office and private residence. Protected
waters in town creek, easy access to
Chesapeake Bay via Patuxent River.
Private residence is currently rented.
Dock master’s office has separate his’
and her’s full baths with showers,
small shop, and covered patio and deck.
23701 Bill Dixon Rd, California, Md 20619 • SM8408195 $429,900
Gloria Abell
Sales Master
Coldwell Banker Jay Lilly Real Estate
22811 Three Notch Road, California, MD 20619
E-mail: gabell@mris.com • Office: 301-863-0300 Ext 1311
Toll Free: 800-257-6633 • Cell: 301-904-6808
To list a property in our next
Realtor’s Choice edition,
call Jennifer at 301-373-4125.
The Calvert Gazette Thursday, August 7, 2014 20 Presenting the professionals' favorite properties on the market.

The Master of all Glands

By Debra Meszaros CSN

www.MXSportsNutrition.

com

Could there be un-

derlying reasons why

we can’t seem to control

Osteoporosis?

Are you taking syn-

The Calvert Gazette Thursday, August 7, 2014 20 Presenting the professionals' favorite properties on the market.

thetic hormones to help

your body balance itself?

Have you been diagnosed with Hypo-

thyroidism or think your thyroid is not func-

tioning correctly even after being tests show

it’s in normal range?

The thyroid gland is perhaps one of the

most important glands of the body. Its func-

tion of secreting hormones is utilized by the

body for regulating metabolism, the storage

of fat, the placement of calcium in the bone,

as well as other hormonal functions like acti-

vating vitamin D. Many times an under active

thyroid is a contributing factor to other dis-

eases like Osteoporosis, which is often over-

looked by physicians.

Why is Hypothyroidism so common?

An under active thyroid known as Hy-

pothyroidism, is extremely common and a

growing concern among Americans. There

are many factors that contribute to suppress-

ing thyroid function. Studies indicate that

chemicals are one of the main causes behind

reduced thyroid function. These chemicals

include: drugs, histamines, petro-chemicals,

industrial iodides, antiseptics, fluoride, PCB’s

(often found in microwave containers and

substances in plastic bottles), chemical de-

tergents, parabens (often found in personal

care products), and chlorine (as in pools and

drinking water). We are all exposed to these

compounds on a regular basis and when com-

bined with other factors, can lead to thyroid

dysfunction.

Foods can also contribute to the sup-

pression of thyroid function when they are

in abundance within our diets. Goitrogenic

foods like soy products (and if you read your

food labels you will find soy in just about ev-

erything), uncooked cruciferous vegetables

(broccoli, brussels sprout, green cabbage,

cauliflower, turnips, parsnips, kale, and col-

lard greens), millet, and Brazil nuts. If you

suspect you have a dysfunctioning thyroid,

simply cook these otherwise healthy foods.

These remain “healthy” foods if they are not

overdone in the diet. A diet practicing rota-

tional eating is always suggested to help avoid

an issue.

Dieting is another trigger for reduc-

ing thyroid function. When a diet includes

chronic extreme calorie restrictions, that ac-

tion can affect thyroid function. Restricting

food intake is not suggested unless directed

by a physician. Your thyroid function should

be monitored while you are on any diet. Jump-

ing onto “fad” diets and diets created by book

authors may not be the approach you need to

permanently lose weight or achieve optimal

health. Many women struggle to control emo-

tions, moods, and thyroid function because

of insufficient protein intake, or sometimes

the inability for your body to breakdown pro-

tein, which can led to amino acid deficiencies

which impairs the body’s capacity to convert

T4 to T3. Further, a high glycemic diet (usu-

ally a diet that includes processed grains) is

usually associated with lack of thyroid func-

tion. If your diet includes starchy foods (root

vegetables), pastas, certain grains, processed

foods, candy, cookies, pastries, ice cream and

chocolate, you may be stressing your thyroid

function.

Iodine has always been associated with

helping thyroid function but recently there’s

some evidence that indicate excess iodine can

increase the chances of autoimmune thyroid

disease, thyroid cancer, and hypothyroidism.

Want to take control over your own thy-

roid health?

Blood tests are usually utilized to de-

termine how the thyroid is functioning but

sometimes physicians make this determi-

nation solely by the TSH value of your test.

Many laboratories set the high TSH value at

> 2.50. Recent studies are indicating that a

“true” high value is more like >1.50. When

the thyroid under functions it pumps out more

TSH. In addition to your regular checkups,

incorporating an auxiliary body temperature

test, A/K/A Basal temperature test (tempera-

ture taken underneath the arm pit) can provide

you with accurate data on how your thyroid is

indeed functioning. Here’s how to do it.

1). Place a mercury-type clinical ther-

mometer, well shaken down, next to your

bedside.

2). When you awake in the morning,

before you actually get up out of bed, place

bulb of thermometer under your armpit for 10

minutes. DO NOT GET UP OUT OF BED.

3). Record the temperature.

4). Repeat for 2 or 3 days consecutively.

Note: Men, pre-pubescent and post-

menopausal women can take this test on any

day.

*Menstruating women need to perform

this test on the second and third mornings af-

ter their flow starts.

Temperature range: 97.8 to 98.2 suggests

normal thyroid function

Temperature range below 97.8 indicates

hypothyroidism (low thyroid function).

Temperature range above 98.2 indicates

hyperthyroidism (overactive thyroid gland).

It’s that simple to take control over your

thyroid health!

©2014 Debra Meszaros MXSportsNutrition.com. All rights reserved; no duplication without permission. DISCLAIMER: When you read through the diet and lifestyle information, you must know that everything within it is for informational purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for advice from your physician or other health care professional. I am making no attempt to prescribe any medical treatment. You

should not use the information here for diagnosis or treatment of any health problem or for prescription of any medication or

other treatment. The products and the claims made about specific

products have not been evaluated by the United States Food and

Drug Administration and are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent disease. You should consult with a healthcare profes- sional before starting any diet, exercise or supplementation pro-

gram, before taking any medication, or if you have or suspect you might have a health problem. Confirm the safety of any supple- ments with your M.D., N.D. or pharmacist (healthcare profes- sional). Some information given is solely an opinion, thought and or conclusion based on experiences, trials, tests, assessments or other available sources of information. I do not make any guaran- tees or promises with regard to results. I may discuss substances

that have not been subject to double blind clinical studies or FDA

approval or regulation. You assume the responsibility for the deci- sion to take any natural remedy. You and only you are responsible if you choose to do any-

thing with the information you have read. You do so at your own risk. I encourage you to make your own health decisions based

upon your research and in partnership with a qualified health care

professional.

  • 21 Thursday, August 7, 2014

The Calvert Gazette

Library Events

August, Month Long

• August: Art in the Stacks-Amy Davis

Calvert Library Prince Frederick, 850 Cost-

ley Way

Nature-inspired paintings of wildlife and

botanicals in oil, with an emphasis on local

flora and fauna. 410-535-0291 or 301-855-1862

Thursday, Aug. 7
Thursday, Aug. 7

• Children’s Maker’s Space

Calvert Library Southern Branch, 13920 H.

  • G. Trueman Road, Solomons – 10:30 to 11:30

a.m.

Come join our first “Maker’s Space” for

children at Southern and see what you can

build. We will supply a large amount of Legos,

including some Lego Duplos. Activities will

also include craft stations. 410-326-5289

• Fizz! Boom! Afternoon!

Calvert Library Prince Frederick, 850 Cost-

ley Way – 2:30 to 3:30 p.m.

Summer and Science go together on

Fizz! Boom! Afternoon! Children Kindergar-

ten to 5th grade drop by for science stories,

activities ,and snacks. Registration not re-

quired. 410-535-0291 or 301-855-1862

• Fizz! Boom! Afternoon!

Calvert Library Fairview Branch, Rt. 4 and

Chaneyville Road, Owings – 2:30 to 3:30 p.m.

Summer and Science go together on

Fizz! Boom! Afternoon! Children Kindergar-

ten to 5th grade drop by for science stories, ac-

tivities, and snacks. Registration not required.

K to 5th grade. 410-257-2101

• Tween Summer Book Fest

Calvert Library Southern Branch, 13920 H.

  • G. Trueman Road, Solomons – 6:30 to 8 p.m.

5th to 7th graders are invited to an eve-

ning of fun and free activities, discussion and

snacks themed around the book they have all

read – “Because of Mr. Terupt” by Rob Bu-

yea. Please register. 410-326-5289

Friday, Aug. 8
Friday, Aug. 8

• On Pins & Needles

Calvert Library Prince Frederick, 850 Cost-

ley Way – 1 to 4 p.m.

Bring your quilting, needlework, knit-

ting, crocheting, or other project for an after-

noon of conversation and shared creativity.

410-535-0291 or 301-855-1862

• Garden Smarter: Grow It, Eat It, Pre-

serve It

Calvert Library Prince Frederick, 850 Cost-

ley Way – 10 to 11:30 a.m.

Learn to identify safe food preservation

practices, how canning preserves food, and

processing high and low acid foods using a

water bath and pressure canner. 410-535-0291

or 301-855-1862

Saturday, Aug. 9
Saturday, Aug. 9

• Summer Storytime

Calvert Library Prince Frederick, 850 Cost-

ley Way – 10 to 10:30 a.m.

Children enjoy 30 minutes of books and

language through short stories, songs, finger-

plays and flannel stories. No registration re-

quired. 410-535-0291 or 301-855-1862

• Summer Storytime

Calvert Library Southern Branch, 13920 H.

  • G. Trueman Road, Solomons – 10 to 10:45

a.m.

Summer Storytime is for families with

children of multiples ages. The program lasts

45 minutes and there is no craft. For ages

birth through 5 years old. 410-326-5289

• Chess Saturdays at the Library

Calvert Library Twin Beaches Branch, 3819

Harbor Road, Chesapeake Beach – 10 a.m.

to 12 p.m.

Chess enthusiasts or wannabe enthu-

siasts—please join us (with or without your

own chess set) at the library the 2nd Satur-

day of each month from 10:00 a.m. to noon.

All ages and levels welcome! Please register.

410-257-2411

• Introduction to Finding Funders for

Nonprofits

Calvert Library Prince Frederick, 850 Cost-

ley Way – 11 a.m. to 12 p.m.

Learn to find funders for your nonprofit

with the Foundation Center’s comprehensive

funding research tool, Foundation Direc-

tory Online. Space is limited. Registration

required-- contact Cathey Moffatt-Bush or

Robbie McGaughran at 410-535-0291. 410-

535-0291 or 301-855-1862

• Learn Mahjongg

Calvert Library Southern Branch, 13920 H.

  • G. Trueman Road, Solomons – 1 to 3 p.m.

Want to learn Mahjongg? Games are a

great way to keep your brain sharp while hav-

ing fun! Join us! 410-326-5289

• Lego Mania

Calvert Library Prince Frederick, 850 Cost-

ley Way – 3 to 4 p.m.

Lego enthusiasts will meet to hear a

story followed by a Lego building session.

Each session will close with sharing time.

Legos supplied by library. Drop in. The

theme is Amusement Parks. 410-535-0291 or

301-855-1862

Monday, Aug. 11
Monday, Aug. 11

• Teen Movie Night

Calvert Library Prince Frederick, 850 Cost-

ley Way – 6 to 8:30 p.m.

Free food and a movie, based on the

book, “The Perks of Being a Wallflower.”

We’ll raffle off all the prizes to summer read-

ing participants. (ages 13-19). 410-535-0291 or

301-855-1862

Tuesday, Aug. 12
Tuesday, Aug. 12

• Game on @ Calvert Library

Calvert Library Prince Frederick, 850 Cost-

ley Way – 2 to 3:30 p.m.

Join us to play Nintendo Wii. Try out

Rock Band, Guitar Hero and more. All ages

are welcome! 410-535-0291 or 301-855-1862

• How to Get Library eBooks to Your

Device

Calvert Library Prince Frederick, 850 Cost-

ley Way – 7 to 8 p.m.

Learn how to use Maryland’s Digital

eLibrary and the OverDrive Media Console

to check out, download and read library e-

books on your tablet, smartphone, ereader

or computer. Please register. 410-535-0291 or

301-855-1862

• Flying Needles

Calvert Library Southern Branch, 13920 H.

  • G. Trueman Road, Solomons – 7 to 8:45 p.m.

Knitting, crocheting and portable craft-

ing group open to anyone wanting to join in

and share talents, crafting time or learn a new

skill. 410-326-5289

Wednesday, Aug. 13

• Memoirs & Creative Writing Workshop

Calvert Library Prince Frederick, 850 Cost-

ley Way – 2 to 3:30 p.m.

Join author and editor Elisavietta Ritchie

as she encourages the art of creative mem-

oir writing. Bring 12 double-spaced copies

of your piece of memoir, 500-800 words, to

work on and share with the group. 410-535-

0291 or 301-855-1862

Thursday, Aug. 14
Thursday, Aug. 14

• Town Hall Meeting

Calvert Library Prince Frederick, 850 Cost-

ley Way – 6:30 to 8:30 p.m.

Topic: Dominion Cove Point Unan-

swered Questions. Citizens still have many

questions regarding the LNG expansion

at Cove Point. Join us as we bring experts

together in order to get those questions an-

swered. 410-535-0291 or 301-855-1862

• On Pins & Needles

Calvert Library Prince Frederick, 850 Cost-

ley Way – 1 to 4 p.m.

Bring your quilting, needlework, knit-

ting, crocheting, or other project for an after-

noon of conversation and shared creativity.

410-535-0291 or 301-855-1862

Friday, Aug. 15
Friday, Aug. 15

• End of Summer Celebration

Calvert Library Southern Branch, 13920 H.

G. Trueman Road, Solomons – 1 to 3 p.m.

Come celebrate the end of summer at

Calvert Library Southern Branch, with a

showing of a Lego movie on our big screen.

410-326-5289

Saturday, Aug. 16
Saturday, Aug. 16

• Garden Smarter: Composting

Community Resources Building, 30 Duke

Street, Prince Frederick – 10 to 11:30 a.m.

Why compost? How do you compost?

What materials do you need to compost? Is it

difficult to compost? Find these answers and

more! 410-535-0291 or 301-855-1862

• Brain Games: Mahjongg, Scrabble &

more

Calvert Library Prince Frederick, 850 Cost-

ley Way – 12 to 3 p.m.

Want to learn Mahjongg? Hope to make

your Scrabble skills killer? Games are a great

way to keep your brain sharp while having

fun! Join us! 410-535-0291 or 301-855-1862

Monday, Aug. 18
Monday, Aug. 18

• Books & Toys

Calvert Library Southern Branch, 13920 H.

G. Trueman Road, Solomons – 10 to 11 a.m.

Star for Mrs. Blake by April Smith.

Moms, Dads, caregivers and your tots!

Book club for adults, playtime for kids!

410-326-5289

For more events and information about

Calvert County libraries, visit calvert.lib.

md.us

21 Thursday, August 7, 2014 The Calvert Gazette Library Events August, Month Long • August: Art

The Calvert Gazette

Thursday, August 7, 2014

22

The Calvert Gazette Thursday, August 7, 2014 22 Out & About Community Events August Month Long

Out& About

Community Events

August Month Long

2014 Annual Summer Public Art Project:

JIBE: Compositions on Sail

Annmarie Sculpture Garden & Arts Center (13480 Dowell Road, Solomons) - 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Aug. 1 - 31 Price is included with site admission. Come and add to the Summer Public Art Project by drawing, painting or doodling on a swatches of repurposed sailcloth. Lauren Feusahrens, a re- cent BFA graduate from Salisbury university, is the 2014 Artist-In-Residence and has created this project. The project name “Jibe” was derived from a sailing term that Feusahrens explains as “

...

that moment when someone sailing gets that

real feeling of excitement and the adrenaline rush when you come about and then, the sudden calm.” Participants may return to Annmarie Sculpture Garden at any time between Aug. 2 and Oct. 31 to see the sail cloths be transformed into mazes at the ARTmazing! Exhibit, which will be an inter- active outdoor exhibit. To learn more, visit www. annmariegarden.org

Best Photographs from Photographers in Cal- vert County

Cox Art Center (32 Cox Road, Huntingtown) -

Thursday - Saturday: 12 to 7 p.m., Sunday: 12 to 5 p.m.

Aug. 1 - 17 Come to Cox At Center for a special gallery show that features eight Calvert County photog- raphers and 20 of their best photographic works of art. Gallery Reception will be held on Satur- day, July 26, from 1:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. Light refreshments will be served. Visit their website, coxartcenter.com for detailed information about the photographers. For more information, call 410 535-0014 or email them at info@coxartcenter. com.

“Loathsome Lovelies” Fine Art By Jen Poteet

Artworks@7th (9100 Bay Ave, North Beach) - Thursday thru Monday, 12 to 7 p.m.

July 31 - Aug. 25 The Artworks@7th featured artist for Au- gust is Jen Poteet. Poteet’s artwork is the product of an over-imagination and inspired creativity. She gets inspiration from many sources, but her love of nature, Mexican folk art and all things dark and spooky are her main focus. Her works are one of kind, rendered in pen, watercolor, acrylic and even coffee. She likes to use her framing to add a little something extra to her paintings, which in term creates and overall unique piece. Come and expose yourself to something different! Opening reception is Friday, Aug. 1, from 5 to 9 p.m. and on Saturday, Aug. 2 there will be an added special event with live music from 4 to 6 p.m. If you are unable to attend either of those, come any time during business hours! The show will run July 31 thru Aug. 25. For more information, call 410-286- 5278 or visit our website at www.artworksat7th. com.

Twin Beach players 9th annual Kids’ Play- writing Festival

North Beach Boys and Girls Club (9021 Dayton

Ave. North Beach) - Friday & Saturday 7 p.m., Sunday 3 p.m.

Weekends Aug. 1-10 This annual festival features the talents of local children. The six winning shows are written by children in the state of Maryland! Playwrights are given an opportunity to have complete cre- ative control over their shows from casting, di- recting, designing and even starring in their own

plays. Each is also awarded a $100 prize. With over 60 children involved in the production, au- dience members will be entertained and amazed by the wide array of storytelling! Tickets are $10, but are $5 for members, seniors and students. For

more information, visit find us online at www.

twinbeachplayers.com or www.facebook.com/ twinbeachplayers.

Thursday, Aug. 7
Thursday, Aug. 7

Calvert Library: Children’s Makers Space

Calvert Library Southern Branch (13920 H.G. Trueman Road, Solomons) - 10:30 to 11:30 a.m.

Come join the first “Makers Space” and see

what you can build! There will be a large supply

of Legos, including some Lego Duplos. Activities will also include craft stations! For more informa- tion, contact the Calvert Library Southern Branch at 410-326-5289, email them at rtruslow@somd. lib.md.us or visit their website at www.calvert.lib. md.us.

Coffee Connections Meeting

Women’s Institute (AACC, College Parkway, Bldg., Arnold) - 8:30 to 10 a.m.

Coffee Connections is a free group for those women who are involved in the professional, en- trepreneurial and business world. The meeting is in CADE 219. Its’s located on located on the west

side of campus closest to Route and the Y – (Big Vanilla). Come in that entrance to the college and

turn right into the first parking lot on your right

( parking Lot F). CADE is the building right across the street from this parking lot. This is the

Women’s Institutes first time hosting the meeting.

The Women’s Institute offers non-credit courses designed with women in mind. From every sub-

ject, gardening to starting a business, the class is

designed specifically with women in mind. Dawn

Schulman is currently looking for instructors, so seek her out if that’s something of interest to you! Don’t forget to bring plenty of business cards, ma- terials and door prizes, if you would like! Pass this information on to your associates! For more infor- mation, please visit us on our Facebook page City Coffee Connections or contact Barbara Gill at 410-320-4026! Coming soon, their own web site!

Friday, Aug. 8
Friday, Aug. 8

Calvert Library: On Pins & Needles

Calvert Library Prince Fredrick (850 Costley Way, Prince Frederick) - 1 to 4 p.m.

Bring your quilting, needlework, knitting, crocheting, or other project for an afternoon of conversation and shared creativity! For more in- formation, contact Calvert Library Prince Fred- rick at 410-535-0291 or 301-855-1862, email them at rtruslow@somd.lib.md.us or visit their website at www.calvert.lib.md.us.

Saturday, Aug. 9
Saturday, Aug. 9

Introduction to Stained Glass With Ray & Phyllis Noble

Cox Art Center (32 Cox Road, Huntingtown) - 12

to 3 p.m.

Aug. 9, 10 Cost: $100 dollars. For more information, contact Cox Art Center by calling 410 535-0014 or by email at info@coxartcenter.com.

Sale at Asbury Solomons Retirement Community

Asbury Solomons Retirement Community (11000 Asbury Circle, Solomons) - 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Sale will include Betty’s closet, a resale of new and gently used clothing and accessories! There will also be books and cd’s at a fabulous low price being sold by the Library Committee. Housewares, furniture and miscellaneous items will be sold by Grannies Treasures! All proceeds will go to the Benevolent Care Fund! For more in- formation, call 410-394-3483.

Free Car Show!

Philly Flash Restaurant (2989 Plaza Dr., Dunkirk)

- 4 to 9 p.m.

Come and enjoy some great music and great cars at the Philly Flash Restaurant! DJ Ron will be there to spin the tunes. There’s unlimited park- ing with shade trees. Great food in a nostalgia drag race atmosphere restaurant! Free admission! Rain date, Aug. 16. For more information, call

443-550-3484.

Sunday, Aug. 10
Sunday, Aug. 10

Little Shop of Horrors! Presented by New- towne Players Three Notch Theatre (21744 South Coral Drive, Lexington Park) - 3:30 to 6:30 p.m. Little Shop of Horrors, which has been a stage play as well as twice adapted for the movies, will finish The Newtowne Players’ 10th anniver-

sary season and will run from July 25 to Aug. 10, 2014, with performances at 8 p.m. on Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays, and 3:30 p.m. on Sundays.

Performances are held at Three Notch Theatre on

South Coral Drive in Lexington Park. Cost: $18 for adults, $15 for seniors over the age of 65, students and military, $13 for children under 12 and $13 on Thursdays. Call 301-737-5447 or visit www. newtowneplayers.or to reserve tickets. Addition- ally, patrons are invited to close the 10th anniver- sary season with an end-of-season wrap party on closing night, Aug. 10, featuring food, music and fun. For more information about volunteer op- portunities or other upcoming programs by The

Newtowne Players, visit www.newtowneplayers.

org or www.facebook.com/newtowneplayers.

Monday, Aug. 11
Monday, Aug. 11

Economic Development Authority Meeting

Department of Economic Development Office

Courthouse Square (205 Main Street, Prince

Fredrick) - 8:30 to 10:30 a.m.

The Economic Development Authority undertakes and supports economic development activities Countywide. They were created for the purpose of acquiring, constructing, developing, improving, operating and managing economic properties in the County. The Authority oversees management and land sales at the Calvert County Industrial Park and the Patuxent Business Park. For more information, please contact 410-535- 1600, ext. 2481, email them at bentlesf@co.cal. md.us or visit their website www.co.cal.md.us/

index.aspx?nid=680.

Tuesday, Aug. 12
Tuesday, Aug. 12

Sea Squirts: Doing the Crab Dance

Calvert Marine Museum (14200 Solomons Island Rd, Solomons) - 10:30 to 11 a.m.

Aug. 12, 14 Free drop-in program for toddlers 18 months to three years and their caregivers. For more in- formation, call 410-326-2042 or visit their website www.calvertmarinemuseum.com.

Wednesday, Aug. 13

FREE Beginner Line Dance Lessons!

Hotel Charles (15110 Burnt Store Road, Hughes-

ville) - 7 to 7:30 p.m.

Offered by the Boot Scooters of Southern Maryland, come and enjoy a free beginner line dance lesson! Lessons are every Wednesday night, starting at 7 p.m. and ending at 7:30 p.m. Guests are welcome to stay and watch or may participate in, the more advanced practice ses- sion that follows the beginner lessons. For more information, please contact the Boot Scooters of Southern Maryland website at www.bootscooter- sofsomd.blogspot.com/.

Thursday, Aug. 14

Luau for Hospice

Stoney’s Broomes Island (3939 Oyster House

Road, Broomes Island) - 6 p.m. (Open Bar from 6 to 7:30 p.m.)

This year, Stoney’s Seafood House of

Broomes Island will be holding the second an-

nual fundraising event for the benefit of Calvert

Hospice. Gerald and Mary Donovan of the Rod & Reel have held a cancer gala at their restau-

rant for many years now for the benefit of the

American Cancer Society. Because this event is no longer held, Stoney’s has taken up the annual fundraising event. Seafood and heavy appetizers will be served. Tickets are available at Calvert Hospice or any Stoney’s Location. General ad- mission tickets a re $100 per person in advance or $125 at the door. Sponsorships are available, which include tickets and VIP seating and park- ing. Sponsorships are available ranging from the Platinum Level ($3,000) which includes 10 VIP event tickets, VIP parking, reserved seating, gift bags and recognition prior to and at the event to the Copper Level ($500) which includes 2 VIP event tickets, VIP parking, reserved seating, gift bags and recognition prior to and at the event. For more information, to become a sponsor or to re- serve your general admission tickets, call Jeannie Stone at 410-586-1888 or Calvert Hospice at 410- 535-0892. All checks should be made payable to Calvert Hospice.

Friday, Aug. 15
Friday, Aug. 15

Maritime Performance Series Presents Simple Gifts

Calvert Marine Museum (14200 Solomons Island

Rd, Solomons) - 7:30 p.m. in the Harms Gallery

Two women plus their 12 instruments amounts to one good time! This award-winning duo plays multiple styles, including lively Irish

Jigs and down home American reels. Spicing the mix with the distinctive rhythms of Balkan dance music, the lush sounds of Scandinavian twin

fiddling, and original compositions written in a

traditional style give this duo a unique and excit- ing sound. Admission is $10 at the door, cash or check; beer and wine available for sale! For more information, call 410-326-2042 or visit their web- site www.calvertmarinemuseum.com.

Saturday, Aug. 16
Saturday, Aug. 16

Fossil Field Experience

Calvert Marine Museum (14200 Solomons Island Rd, Solomons) - 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.

Explore the fossils of Calvert Cliffs on a lo- cal beach with a trained guide and get a guided tour of the fossil hall. Cost is $20 per person, which includes museum admission. Space is lim- ited! Registration is required. Children must be 8-years-old and accompanied by an adult. Call 410-326-2042, ext. 41.

Sunday, Aug. 17
Sunday, Aug. 17

Chesapeake Community Chorus Practice Session North Beach Union Church (8912 Chesapeake Avenue, North Beach) - 4 to 6 p.m. Aug. 17, 24 The Chesapeake Community Chorus is an all-volunteer chorus that performs concerts to benefit charities in Calvert County. We are look-

ing to add new singers to the chorus. No auditions

required! Contact Larry Brown, Director, at 301- 855-7477, or email lbrown9601@verizon.net.

Monday, Aug. 18
Monday, Aug. 18

Calvert Eats Local

Calvert Library Prince Fredrick (850 Costley Way, Prince Frederick) - 7 to 8:30 p.m.

Come and encourage local agriculture, dis- cover ways to eat locally, as well as share resourc- es, energy and amazing ideas for food! There will

also be a discussion of the book Gaining Ground:

A story of Farmers’ Markets, Local Food, and Saving the Family Farm by Forrest Pritchard. For more information, contact Calvert Library Prince Frederick at 850 Costley Way, by phone 410-535- 0291 or 301-855-1862 or by visiting their website calvertlibrary.info.

  • 23 Thursday, August 7, 2014

The Calvert Gazette

CLUES ACROSS 6. Gusto (Italian) 1. Mimics 7. Territory ruled by a 5. Ed Murrow’s home
CLUES ACROSS
6.
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1.
Mimics
7.
Territory ruled by a
5.
Ed Murrow’s home
Satrap
8.
Semitic gods
9. Disseminates
10.
Print errors
10.
Other
35.
Indian frocks
13.
Shared
11.
Appellation
37.
Jewish day of rest
15.Intestinal
12.
Arthur
Stadium (USTA)
38.
Earliest anesthetic
inflammation
13.
Seed container
40.
Hair product
16.
Word element meaning ear
14.
Paradoxical Zen question
41.
So. Am. wood sorrels
17.
English romantic poet
15.
Runs disconnected
43.
Blockades
19.
Proofreading symbol
18.
Rainbow Effect (abbr.)
44.
Pierce
21.
Marten pelt
20.
Chalk remover
45.
The class of birds
22.
Brew
24.
Assist in some wrongdoing
46.
Stake
23.
Liquid body
substances
26.
Main arterial vessels
48.
After B
28.
Unreturned serve
50.
Comedian Letterman
25.
Born of
30.
Brain wave instrument
51.
British School
26.
Large primate
31.
Baby carriage
52. 1996 presidential candidate
27.
Aba
Honeymoon
34.
Image recorders
56.
Radioactivity unit
29.
Indian solder
32.
NYSE regulator
33.
Be incorrect
34.
Badger groups
36.
Gangster pistols
38.
Hearing receptor
39.
Gone by
42.
“Heir of Fire”
author Sarah
44.
Short-term memory
45.
Egg-shaped nut palms
47.
Invests
in
little
enterprises
49.
_______
Daniel
Last Week’s Puzzle Solutions
Webster”
53.
Busy, honey or quilting
54.
Supplies with air
55.
Repository
57.
Verbal approvals
58.
Make joyful
59.
1/100 yen
60.
Lam
:
12th hebrew
letter (pl)
CLUES DOWN
1.
Diminishes
2.
Set free
3.
Consume
4.
Salem-Leckrone Airport
5.
Rowing team

CLASSIFIEDS

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Email your ad to: sales@countytimes.net or Call: 301-373-4125 or Fax: 301-373-4128. Liner Ads (No artwork or special type) Charged by the line with the 4 line minimum. Display Ads (Ads with artwork, logos, or special type) Charged by the inch with the 2 inch minimum. All private party ads must be paid before ad is run.

Publication Days

The Calvert Gazette is published each Thursday. Deadlines are Tuesday at 12 noon

Office hours are: Monday thru Friday 8am - 4pm

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The Calvert Gazette will not be held responsible for any ads omitted for any reason. The Calvert Gazette reserves the right to edit or reject

any classified ad not meeting the standards of The Calvert Gazette. It is your responsiblity to check the ad on its first publication and call us if a mistake is found. We will correct your ad only if notified after the first day of the first publication ran.

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