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Do You Know Who Your Next CEO Is?

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Do You Know Who Your Next
CEO Is?
Developing Leaders With 20/20 Vision










Do You Know Who Your Next CEO Is?
May 2, 2006
By Sumeet Varghese
Sponsored by Lominger




Do You Know Who Your Next CEO Is?

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DO YOU KNOW WHO YOUR NEXT CEO
I S?
DEVELOPI NG LEADERS WI TH 20/ 20
VI SI ON

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

There’s a pressing need today to develop and groom the
next generation of leaders. The impending departure of
millions of Baby Boomers from the U.S. workforce
coupled with the intensifying global competition for
talent will leave organizations without a leadership
succession plan at a severe competitive disadvantage.
Just as athletes strive to break records at the Olympics
by years of advance training, smart companies are
investing now in developing future leaders. This requires
identifying the organization’s talent potential and
developing the talent competencies the organization
needs to achieve business success. What are the specific
skill sets desired of potential leaders? How can
companies do the best job of talent development? What
makes some better at it than their competitors? What are
the major trends in developing current and future
leaders?

This paper will address these questions and look at:

• Developing leaders for times of change
• Action principles from research on trends and best
practices
• The special challenges of identifying and developing
“rising stars”

“There are several compelling reasons to believe that
many organizations are heading for a leadership crisis,”
warns Dr. Robert Fulmer, Academic Director for Duke
Corporate Education. The following demographic and
cultural trends are indicative of what he calls the
emerging “Perfect Storm” for Human Resource
professionals charged with leadership development:

• Departure of a Generation of Leaders
The potential wave of retirements in the next
five to ten years, led by the Baby Boomers,
should be of immediate concern. Born
between 1946 and 1964, many will turn 65 in
just five years but over the next 20 to 25
years, about 80 million will retire.
• From ‘Boom’ to ‘Bust’
The generation that follows the Boomers has
20-25% fewer people which means they will
not be able to fill all vacant leadership
positions.
• Decline of Employee Loyalty and
Commitment
According to the National Guidance Research
Forum, the present generation is expected to
change jobs have about 15 times during the
course of their careers.
• Loss of Knowledge Capital
More retirements and high turnover rates
translate into loss of knowledge capital.
• Increasing Technical and Global
Complexity
Globalization and spread of technology has
made it impossible to conceive of leadership
talent in non-technical and non-global terms.

EFFECTIVE LEADERS DELIVER SOLID RESULTS

There’s little doubt that leadership development
correlates to improved business success. Yet a poll
conducted by the Human Capital Institute (HCI)
during a May 2, 2006 webcast on leadership
development found that 56% of respondents
reported they were only “somewhat satisfied” with
top management’s involvement in leadership
development. Almost 34% of respondents found
management’s involvement “not at all
satisfactory.” The following studies further
establish the connection between leadership
bench strength and financial performance:

• Organizations with strong leadership bench
strength have approximately 10% higher total


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shareholder return than their weaker peers (Corporate
Leadership Council, 2003)
• Companies with above average financial returns
have more comprehensive succession planning processes
and are committed to developing future leaders (Hewitt,
2005)
• Employees with strong leaders are more satisfied,
engaged, and loyal than employees with weak leaders
(DDI, 2003)
• A conscious partnership between line execs and HR
drives strategic leadership success (APQC 2005)
• Educational investments at the senior level appear
to be linked with greater profitability (IBM, 2005)

While there are several strategic steps organizations can
consider for leadership development, Fulmer picks the
following five he finds to be most effective1 in
articulating a comprehensive leadership strategy:

1. Start with the top
2. Directly link to the business to deliver results
3. Build an integrated leadership strategy
4. Provide consistency in the execution of leadership
programs and practices
5. Hold leaders accountable for results

1: START WITH THE TOP

C-level commitment and passion for leadership
development is absolutely essential. Senior management
can be engaged as champions, role models, and faculty.
Fulmer provides six examples of people he feels
demonstrate excellent C-level commitment to leadership
succession planning.

JIM OWENS, CATERPILLAR

The Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of Caterpillar
Inc. believes in listening to people as part of his Vision
2020 strategy. High potential participants are asked

1. Adapted from: Duke Corporate Education, “Leadership Strategy
Project” (2005); Hewitt, “The Top 20 Companies for Leaders – US”
(2005); ExecSight, “Current Challenges in Leadership Development”
(2004); Growing Your Company’s Leaders, 2004
what the strategy of the firm should be in 2020.
Their responses are shared with the corporate
strategy standing committee and disseminated
throughout the organization. One of the key
points that participants obtain from this exercise
is that leaders can be teachers and can infuse that
spirit throughout the organization.

MICHAEL DELL, DELL

The Chairman of the Dell board also served as a
role model CEO. He was open to change, and
solicited inputs from his peers and subordinates to
improve. This openness is part of Dell’s corporate
culture.

STEPHEN SANGER, GENERAL MILLS

As Chairman of the Board and CEO, Sanger
understood the importance of listening and
learning very early. By getting feedback on
himself from co-workers, he modeled a sense of
personal development and ultimately credited
them for his improvement. This attitude was
transferred to all levels of the company.

JACK WELCH, GENERAL ELECTRIC

The Ex-CEO of General Electric was personally
committed to increasing bench strength and knew
the cost of not developing talent. His
commitment was manifested in a corporate-wide
development program.

J. P. GARNIER, GLAXO SMITHKLINE

As CEO, Garnier’s involvement with high potential
leaders and development programs is exemplary
and ongoing.

ED ZANDER, MOTOROLA

The Chairman and CEO, Zander is known for his
commitment to teaching and learning, and his


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passion is reflected in the company’s leadership
development planning.

2: DIRECTLY LINK TO THE BUSINESS TO DELIVER RESULTS

“Support from top management,” says Fulmer, “comes
only when human resource development efforts are
directly linked to the business and the results they are
associated with.” Leadership development practices have
to be aligned with business strategy and priorities so
that investment in leadership training and education
reflects a positive ROI. By tying HR practices targeted at
developing leadership talent to financial growth, talent
managers will be able to demonstrate value in business
terms and develop metrics that reflect business goals.

According to Fulmer, the best organizations have
programs that link active learning and leadership
development to produce positive business results. Fulmer
chooses the following as notable examples of action
learning:

IBM – ACT PROGRAM

International Business Machines Corporation launched
its “Accelerate Change Together" business strategy
initiatives to bring about performance improvement in
the company and related changes in its culture and
capabilities. After 400 ACT sessions, results were seen
and felt not only in terms of revenue growth and
increased market share but also across the organizational
culture spectrum through stronger leadership ability,
better employee understanding, quicker problem solving
and faster execution.

GE – WORK-OUT

GE’s Work-Out process, launched in 1988, was designed
to improve productivity and efficiency. At the outset, the
task plan was to identify and weed out unnecessary
processes. It involved people from all sides of the process
like design, marketing, production, sales, etc. Work-Out
required participants were expected to share change
ideas with their bosses and make appropriate
recommendations. Team proposals had to be
accepted or rejected on the spot and in case
additional time was needed to carefully consider
the proposal, both parties would mutually agree
to an extended period of time to arrive at a
decision. The exercise attracted excellent
employee participation with about 20,000
participating every week and demonstrated to the
employees that GE leadership would listen to what
the workers said.

3: BUILD AN INTEGRATED LEADERSHIP STRATEGY

Dr. Fulmer believes leadership development
cannot be a stand-alone structure. In order to
recoup leadership investments, leadership efforts
must include a compelling vision of integrated
development, leadership and corporate strategies.
Leadership development, in particular, must be
presented as a strong business case, says Fulmer,
intertwining leadership strategy and a mosaic of
targeted programs and development solutions
designed for maximum impact.

“A common misperception linked with leadership
development,” says Fulmer “is that leaders will act
if they understand,” the package. The trouble is
there might well be a rift between “knowing” and
“doing.” “Buzz words” and program packaging
alone cannot drive leadership development; a
clearly integrated effort tied to business goals is
essential.

4: PROVIDE CONSISTENCY IN THE EXECUTION OF
LEADERSHIP PROGRAMS AND PRACTICES

Leadership development initiatives need
consistency to improve organizational reception
and drive cultural and strategic change. Customize
solutions for business units to win strong senior
management buy–in. Leverage key career


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transition points for leaders into “teachable moments” at
every step of the process.

5: HOLD LEADERS AND OTHER STAKEHOLDERS
ACCOUNTABLE FOR RESULTS

“Leaders should be held accountable for both
development and business results,” observes Fulmer.
They should also be responsible for differentiating and
actively managing the development of high potential
talent. But it’s not just leaders who have a stake in
development efforts. In an article titled “Leadership Is a
Contact Sport”,2 co-authored by Marshall Goldsmith and
Howard Morgan, the authors argue that leadership
development should be driven with the support of key
co-workers. With the help of mini-survey responses
collected from 86,000 respondents in eight major
corporations, (12,000 outside the U.S.), Goldsmith and
Morgan found that increased leadership effectiveness
was determined not only by the participants in the
development effort but by pre-selected key co-worker
stakeholders.

Undoubtedly, a business case for leadership development
rests on the perceived and real ability of development
programs to generate business value. All of Hewitt’s Top
20 Companies have3:

• Leader development strategies that are closely linked
to their business strategies
• Strategies for selecting, developing and rewarding
leaders, most of which are anchored by a “lean
competency” model so that excessive executive time is
not taken up.

LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT ACTIVITIES

Job assignments are still the greatest source of
leadership development activities, followed by

2. See Leadership is a Contact Sport at
http://www.marshallgoldsmith.com/articles/article.asp?a_id=6&p_id=2
3. See “The Top 20 Companies for Leaders – US 2005”, Hewitt
customized programs and executive coaching (see
Figure 1, below).

Executive coaching is a preferred option for Dr.
Marshall Goldsmith, who suggests organizations
should keep in mind a few key points before
implementing a coaching model:

• Don’t use a cookie cutter-approach - there is
no perfect model for executive coaching
• Since different coaches have different skills,
match the needs of the client to the skills of the
coach
• Set clear performance expectations
• If possible, pay for results, not activities

Figure 1

JOB ASSIGNMENTS COMPARED TO OTHER
LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT METHODS4


According to Fulmer and Goldsmith, companies5
that have the best leadership development
programs follow successful strategies that include:

A high profile “Talent Management
Conference” that links strategy and talent
development

4. See “Executive Development Trends 2004”, EDA Inc.
5. See Neisendorf & Saslow 2006; “The Top 20 Companies for
Leaders – US 2005”, Hewitt; ExecSight: Current Challenges in
Leadership Development, October 2004; Corporate Leadership
Council: Global Leadership Development Programs, 2004;
“Next Generation HR Practices”, APQC 2005


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A curriculum of education/action learning for key
transition points
Coach Senior Execs to practice “teaching as leading”
Ask the Board to meet and assess “rising stars”
A comprehensive plan for accelerating development
Align and link talent development and other HR
initiatives

However, as organizations evolve over time, executive
development program priorities are bound to change or
get reshuffled. According to an Executive Development
Associates, Inc. survey, key objectives of executive
development activities in the next two to three years will
be6:

Figure 2


The online poll conducted by the Human Capital
Institute, referred to previously, had a high degree of
correlation with the EDA survey findings:















6. See Executive Development Trends, 2004, EDA Inc.
Table 17
Executive Development
Activities
Percentage
Ensure bench
strength/replacement for
key jobs
79
Accelerate development of
high potentials
62
Communicate vision and
strategy to create alignment
61
Support organizational
change and transformation
56
Develop capabilities of
individual leaders
53
Address key business
issues/challenges
48

EFFECTIVE DEVELOPMENT PRACTICES IDENTIFY
POTENTIAL FUTURE LEADERS

Developing leadership involves identifying high
potential employees and defining key leadership
attributes. “There are many more core attributes
that we need to be looking for beyond the
technical, industrial experience”, says Lauryn
Franzoni, Managing Director and Executive
Director of ExecuNet. “At times, we may have to
assess their risk tolerance or integrity and
judgment.” While it is reasonable to expect high
potentials to leverage development initiatives
when given the opportunity, most companies still
worry about identifying and helping such talent.
According to Fulmer and Goldsmith:

• 46% of companies have no formal process for
identifying and developing candidates for key
leadership positions
• Half the candidates selected internally for
leadership positions fail when there is no
succession management system

Accordingly, they recommend employing the
following succession management practices8:

7 ibid 5


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A time frame for achieving planned development
actions
Flexibility to change in response to changing strategic
business plans
Sharing of information with candidates involved in
succession planning
Visible support by senior management
Line leaders involved in identifying and developing
succession candidates

Dr. Patrick Pinto, Founder of Pinto Consulting Group,
says the key trend today is to identify leaders with agile
learner skills. Since the future is changing at an
increasingly rapid pace, talent with learning agility have
a greater chance to play a more successful role in it. The
multiple tasks involved in identifying, tracking and
developing high potentials over time in an organization
requires not only concerted thought and effort but also
constant supervision. The Human Capital Institute poll
cited earlier asked webcast participants about prevailing
practices at their organizations targeted at high
potentials. Incidentally, the results coincided with
established findings in the area.

Table 29
Question Percentage
Yes
No
Do you identify high
potentials?
75 24
Do you review high
potentials’ progress with
the Board?
41 58
Do you tell high potentials
of their selection?
37 62
Do you track high
potentials’ turnover?
48 51

While a majority of the HCI poll respondents believe
informing high potentials of their status is problematic

8 See “Leadership Forecast: A Benchmarking Study 2003”; DDI;
Growing Your Company’s Leaders, 2004
9 ibid 5
lest such talent develop an entitlement attitude,
this is not standard practice. According to
Goldsmith, the best companies identify high
potential players, let them know it, have specific
programs for their development, and are willing to
take a risk on their future development. 10

Figure 3



Development of high potentials also follows a
similar pattern in the same organizations, as
Figure 4 illustrates:

Figure 4
TECHNIQUES USED TO DEVELOP HIGH
POTENTIALS11



Almost 90% of those polled in a 2005 Hewitt
survey preferred a combination of techniques
rather than just one. The HCI poll of May 2 on
the same subject showed a greater variation in
respondents’ choice of techniques:



10. See “The Top 20 Companies for Leaders – US 2005”,
Hewitt
11. ibid


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Table 3
Techniques utilized for
high potentials
Percentage
Developmental (stretch)
assignments
40
Educational initiatives
(“anointment” program)
21
Mentor/coach (with multi-
rater feedback)
21
Additional exposure to
Board or Senior Execs
15

According to Goldsmith and Fulmer, top firms also link
compensation to a leader’s future potential. In such
organizations leader competencies are invariably tied to
succession planning and reward systems. See Figure 5:

Figure 5
ANCHOR LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT MODEL TO
PERFORMANCE AND REWARD SYSTEMS 12
30
09.12.05.WachoviaLeadershipBenchmarkingv1
Best Practice Firms Anchor Their Leadership Development With A Lean
Competency Model Tied to Performance and Reward Systems
31%
23%
100%
60% 60%
65%
78%
30%
0%
20%
40%
60%
80%
100%
120%
Succession
Planning
Base Pay Annual
Incentive
Long Term
Incentive
Non Top Companies
Top Companies
Leader competencies
are integrated into:
Source: The Top 20Companies for Leaders – US 2005; Hewitt
29% 71% Metrics from performance
management process are
integrated into succession
planning
TopQuartile
Metrics
Integrated
Not
Integrated
45% 55%
BottomQuartile
Metrics
Integrated
Not
Integrated


As illustrated above, top companies have learned that
fully integrated development strategies are the most
effective. “If there’s no measurement and no
accountability,” Goldsmith contends, behavioral issues
may take their toll on executives as they move up the
organization.

Despite having well-defined leadership attributes and
leadership development programs, organizations may fall
short of meeting their objectives. What are the pitfalls to

12. ibid.
avoid in leadership development? What key
experiences are next generation leaders often
unprepared for?

According to Fulmer, a typical pitfall to look out
for is corporate “attention deficit disorder,” a
malady that afflicts organizations when they
attempt an initiative then move onto another one
when results from the first one aren’t
forthcoming.

Karen Armon, CEO and Founder, Alliance
Resources, believes next generation leaders have
to be prepared for dealing with pressure and
should make themselves politically savvy about
their peers. “People weak in strategic intellect are
not fit for future leadership,” she says. Also, those
who cannot communicate within the organization
and outside it will find themselves wanting.




























Do You Know Who Your Next CEO Is?

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CONCLUSI ON

Organizations cannot develop tomorrow’s leaders with a
fragmented approach. The work of Goldsmith, Fulmer,
and others demonstrates the effectiveness of an
integrated initiative. Employees with high leadership
potential need to be systematically identified and
tracked by line managers as part of an overall strategic
succession planning process; senior leaders and
managers should articulate the major competencies
required for leadership. Senior leaders right up to C-level
need to support the program by taking a measure of
ownership in it. The planning, implementation,
monitoring and reviewing of leadership development
initiatives requires the attention and effort of all
elements of organizational hierarchy.

Marshall Goldsmith feels there are common attributes of
potential leaders that cut across industries and may serve
to differentiate future leaders from employees with less
potential. On the basis of interviews with young high
potential leaders, Goldsmith advises organizations to
look out for people who demonstrate global thinking,
cross-cultural awareness, the ability to build alliances
and partnerships, are technologically savvy, and who
believe in leadership sharing or people partnerships.
Fulmer firmly believes that leaders should display a high
level of energy, and clearly show the ability to do what
has to be done and to energize others to take part. As
this paper has shown, a company that truly understands
the need for leadership planning now will have the
leaders it needs tomorrow to remain competitive.

Based on the Human Capital Institute webcast, Do You
Know Who Your Next CEO Is?
Developing Leaders with 20/20 Vision, May 2, 2006

Reports referenced during the webcast

•James Bolt, "Executive Development Trends 2004:
Filling the Talent Gap,” (survey of 101 global companies)
Executive Development Associates (EDA) Inc.
•Corporate Executive Board: “Driving
Performance and Retention Through Employee
Engagement” (September 2004)
•Corporate University XChange 6th Annual
Benchmarking Report, 2005
•IBM Learning Solutions, “Learning Strategy—An
Investment in the Future, September, 2005
•Robert M. Fulmer & Jay A. Conger, Growing
Your Company’s Leaders, AMACOM, 2004
•Robert M. Fulmer & Marshall Goldsmith, The
Leadership Investment, AMACOM, 2001
•Robert M. Fulmer SME, “Next Generation HR
Practices,” APQC, 2005
•Hewitt & Associates, “The Top 20 Companies for
Leaders,”2005
•Andre Martin, “Differences in the Development
Needs of Managers at Multiple Levels,” Center for
Creative Leadership, 2005.
•Barbara Neisendorf & Scott Saslow, “How to
Involve the Board in Exec. Growth,” Strategic HR
Review, March, 2006.
•Mark Nevins and Stephen Stumpf, “21
st
Century
Leadership: Redefining Management Education,”
Business & Strategy, 1999.
•Scott Saslow, “Transforming Corporate
Leadership: Best Practices in Executive
Education,” ExecSight, (April 2004).
•Training Magazine’s 2005 Survey of Top 100
Companies
•Training Magazine’s Annual Comprehensive
Analysis of Employer-Sponsored Training in the
US , October 2004
•Watson Wyatt,“Maximizing the Return on Your
Human Capital Investment”2005

PRESENTERS

DR. ROBERT FULMER, ACADEMIC DIRECTOR, DUKE
CORPORATE EDUCATION, INC.

Dr. Fulmer served as chairman of Pepperdine's
business administration department, wrote the
proposal that led to Pepperdine offering an MBA,


Do You Know Who Your Next CEO Is?

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and taught the first graduate business class. He holds
The Graziadio School's Virtue Chair and serves as
Academic Director of Duke Corporate Education. Dr.
Fulmer was the W. Brooks George Professor of
Management at the College of William and Mary and the
former director of its Executive MBA program. Dr.
Fulmer has been a Visiting Scholar at the Center for
Organizational Learning at MIT and taught organization
and management at Columbia University's Graduate
Business School. When director of executive education at
Emory University Dr Fullmer oversaw the Executive MBA
program as well as public and customized programs for
general and functional managers. In addition, Dr. Fulmer
was director of corporate management development for
Allied Signal, Inc., with responsibility for the
development of employees ranging from first-line
supervisors to senior executives. Dr. Fulmer has
published extensively; he is the author of four editions
of The New Management and co-author of four editions
of A Practical Introduction to Business. He also authored
Crafting Competitiveness, Executive Development and
Organizational Learning for Global Business, and
Leadership by Design. Dr. Fulmer has served on the
editorial board of seven journals, is author of more than
120 published articles, and has conducted management
seminars in 24 countries.

DR. MARSHALL GOLDSMITH, CO-FOUNDER, MARSHALL
GOLDSMITH PARTNERS

Marshall Goldsmith is a world authority in helping
successful leaders get even better - by achieving positive
change in behavior: for themselves, their people and
their teams. Recently the American Management
Association named Dr. Goldsmith as one of 50 great
thinkers and leaders who have influenced the field of
management and Business Week listed him as one of the
most influential practitioners in the history of leadership
development. In November 2005 he was recognized as a
Fellow of the National Academy of Human Resources -
the highest award for an HR professional. He has
appeared in: The Wall Street Journal - as one of the top
ten executive educators, Forbes - as one of five most-
respected executive coaches, the Economist - as
one of the most credible consultants in the new
era of business and Fast Company - as America's
preeminent executive coach. His work has received
national recognition from almost every
professional organization in his field, including:
the Academy of Management, ASTD, HRPS and
SHRM. Marshall is one of the few consultants who
have been asked to work with over 70 major CEOs
and their management teams. His Ph.D. is from
UCLA and he is an Adjunct Professor teaching
executive education at Dartmouth's Tuck School.
Marshall is co-founder of Marshall Goldsmith
Partners, a network of top-level executive
coaches. He served as a member of the Board of
the Peter Drucker Foundation for ten years. He
has also donated substantial time to non-profit
organizations, such as the Girl Scouts, the
International and American Red Cross - where he
was a National Volunteer of the Year. Dr.
Goldsmith's twenty books include: The Leader of
the Future (a Business Week best-seller) and
Coaching for Leadership. Two of his recent books
are: Global Leadership: The Next Generation and
The Art and Practice of Leadership Coaching.
Amazon.com has ranked seven of his books as
"most popular" in their field. Harvard Business
School has chosen six of his books to be their
Working Knowledge recommended books.

PANELISTS

Karen Armon is CEO and Founder of Alliance
Resources, LLC, with 20 years of experience in
executive coaching and consulting. Recognized as
"insightful yet accessible" and a "bright thinker,"
Karen has keen insights into the challenges that
move organizations forward in crowded
marketplaces and ever-changing environments.
She is becoming a leading authority among
executive ranks in presenting new ideas that
challenge the current corporate thinking, making
her a recognized thought-leader. Karen is a


Do You Know Who Your Next CEO Is?

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contracted Webinar speaker for ExecuNet. She has been
quoted in such as Harvard Management Update/Harvard
Communications Letter, Wall Street Journal, BtoB
Magazine, HR Magazine, VOWS Magazine, Advanced
Manufacturing, Profit Magazine, Houston Chronicle,
Fort Worth Star-Telegram, Holland Sentinel, Bradenton
Herald, Denver Post, Rocky Mountain News, San Antonio
Times, and Jobing.com.

Dr. Lawrence Clark is an Assistant Vice President -
Executive Development at New York Life Insurance
Company. In that capacity, he provides expert consulting
services to New York Life, its subsidiaries, and its senior
executives. At New York Life he has been a member of
two Core Competency Teams, a member of the Sourcing
Committee, and a member of the SAP - HRD
implementation team. In addition he has major
responsible for the design of the Leadership
Effectiveness Program, Developing Excellence in
Leadership, and the program for Vice Presidents. Prior to
joining New York Life, Larry was Vice President of W.
Warner Burke Associates, Inc., a Pelham, N.Y. based
consulting firm. He has conducted research in the areas
of managerial competencies, organizational climate, and
management training. He is interested in applying
organizational and social psychology techniques to
problems that confront major organizations.

Lauryn Franzoni is the Vice President and Executive
Director of ExecuNet's Center for Executive Careers
(www.execunet.com) the leading Internet-based resource
for executive career market trend and management
information. She is responsible for market research,
website and publications content, and overseeing the
company's Career Services offerings. Ms. Franzoni joined
ExecuNet in 2004 bringing extensive experience in the
specialized information industry including product
development and community building for
electronic/internet communications and print media for
corporations and non-profit organizations. In addition
to post-graduate finance and language studies, Ms.
Franzoni holds an MA in journalism and public affairs
from The American University and a BA in
American Studies from Dickinson College.

Michael Harper has 20 years of operations,
marketing and executive search experience
combined with 8 years as President of
TalentGenesis Inc., a consultancy engaged in the
design and delivery of large-scale initiatives in
Talent Management including succession,
leadership development, selection, performance
management and measurement of organizational
impact. Michael has facilitated 360 feedback,
career planning and development coaching to
over 700 individuals ranging from CEOs to middle
managers. He has certified over 1000 HR
professionals in the LEADERSHIP ARCHITECT
Suite of tools from Lominger Limited in the US
and Europe. With the TalentGenesis team, Michael
has designed and licensed The Development In
Action Series of competency-based development
workshops delivered to thousands of managers.

Patrick R. Pinto, Ph.D. is an organizational
consultant whose experience covers a broad
range, from individual development to human
resource strategy for organizations. Prior to
forming his firm, he was a faculty member at the
University of Minnesota. Pat has long been
affiliated with Lominger Ltd., Inc. as a Master
Certifier for their Leadership Architect Suite of
learning and development tools. He is a frequent
speaker at management seminars, and a faculty
member in executive education and leadership
development programs for many or the world's
leading companies. Dr. Pinto also serves as an
executive coach to assist leaders in accelerating
their potential for the future and improving their
performance.








Do You Know Who Your Next CEO Is?

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MODERATOR

JOY KOSTA

As Director of Talent Development and Leadership
Communities at The Human Capital Institute, Joy brings
twenty-five years of experience in multiple facets of
organizational development, human resources and
business management with an emphasis in customer
satisfaction, service quality, process improvement, and
applying the Malcolm Baldrige Criteria for Performance
Excellence. As founder and President of Performance
Partners in Health Care, a company dedicated to
building better patient experiences, she has authored
several curriculums in leadership and staff development,
and co-authored with Harold Bursztajn, MD Senior
Clinical Faculty member, Harvard Medical School,
Building a Treatment Alliance with Patients and Families.

AUTHOR
SUMEET VARGHESE

EDITOR
THOMAS V. DURGIN



















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ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

This White Paper is made possible by Lominger, sponsors
of HCI’s Next Generation Leadership Develop Track.

ABOUT LOMINGER





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the internationally recognized LEADERSHIP ARCHITECT?
Suite, equips executives, managers, and human resource
professionals in the world's leading organizations with
the tools, research and expertise they need to transform
their organizations into best practice centers of
leadership. Headquartered in Minneapolis, Minnesota,
Lominger markets its suite of research-based products in
56 countries using internal experts, an international
network of associates, a professional consulting division,
Lominger Consulting, Inc., and a comprehensive network
of strategic alliance and technology partners. For more
info, please visit www.lominger.com

ABOUT THE HUMAN CAPI TAL
I NSTI TUTE






The Human Capital Institute is a catalyst for innovative
new thinking in talent acquisition, development and
deployment. Through research and collaboration, our
programs collect original, creative ideas from a field of
top executives and the brightest thought leaders in
strategic HR and talent management. Those ideas are
then transformed into measurable, real-world strategies
that help our members attract and retain the best talent,
build a diverse, inclusive workplace, and leverage
individual and team performance throughout the
enterprise.

The Human Capital Institute gratefully
acknowledges the financial and volunteer
contributions of our Underwriters. They include:

- BERNARD HODES GROUP
- BEST SOFTWARE
- BRASSRING LLC
- CENTER FOR TALENT RETENTION
- DBM
- DNL GLOBAL, INC.
- DOUBLESTAR, INC. - HYPERION
- EMPLOYEASE
- EXXCEED
- FIRST ADVANTAGE CO.
- FYI CONSULTING LLC
- HIREDESK
- HRSMART, INC.
- IBM
- JOBSTER, INC.
- JWT EMPLOYMENT COMMUNICATIONS
- KENEXA
- LOMINGER LIMITED INC.
- MENTTIUM CORPORATION
- MONSTER GOVERNMENT SOLUTIONS
- MONSTER JOBS
- MULTI-HEALTH SYSTEMS
- MYBIZOFFICE, INC.
- PEOPLECLICK
- PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT NETWORK
- PILAT NAI
- PLATEAU SYSTEMS LTD
- PREVISOR
- SABA SOFTWARE, INC.
- SAGE GROUP PLC
- SEQUENT, INC.
- SKILLSNET CORPORATION
- SOFTSCAPE
- SUCCESSFACTORS.COM
- TALEO CORPORATION
- UNICRU
- VALTERA
- VURV TECHNOLOGY, INC.
- WORKSTREAM, INC.