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Kalimantan

Kalimantan, also known as borneo, is the island where the world’s most sense and remote rainforests
can be found. The island is famous for its rich concentration of wildlife, and it is equally notorious for its
legendary headhunters.
Kalimantan , Indonesia’s second largest island, has become a source of substantial natural wealth for the
country. Its extensive oil reserve are now key part of Indonesia’s economy and diamond, rare woods,
rattan, and resin are also harvested here.
You know, there are parts of Kalimantan that to this day remain unexplored. Eighty percent of central
Kalimantan is thick jungle that often clings to treacherous mountain slopes, hiding valleys that remain
utterly inaccessible. Although only the most hardcore and experienced adventurers should consider a
foray into these region, Kalimantan has plenty of less formidable forest open to visitors.
Kalimantan is also home to one of Indonesia’s most interesting indigenous cultures the Dayak tribe.
Although they are no longer practice headhunting, the dayak continue to live much as they have for the
last millennium, occupying enormous communal longhouse which serve as the residence for large family
groups. An ideal way to tour Kalimantan is by river boat on the Mahakam river, where one can also spot
the world’s only species of freshwater dolphins. Orang utans live in the surrounding jungles and special
tours for the purpose of viewing the animals up close are available
Kalimantan
Kalimantan, also known as borneo, is the island where the world’s most sense and remote rainforests
can be found. The island is famous for its rich concentration of wildlife, and it is equally notorious for its
legendary headhunters.
Kalimantan , Indonesia’s second largest island, has become a source of substantial natural wealth for the
country. Its extensive oil reserve are now key part of Indonesia’s economy and diamond, rare woods,
rattan, and resin are also harvested here.
You know, there are parts of Kalimantan that to this day remain unexplored. Eighty percent of central
Kalimantan is thick jungle that often clings to treacherous mountain slopes, hiding valleys that remain
utterly inaccessible. Although only the most hardcore and experienced adventurers should consider a
foray into these region, Kalimantan has plenty of less formidable forest open to visitors.
Kalimantan is also home to one of Indonesia’s most interesting indigenous cultures the Dayak tribe.
Although they are no longer practice headhunting, the dayak continue to live much as they have for the
last millennium, occupying enormous communal longhouse which serve as the residence for large family
groups. An ideal way to tour Kalimantan is by river boat on the Mahakam river, where one can also spot
the world’s only species of freshwater dolphins. Orang utans live in the surrounding jungles and special
tours for the purpose of viewing the animals up close are available