Staunton News Leader 08/08/2014 Page : A01

Copyright © 2014 Staunton News Leader 08/08/2014 August 11, 2014 3:54 pm / Powered by TECNAVIA
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Valley sees effects of polar vortex
STAUNTON —Cooler temper-
atures have hit the country,
breakingrecords datingbackto
the late 19th century, reports
say.
Some experts claim it’s the
polar vortex — a strong area of
low pressure that creates dras-
tic changes in temperatures —
that the area experienced dur-
ing the winter.
The winter’s mild start and
icyandcoldfinishisanexample
of why the summer’s weather
might start out cool and keep
cooling off, according to Ken
Widelski, meteorologist for the
National Weather Service in
Sterling.
“We’ve just been trending
cooler than normal for the past
couple of years. It’s just a pat-
ternthat’s continuedon,” Widel-
ski said. “It’s unseasonablycool,
for sure, but it’s not something
that’s totally uncommon.”
USAToday reported in early
July that temperatures for a
time would be 10 to 30 degrees
below average thanks to a
strong cold front, mainly in the
Midwest. Even the southern re-
gion had early autumn-like
weather during the month of
July, barely reaching out of the
70s, according to Accuweather.
In Staunton, days have re-
mained cool for the past few
weeks, with temperatures com-
parable to San Diego.
Staunton’s expected highs
are in the upper 70s and lows in
the high 50s for the week. San
Diego expected highs in the
mid-to-upper70sandlowsinthe
high 60s for the week.
The cooler temperatures
haven’t affected local camps or
activities for Staunton Parks
and Recreation, said Director
Chris Tuttle. Business has been
operating as usual, and they
welcome the cooler weather, he
said.
Overnight campers at higher
By Laura Peters
lpeters@newsleader.com
MIKE TRIPP/THE NEWS LEADER
Sandy Elliott of Mechanicsville wears layers, including a long-sleeved shirt,
on a July day at Polyface Farm’s field day in Swoope. See VALLEY, Page A8
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FISHERSVILLE—Younever sawsucha
turnout of pickup trucks as on Thursday
evening at the Augusta County Fair,
where Rams and Rangers and Tacomas
lined up bumper-to-bumper to watch a
contest or win one.
Thenagain, there might be evenmore
Friday or Saturday evening at the fair
when the bigger contests are held.
Pickup owners come for the bull rid-
ing, the drag racing and the tractor and
truck pulling, and this year, quite a few
came Thursday for the fair’s first sanc-
tioned hooking party.
“That’s my event,” said Scott White of
Fishersville, whose license plate reads
LK2HOOK. White’s souped-up 2001 bur-
gundyF350wonthefair’s first impromp-
tu hookup last year.
TRUCKOWNERS FEEL THE PULL OF CONTEST
MIKE TRIPP/THE NEWS LEADER
Colton Hedrick, 12, of Churchville rides to the event in the cab of a pickup truck being pulled on a trailer at the Augusta County Fair on Thursday.
GETTING HOOKED
AT THE COUNTY FAIR
By Patricia Borns
pborns@newsleader.com
“I think I’ll have a
whole lot more
(competition). I have a
feeling I’m gonna get
pulled.”
SCOTT WHITE of Fishersville, whose
license plate reads LK2HOOK
See PULL, Page A8
WAYNESBORO — A felony
chargehasbeenfiledagainst
a Staunton man in a hit-and-
runcaseamida
larger bar
brawl July 19.
Chauncey’s
Smokehouse &
Bar on U.S. 250
in Waynesboro
had a DJ event
the night of
July 18 and at
some point after midnight,
the party reportedly dis-
solved into a brawl involving
dozens of patrons.
During the melee, a man
fled or stumbled into the
street and was struck by a
vehicle about 12:30 a.m. The
28-year-oldWaynesboroman
was seriously injured.
Now, a driver who came
forward after the accident
has been arrested. Christo-
pherPaxtonWray, 43, facesa
single felony charge. Police
saidWrayfirst contactedpo-
lice 13 hours after the inci-
dent, later in the day of the
early-morning incident.
Police said that Wray had
not beenat Chauncey’s. They
said he had been driving a
2009 Hyundai Sonata; it was
recoveredat his residence in
Staunton.
Sgt. Brian Edwards with
the Waynesboro Police De-
partment said that the
charges against Wray were
delayed because police were
reviewing surveillance foot-
age related to the bar fight
and meeting with a VABC
special agent. Also, he said
theleaddetectiveonthecase
had been out of the office for
several days.
The victim said he was in
the street because he was
heading home to one of the
motels directly across West
Main Street, after fighting
broke out, Edwards said.
Police said the man has
some lasting injuries but is
out of the hospital and has
been interviewed by detec-
tives.
Wray is free on bond.
HIT-AND-RUN DURING
WAYNESBORO BRAWL
Police
arrest,
charge
driver
Staff Reports
Wray
VERONA — The Augusta
County School Board approved
Thursday a 10-year plan, that
details school renovations and
closures.
Theplanisfluid, saidnewSu-
perintendent Eric Bond, before
presenting the details to the
school board. It will depend on
public input, finances and
school needs.
The board has moved for-
ward with its first priority
school: RiverheadsElementary.
The completion of an $18.6-mil-
lion building is slated for 2016.
Following the completion, the
plancalls for theclosingof Bev-
erleyManor Elementary, which
is 41 percent underutilized. The
students will go to either
Churchville Elementary or the
newly expanded Riverheads El-
ementary. Beverley Manor Ele-
mentarywill closefollowingthe
2015-16 school year.
The next renovation priority
is adding classrooms to Wilson
Middle School, to be completed
in2016. WilsonMiddlewasat110
percent capacity at the end of
the 2013-14 school year.
For a projected cost of $2.2
million, the additional eight
COUNTY BOARD PRESENTS LONG-TERMVISION
School plan calls for three closings in next 10 years
By Megan Williams
mwilliams@newsleader.com
See SCHOOL, Page A8
INSIDE
See excerpts of a blog from the
meeting. Page A2
FRIDAY, AUGUST 8, 2014 • WWW.NEWSLEADER.COM
Staunton News Leader 08/08/2014 Page : A08
Copyright © 2014 Staunton News Leader 08/08/2014 August 11, 2014 3:54 pm / Powered by TECNAVIA
classrooms would accom-
modate 160 students.
The next project, ac-
cording to the 10-year
plan, is a new Cassell Ele-
mentary, one of the dis-
trict’s three remaining
pod schools, along with
Riverheads Elementary
and Verona Elementary.
Theplancallsforanew
Cassell Elementary to be
built at a projected cost of
$17.6 million. Completion
is expected in 2017.
Verona Elementary
School will close follow-
ingthe2016-17school year
after the new Cassell Ele-
mentary is completed, ac-
cording to the plan. Stu-
dents would go to Cly-
more Elementary, North
River Elementary and
Churchville Elementary
schools.
The final construction
plan the board has for
schools in the next 10
years is building middle
school wings onto River-
heads High School and
Buffalo Gap High School
in 2023.
The total cost of both
projects is projected at
$28.9 million.
Adding middle schools
to Buffalo Gap and River-
heads High will allow for
Beverley Manor Middle
School to close following
the 2023-24 school year,
according to the plan. The
new wings would allow
rising middle school stu-
dents fromthese districts
to remain vertically
aligned with their respec-
tive elementary and high
schools.
Bond used the term
“mothballing,” when re-
ferring to the closing of
schools, indicating that
these facilities will re-
main property of Augusta
County in case future
growth requires reopen-
ing them.
About $13.6 million in
savings would be realized
by 2025 by closing the
three schools, throughthe
elimination of school bus
runs and operational
costs.
The 10-year plan also
calls for a boundary line
study of all school atten-
dance zones following the
approval of the plan by
the school board.
“I think it’s a great
plan,” said school board
member DavidShiflett. “I
didn’t think we could do
it.”
Continued from Page A1
School
WILSON ELEMENTARY PRINCIPAL
Dawn Young, principal at Beverley Manor Elementary
School will be the principal at Wilson Elementary School
in the fall following the resignation of Patty Black.
Replacing Young will be Miranda Ball, assistant princi-
pal at Clymore Elementary School.
WEATHER
A8 • THE NEWS LEADER • FRIDAY, AUGUST 8, 2014
5- day Forecast for Staunton & Waynesboro
Al manac
Ki d’s Corner
-10s
-0s
0s
10s
20s
30s
40s
50s
60s
70s
80s
90s
100s
110s
Nati onal Forecast for Fri day, August 8
Nati onal
Extremes
Regi onal Forecast
aa WWa a hington hin hin hin hin hin shin shin shin
000 887/700
Ne New New Yooo Yo Yo Yo Yo York
77 67 /67 /677 /67 67 2/677 82/67 2/67
Mia ia ia iaam am am ami am ami mi
89/78 78 78 78 78 8888
Atlan tlanta At A
92/73 /73
tttt r D o DD ro D
61 6666 /6 /6 80/ 80/ 80/ 80/6 80/6
on on o Ho Ho
5/76 5/76 95/7 95/7 95/7 95/7 95/7 95/ 95/
cago ago Chica CCCCCCChicag h C
81/64 8 4 64 1/ 8
neapolis Minneapolis apoli apolis M
883/66
ansass Ka as a n a Cityy Cit C
80/65 80/655
aso P
88887/69 87/69
Denver verr
85/599
ngs s Billing
89/63
os Looos Angeles Angeless A
81/6 /66665 65 65 65 655 /65
Sa SSan S Francisco F
772/59 72/59
e SSSea
766/55
Washington
87/70
New York
82/67
Miami
89/78
Atlanta
92/73
Detroit
80/61
Houston
95/76
Chicago
81/64
Minneapolis
83/66
Kansas City
80/65
El Paso
87/69
Denver
85/59
Billings
89/63
Los Angeles
81/65
San Francisco
72/59
Seattle
76/55
City Hi Lo W Hi Lo W City Hi Lo W Hi Lo W
Statistics for Staunton are compiled using hourly information from
the Shenandoah Airport and radar estimates as of 5 p.m. yesterday.
Precipitation is supplemented with the information from the National
Weather Service the following day. Statistics for Waynesboro are as of
8 a.m. yesterday and are supplied by the National Weather Service.
Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs
for the day. Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities
Weather (W): s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, t-thunderstorms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice.
Yesterday for the 48
contiguous states
For current radar, updated forecasts, go to www.newsleader.com
Major today 9:50 a.m. 10:20 p.m.
Minor today 3:35 a.m. 4:05 p.m.
Major Saturday 10:45 a.m. 11:15 p.m.
Minor Saturday 4:30 a.m. 5:00 p.m.
TEMPERATURE Staunton Waynesboro
High/Low 83°/57° 79°/62°
Normal high/low 83°/63°
Record high 97° in 2001
Record low 45° in 1994
24 hrs 0.00" 0.01"
Month to date 0.04" 0.11"
Normal month to date 0.88"
Year to date 20.66" 22.24"
Normal year to date 23.75"
Sol unar Tabl es
The solunar period indicates peak feeding times for fish and game.
Ni ght Sky
– Morrison Planetarium, California Academy of Sciences
At midnight, the Summer Triangle is straight overhead,
pointing southward to the nearly-full moon. Rising in the
east is the Great Square of Pegasus, which some imagine
as a large baseball diamond in the sky (fielded by all-stars,
of course). Venus rises at 4:38 a.m. Mars sets at 11:34 p.m.
Jupiter rises at 5:26 a.m. Saturn sets at 12:19 a.m.
Albany 79 58 pc 83 61 s
Anchorage 66 57 r 66 56 sh
Atlanta 92 73 t 87 72 t
Austin 101 72 pc 98 72 s
Baltimore 84 65 s 81 65 c
Boise 91 65 s 93 65 pc
Boston 79 64 pc 80 65 s
Buffalo 78 58 s 82 63 s
Burlington 78 58 pc 83 58 s
Casper 84 53 t 83 51 pc
Charleston, WV 78 67 t 78 66 r
Chattanooga 88 73 t 86 72 t
Chicago 81 64 pc 80 64 pc
Cleveland 79 62 pc 81 65 pc
Dallas 101 79 pc 101 79 s
Denver 85 59 pc 86 58 t
Detroit 80 61 s 82 64 pc
Duluth 78 56 pc 79 58 pc
El Paso 87 69 pc 87 69 t
Fairbanks 74 55 pc 76 55 s
Houston 95 76 pc 93 76 pc
Indianapolis 74 65 t 79 66 c
Kansas City 80 65 t 82 66 pc
Knoxville 86 70 t 83 70 t
Los Angeles 81 65 pc 81 65 pc
Louisville 79 72 r 85 70 t
Memphis 90 77 t 92 76 t
Miami 89 78 t 89 78 t
Morgantown 86 64 pc 79 65 t
Nashville 88 72 t 90 72 t
New Orleans 91 77 pc 90 77 pc
New York City 82 67 s 85 69 s
Orlando 92 74 t 92 75 t
Philadelphia 84 66 s 86 68 pc
Phoenix 104 84 pc 103 84 t
Pittsburgh 81 64 pc 81 64 pc
Raleigh 86 69 t 77 70 r
St. Louis 83 70 t 82 68 pc
Salt Lake City 83 62 t 88 63 pc
San Francisco 72 59 pc 70 60 pc
Seattle 76 55 s 80 57 s
Tucson 96 75 pc 94 74 t
West Palm Beach 89 76 t 88 76 t
Wheeling 82 63 pc 79 64 t
TODAY SATURDAY TODAY SATURDAY
In the Sky
Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. ©2014
Moon Phases
Full
Sep 2 Aug 25 Aug 17 Aug 10
Last New First
TODAY TONIGHT SATURDAY
80° 64°
A passing
afternoon shower
Mostly cloudy with
a t-storm
SUNDAY MONDAY
72°/64° 75°/61° 75°/63° 78°/62°
Periods of rain,
some heavy
Rather cloudy with
a t-storm
Partly sunny
TUESDAY
Some sun,
t-storms possible
HIGH:
106° in Laredo, TX
LOW:
36° in Big Bear Lake, CA
RF: 86° RF: 64° RF: 76°/62° RF: 80°/61° RF: 82°/64° RF: 82°/63°
The patented AccuWeather.com RealFeel Temperature® (RF) is an exclusive index of effective
temperature based on eight weather factors. Shown is the highest and lowest values of the day. The higher the
AccuWeather.com UV Index™ (UV Index) number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection.
UV Index: 7
Turning cloudy with a shower this afternoon. A shower
or thunderstorm tonight. Periods of rain, some heavy
tomorrow. Sunday: a shower or thunderstorm around.
PRECIPITATION Staunton Waynesboro
Alexandria 87/69/pc
Arlington 86/69/pc
Blacksburg 75/64/t
Bluefield 74/66/t
Charlottesville 82/65/pc
Danville 84/68/t
Elkins 81/62/pc
Fairmont 83/62/pc
Fredericksburg 85/67/pc
Harrisonburg 81/64/pc
Lewisburg 76/64/t
Lexington 79/65/pc
Lynchburg 80/64/pc
Marion 76/64/t
Martinsburg 84/62/pc
Martinsville 81/67/t
Moorefield 85/63/pc
Newport News 86/69/pc
Norfolk 82/69/pc
Petersburg 90/70/pc
Richmond 88/69/pc
Roanoke 77/65/t
Virginia Beach 82/68/pc
Washington 87/70/pc
Winchester 82/62/pc
Wytheville 78/64/t
City Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/W
Sunrise today 6:25 a.m.
Sunset today 8:18 p.m.
Sunrise Saturday 6:26 a.m.
Sunset Saturday 8:17 p.m.
Moonrise today 6:26 p.m.
Moonset today 3:55 a.m.
Naomi Blair, Berkeley Glenn Elementary
Partly sunny today with a shower in the afternoon. High
78 to 82. Winds south 3-6 mph. Expect 6-10 hours of
sunshine with a 55% chance of precipitation and aver-
age relative humidity 70%. Drying conditions poor. A
shower or thunderstorm around tonight. Low 62 to 66.
Winds light and variable.
Agri cul ture Forecast
Source: Virginia Adult & Pediatric Allergy & Asthma
Pol l en
Trees Absent
Grasses Low
Weeds Low
Mold Moderate
Classes Begin August 25
Registration
Now Open
Valley Career &
Technical Center
Adult Evening Classes
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Gen. Admission: $5, Children 7-12: $3, Under 6: Free
RosedaIe Attractions
AUGUSTA COUNTY FAIR
“Augusta County Fair...A Valley Tradition”
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1pm.................................................................... Goat Show Barn
FoIIowed by: Market Goat Show Barn
4pm.............. InternationaI Harvester Tractor show/State Meet
Horseshow Ring
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6pm................................Midway Opens - RosedaIe Attractions
6pm........................................... Livestock Costume CIass Barn
6-9pm................................... SheIIy & The Cornerstones BIdg 3
6:30pm.................. Truck & Tractor PuII ($10 admission) Track
7pm................................... Youth Supreme Showmanship Barn
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elevation reported cooler
nights during trips. The
drop in temperatures af-
fected some local stores
near campgrounds, like
the Family Dollar in Clif-
ton Forge near Douthat
State Park. It sold out of
blankets a week ago, due
to traffic from campers
caught unprepared for
nighttime temperatures
in the upper 40s.
Thecooler weather has
had a positive effect on
MimWenger’sgrapefarm
in Ladd, Wenger Grapes.
The crop was late com-
ing in, but has caught up
and should be ready to be
picked next month, she
said.
The only challenge for
the farm has been the in-
creasing Japanese beetle
population, whichWenger
believes is due to exces-
sive dampness from the
weather.
“So far this summer
has been good for us,”
Wenger said. “The grapes
look really nice.”
Continued from Page A1
Valley
The sport of bumper
hooking, where trucks
hook up to one another
with chains and pull until
one drags the other a
ways downthe track, is an
illicit thrill; not legal un-
less you do it on your
driveway or farm.
Justin Freed of Staun-
ton explained that the
dragracingfinishedearly
at last year’s fair and the
event promoters were
looking for entertain-
ment.
“ ‘We’re gonna have a
hooking party,’ ” Freed
remembers the announc-
er calling out. “People
were excited, like ‘Heck
yes, let’s do this,’ and
Scott was the first one
down there.”
White likes to hook, or
LK2HOOK, because it’s
pure fun and doesn’t take
a lot of horsepower or
modifications, although
his nephewTyler Sprouse
has worked over the F350
pretty well.
Sprouse of Fishers-
ville, who started his own
small performance auto-
motive shop last year, has
modified a lot of his
friends’ trucks. He
beefed up White’s ex-
haust system and pro-
grammed an after-mar-
ket fuel management chip
to give him a power lift.
“Grippy,” Sprouse de-
scribed White’s tires.
“Bumper pulling is about
tires and weight,” he said.
When trucks go to bump-
er hook, the drivers im-
mediately let out air pres-
sure for a better bite.
It’s also about brag-
ging rights and “who’s got
the baddest truck in the
county,” said Shawn Call-
ahan of Stuarts Draft,
who was working to get
the track ready for the
drag racers to tear it
apart.
Ladies do it, too. Jor-
dan Graham, 17, has won
three out of four contests
on the local Old Skool Cir-
cuit with her 35,000-
pound rig built around
her Chevy S10, Child’s
Play. She’ll be competing
in the fair’s truck pulling
contests Friday and Sat-
urday night. She won the
Redneck Rally at the fair
Tuesday night.
Her dad, Kevin Gra-
ham of Deerfield, flags
the contests at the track.
He came in second Tues-
day.
As for bumper-hook-
ing, White wasn’t so confi-
dent about this year’s con-
test. “The sport last year
was awesome, because it
was completely spontane-
ous,” he said. “No one had
time to prepare.”
This year’s hookup
contest was announced
last May and rumored
well before that. “I think
I’ll have a whole lot more
(competition),” White
said. “I have a feeling I’m
gonna get pulled.”
Which truck is the bad-
dest? Stay tuned when we
announce the results Fri-
day online and Saturday
in print.
MIKE TRIPP/THE NEWS LEADER
Jamie Brown and Justin Freed of Staunton talk about the hooking event at the Augusta County
Fair on Thursday.
Continued from Page A1
Pull

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