BBA

Student Handbook
2012-2013


2

Nancy/Metz, September 2
nd
, 2012

Dear Students and Participants,

Welcome to the School. By joining ICN Business School, you are joining a French Graduate
School of international standard in which pedagogy has been designed to be highly
interactive.
At ICN, you will implement, throughout your reading and projects, a work method for developing
knowledge, skills and experiences that will distinguish you in your future career.
This means that teaching is built on the basis of a learning agreement requiring students to
actively participate in different courses and prepare for prerequisites defined by the teachers
who will engage in a positive pedagogical relationship and closely accompany each student’s
progress.
To maximize your understanding of the teachings as well as your chances of success, it is
imperative that you commit to being present in class in order to avoid having difficulty catching
up, because nothing can replace the class dynamics and the intellectual exchanges that will
allow you to put your knowledge to use and therefore succeed your exams.
It also means that the class schedule has been designed by integrating time for, in addition to
courses, personal homework, group work, searching for internships and your professional
project as well as your commitment to a student association that is necessary in developing
your personality and your capacity to take initiatives.
You must therefore organize your schedule according to your courses, homework, student
association and personal life. Managing your personal agenda is a key skill that must be
mastered in School just as it would be in a company.
Students must also participate in the quality of education delivered at the School by giving
their constructive criticism all the while behaving as respectful citizens of the academic
community.
You should give your opinion by completing the required teaching evaluations that will be
administered online, which will allow the School to improve the quality of its teaching: without
you, this can not be done.
You should also, both while at the School and in all of your activities, respect all staff
(administrators and teachers alike). This should include responsible behavior towards those
who are present to ensure your success.
By being aware of these values and committing yourself to respecting them, let’s work
together towards your academic and professional success.

Jean-Claude GRASS
Director of Programs

Tamym ABDESSEMED
Academic and Research Director


3
- CONTENTS -
PART 1: BBA English Track in 2012-2013
1.1. The BBA program .........................................................................................................p 4
1.2. Presentation of the Academic Year ..............................................................................p 6
1.3. General Presentation of Courses .................................................................................p 8
1.4. Requirements for graduation ...................................................................................... p 10

PART 2: Detailed presentation of each course
2.1. 1st semester courses ................................................................................................... p 16
2.1.1. Management Department ........................................................................................ p 16
2.1.2. Economic and Legal Environment Department ........................................................ p 20
2.1.3. Marketing Department ............................................................................................. p 24
2.1.4. Strategy Department ................................................................................................ p 28
2.1.5. French, European & International Cultures Departmt ............................................... p 31
2.2. 2nd semester courses ......................................................................................... p 37
2.2.1. Management Department ........................................................................................ p 37
2.2.2. Economic and Legal Environment Department ........................................................ p 41
2.2.3. Finance and Control Department ............................................................................. p 45
2.2.4. Marketing Department ............................................................................................. p 49
2.2.5. French, European & International Cultures Departmt ............................................... p 53
2.2.6. Bachelor Thesis ....................................................................................................... p 59





4

PART 1

BACHELOR OF BUSINESS
ADMINISTRATION
ENGLISH TRACK IN 2012-2013
1.1. THE BBA PROGRAM
The Bachelor of Business Administration Degree was created in 2003. It is the first ICN year
track to be taught entirely in English at ICN Business School, while other English-speaking
partnership programs exist at ICN, for example the Executive MBA, the MSc in International
Management (MIEX) in partnership with universities in Bologna, Mexico City, Shanghai,
Moscow and Uppsala, the MSc in International Business Development (2
nd
year), the Summer
Program...
The teaching Faculty consists of full-time professors from our own School, visiting professors
from our international partner universities, and professional business people with a wealth of
international experience. Hence this track is a rare opportunity for students to acquire a rich and
significant intercultural experience from their studies.
The Bachelor of Business Administration has two main objectives:
To offer international students (who do not speak French), the opportunity to follow a
Bachelor program entirely in English while at the same time acquiring a real international
and intercultural experience during a substantial period of study in France and in the
European Union.

To offer French students the opportunity to complete the third year of their studies in
English and draw the many benefits of studying alongside students from other regions of
the world.

In support of these aims, ICN Business School is regularly attracting more and more foreign
students from its partner Universities and Business Schools in countries such as, China, the
United States, Canada, Mexico, Brazil, Thailand, Russia, Lithuania, Spain, Germany, Poland,
etc.
In 2012-2013, the English track will provide an exceptional opportunity for students from
different nationalities and cultures to meet and understand each other. Whether your course of
study is for a semester or a year, I wish you an enjoyable, enriching and successful stay at ICN
and in Nancy.

Jean-Claude GRASS
Director Delegate of Programs
ICN Business School


5

MESSAGE FROM THE COURSE LEADER & PROGRAM DIRECTOR
Dear BBA students,

We are very glad to welcome you to the BBA program of ICN Business School as from
September 2012. Our school has always had a strong propensity to build close relationships
with universities based all over the world and prides itself today on relying on a network of more
than 100 universities covering all continents. If you have chosen this academic pathway at ICN
Business School, it is certainly because you want to live a truly international experience in a
French setting. You will have thus the opportunity to enhance your academic level while
immersing yourself in a new culture.

Initiated in 2003, the English track of the ICN Bachelor of Business Administration hosts today
more than 80 students from all corners of the globe and a cluster of French students who join
this academic pathway after successfully completing the 2
nd
year of ICN Bachelor Program.
You will get to know these French students as you will have the opportunity to interact with them
within the framework of lectures, workshops but also outside of the academic curriculum, in
extracurricular activities.

Given the location of Nancy, at the heart and crossroads of many different countries in Europe,
you will be able to travel during the weekends or vacations to diverse places. Studying,
improving your language skills, travelling, sharing your own views and perceptions of the world
with other people: no doubt your academic stay at ICN Business School will be rewarding and
enriching; this is what we wish you.

Developed in a truly international spirit, this English track offers you a unique opportunity to
study in a multicultural environment where intellectual enquiry can flourish. Living overseas and
experiencing a different country firsthand will no doubt give you an edge in your future
professional pathway since it will bring you a foretaste of how companies work in the 21
st

century. This academic pathway will give you the qualities which current global companies are
looking for: adaptability, an international mindset and openness to other cultures. Furthermore,
on a shorter term, it will also broaden your mind and help you see the world from a range of
perspectives.

Once you graduate from the English track of the BBA Program, you will be able to continue your
studies in international business or related fields.

If you are within or without the framework of an exchange, if you have planned to stay for a
semester or for a year, if you come from a culture which is close to ours or quite far from ours,
we wish you a wonderful stay in France, in Nancy and at ICN Business School.


Malika KACED
BBA Course Leader
ICN Business School
Christine KRATZ
Director of Bachelor of Business
Administration
ICN Business School



6

1.2. PRESENTATION OF THE ACADEMIC YEAR 2012-2013


THE STAFF 2012 / 2013:
Christine KRATZ Director of Bachelor of Business Administration
Malika KACED BBA Course Leader
Elisabeth AGUILAR Director‘s Administrative Assistant
Sophie THIREAU Administration Office





FIRST SEMESTER (FROM SEPTEMBER TO DECEMBER)

Start of the first semester: September 17
Start of Courses: September 17 from 2pm to 5pm
Exams Period: December 17 to December 21

SECOND SEMESTER (FROM JANUARY TO MAY)

Cross-cultural Seminar in the French Alps: January 6 to January 12
Start of Courses: January 14
International Business Seminars: March 18 to March 22
End of courses and exams: May 28


7

Principal dates to remember during the academic year 2012-2013

START OF THE ACADEMIC YEAR

From September 17: Mandatory meeting from 10am to 12am
CLASSES

1
st
semester: From September 17 to December 21

2
nd
semester: From January 14 to May 28


SEMINARS

Cross Cultural Seminar in the French Alps: From January 6 to 12
International Business Seminars ICN Business School: From March 18 to 22

EXAMINATIONS

End of 1
st
semester examinations 1
st
session: From December 17 to December 21
End of 2
nd
semester examinations 1
st
session: From April 17 to 19
Retake examinations: From May 23 to May 28

VACATION (NO CLASSES)

Christmas: From December 22

to January 5
Winter: From March 2 to March 9
Spring: From April 20 to May 4



8

1.3. GENERAL PRESENTATION OF COURSES
1ST SEMESTER COURSES CLASS CONTACT
HOURS
ECTS
UE 1 : MANAGEMENT
60 h 6

Human Resource Management

Intercultural Management

Change Management and Project Management


20h

20h

20h


2

2

2

UE 2 : ECONOMIC AND LEGAL ENVIRONMENT
60 h 6

French Economy

The European Union and the European Institutions

Principles of French and comparative Law


20h

20h

20h


2

2

2

UE 3 : MARKETING
70 h 7

Marketing Management

Marketing and E-Business

Logistics and Transportation in an International Environment

Research methodology ( Bachelor Thesis)


20h

20h

20h

10h

2

2

2

1
UE 4 : STRATEGY
40 h 4

Innovation Management and Entrepreneurship

Corporate Strategy


20h

20h

2

2
UE 5 : FRENCH, EUROPEAN AND INTERNATIONAL
CULTURES
70 h 7

Cycle of Conferences 1

French Language Course 1 (only for foreign students)

French Culture and French Civilization 1
(only for foreign students)

Second Year Internship Report
(only for French students)


20h

20h

30h


_


2

2

3


5

SUB TOTAL

300h

30


9
2ND SEMESTER COURSES CLASS CONTACT
HOURS
ECTS
UE 6 : MANAGEMENT
40 h 4

International Negotiation

International Business Seminars

Cross Cultural Seminar in the French Alps (optional)

20h

30h

20h’


2

2

2’

UE 7 : ECONOMIC AND LEGAL ENVIRONMENT
60 h 6

Knowledge Management

New Global Geopolitical Challenges

Doing Business with European Countries and People


20h

20h

20h


2

2

2
UE 8 : FINANCE AND CONTROL
60 h 6

Corporate Finance

International Finance

Management Control

20 h

20h

20h


2

2

2
UE 9 : MARKETING
60 h 6

International Marketing

Marketing Business Game

Corporate Communication

20h

20h

20h

2

2

2
UE 10 : FRENCH, EUROPEAN AND
INTERNATIONAL CULTURES
40h 4

Cycle of Conferences 2

French Language Course 2 (optional)
(only for foreign students)

French Culture and French Civilization 2 (only for foreign
students)

20 h

20h’


20h


2

2’


2

UE 11 : BACHELOR THESIS
Cultural, Commercial, Economic Approach of a European
Country
4
SUB TOTAL 300h 30
GRAND TOTAL 600h 60


10

1.4. SCHOOL REGULATIONS AND REQUIREMENTS FOR
GRADUATION
PRINCIPLES OF ASSESSMENT AND REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION
In order to graduate from the BBA program, students must obtain 60 ECTS credits; i.e
30 ECTS in semester 1 and 30 ECTS in semester 2. The 2 semesters are free-standing
or independent, as far as grades are concerned, which means that grades for subjects in
one semester cannot compensate for grades for similar subjects in the other semester.
Teaching is divided into teaching units (UE) and spread over the 2 semesters. Each
teaching unit includes one or more teaching modules.
Within each teaching unit (UE) there can be compensation between the modules making
up the UE. Hence, in order to obtain the total number of credits allocated to a UE (i.e.
therefore to its constituent modules) students must be awarded an average grade of at
least 10/20 for the modules in the UE. Note, however, that for each module, a minimum
grade of 5/20 is required.
Attendance in classes is mandatory and the attendance checks are done regularly.
The purpose of verifying attendance is, first and foremost, pedagogic in that it helps to
determine whether poor assessment grades are the result of repeated absenteeism or
whether they are the result of a poor understanding of the material taught. Absence
from classes is therefore subject to a systematic check by staff in the BBA Academic
Office, to whom a document justifying the student’s absence as essential must be
presented by the student within 1 week following the period of absence. However,
acceptance of this reason is not automatic. Any documentary evidence produced after
the period of 1 week will be refused. A student who is unable to present this document
to the BBA Academic Office in person must inform the Office staff as soon as they
become aware of this difficulty.
Absence does not directly affect the student’s grade in the subject concerned. However,
in each teaching module or course which is graded, the lecturer may take into
consideration the student’s attendance rate and/or class participation when allocating the
final grade. Students are informed, at the beginning of each module, of the importance
of the two factors, attendance and class participation, in the lecturer’s final assessment.


11

ABSENCE DURING EXAMINATIONS AND ASSESSMENTS.
Attendance at all examinations is mandatory. A student who is absent from an
examination during the first session of examinations may sit the examination during the
second (re-take) session.
CONSULTATION OF EXAMINATION DOCUMENTS.
Students have the right, within a reasonable amount of time after the examination, to ask
to see a copy of their examination documents and to have a meeting with the lecturer
responsible for setting the examination. This meeting must take place before the second
(re-take) examination.
CHEATING AND OTHER FRAUDULENT BEHAVIOR
Examination supervisors. Supervisors will be appointed for all examinations. Should
students be caught cheating or attempting to cheat, the examination supervisor(s) will:
- take all necessary steps to put an end to the cheating without interrupting the
examination
- confiscate any material which may later be used to prove the act of cheating
- write a detailed report on the cheating incident, which will be signed by both the
supervisor and the student(s) accused of cheating. Should the student(s) concerned
refuse to sign the report, this too will be mentioned in the supervisor’s report
- inform the Program Director and the Chair of the Assessment Board, who, on the
basis of verbal and written reports, may convene a meeting of the School’s
Disciplinary Board.
In cases where persons other than the registered students sit, or attempt to sit the
examination, or in the event of disturbances during the examination, the General Director
of the School, or his representative, may order the offending persons or students to
leave the examination room.


12

THE ASSESSMENT BOARD AND FRAUDULENT BEHAVIOR
In cases where the student has not been excluded from the examination room:
- his/her examination script is considered, along with those of other examination
candidates
- the Assessment Board discusses and approves the results in the same conditions as
those of other candidates
- in cases where cheating has taken place, the student is allowed to sit other
examinations in the session. This is also the case when the Assessment Board has
informed the General Director of the School.

PROCEDURE IN CASES OF CHEATING
- This is within the ‘Discipline’ section of the School’s Disciplinary Board.
- The Board’s Chairperson is informed of the attempt to cheat. He/she receives the
detailed written report and any supporting documents, and sends a copy of the report
to the student(s) alleged to have cheated.
- The Chair of the Disciplinary Board appoints an investigating commission, made up
of two lecturer members and one student representative. One of the lecturer
members is appointed to act as “Rapporteur”.
- The Chair may request further information and ask the examination supervisor(s) and
the student(s) concerned by the allegation to attend for questioning.



13

EXAMINATIONS
To be awarded the BBA Degree, students must obtain 60 credits. If they do not achieve this
total, they may take a re-take examination in all the subjects for which they have not obtained
credits at the first session. BBA students may re-take each subject once only.
There are two sessions of examinations, and consequently the Assessment Board meets on
two occasions to consider students’ grades. The two examination sessions are programmed as
follows:
- the first session of examinations takes place in December and April. This concerns
the whole BBA class.
- the second session of examinations is held in late May. This is for students who
have failed to obtain credits for subjects at the first session of examinations.

At the second meeting of the BBA Assessment Board, two situations may arise:
- either, the student has not obtained the minimum of 60 credits required, in which
case the Assessment Board will not award him the BBA degree.
- or, the student has obtained the minimum of 60 credits required, even if not all of the
credits were obtained at the first session of examinations, and he is awarded the
Degree.
In all cases students must obtain 60 credits at the second session of examinations at
the end of the academic year in order to be awarded the BBA Degree.

GENERAL COMMENT ON ASSESSMENT BOARDS
The decisions of the Assessment Board are collective and result from a majority vote
by the Board members. They are final and binding only when they have been signed
by the Chair of the Assessment Board.



14


1st SEMESTER COURSES

UE 1 : MANAGEMENT

 Human Resource Management

 Intercultural Management

 Change Management and Project Management


2 credits

2 credits

2 credits

UE 2 : ECONOMIC AND LEGAL ENVIRONMENT

 French Economy

 The European Union and the European Institutions

 Principles of French and comparative Law


2 credits

2 credits

2 credits

UE 3 : MARKETING

 Marketing Management

 Marketing and E-Business

 Logistics and Transportation in an International Environment

 Research methodology ( Bachelor Thesis)


2 credits

2 credits

2 credits

1 credit
UE 4 : STRATEGY

 Innovation Management and Entrepreneurship

 Corporate Strategy


2 credits

2 credits

UE 5 : FRENCH, EUROPEAN AND INTERNATIONAL CULTURES

 Cycle of Conferences 1

 French Language Course 1 (only for foreign students)

 French Culture and French Civilization 1 (for foreign students only)

 Second Year Internship Report (for French students only)


2 credits

2 credits

3 credits

5 credits



15

2nd SEMESTER COURSES

UE 6 : MANAGEMENT

 International Negotiation

 International Business Seminars

 Cross Cultural Seminar in the French Alps (optional)

2 credits

2 credits

2 credits

UE 7 : ECONOMIC AND LEGAL ENVIRONMENT

 Knowledge Management

 New Global Geopolitical Challenges

 Doing Business with European Countries and People


2 credits

2 credits

2 credits
UE 8 : FINANCE AND CONTROL

 Corporate Finance

 International Finance

 Management Control

2 credits

2 credits

2 credits

UE 9 : MARKETING

 International Marketing

 Marketing Business Game

 Corporate Communication

2 credits

2 credits

2 credits
UE 10 : FRENCH, EUROPEAN AND INTERNATIONAL CULTURES

 Cycle of Conferences 2

 French Language Course 2 (optional) (for foreign students only)

 French Culture and French Civilization 2 (for foreign students only)

2 credits

2 credits

2 credits

UE 11 : BACHELOR THESIS

 Group research project on a European country (maximum 3 students)



4 credits




16

PART 2

DETAILED PRESENTATION OF EACH
COURSE

2.1 1
ST
SEMESTER COURSES
2.1.1 MANAGEMENT DEPARTMENT

Human Resource Management

Intercultural Management

Change Management and Project Management





17

Human Resource Management
Semester: 1 ECTS: 2



Length of module: 20 hours

Lecturer(s): Nuno GUIMARAES DA COSTA


Student learning
objectives:
Make people conscious that management is not only setting objectives and controlling
results but also motivating employees to achieve their goals
Demonstrate the role on my personal behavior and examplarity in my leadership
responsibility


Course/module
content:
Manager / Leader : same person, two roles, one example
the human capital development model
how to discover our employees motivations?
how to help people to motivate themselves?
the manager's tasks : from objectives to control
initiatives and creativity
delegation
decisions and mistakes
personal development meetings
efficient meetings : preparation
reprimand and conflict handling
internal negotiations
acting upwards


Teaching methods: Exercises
Group preparations
Exchanges : personal and real experiences
Case studies
Multicultural influences and examples


Assessment: A multiple-choice questionnaire: 50%.
A case study: "the management stoty" where the student plays the coaches role : 50%.


Bibliography: "Good to Great" Jim Collins (random house business books)
"Développez vos qualités de manager" Daniel Kluger (Eyrolles)




18
Intercultural Management
Semester: 1 ECTS: 2
Length of module: 20 hours

Lecturer(s): Stéphane GANGLOFF

Student learning
objectives:
Main objectives:

The seminar is aimed at helping students understand the main cultural issues that must be taken
into account when doing business in a multicultural setting. The course provides students with a
basic understanding of some of the major cultural profiles, communication patterns, negotiation
strategies and management styles in several countries and companies in various regions of the
world, including North America, Europe, Asia and Latin America.
Students will be introduced to concepts, models, approaches and tools to communicate, negotiate
and work effectively in multicultural teams. They will be asked to apply these tools to case studies,
exercises, role plays.

Secondary objectives:

Create and deepen awareness for your own cultural background
Give orientation about different cultural concepts
Change the attitude toward foreign cultures, damp culture shock through preparation and
anticipation (for example in simulations)
Teach hard facts, for example practical hints for daily life
Motivation, Encourage people to experience new cultures

Course/module
content:
This seminar is designed to highlight the important issues in cross-cultural management. The
course assumes an understanding of the basic theories, concepts and techniques in organizational
behaviour and human resource management. This seminar begins with a discussion on the various
theories of culture, the cultural dimensions and its influence on organizations. Various cross-cultural
issues are addressed such as: leadership, motivation, goal setting, job satisfaction, stress,
absenteeism, team working, negotiations, conflict, human resource management, cross-cultural
training, expatriation, and communication.
Teaching methods: Materials used: Adapted to the different situations and authentic (newspaper articles, power point
presentation, pertinent workshops)
Assessment: By the end of the seminar, students will be asked a team project consisting in a cultural analysis of
a country in the regions discussed in class, in which the student's sponsoring company would
hypothetically, or actually, do business. The project will also include the design of an intercultural
management strategy. The cultural analysis and strategy design must be done in the context of a
specific business situation like outsourcing from another country, marketing your products in
another country, forming a joint venture or strategic alliance with a company in another country, etc.
Bibliography: •Hall, E. & Hall, M. Understanding Cultural Differences: Germans, French and Americans Yarmouth
: Intercultural Press, l990.
•Kras, E. Management in Two Cultures: Bridging the Gap Between US and Mexican Managers
Yarmouth: Intercultural Press, 1989.
•Perry, Gaye (Editor) Intercultural Communications. Bellevue: Coursewise Publishing Inc., 1999.
•Catlin, L. & White, T. International Business: Cultural Sourcebook and Case Studies Cincinnati:
South-Western Publishing, l994.
•Duenas, G. The Meaning of Human Relationship: The Case of Latin America paper submitted to
the Cross-Cultural Connection Network, California Institute of Integral Sciences, San Francisco,
1994
•Gannon, M. Understanding Global Cultures: Metaphorical Journeys Through 23 Nations,
Thousand Oaks: Sage Publications, 2 nd edition, 2001
•Harris, P.R. & Moran, R.T. Managing Cultural Differences: Leadership Strategies for a New World
of Business, Houston: Gulf Publishing Co., 5 th edition, 2001
•Hofstede, G. Culture's Consequences: Comapring Values, Behaviors, Institutions, and
Organizations Across Nations, Thousand Oaks: Sage Publications, 2 nd . Edition, 2001
•Kung, H. (Editor) Yes to a Global Ethic , London: SCM Press, 1996 Kung, H. A Global Ethic for
Global Politics and Economics , London: SCM, 1997
•Lee, Y. & Duenas, G. "Stereotype Accuracy in Multicultural Business", in Stereotype Accuracy:
Toward Appreciating Group Differences, Washington: American Psychological Association, 1995
•Moran, R.T. & Abbott, J. NAFTA: Managing the Cultural Differences. How to benefit from the
economic and cultural integration of North America Houston: Gulf Publishing Co., l994.
•Moran, R.T., Braaten, D. & Walsh, J. (editors) International Business Case Studies for the
Multicultural Marketplace Houston: Gulf Publishing Co., 1994.
•O'Hara-Deveraux, M. & Johansen, R. Global Work: Bridging Distance, Time and Culture San
Francisco : Time, Jossey Bass, l994.


19
Change Management and Project Management

Semester: 1 ECTS: 2

Length of module: 20 hours


Lecturer(s): Christiane FRANCEY


Student learning
objectives:
To enable the students :

To develop a global understanding of the complexity and challenges of Change
Management and Project Management.
To integrate Management of Change within the strategic development of a
project.


Course/module
content:
Introduction and the Square Wheels (Performance Management Company).
External and internal factors of change and their impact on the introduction of a
project.
Change strategies: Lewin, Pettigrew, Dawson, Burnes.
Obstacles and resistance to change: breaking barriers and motivating people to
change.
Exploring some initiatives that succeeded and failed: developing creative
alternatives.
Risk analysis and development of a CATWOE: Checkland.
Case study: development of a project taking into account resistance to change.

Teaching methods: Presentations and student led discussions.
Assessment:
At the beginning of the course, students will be given a selection of projects to be
developed. One of them will be submitted as a written and oral assessment at the end of
the course. Students will be able to work on the selected project on their own or in small
groups. If they work in small groups, they will have to form a project team and each
person will have to develop one specific aspect of the project in question.
Bibliography:
Harvard Business Review on Change. (1998) (Harvard Business School Press)
Paul Bate (1994) Strategies for Cultural Change. (Butterworth Heinemann)
Harold Kerzner (2000) Applied Project Management. (John Wiley &Sons, Inc)

Internet site: Teaching the Caterpillar to fly
http://www.SquareWheels.com



20





1
ST
SEMESTER COURSES
2.1.2 ECONOMIC AND LEGAL ENVIRONMENT

French Economy

The European Union and the European Institutions

Proactive Management and Proactive Business Law




21
French Economy
S
Semester: 1
ECTS: 2



Length of module: 20 hours


Lecturer(s): Alexandre MELNIK


Student learning
objectives:
To give to students a global panorama of the French Economy in the
Globalization of the XXI century: genesis and particular features of the French
economic model, its historical evolution, great names, leading sectors and
companies, key challenges of the French economy today and tomorrow.
To develop the general culture in international and macro-economic areas.

To identify the real opportunities for the future student's professional career
within the international expansion of the French Economy.


Course/module
content:
1. Global outlook of the today's situation of France in area of economy: strong points vs.
weak points from the point of view of a global decision maker.
2. Historical background of the French Economy: main stages of development of the free
market economy, key historical actors, driving forces of the French historical model,
main lecons and messages.
3. Up-date panorama of the leading sectors and companies of the French Economy.
4. Key economic challenges of the French government in the Globalization of the XXI
century.

Teaching
methods:
 To prioritize the ability of synthesis (vs analysis) in order to set up the essentials.

 Multidisciplinary approach.
 To boost the individual motivation and intellectual curiosity of every student.
 Interactivity, open discussion in class.

Assessment:
Note of synthesis in correlation with a key topic of the course - 50%
QUIZ (20 questions in conformity with the course's content) - 50%
Bibliography:
Walt Rostow "The Steps of the Economic Growth"
Adam Smith "An Inquiry into Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations"
Karl Marx "The Capital"
Larry Allen "Capitalsm" ABC-Clio, 2001
Currents news, French and Anglo-Saxon newspapers and magazines




22
The European Union and the European Institutions
Semester: 1 ECTS: 2



Length of module: 20 hours

Lecturer(s): Günter SCHUMACHER

Student Learning
Objectives:
At the end of this module students should be able to:
• Distinguish the different aspects of the process of European construction (historical,
political, cultural, legal, economic and social aspects) and to understand how they are
linked together
• Use the different criteria surrounding the notion of an “EU-identity”
• Explain how the question of the balance of power in the EU is reflected in the
institutional framework
• Make the link between the EU-institutions and daily life of the citizens and the different
economic players
Course/Module
content:
I. THE EUROPEAN UNION (Identity)

A. How to define the “identity” of the E.U.
B. A historical approach of the “European” identity of the EU
C. The history of the EU
D. The EU and the question of religion(s)
E. European values

II. THE EUROPEAN INSTITUTIONS (Power)

A. The European Institutions = the EU-Institutions
B. The link between the question of power and
a) the type of “Union” (objective)
b) the type of implementation procedure (method)
C. Institutions and the question of the balance of power
D. Legislation procedure and budgetary policy
E. EU-institutions in more detail

Teaching methods: Combination of a lecture approach, for the transmission of knowledge, with an inter-
active -approach, which – based on the meiotic method - tries to awaken the curiosity
directed to the knowledge (to be transmitted) and which makes possible an adequate
implementation of the acquired knowledge.
Assessment: continuous assessment (50% of final grade) +
final written test (1 hour) in the form of Multiple Choice Questionnaires (50% of final
grade)
Indicative
bibliography:
BERTONCINI Y. et alii (2011) Dictionnaire critique de l'Union européenne, Armand
Collin
COMMISARIAT GENERAL DU PLAN et alii (2002), Croyances religieuses, morales et
éthiques dans le processus de construction européenne, Paris, La Documentation
Française.
COMMISSION OF THE EU, The Charter of Fundamental Rights of the EU,
http:// europa.eu.int/comm/justice_home/unit/charte/en/charter-preamble.html
DAVIES N. (1997), Europe, A history, London, Pimlico
GOWLAND, D., DUNPHY, R., LYTHE, Ch. (2006), The European Mosaic, 3rd edition,
Pearson Education Limited


23

Principles of French and Comparative Law
Semester: 1 ECTS: 2


Length of module: 20 hours

Lecturer(s): Gerlinde BERGER-WALLISER

Student learning
objectives: Law is the framework for all our activities – in every day life as in business life. This
course is an introduction to (business) law from a comparative perspective. The chief
purpose of the course is to furnish students with basic skills to understand law, to be
conscious about existing differences between their own and other legal systems, to work
out legal methods and to communicate on legal issues in an international environment.
Course/module
content: In order to make it understandable and interesting for students from different countries
and with different knowledge in law the course combines the study of basic elements of
the French legal system with an introduction to the comparative method focusing on
certain European civil law systems (particularly France and Germany), as well as the
English and American system. But the course will also include some more limited studies
of non-Western legal systems (for example Asia). The following subjects will be
addressed:
The nature and sources of law
The court system
Legal actors, legal training
Civil litigation and alternative dispute resolution
Introduction to international and comparative law
Presentation of the principal law systems in the world, such as the Civil law
system (especially German and French Law) and the Common law system; Asia
and other laws to a limited extend
Comparative analysis of special problems of substantive law such as contracts,
property, intellectual property rights, legal forms of business organization


Teaching methods: Combination of front lecture, discussion, role play, short case studies and student
presentations.

Assessment: Group presentation (50%)
Final Individual (50%)

Bibliography: NEYLER, Peter, Business Law in the Global Marketplace, The effects on international
business, Elsevier, 2006
NEIPERT, D. M., Law of Global Commerce, A Tour, Prentice Hall, 2002
JEEVA, J., "Comparative Law: A General Introduction", 2001,
at: http://www.lawgazette.com.sg/2001-10/Oct01-focus3.htm
University of Ottawa, Legal Systems at:
http://www.droitcivil.uottawa.ca/world-legal-systems/eng-monde.html
GLENN, H. P., Legal Traditions of the world, 2nd ed., Oxford, 2004
BELL, J. / BOYRON, S. / Whittaker, S., Principles of French Law, Oxford, 1998
ELLIOT, C. / VERNON, C., French Legal System, Longman, 2000
FOSTER, N.G. / SULE, S., German Law and Legal System, 3rd ed., Oxford 2002


24





1
ST
SEMESTER COURSES
2.1.3 ECONOMIC AND LEGAL ENVIRONMENT

Marketing Management

Marketing and E-Business

Logistics and Transportation in an International Environment







25
Marketing Management
Semester: 1 ECTS: 2




Length of module: 20 hours

Lecturer(s): Patricia APANGU

Student learning
objectives:
This course in Marketing Management will integrate concepts and models learned in
prior marketing courses and apply them to contemporary marketing problems. The
primary objectives are to improve the students' critical assessment capability, problem-
solving and decision-making, and communication skills within the marketing area.
Course/module
content:
The course will consist of:
A review of the core topics within the field (i.e., definitions, consumer behavior,
segmentation, positioning, international marketing, marketing mix and service
marketing) ;
Updates on contemporary topics and issues discussed at time of the course ;
Examples from the operational as well as the strategically and managerial levels
of marketing.
Cases and assignments that have to be discussed and solved within the
framework of the course.


Teaching methods: Students are expected to actively participate in class discussions, cases and
assignment.


Assessment: 50% assignments

50% written examination


Bibliography: Kotler and Armstrong (2011). Principles of Marketing. 14th Edition, Pearson Education.
Cases and other material will be provided by the lecturer during class.



26
Marketing and E-Business
Semester: 1 ECTS: 2



Length of module: 20 hours

Lecturer(s): Krish KRISHNAN


Student learning
objectives:
This seminar provides an overview of global E-business activities and Internet Marketing
strategies of the modern enterprise. Design and implementation of E-Commerce
strategies with special emphasis on Internet Marketing in a global context are presented
with current examples and mini case studies. The economic, organizational,
technological, socio-cultural and political-legal dimensions of E-Commerce are reviewed
as well as product, pricing, promotion and place dimensions of marketing online.
Course/module
content:
1. Nature and extent of global E-Commerce
2. Internet Business Models
3. Marketing Research for E-Commerce and Online Marketing
4. Internet Marketing Strategies for Consumer Markets
5. Business to Business E-Commerce
6. Advertising on the Internet
7. Electronic Payment Systems and Pricing
8. Cross Cultural Issues in globalization of E-Business
9. Legal dimensions of E-Commerce
10. Public Policy and Ethical dimensions of E-Business

Teaching
methods:
Lectures, Video Case Studies, Group Exercises


Assessment: Individual exam with short answer questions at the end of the seminar.


Bibliography: Turban et. al. “E-Commerce – A Managerial Perspective”, Prentice Hall, 2010.
Michael Rappa, “Managing the Digital Enterprise”, www.digitalenterprise.org



27
Logistics and Transportation in an International Environment
Semester: 1 ECTS: 2




Length of module: 20 hours

Lecturer(s): Jean-Paul GAERTNER

Student learning
objectives:
Acquire the principles and rules governing the international flow of goods.
Be able to organize and manage transportation.
Link the operations to the financial consequences for a company.

Course/Module
content:
Logistics – origin, place, definitions and characteristics in the international global flow.
Incoterms – interpretation-rules, choice and impact on the current business flow, their
costs.
Organization and Actors of international logistics, the role of the specialists.
Different means of transport, characteristics of international transport modes, freight
rates, multi-modalism, documentation, the significance of speed, frequency, reliability,
capability, accessibility, quality and costs, tools of handling.
Transport – cargo insurance, real costs of logistics.
Customs-practice in handling of goods within Europe/ with third countries, other
administrative handling.
Future of logistics, impact on the environment.


Teaching methods: Lectures and case-studies.


Assessment: Final written exam.


Bibliography: Internationale Logistik by Arno Schieck published at Oldenburg.de
Operations management by N.S. Pack, S. Chambers..; published at Pitman Publishing
Export practice & management by A.E.Branch published at Int. Thomson bus. Press
Lamy chargeur published at "Editions Lamy" (f)
ICC Rules (2010) for the interpretation of trade-terms, published by ICC Paris
Different weekly + monthly magazines



28






1
ST
SEMESTER COURSES
2.1.4 STRATEGY DEPARTMENT

Innovation Management and Entrepreneurship

Corporate Strategy






29
Innovation Management and Entrepreneurship

Semester: 1 ECTS: 2




Length of module: 20 hours


Lecturer(s): Samuel MATHEY


Student learning
objectives:
In undertaking the course, we expect students to accrue knowledge and skills necessary
to identify innovation and turn innovation into a workable business plan for
implementation thereof. The course introduces as well through the business plan, ideas
on the tools box for managing a company (marketing, finance and budgeting, staffing…).
While the course is focused towards venture-funded startups, the pedagogy is
sufficiently general that the knowledge and skills are also directly applicable to
innovation in a corporate environment.


Course/module
content:
Innovation process management.
Innovation performance measurement.
The NPD framework and the SDP.
Portfolio concept and the case of non profit.
Protection of innovation.
Identifying ideas, Generating ideas, Protecting ideas.
Writing a Business Plan.
Defining entrepreneurship.
Role and impact of entrepreneurs.
The entrepreneurial process.


Teaching methods: The innovation and Entrepreneurship course consists of weekly class meetings and
team meetings for group project (case studies and business plans).


Assessment: For this course, final grades are determined by participation, contribution and Final
exams in the following manner:
• Group Mini-case study on Innovation: 25%
• Group Business Plan project: 25%
• Final exam, closed books: 50%


Bibliography: Soparnot, R. and Stevens, E. Management de l’Innovation, 2007, Dunod: Les Topos.
Fayolle, A., Introduction à l’Entrepeneuriat, 2005, Dunod: Les Topos.



30
Corporate Strategy
Semester: 1 ECTS: 2




Length of module: 20 hours


Lecturer(s): Dr Stanislas D'EYRAMES


Student learning
objectives:
This module aims to give the students a tool helping them in their decision making
process. We would like them to be able to have a wider approach of a situation before
considering making a decision.
Trying to be more rational or at least finding out where we are less rational or where
being irrational is acceptable is our main goals here.


Course/module
content:
We will focus our work in studying the “issue tree” and how it will help us in facing a
complex problem by splitting the main problematic in smaller groups easier to handle.
We will finish by the evaluation of our final decision and the analyse of the
consequences which might occur.


Teaching
methods:
Students will be placed in a real situation where they will have to make a decision as a
manager. They will be asked to organize their decision making process which will lead to
a decision they will have to face.
Excel software will be used and small groups will be arranged (3 students per group).



Assessment: The students will have to present their decision making process orally with the help of
powerpoint. The work will be based on a study case studied together.


Bibliography: ASPEN > Cross-knowledge (Savoir être >gestion de projet > les modules de la partie 1).



31





1
ST
SEMESTER COURSES
2.1.5 FRENCH, EUROPEAN AND INTERNATIONAL CULTURES DEPARTMENT

Cycle of Conferences 1

French Language Course 1

French Culture and French Civilization 1





32
Cycle of Conferences and visits 1
Semester : 1 ECTS : 2



Length of module : 20 hours

Lecturer(s) : Malika KACED in partnership with international guest speakers and business
professionals.

Student learning
objectives :
1. For the set of visits:
To help students get exposure to the business reality and more precisely to
become familiar with the way typical French companies function, their activities
and clients, their products/ services and issues such as how companies plan
their strategies, how they deal with competitors and other such challenges.

To better understand the economic environment of the region and become more
acquainted with the management of companies set up in the region.

To have students discover the cultural and historical patrimony of the Lorraine
region. Often International students make the most of their free time discovering
remote places at the expense of the regional area, which is full of many
interesting places, where they will be spending many months.

2. For the set of conferences:
To give international and French students the opportunity to open their horizons
by discovering other countries by different angles such as the economy, society,
culture….
To allow students to see things and analyze them from another perspective.
To permit them to enrich their international culture and mind sight while
enhancing their cross-cultural awareness.

Course/module
content:
The cycle of conferences and visits supplement the core academic modules and
lectures. It is designed in a twofold way: company visits and visits to cultural sites, and
conferences taught by international guest speakers.
1. The visits take place on days that students don’t have classes in the program. One of
the highlights of the visits is the European Parliament. It permits the students to have an
insight into one of the main institutions of the EU and to further the knowledge given in
certain modules in a concrete way. Other visits permit students to discover some
aspects of the region and its surrounding areas.
2. The conferences are usually held on Thursdays and may last from 2 to 3 hours. They
focus on many different subjects in line with the curriculum. They highlight varied
branches such as the economy, society, culture….
Please note that this module is an integral part of the program and that participation in
all the visits and conferences is compulsory.

Teaching
methods:

Conferences are held in the lecture halls with all the class.

Assessment: Students will synthesize each visit and conference in a dossier which they will present
as follows:
• An introduction
• A one-page account of each visit and conference.
• A conclusion
One dossier per semester.

Bibliography: N/A

33
French Language Course:Beginner
Semester: 1 ECTS: 2


Length of module: 20 hours
Lecturer(s): Sébastien PABST


Student learning
objectives:
The aims of the course are to:
Introduce students to the peculiarities of French pronunciation.
Give a basic notion of French grammar.
Lay the foundation of general-language vocabulary.
Practice everyday French parlance.

Course/module
content:
-Greetings and introductions.
-Nouns and numbers.
-Time and date.
-Family.
-Meals.
-Weather and temperature.
-Shopping.
-Travel and holidays.
-Professions.
-At home / going out.
-Body and health.

Teaching
methods:
The aims and contents determine the teaching and learning methods used. Some of
them will to be based on the more classical lecture-style approaches. The major part,
however, will consist of a combination of interactive group work and some elements of
what has come to be known as "suggestopedia" and "neuro-linguistic programming" or
"nlp".
Assessment: For this course to be validated regular attendance is mandatory within the general rules
and regulations of the school. In addition, participation in class activities and a final test
are required: 50% continuous assesment, 50% final examination.
Bibliography: No particular textbooks are required. The material used for the course will be provided by
the lecturer. Participants should seek advice from the course tutor before buying any
books (dictionaries, grammar books, etc)



34
French Language Course: Intermediate
Semester: 1 ECTS: 2




Length of module: 20 hours


Lecturer(s): Linda COLACO


Student learning
objectives:
Linguistic objectives:
Formal, standard and collaquial vocabulary.
Numbers, directions, pronouns and adjectives.
Interrogation, negation and comparison.
Idiomatic expressions.
Present tense, imperative, simple future, future tense, present perfect,
imperfect, present conditional and present subjunctive.
Phonetics.



Course/module
content:
Oral comprehension/ written comprehension/ oral expression/ written expression :
- Understanding French humour (jokes, expressions and sketches).
- Describing one's family, other people, conditions of life, and professional training.
- Communicating at the supermarket, at the doctor's, at the post office, at the train
station, and at restaurants.
- Understanding menus, train and bus schedules, short letters, and commercials.
- Writing letters.
- Exchanging information.
- Describing the plot of a film and analyzing its contents.
- Telling a story.
- Expressing one's opinion.
- Expressing one's feeling.



Teaching
methods:
 Teaching following the C.E.C.R. guideline.
 Employment of authentic material.
 Employment of audio, visual and textual materials.
 Cognitive tools.


Assessment: 50% continuous assessment.
50% final examination.


Bibliography: No particular textbooks are required.



35
French Language Course: Advanced
Semester: 1 ECTS: 2




Length of module: 20 hours


Lecturer(s): Stéphane GANGLOFF


Student learning
objectives:
By the end of the session, the students should be able to understand the main points
and arguments of a French conversation when the language used is standard French.
As well they should be able to manage on their own everyday like situations such as:
shopping, asking for transport, leisure...Therefore thanks to this module and personal
work they will be autonomous in traveling situations, develop a capacity to give brief
explanations on a project or on a given subject. Students should also be able to
participate in a conversation, understand the main issue and give their opinion on any
subject.
The materials used will all have in common the discovery of French culture.


Course/module
content:
WRITTEN AND ORAL FRENCH WORKSHOPS
Given the context, and the demands of what it is like to live in a foreign country, the
emphasis will be put on oral expression, oral and written comprehension...
Written French: to help reinforce the reading and writing capacity of the students in
everyday and professional life.
Oral French: to help reinforce the capacity of understanding all kinds of documents,
start a conversation in everyday and professional life.

Teaching methods: Emphasis put on grammar overview and communication workshops.


Assessment: 50% continuous assessment.
50% final examination.


Bibliography: No particular textbooks are required. Course materials are adapted to the different
situations and authentic (newspaper articles, video, TV...).



36
French Culture and French Civilization 1
Semester: 1 ECTS: 3




Length of module: 30 hours


Lecturer(s): Joseph ROGERS

Student learning
objectives:
The module is designed to review key aspects of France’s society and culture. It covers
a large array of topics that relate to French contemporary society and culture in order to
expand students knowledge of the country.
At the end of the course, students will be able to:
- Demonstrate knowledge of French culture and society
- Analyze critically and discuss perceptively aspects of French contemporary
culture.
Demonstrate awareness of various aspects of French social customs.


Course/module
content:
Topics will include institutions and society (education, politics, the French Republic and
its symbols, media…), essential culture features (French value orientations, beliefs,
etiquette, Art de Vivre, the French exception, French polychronism…).
Major events that have contributed to the shaping of the country will be presented and
their significance discussed. French current events and contemporary social issues will
also be discussed.
During the 1
st
semester, students will follow the Cinema Cycle, which will consist of an
interdisciplinary study of contemporary French society and culture through the medium
of films. Its aim is to trace the history of film in France and show the interconnections
between artistic expression and the historical and cultural realities of France from the
50s’ to the present, with special emphasis on the French New Wave movement with
reference to the major French directors (Truffaut, Godard…) and their influential works.

Teaching methods: Teaching methods will include lectures, workshops and other methods appropriate to the
subject being taught.


Assessment: Continuous assessment = 50%
(i.e.: Individual word-processed analytical report= 25%. Team assignment and
presentation= 25%)
End-of semester examination = 50%


Bibliography: BERNSTEIN, Richard, Fragile Glory-A Portrait of France and the French, Plume, New
York, 1990.
JACK, Andrew, The French Exception-France: Still so Special? Profile, London, 1998.
MAYLE, Peter, French Lessons, Alfred Kopf, New York, 2001.


37


2.2 2
ND
SEMESTER COURSES
2.2.1 MANAGEMENT DEPARTMENT

International Negotiation

International Business Seminars

Cross Cultural Seminar in the French Alps



38
International Negotiation
Semester: 2 ECTS: 2

Length of module: 20 hours
Lecturer(s): Guy DELOFFRE
Student learning
objectives:
Know the field, theoretical aspects and conceptual models of negotiation,
Know types of negotiations and how they are used,
Know how negotiation is integrated into the field of social sciences as one of the
dimensions (like psychology, sociology, culture, etc),
Understand the links between models and situations,
Be able to analyze a situation with communication aspects,
Understand the links between real negotiations and negotiation models,
Be able to analyze a real negotiation,
Understand the links between cultural models and situations with a strong
cultural aspect,
Be able to analyze a situation that implies a strong cultural content or
background.

Course/module
content:
-The field of negotiation.
-Strategies and tactics.
-Negotiation models.
-Dirty tricks and tricky negotiations.
-Principled negotiation.
-Arguments, dispute resolution and problem solving.
-Phases, concepts, elements of a negotiation.

Teaching
methods:
 Pre-readings (books and texts).
 Formal classes (theories and discussions).
 Practical exercises, simulations and case-studies.

Assessment: 50% uncontrolled conditions: group work.
50 % controlled conditions : exercise (presentation or written) in class.

Bibliography: Strongly recommended:
-Carrell, M. ; Heavrin, Ch. : Negotiating Essentials, Theory, Skills and Practices,
Pearson Prentice Hall, Upper Saddle River, 2008. (Available in the CRDG)
Additional:
-FAURE, G. Olivier; RUBIN, Jeffrey Z: Culture & negotiation, Sage publications,
Newbury Park, 1993.
-FISHER, Roger, URY, William: Getting to yes, Penguin Books, New York, 1981-91 ;
Comment réussir une négociation, Seuil, Paris, 1982.
-HALL, Edward: La dimension cache (The hidden dimension), Points Seuil 89,
Doubleday, NY 1966, Seuil, Paris, 1971.
-HALL, Edward: Le langage silencieux (the silent language), Points Seuil, Paris
-JOHNSON, R.: Negotiation basics, Sage, 1993.
-HALL, Edward: La danse de la vie (The dance of life), Points Seuil 247, Paris, 1984.
-MORAN, Robert T; STRIPP, William G: Successful international business negotiations,
Gulf publishing, Houston, 1991.
-HALL, Lavinia: Negotiat°, strategies for mutual gain, Sage Publications, Newbury Park,
1993.
-RAIFFA, Howard: The art & science of negotiation, Harvard University Press,
Cambridge mass, 1982, 2000.
-SUN TZU: L’art de la guerre (The art of war), Champs Flammarion, Paris, 1972.
-THOMPSON, Leigh: The Mind and Heart of the Negotiator, Pearson Prentice Hall,
Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, 2009.
-URY, William: The Power of a Positive No, Bantam Books, New York, 2007.

39

International Business Seminars
Semester: 2 ECTS: 2



Length of module: 30 hours
Lecturer(s): Frédérique BOUTIN and visiting professors
Student learning
objectives:
The objective of this week is to offer students Marketing, Management and Finance
courses taught in different languages: French, English, and Spanish.
All courses are taught by visiting professors from our international partner universities.
These Seminars are a unique opportunity for students to experience other academic
styles. It allows students to meet and exchange ideas with professors from all around
the world.
It is also an opportunity to meet other undergraduate French students coming from the
Bachelor program (2
nd
and 3
rd
years).

Course/module
content:
The courses are different each year. A list of the visiting professors and the subjects of
their classes will be published in February 2013.
The International Business Seminars will take place from March 18
th
to 22
nd
, 2013. This
week is fully integrated into the syllabus of Bachelor program’s second and third year
students. The students must choose several of these seminar courses and can obtain
credits.

Teaching methods: Lecture, cases studies, class work, exercises and discussions.
Assessment: International Business Seminars are a requirement for students and they are required to
take 5 days of classes during the week. Each course has an examination.
Bibliography: N/A



40
Cross Cultural Seminar in the French Alps
Semester: 2 ECTS: 2’



Length of module: 20 hours


Lecturer(s): International Relations Office and visiting professors
Student learning
objectives:
To give students a group experience outside the School for the entire Class with
workshops focusing on current events and management topics.
Equivalent to an Integration Week for students arriving at the beginning of the 2
nd

semester.

The presence of all BBA students is important.
Course/module
content:
4 mandatory workshops focused on Management and international business.
Sporting activities.
Teaching methods: This is a cross-cultural seminar. For one week, 50 students from different nationalities
will live and work together. It is a multicultural life experience that will require adaptation,
tolerance and respect from everyone. This seminar is a great opportunity to spend time
and have discussions with the visiting professors and the International Relations staff.
The seminar is located in Morzine, one of the most famous ski areas in the Alps.
Morzine is a village which strives to preserve its gentle pace of life and authentic
Savoyard charm.

Workshops include lectures, group work, discussions, case studies, etc.
Assessment: Written report.
Students will have to use the standard academic criteria (introduction, plan (2-3 parts,
conclusion…).
As far as the content is concerned, students have to keep in mind that it is more than a
basic descriptive report on workshops and the other activities.
Students are required to analyze and assess their experience of the week. It should be a
constructive approach of the whole seminar: in summary, we expect students to give a
personal and original approach to their experience during the stay.
Bibliography: N/A



41





2
ND
SEMESTER COURSES
2.2.2 ECONOMIC AND LEGAL ENVIRONMENT DEPARTMENT




Knowledge Management

New Global Geopolitical Challenges

Doing Business with European Countries and People




42
Knowledge Management
Semester: 2 ECTS: 2

Length of module: 20 hours

Lecturer(s): Christophe STALLA-BOURDILLON

Student learning
objectives:
1. Explaining the CI concept, being more specific about its boundaries and ethic limits,
and then explaining the way this concept has been introduced in France and in foreign
countries, in Governments and in firms since the fall of the Wall.
2. Providing students with a method, key tools, reading schedule, frames of reference to
put CI into practice, explicit ethic rules and occupational contacts to enable them to take
the best from CI contribution: put students in situation through real, sometimes
"borderline" scenarios, always close to actual experience.
3.Improving students' overall awareness and maturity level without decreasing their deep
motivation to have a job in firm.

PREREQUISITES
- Open-mindedness
- Good level in general knowledge
- Analysis capabilities, ability to see the overall picture, and anticipation
abilities
- Proficiency in English (reading, writing, spoken)
- Overcoming the World Wide Web "www"
- Good morality and "actual-experience" ethic sense

Course/module
content:
The course is organized around the six CI key pillars:
1. UNDERSTANDING AND INVESTIGATING (economic and financial environments that
are highly competitive, global, more and more sophisticated and mafia-like in order to
supply decision-makers' strategic thinking, and support action);
2. ANTICIPATING (in order to be better adaptable) ;
3. INFLUENCING (the various environments in order to better shape and control them) ;
4. SPOTTING BUSINESS AND INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITIES (innovation, mergers,
customers, markets…),
5. PROTECTING ONESELF AGAINST THE MOST SERIOUS HAZARDS (accidental
disasters and threats),
6. MONITORING THE CONQUEST OF ONE'S FUTURE (in order to become master of
one's own fate).

Teaching methods: Lectures with both a deductive approach (concept / top-down) and an inductive
approach (terrain / bottom-up), always accompanied with personal lessons learned.
Assessment: Students are likely to be required to make group lectures (with 3 to 4 students) in the
form of slideshows (7 slides / 12 minutes) during the whole session (one briefing per
student).
At the end of the session, students will take an exam as follows:
• Either a 30-page group report (with 3 / 4 students), provided with documents (to be
given one month after) ;
• Or a final written exam, aiming to assess what students have learned individually: this
exam will consist of an essay (topic of thinking), a MCQ (Multiple-Choice Questionnaire)
pertaining to the main concepts and dealt-with examples, or of a case study to deal with
(or even with a combination of these three kinds of knowledge assessments).

Bibliography: 1998, Competitive Intelligence: How to Gather, Analyze, and Use Information to Move Your
Business to the Top, Larry Kahaner..
1998, Competitive Strategy: Techniques for Analyzing Industries and Competitors, Michael E.
Porter.
2006, L'intelligence économique : la comprendre, l'implanter, l'utiliser, François Jakobiak.
2006, Pratique de la veille technologique, François Jakobiak.
2005, Intelligence Economique et Entreprise: comprendre son environnement pour agir, Jean-
Marc Beignon.


43
New Global Geopolitical Challenges
Semester: 2 ECTS: 2



Length of module: 20 hours


Lecturer(s): Alexandre MELNIK


Student learning
objectives:
To propose to students a Global Panorama of the World in its historical
evolution, today's situation and projection into future.
To determine the key challenges of the Globalization of the XXI century.
To focuse on the development of the Global Responsible Stakeholders (Poles of
Excellence) of the ongoing Globalization: US, EU, BRIC.
New winning approach for a Global Decision Maker in the new international
context of the XXI century.


Course/module
content:
I. Theoretical tools of the geostrategy:
-glossary of key words.
-genesis and historical background of the previous Globalizations.
-3 key referencies of the Globalization of the XXI century.
II. Focus of synthesis on the Driving Forces of the ongoing Globalization: US, Europe,
BRIC: strong points vs. weak points.
III. Place and role of every student, as a future Global Decision Maker, in the new
international context of the beginning of the XXI century.


Teaching methods:  Top priority given to the ability of synthesis (vs ability of analysis) in order to set
up better visibility of the international situation.
 Interactivity, general culture, individual motivation and intellectual curiosity.
 Open-minded discussion in class.


Assessment: Note of synthesis written from the point of view of a Global Decision Maker, in
correlation with a key topic of the course - 50%.
QUIZ (20 question), in conformity with the content's course - 50%.


Bibliography: Francis Fukuyama "The End of the History".
Samuel Huntington "The Clash of Civilizations".
Samuel Huntington "Who are We" (The Challenges to America's National Identity).
Thomas Friedman "The World is Flat".
Fareed Zakaria " The Post-American World".



44
Doing Business with European Countries and People
Semester: 2 ECTS: 2



Length of module: 20 hours
Lecturer(s): David SPRECHER
Student learning
objectives:
Since its creation, the European Community today known as the European Union has
been in constant move.

From a pan-national organization it has started taking into account the various regions
that compose the European patchwork and its cultural and linguistic differences as well.

The aim of this course will be the acquisition of the required tools to correctly negotiate
contracts in the “new” European Union and to handle the applicable EU rules and
regulations regarding the setting-up of European operations. An overview of the
applicable European rules to public funding as well as the adequate requirements for the
setting-up of mixed public-private consortia for the carrying-out of European projects will
be delivered. Finally the course will end with a field trip to Brussels where students will
meet with top-European decision-making people, covering all aspects of the setting-up
of European projects related to SME’s : Research and Development, Lobbying and
European Funding. The visit is organized in cooperation with European institutions and
private companies.
Course/module
content:
The characteristics of international contract negotiations.
Perception and behavioral adaptation.
The match-making process.
Basics of contractual documents in the European framework: NDA, MOU.
Highlights of European Contract Law in practice.
Introduction to local, regional, national and European public funding.
The integration of public and private funding in Europe.
The European consortium – how to do it well?
Case-study Workshop.
Field visit in Brussels.


Teaching methods:  Interactive lecture.
 Analysis and discussion of practical case studies.
 Active participation of the students.


Assessment: 50% attendance and active participation.
50% exam.


Bibliography: A reading list will be posted on the class website (accessible via aspen) at the beginning
of the semester and a series of practical documents will be made available on the
website.




45






2
ND
SEMESTER COURSES
2.2.3 FINANCE AND CONTROL DEPARTMENT


Corporate Finance

International Finance

Management Control



46
Corporate Finance
Semester:2 ECTS: 2




Length of module: 20 hours



Lecturer(s): Sandrine JACOB LEAL



Student Learning
Objectives:
The aim of this course is to enable students, as future managers, to better understand
how major financial decisions, which will inevitably affect the departments in which they
work (Human Resources, Marketing, etc.), are made. The course presents the main
concepts and tools of corporate finance.


Course/Module
content:
Financial statement analysis
Investment decision
Financing decision


Teaching methods:  Lectures
 Interactive tutorials


Assessment: Continuous assessment (50% of the final grade: MCQ and class participation)
Final exam (50% of the final grade)


Indicative
bibliography:
Marney J.P. and Tarbert H. (2011) Corporate Finance for Business, Oxford
Atrill P. (2012) Financial Management for Decision Makers, 6
th
edition, Pearson
Berk J., DeMarzo P. and Harford J. (2012) Fundamentals of Corporate Finance, 2
nd

edition, Pearson
Brigham E. F. and Ehrhardt M. C. (2002) Financial Management Theory and Practice,
10
th
edition, South-Western




47
International Finance
Semester: 2 ECTS: 2




Length of module: 20 hours


Lecturer(s): Nijhar Nigam


Student learning
objectives:
The objective of the course is to make international business students familiar with the
fundamental concepts and tools necessary to implement an effective global financial
management strategy in multinational companies. It also puts the stress on the
difference between the financial management of the domestic corporations and the
multinational ones.


Course/module
content:
Foreign exchange exposure.
Financing the global firm.
Foreign investment decisions.
Managing multinational firms.


Teaching
methods:
 Lectures.
 Interactive tutorials.



Assessment: Mid-term exam: 50%.
Final exam: 50%.


Bibliography: Fundamentals of Multinational business, M. Moffett, A.I. Stonehill, D. K. Eiteman, 2009
Multinational financial Management by Alan C Shapiro (9th edition)
International Financial Management, 5th edition, Eun and Resnick (E&R5), 2009.




48
Management Control
Semester: 2 ECTS: 2



Length of module: 20 hours


Lecturer(s): Jacques FLORENCE


Student learning
objectives:
Understand the usefulness of Controlling and its interaction with other departments within
the company.
Be in a position to implement the most used techniques in the controlling field i. e.:
o the budget construction
o the budget follow-up
o the scorecards
Understand the uses of these tools in order to measure and manage performance.


Course/module
content:
Introduction to Controlling
Budgets:
o The planning and budgetary process.
o The different budgets and their articulation.
o Budget variances and corrective actions.
o Application to production centers and sales budgets.
o Advantages and limits of budget management.
Scorecards:
o Scorecards definitions and objectives.
o Principles and implementation methodology aimed at building scorecards.
o How to use scorecards.


Teaching methods:  Mix of lectures and case studies sessions. The lectures will use teaching methods
based on understanding with cases.
 Readings and/or cases will be requested for the attendance of the courses.


Assessment: 50% participation and oral presentation.
50% final exam.


Bibliography: N/A



49





2
ND
SEMESTER COURSES
2.2.4 MARKETING DEPARTMENT

International Marketing

Marketing Business Game

Corporate Communication




50
International Marketing
Semester: 2 ECTS: 2



Length of module: 20 hours


Lecturer(s): Krish KRISHNAN


Student learning
objectives:
To gain an understanding of the theoretical framework of the international
marketing process and strategies.
To learn and acquire skills in strategic, tactical and operational decision making
about expansion into foreign markets.
To gain an understanding of the environmental factors that influence the buying
behavior of the consumers on the international market.
To learn and acquire knowledge of the differences in product / price / promotion
/ distribution tools that can be used when marketing products on an international
market.


Course/module
content:
This course is an introduction to the problems associated with managing marketing
operations in international companies. It introduces students to organization, principles,
policies, procedures, ethics, and techniques used in efficient and effective marketing of
products and supplies by business and industry in international marketing. It provides
students with concepts and ideas for solving business problems dealing with
international marketing. Topics include trends in globalization and impact on
international marketing practice, international market entry strategies, specific issues
dealing with product, price, promotion and distribution issues in international marketing
new emerging markets in Asia and Latin America. Case studies in international
marketing will be used to emphasize decision making in a global marketing setting.
Teaching
methods:
Lectures, Video Cases, International Marketing Group Exercises.


Assessment: (1) Individual Written Examination at the end of the course (50%).
(2) Group Case Report on a comprehensive international marketing case (50%).


Bibliography: Cateora, Gilly, Graham: “International Marketing”, 15th Edition, McGraw-Hill, 2010.



51
Marketing Business Game
Semester: 2 ECTS: 2





Length of module: 20 hours


Lecturer(s): Finn FRANDSEN & Winni JOHANSEN
Student learning
objectives:
After completion of this course you should:
understand the important changes concerning consumption, marketing and
society which have taken place during the last decade or so (like the rise of the
new experience economy, hypermodernity and the over-communicated society,
etc.);
be able to apply and combine new approaches to marketing;
be able to participate (compete) in the new "marketing game" launching new
products and services on the French market.

Course/module
content:
The course covers various topics within the field of marketing, ranging from
segmentation and purchasing behavior to lifestyles and brand communities, from mass
communication (advertising) to network communication (viral marketing), and from the
traditional marketing mix approach to more recent marketing approaches (like product
branding, relationship marketing, experiential marketing, tribal marketing, retro
marketing, ethical marketing, etc.)

Teaching
methods:
The course will be interactive, with lecturer presentations being followed by discussion.
The course will also include a "business game" where groups of students representing
French or international companies compete with each other

Assessment: Active class participation, report and oral presentation (including PowerPoint slides).

Bibliography: The course is based on a selection of academic texts (all in English) that will be
distributed to the students before the beginning of the course.




52
Corporate Communication
Semester: 2 ECTS: 2




Length of module: 20 hours


Lecturer(s): Finn FRANDSEN & Winni JOHANSEN.
Student learning
objectives:
After completion of this course you should:
understand the importance of creating a favorable corporate image or reputation
among both internal and external stakeholders ;
be able to work strategically with the communication of a private company in
various ways.


Course/module
content:
The course covers various topics within the field of corporate communication: corporate
branding, stakeholder management, issues & media management, change management
and reputation management.

The primary elements of the course will be:
To define the key concepts or the "building stones" of corporate communication:
corporate culture, corporate values, corporate identity and corporate image or
reputation
To follow the important evolution from product branding to corporate branding:
who is behind the product?
To introduce a stakeholder approach (relationship management): how to build
relations with both primary and secondary stakeholders?
To work with various strategic aspects of the branding proces: which branding
strategy to choose?
To work with branding tools such as corporate storytelling: how can corporate
values be "told" to both employees and customers?
To understand the challenges of change and reputation management: how can
changes and new strategies be communicated to employees and customers in an
engaging way?

Teaching methods: The course will be interactive, with lecturer presentations being followed by discussion.


Assessment: Class participation and written exam.



53





2
ND
SEMESTER COURSES
2.2.5 FRENCH, EUROPEAN AND INTERNATIONAL CULTURES DEPARTMENT

Cycle of Conferences 2

French Language Course 2

French Culture and French Civilization 2



54
Cycle of Conferences 2
Semester: 2 ECTS: 2



Length of module: 20 hours

Lecturer(s): Malika KACED in partnership with international guest speakers and business
professionals

Student learning
objectives:
1. For the set of visits:

To help students get exposure to the business reality and more precisely to
become familiar with the way typical French companies function, their activities
and clients, their products/ services and issues such as how companies plan
their strategies, how they deal with competitors and other such challenges.
To better understand the economic environment of the region and become more
acquainted with the management of companies set up in the region.
To have students discover the cultural and historical patrimony of the Lorraine
region. Often International students make the most of their free time discovering
remote places at the expense of the regional area, which is full of many
interesting places, where they will be spending many months.

2. For the set of conferences:

To give international and French students the opportunity to open their horizons
by discovering other countries by different angles such as the economy, society,
culture….
To allow students to see things and analyse them from another perspective.
To permit them to enrich their international culture and mind sight while
enhancing their cross-cultural awareness.

Course/module
content:
The cycle of conferences and visits supplement the core academic modules and
lectures. It is designed in a twofold way: company visits and visits to cultural sites, and
conferences taught by international guest speakers.

1. The visits take place on days that students don’t have classes in the programme.
One of the highlights of the visits is the European Parliament. It permits the
students to have an insight into one of the main institutions of the EU and to
further the knowledge given in certain modules in a concrete way. Other visits
permit students to discover some aspects of the region and its surrounding
areas.
2. The conferences are usually held on Thursdays and may last from 2 to 3 hours.
They focus on many different subjects in line with the curriculum. They highlight
varied branches such as the economy, society, culture….

Please note that this module is an integral part of the program and that participation in all
the visits and conferences is compulsory.
Teaching
methods:
Conferences are held in the lecture halls with all the class.
Assessment: Students will synthesize each visit and conference in a dossier which they will present as
follows:

• An introduction.
• A one-page account of each visit and conference.
• A conclusion.
One dossier per semester.

Bibliography: N/A

55
French Language Course: Beginner
Semester: 2 ECTS: 2’




Length of module: 20 hours


Lecturer(s): Sébastien PABST


Student learning
objectives:
The aims of the course are to:
Introduce students to the peculiarities of French pronunciation.
Give a basic notion of French grammar.
Lay the foundation of general-language vocabulary.
Practice everyday French parlance.


Course/module
content:
Greetings and introductions.
Nouns and numbers.
Time and date.
Family.
Meals.
Weather and Temperature.
Shopping.
Travel and holidays.
Professions.
At home / going out.
Body and health.

Teaching
methods:
The aims and contents determine the teaching and learning methods used. Some of
them will to be based on the more classical lecture-style approaches. The major part,
however, will consist of a combination of interactive group work and some elements of
what has come to be known as "suggestopedia" and "neuro-linguistic programming" or
"nlp".
Assessment: For this course to be validated regular attendance is mandatory within the general rules
and regulations of the school. In addition, participation in class activities and a final test
are required: 50% continuous assessment, 50% final examination.
Bibliography: No particular textbooks are required. The material used for the course will be provided
by the lecturer. Participants should seek advice from the course tutor before buying any
books (dictionaries, grammar books, etc)




56
French Language Course: Intermediate
Semester: 2 ECTS: 2’




Length of module: 20 hours


Lecturer(s): Linda COLACO


Student learning
objectives:
Linguistic objectives:
Formal, standard and collaquial vocabulary.
Numbers, directions, pronouns and adjectives.
Interrogation, negation and comparison.
Idiomatic expressions.
Present tense, imperative, simple future, future tense, present perfect, imperfect,
present conditional and present subjunctive.
Phonetics.

Course/module
content:
Oral comprehension/ written comprehension/ oral expression/ written expression:
Understanding French humour (jokes, expressions and sketches).
Describing one's family, other people, conditions of life, and professional
training.
Communicating at the supermarket, at the doctor's, at the post office, at the train
station, and at restaurants.
Understanding menus, train and bus schedules, short letters, and commercials.
Writing letters.
Exchanging information.
Describing the plot of a film and analysing its contents.
Telling a story.
Expressing one's opinion.
Expressing one's feeling.


Teaching
methods:
 Teaching following the C.E.C.R. guideline.
 Employment of authentic material.
 Employment of audio, visual and textual materials.
 Cognitive tools.

Assessment: 50% continuous assessment.
50% final examination.

Bibliography: No particular textbooks are required.



57
French Language Course: Advanced

Semester: 2 ECTS: 2’



Length of module: 20 hours


Lecturer(s): Stéphane GANGLOFF


Student learning
objectives:
Speaking/listening:
Initiate and maintain extended conversation on unfamiliar topics, though may need to use
circumlocution or other strategies to express ideas.

Reading/writing:
Write summaries of factual texts and literary works.
Read and understand short texts from a variety of different genres.
Make connections between characters, motives, actions and ideas presented in a literary
text.

Speaking/writing:
Express differences between real and hypothetical people/places/things/ideas/events.
React to and express a variety of complex emotions generally recognize and correct
errors when they lead to misunderstandings.
Express complex temporal/spatial relationships.
Follow extended formal and informal speech.


Course/module
content:
WRITTEN AND ORAL FRENCH WORKSHOPS
Semester 2 is a continuum of semester 1 in that the grammar aspects seen previously
will not be treated again in order to favour more interactive oral exercises and individual
written expression.


Teaching
methods:
Emphasis put on grammar overview and communication workshops.


Assessment: 50% continuous assessment.
50% final examination.


Bibliography: No particular textbooks are required. Course materials are adapted to the different
situations and authentic (newspaper articles, video, TV...).



58
French Culture and French Civilization 2
Semester: 2 ECTS: 2




Length of module: 20 hours


Lecturer(s): Malika KACED


Student learning
objectives:
The module is designed to review key aspects of France’s society and culture. It covers
a large array of topics that relate to French contemporary society and culture in order to
expand students’ knowledge of the country.
At the end of the course, students will be able to :
Demonstrate knowledge of French culture and society
Analyze critically and discuss perceptively aspects of French contemporary
culture.
Demonstrate awareness of various aspects of French social customs.
Course/module
content:
Topics will include institutions and society (education, politics, the French Republic and
its symbols, media…), essential culture features (French value orientations, beliefs,
etiquette, Art de Vivre, the French exception, French polychronism…).

Major events that have contributed to the shaping of the country will be presented and
their significance discussed. French current events and contemporary social issues will
also be discussed.
During the 1
st
semester, students will follow the Cinema Cycle, which will consist of an
interdisciplinary study of contemporary French society and culture through the medium
of films. Its aim is to trace the history of film in France and show the interconnections
between artistic expression and the historical and cultural realities of France from the
50s’ to the present, with special emphasis on the French New Wave movement with
reference to the major French directors (Truffaut, Godard…) and their influential works.

Teaching methods: Teaching methods will include lectures, workshops and other methods appropriate to
the subject being taught.
Assessment: Continuous assessment = 50%
(i.e.: Individual word-processed analytical report= 25%. Team assignment and
presentation= 25%)
End-of semester examination = 50%


Bibliography: BERNSTEIN, Richard, Fragile Glory-A Portrait of France and the French, Plume, New
York, 1990.
JACK, Andrew, The French Exception-France: Still so Special? Profile, London, 1998.
MAYLE, Peter, French Lessons, Alfred Kopf, New York, 2001.



59







2
ND
SEMESTER COURSES
2.2.6 BACHELOR THESIS

Bachelor Thesis



60
Bachelor Thesis
Semester: 2 ECTS: 4

Length of module:
Lecturer(s): Malika KACED.

Student learning
objectives:
To give students an opportunity to show their capability to apply the knowledge
and skills accumulated during the program for one fairly large subject. The
thesis is a complete exercise the objective of which is to point out the students’
readiness and maturity to adapt independently the theory and practice learned
during the program.
To provide the opportunity for students to demonstrate independence and
originality, to be able to plan and organize a project, obtain information, analyse
them, draw conclusions and make recommendations.
Course/module
content:
Students enrolled in the full-time program are required to validate the Thesis module.
They will have to conduct research on a European country, member of the European
Union.
Please note that French students have to choose another country than France as this
research project is meant to be a project of discovery of a country. In the same way,
international students from the EU are not entitled to choose their country. Indeed the
aim of this research is to enhance knowledge of European country that a student may
not be familiar with.
Students will place themselves from the perspective of an exporter willing to export a
product or a service in a given country in the EU. They will ask themselves the following
question:
- Is it worthwhile exporting my product/service in the target country?
Before actually implementing their project, they will have to analyse the country
according to different angles, e.g.: overview of the country, economy (general overview,
current problems…); political overview, current problems, society, market, culture…
They are free to choose their fields of investigation but these ones have to be chosen in
coherence with the project and studied country. They may use the PESTEL analysis
(political, economic, social factors…) or any other angle of analysis. The intercultural
analysis is also an important part of their research (is my product in adequacy with the
culture …).
Once they have analysed these elements, they will implement a SWOT analysis and
decide if they can go ahead with their project or not. ( conclusion) :

Owing to the climate of political instability, the gloomy economic outlook …, we
have to postpone our project.
All the conditions are gathered: the market of this country offers us great
opportunities; let’s go ahead…
The blend of ideal geographic location, low business barriers… create an
enticing environment but…

Teaching methods: The Bachelor thesis is to be written in groups of up to 3 students. Prior to the
implementation of the thesis, students will attend a research methodology course during
which they become familiarized with the different aspects associated with the research
process.

Assessment: 50% Written project. 50% oral defence.
The Bachelor Thesis must meet the following requirements: Statutory declaration of non-
plagiarism / Table of contents / Introduction / Different parts / Conclusion / Appendices,
Bibliography. Structured report of 25 to 30 pages. Individual assignment without oral
presentation.

Bibliography: This aspect will be tackled within the framework of the Research Methodology course
module.