IIS workstream Delivery Programme Directorate Project Lead

Investing in Prevention
at a Population Level
1 Preventative Commissioning Strategy
People
Terry Dafter / Donna
Sager
2 IPS Children and Family Services Chris McLoughlin
Targeted prevention,
early help and the
provision of specialist
services
3 Integrated Care – Adult Social Care and Health Terry Dafter
4 0-25 SEND Review
Chris McLoughlin /Phil
Beswick
5 Learning Disability Review Terry Dafter
Alternative Service
Delivery Models
6 Leisure Facilities
Place
Peter Ashworth
7 Museum and Cultural Attractions
8 Highways and Engineering Megan Black
9 New Model for Regulation Ian O’Donnell
Locality Operating
Model
10 Locality Operating Model Janet Wood
Commissioning Review 11 Solutions SK Operating Model
Megan Black / Michael
Cullen
Investing in Growth 12 Facilitating Accelerated Growth Andy Kippax
Cross-cutting
13 Information, Advice and Guidance All
Alison Blount /
Geraldine Gerrard
14 Corporate and Support Services CSS Andrea Stewart
Index of the Investing in Stockport Projects

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Investing in Stockport - Business Case


IIS Programme:
IIS Board SRO: Andrew Webb
IIS Project Lead: Terry Dafter, Donna Sager
Portfolio: Adult Care Service and Health and Wellbeing
Project Name: Preventative Commissioning Strategy

Project Board / Team Members

Donna Sager
Sarah Newsam
Vince Fraga
Nick Dixon
Gill Waters
Jo Lancaster


INVESTING
IN REFORM

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1. Project Overview

This project forms part of a strategic review of preventative commissioning in Stockport and seeks to achieve a
whole-system change in the way that preventative services are commissioned and provided. It will include the
recommissioning of some preventative services that are provided by a range of partners including the not for
profit sector, voluntary and community organisations and NHS providers.

The Council will lead the development of a single, evidence based, integrated prevention strategy for people
who are vulnerable or at risk. At its core this strategy will incorporate a number of the Council’s statutory
duties in respect of public health, adult social care, supported living and support to vulnerable children and
their families. The strategy will focus on building community capacity, increasing personal and community
resilience and supporting action to improve health and wellbeing across the community and for the individual.
Over time, commissioning will need to move from its current, service specific approach to one that is outcomes
led. In order to achieve this shift the Council will actively re-appraise the impact on outcomes of all preventive
activity and will lead to a realignment of Public Health services and those currently managed in Adults and
Children’s Social Care Services.




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2. Regulation and Statutory Considerations

The Care Act 2014 requires that Local Authorities ensure the provision of or arrangement of services, facilities
or resources to help prevent, delay or reduce the development of needs for care and support for all people in
its area, regardless of whether they have care and support needs. This applies to adults and carers.

The purpose of preventative services must be to intervene early to support individuals, help people retain or
regain their skills and confidence, and prevent need or delay deterioration wherever possible. The Care Act
draft guidance suggests that preventative support should build on and grow the resources within local
communities.

The aims of this project are consistent with the requirements currently set out in the draft guidance and Local
Authorities appear to be given freedom as to how to implement the ‘preventing, reducing and delaying need’
duty in the Act.


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3. Investment Profile

The overall investment across these services currently stands at £18.8m. We anticipate that the future
(2016/17) in investment in this area will be £16.6m In order to achieve this ambitious programme of change,
the total investment can be summarised as follows:

Pooled
Budget
Baseline 15/16 16/17
£17.0 M £15.8 M £14.6 M


Year £000s
Baseline £ 17.0 M
2015/16 £ 15.8 M
2016/17 £ 14.6 M
Beyond £ To be determined




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4. A Description of the New Service
This project described in this business case will be achieved through the large-scale recommissioning of services
currently regarded as preventative, including those funded by Adult Social Care, Supporting People, some of
those funded by Public Health and to a much lesser (and still to be determined) extent services for Children and
Young People. Many of these services are provided by the not for profit sector, voluntary and community
organisations and some NHS providers. The project will focus on remodelling three dimensions of prevention
which are:

Information, advice and supported signposting – a generic service, which offers a more intensive and tailored
service for people whose needs are greater and who require more support to find solutions or make positive
change on their own.

Vulnerable people – often individuals or families with multiple, complex issues and dependencies which could
include lifestyle/risk-taking, drugs and alcohol, domestic abuse, offending, people with mental health needs,
homelessness, care leavers, people at risk, autism.

Support for independence - people who need support to have a good quality of life & live independently with
good social and emotional wellbeing and supported to age healthily e.g. older people, people living with long-
term health conditions such as dementia, stroke, diabetes; people at risk of falls, loneliness and social isolation;
and carers.

A key aim of the project is to develop new, innovative and more effective ways of delivering local preventative
services which target adults who are already experiencing circumstances which may make them vulnerable (as
described above).

The project goal is to remodel and refocus preventative services to ensure that the people who need support
most, are quickly enabled to find solutions. The individual will be at the heart of the process and they will be
supported to identify their needs and aspirations in the round and be encouraged to consider the assets and
advantages they already have or could benefit from. Aspects of most people’s circumstances can be met at a
community level, through friends, family and community resources and when this ‘natural’ help isn’t available
to someone, preventative services will be offered, or a referral into statutory services could be made.

In summary, the fundamental aims of the project are to:

 re-shape local preventative services for adults in Stockport to ensure that preventative support makes a
targeted contribution to identifying and supporting vulnerable people, providing effective interventions
earlier, and alleviating and delaying demand on the wider care, health, homelessness and criminal justice
system;
 build community capacity and support for social action into our commissioning and adopt an approach that
seeks to increase personal and community resilience through ‘natural’ assets;
 move to a more outcomes-led approach in our commissioning which focuses on support which maintains
independence, promotes self-care and self-maintenance, which ultimately enables people to live well in
their own homes and communities for as long as possible;
 assure the Council of value for money in the deployment of public funds committed to preventing, reducing
and delaying need
 show a return on investment in terms of improved outcomes, contributing to a reduction in demand and
wider community engagement. The options for exploring this may include new contracting arrangements
such as payment by results and other ways to ensure that benefits are captured.


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In addition the Public Health Grant is being redirected to deliver on a programme of evidence based
interventions that are designed to prevent, delay and deflect activity in areas of high costs in the Local
Authority and the NHS. Some of the savings which address NHS budgets are predicated on the development of
an integrated health and social care resource strategy.

Spending within Public Health grant is also being reviewed to identify opportunities for savings that can be
made without damaging the preventative programmes upon which the achievement of the challenging targets
set for health and social care integration will depend. Savings made will be accounted for in the health promise
contracts therefore benefitting the Council cash limit.

We are exploring the possibility of recommissioning and redesigning some services that are currently provided
by the Stockport NHS Foundation Trust. This would enable further integration and alignment of these services
with some of the new Public health commissioning responsibilities.

In addition to those services where there are benefits for recommissioning, there are also some services where
financial savings can only be made at the expense of partners organisations, these may not be required if a
total social care and health resource strategy is achieved.

Overall the purpose of the project is to create a series of remodelled preventative services which are capable of
supporting and enabling tangible and positive change in an individual’s circumstances and which make the best
possible use of available Council and wider public funds.

To understand the context for this project, the Council has funded for many years services and support for
people who would not normally be able to access public funding. These services often assist with simple or low
to moderate care and support needs e.g. handy-help services, social rehabilitation, peer support for people
with low-level mental health problems, befriending, home/environmental assessments to limit falls, breaks for
carers, housing related support, generic wellbeing services etc. This wide range of activities makes a
contribution to preventing some of our more vulnerable residents from deteriorating and needing successively
more complex, intensive and expensive support.

However, many of these services have been in place on a long-standing basis, and have not all been subject to
competitive recommissioning processes or a strategic review of preventative commissioning priorities. There is
now a pressing need to ensure that preventative services in Stockport are fit for purpose going forward, when
social care and NHS budgets will be under significant pressure and the population is ageing. The Care Act also
expects Councils to ensure that support is in place to prevent, reduce or delay the need for care and support.
External commentators have reflected back to us that, given the overall picture for ASC and the local health
economy, current preventative provision needs to make a much more tangible impact than it is currently.

Other boroughs around the country have already undertaken this type of remodelling and/or recommissioning
exercise to refine and refocus local preventative support. This is what this project now seeks to achieve for
Stockport.

This project will also explore the notion of self-management – greater use of personalisation and individual
budgets so individuals can make their own arrangements and determine relevant outcomes. This is also
relevant for individuals being able to manage their own long-term conditions through better information and
networks of peer support, for instance people with dementia. There are also opportunities for personalised
commissioning and personal budgets, building on experiences in health and social care and transferring the
principle to other settings (e.g. skills, weight management, environmental improvement, transport).

This is a detailed, challenging and complex exercise which needs to achieve multiple objectives and will include:

 a root and branch review of current preventative commissioning within the scope of this project
 refocusing future commissioning on the groups, issues and methods for which there is good evidence of

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impact (i.e. which prevent, reduce or delay need)
 redesigning both how people access preventative support and what they have access to – the aim is to
improve both, making it easier and offering more integrated support
 achieve a culture change in which service providers enable, support and facilitate service users to become
self-sustaining and independent in the medium to long-term, which challenges the idea of them as
providers of ‘services’
 encouraging greater collaboration within and between the local voluntary and community sectors
 growing the reciprocal or natural support available within communities, for and by communities,
neighbours, friends, families and volunteers
 To develop both a universal and targeted offer to prevent needs escalating and reduce demand on services
 Be based on agreed outcomes and an evidence base that covers a range of needs and at risk groups

What will the new service
provide?
A person-centred preventative service (or series of services) which is
delivered in a collaborative way so that individuals benefit from an
(informal) rounded assessment which identifies their needs and will
support them to find solutions - in doing so preventing further
deterioration of the individual’s circumstances.
What hours will it operate? Services will need to be accessible Monday to Friday during normal
working hours. However, the Government expects that health and
care services will increasingly be available across a 7 day working
week. Preventative services will need to mirror this working pattern
which will mean that the new service will have to provide access or
cover over 7 days. However, this could be on the basis of an out-of
hours / emergency call-out function.
What staff will be required? This is still to be determined and may not emerge until the financial
envelope has been agreed and the tender / contracting process is
underway.
Does it involve a multi-
agency or integrated
approach?
Yes. The objective is to design preventative services which are
integrated. For instance, a person experiencing housing problems
could expect to receive a rounded and consistent assessment of their
needs (an informal and conversational assessment), which could result
in the individual receiving support with rehousing, but also a benefits
check, an appointment with a health trainer and a referral to an
employment support advisor.
Will there be any change to
current levels of service?
This is a difficult assessment to make at this stage, as some
preventative services may not continue to be provided in the same
way or at the same scale, but there may be genuine alternatives
already available to individuals within their own communities and
family circles. The intention is to support the growth of local
volunteer and community activities which make local informal support
more readily available.
Will customers notice any
change to the current service
provision?
As the purpose of the project is to remodel current provision and
ideally improve upon our current approach, there will inevitably be a
change in the way that services are delivered. The change that service
users are most likely to experience is that their needs will not be
assessed and met in isolation (a positive) and they will be assisted to
find community-level solutions to problems they are experiencing,
rather than always being offered a ‘service’. The approach will focus
on enabling people to be as self-sufficient as possible.

sources, promote community solutions and assure intelligent information sharing at the ‘front door’.

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5. How we will achieve this
14/15

Preparation / description of preventative commissioning strategy, new
service models and outcomes to be delivered

July – Oct 14
Consideration of and decisions regarding most appropriate contractual
mechanisms
July – Sept 14
Communications, change management and engagement support provided
to the voluntary sector through GMCVO
July 14 – April 15
Discussions with 3
rd
sector organisations to review business models July – Oct 14
Consultation with service user’s e.g.. Older people, people with disabilities
and those with physical, emotional and wellbeing difficulties.
August –
September 14
Completion of Equality Impact Assessment September 14
Final Business case September 14
Information provided to wider partners about the process Sept/Oct 14
Implementation of the recommissioning process Sept 14 – April 15

15/16

Provide on-going support to adapt to changing requirements and build
positive relationships with and between providers working under the new
arrangements – via GMCVO
April 15 onwards
Frequent and on-going review by commissioning partners of new
contractual mechanisms, and delivery arrangements between providers, to
consolidate the new arrangements
April 15 onwards
Potentially complete / undertake preventative commissioning processes not
finalised by April 2015
April – Oct 15
Review public health expenditure April 15 onwards

16/17

Full implementation of the new preventative commissioning strategy.

Estimated by April 16


Detail are set out in:

- Appendix 1 – Activity and Impact Schedule
- Appendix 4 – Project milestones



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6. Impact on current service model


As the proposal is to remodel existing provision, it is difficult to predict exactly what the actual impact will be,
compared to the intended impact, and there will initially need to be flexibility on the part of the newly
commissioned services and support to adapt and respond to service user needs.

The following are the intended or likely impacts of the changes:

 There will be a reduction in the total number and breadth of not for profit and formal voluntary sector
services being commissioned and therefore on offer to residents, as our commissioning will be more
focused and prioritised
 The development of the community sector is intended to off-set this reduction in preventative support
provided by the not for profit and formal voluntary sector
 Other preventative services may be remodelled or decommissioned in response to these wider changes
 Not for profit and voluntary sector providers will be required to work in a more collaborative way - sharing
expertise, premises, information and intelligence, assessment processes, and co-managing staff and wider
resources etc
 Preventative services will be much more integrated from the service user’s point of view and people’s
needs will be assessed more consistently and effectively
 Service users wishing to access services in person may have to adapt to using new premises or venues;
existing contact numbers may change; and they may have to adapt to being supported in different ways
where trusted contacts and relationships may be disrupted in the early stages of changes
 Existing preventative services which have a track record of failure / under-performance will be
decommissioned
 Duplication in commissioning will be removed, resulting in some services being decommissioned
 Some more established organisations will not be able to adapt to the changes whilst maintaining their
current form and will develop new business models and approaches accordingly
 Reductions in grant or contract values for some organisations may limit their ability to lever in other
funding sources




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7. Interdependencies

This project cannot be viewed in isolation and is linked to a number of cross cutting IIS themes:

Outcome Sub-Outcome
A) People are able to make
informed choices and look after
themselves

Peoples’ needs are met
People live well
B) People who need support get it

People are supported so that their needs can be met
People are supported to live well


This project is aligned with the evolving integrated health and social care model, delivering the ‘prevention,
independence and self-care’ work stream and supporting the ‘targeted prevention’ work stream. In the new
joint governance arrangements, this project contributes most directly to the ‘Proactive Care’ theme.

It has also drawn funding support from the Centre for Social Action Innovation Fund awarded by the Cabinet
office, a key milestone of which is to explore the application of more innovative contractual approaches with
external providers.

Given that one of the preventative dimensions described above is to commission information, advice and
supported signposting, this project will need to interface closely with the same corporate IiS theme, and the
digital theme. However, new legislation in both the children’s and adults social care arena is explicit that
legislative duties covering information, advice and guidance will not be met through the use of digital channels
alone.



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8. Stakeholders

This Business Case cannot be achieved alone and will require the support of a wide range of stakeholders. The
Management Team are working with a range of stakeholders to shape and progress this proposal. These
include:

Voluntary sector
Not for profit sector
Other preventative providers
Informal Community sector
Service users/carers
Future Service users
Local residents
Local NHS
Other public sector partners
Care Homes
Home Care
Private sector










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9. Consultation and Engagement

There will need to be proportionate consultation which gathers the views of people who may already use
existing preventative services and those who could have a dual interest. Preventative services are meant to be
universal but we will also target specifically those people most likely to need help. Key groups will be a cross
section of vulnerable people/existing service users, older people and people who need support to remain living
independently. The recommissioning exercise will commence September 2014.

The aim of the consultation will be to gain the views of how the participants think the new service could work.
The new approach and the reasons for the new service will firstly be explained followed by a simple
presentation of the theory of the new preventative service model. We will be looking to find out the
participants ideas for what it must include, what benefits or problems it could have and what would encourage
people to use the service.

Throughout the consultative process the objective will be to understand the impact the model could have on
service users and more vulnerable groups, many of whom are covered by the Equality Act, 2010.



APPENDICES
1. Activity and Impact
2. Consultation Plan
3. EIA
4. Project Milestones


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APPENDIX 1
ACTIVITY AND IMPACT SCHEDULE
Year Activity Potential Impact
2014/15
Discussions with 3
rd
sector organisations to review business
models.
Some organisations are more vulnerable and relationships
with the voluntary and community sector may be
challenging.

Intensive collaboration which will encourage the sector to
conceive new solutions and approaches
Potential for greater opportunities within local market for
voluntary and community sector organisations.
Capacity and skills to deliver such complex change across
multiple organisations
The project plan requires intensive and fast-paced change-
management, which not all partners and providers may be
able to adapt to in a timely way. Some organisations may
not have the existing skills or capacity to adapt.
Consultation with service users e.g.. Older people, people with
disabilities and those with physical, emotional and wellbeing
difficulties. EIA significant.
People understand the overall aim of the changes and why
this is important. Feedback is actively considered as part of
the commissioning and development of new services,
including the service user experience dimension.
Some public health services may be brought back in-house to Service transition may lead to temporary disruption in

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avoid management overheads. service provision
2015/16
The Council may have new providers that it will need to build
a relationship with

Some providers may lose their Council contract.
Additional time and effort is needed to foster positive
relationships, support an understanding of Stockport, and
enable providers to become quickly effective
Skills, expertise and organisations could be lost to the local
economy
Requirement for radical rethinking of public health
expenditure.
Could lead to a revised model of local public health
commissioning and delivery
Reduction in the range of services available to the public due
to more focussed commissioning.
People may no longer be able to access services they have
previously used in the same way, but alternatives will be in
place which target those most in need of support.
Refocus and greater use of personalisation End users have greater choice and control but are required
to be more independent in their decision-making, with the
support of family and carers (and professional support where
required).
2016/17
Full implementation of the new preventative commissioning
strategy.
The new commissioning model has been implemented and
there is a comprehensive but more focused local
preventative programme in place across Stockport, which is
making an effective and tangible contribution to individual
and community wellbeing by preventing, reducing and

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delaying the need for intensive health and care services.

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APPENDIX 2
CONSULTATION PLAN
Please indicate if you need to
consult internally and/ or
externally
There will need to be proportionate consultation which gathers
the views of people who may already use existing preventative
services and those who could have a dual interest e.g. on behalf
of others and themselves, such as carers

Details of who you intend to
consult and whether there will be
a geographical focus
No explicit need to take a geographical focus although efforts will
be made to encourage people from more socio-economically
disadvantaged backgrounds to take part. Preventative services
are meant to be universal i.e. for the whole population, but also
targeted specifically at those people most likely to need help.
This will steer the consultation exercise, but gathering the views
of existing service users and carers will be prioritised.

Key groups will be a cross section of vulnerable people / existing
service users, older people and people who need support to
remain living independently e.g. people with physical, sensory or
learning difficulties.

What you intend to ask them or
the aim of the consultation
The new approach and the reasons for it will be explained,
followed by a simple presentation of the theory of the new
preventative service model (as described throughout this
business case). Views will be sought on how the participants
think it could work, their ideas for what it must include, what
benefits or problems it could have and what would encourage
people to use the services.

Throughout the consultative process, the objective will be to
understand the impact the new model could have on service
users and more vulnerable groups, many of whom are covered by
the Equality Act. It will therefore inform the EIA.

What methods of consultation will
be used
Largely face to face methods, as the subject matter is too
complex to deal with via written methods.

The team that will be carrying out
the consultation
Colleagues in Adult Social Care, Supporting People and public
health.


Period of consultation

Commence mid-August through to mid-September, during which
time a number of focus groups will be convened.

What form the feedback will take This will largely be through summary discussion at the events
themselves, as the methods used allow for all participants to
share and understand the key messages.


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APPENDIX 3
EQUALITY IMPACT ASSESSMENT
Title: Preventative Commissioning Date: 22/07/2014
Stage: consultation

Lead Officer: Sarah Newsam

Stage 1: Do you need to complete an Equality Impact Assessment (EIA)?
An EIA will be undertaken as this involves a change to existing contracts and commissioned
services which work with many existing and potential service users groups are covered by
the Equality Act.
This EIA will require further development to analyse the impact on Voluntary and
Community Sector organisations (e.g. any indirect equality implications), current client
groups and their carers (e.g. engagement feedback and service user breakdown) and wider
implications in line with the health and social care integration and the care act.

Stage 2: What do you know?
Further analysis is required to inform a current picture of the service, data that will be
considered includes:
 Analysis of current clients;
 Analysis of existing service provision;
 Analysis of need (building on the JSNA)
 Best practice and national or sub-regional analysis;
 Analysis of current Voluntary and Community Sector market;
 Feedback from any previous or existing consultation or engagement activity;
 Identification of gaps;
 Identification of any emerging impacts;
 Next steps for further data analysis (e.g. consultation)


Stage 2a: Further Data and Consultation
This section will be completed upon analysis undertaken at stage.2.
At stage.2 any gaps identified will be explored further in this stage. This section will
therefore include the outcomes of any consultation and engagement activity.

Stage 3: Results and Measures

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This section will be completed to reflect and build on the learning within section.2

Stage 4: Decision Stage
This EIA is a live document and will accompany the decision at all points throughout the
process.


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APPENDIX 4

Potential milestones
Project Milestone Project Target
Date
Preparation / description of preventative commissioning strategy, new service models and
outcomes to be delivered
July – Sept 14
Consideration of and decisions regarding most appropriate contractual mechanisms July – Sept 14
Communications, change management and engagement support provided to the voluntary
sector through GMCVO
July 14 – April
15
Consultation with service users August – Sept
14
Final business case Sept
Information provided to wider partners about the process Sept/Oct 14
Implementation of the recommissioning process Sept 14 – April
15


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Investing in Stockport - Business Case
Safeguarding/Children’s Social Care /Integrated Children’s Services

IIS Programme: Investing In Prevention at a Population Level
IIS Board SRO: Andrew Webb
IIS Project Lead: Chris McLoughlin
Portfolio: Children and Young People
Directorate: People’s
Project Name: Integrated Prevention and Safeguarding Children and Family Service

Project Board / Team Members
Deborah Woodcock Head of Service, Children’s Social Care
Kate Fitzhugh Supporting Families Senior Lead
Viki Packman Head of the Integrated Children’s Service
Claire Woodford Head of Children’s Services, NHS Foundation Trust
Susan Claydon Service Manager, Supporting Families Pathway/Programme
Ged Sweeney Safeguarding Manager, Children’s Social Care
Heidi Shaw Deputy Head of Integrated Children’s Service, Substance Misuse and SfYP Lead
Helen Woolard Commissioning Support
Jane Connolly Head of Service, Child Protection, Staff and Workforce Development
Jeanette Warburton Service Manager, Children’s Social Care
Mark Hancock Service Manager, Education Psychology
Rebecca Key Deputy YOS Manager
Sarah Leah CAMHS
Stephen Dawson Service Manager, Children’s Social Care
Sue Westwood Service Manager, Fostering and Adoption
Gill Dixon Management Accountant
Geraldine Gerrard CSS Head of Business Support, People’s Directorate
Amanda Carbery CSS Project Manager
Louise Chadderton CSS Project Manager
1. Project Overview

The aim of the project is to establish an Integrated Prevention and Safeguarding Children and Family Service
that provides the highest quality support to Stockport’s most vulnerable children and families.

The ambition is to redesign and align the current Children’s Social Care system with the Integrated Children’s
Service. This will start with a pilot project in 2014/15 to transform the way we support and meet the needs of
Stockport’s most vulnerable children and families.

The Council has been on a journey over the past 3 years to transform the way it works with children and
families via the development of the Supporting Families Pathway/Multi-Agency Safeguarding Hub and the
development of the Integrated Children’s Service which has established joint service delivery with Stockport
NHS Foundation Trust. This has changed the way Stockport identifies need and strengthened integrated
working by making sure that everyone supporting children and families, work together effectively to put the
child and the family at the centre, to meet their needs and improve their lives. This work underpins the next
stage of our transformation programme.

INVESTING
IN REFORM

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The vision is that by 2017 the initiative will lead to a 20% reduction in the numbers of Looked After Children
and those subject to child protection plans at level 4 (see levels of need diagram below) as well as significant
and sustained reduction in people needing repeat support leading to a reduction in the wider children’s
workforce.

It is vital the approach is underpinned with early identification and prevention to stop children and families’
need escalating in the first place and requires joint service delivery with wider partners in the public, private
and voluntary sector.




2. Regulation and Statutory Considerations

In presenting this vision for the future the Service is mindful of the following regulatory and statutory
considerations:

Children Act 1989
Children Act 2004
Children and Families Act 2014
Care Standards Act 2000
Care Planning, Placement and Review Regulations 2010
Planning Transition to Adulthood for Care Leavers regulations 2010
Fostering Services – regulations and Minimum Standards 2011
Children’s Homes – National Minimum Standards 2011
Promoting the health and well-being of looked after children Statutory Guidance

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Local Safeguarding Children Boards Regulations 2006
Working Together to Safeguard Children - A guide to inter-agency working to safeguard and promote the
welfare of children
Local Government Act 2000
Crime and Disorder Act 1998
Apprenticeships , Skills, Children and Learning Act 2009

3. Investment Profile

The overall investment across these services currently stands at £25M. We anticipate that the future
investment in this area will be £23M in 15/16 and £20M in 16/17. In order to achieve this ambitious
programme of change, the total investment can be summarised as follows:

Year Safeguarding and
Social Care
Integrated Children’s
Service
Combined
Baseline £17,000,000 £8,000,000 £25,000,000
2015/16 £15,500,000 (1.5) £7,500,000 (0.5) £23,000,000
2016/17 £13,500,000 (3.5) £6,500,000 (1.5) £20,000,000
Beyond £ To be determined

In 15/16 the reduction in spend by £2M will be achieved as follows:-

Review of social work processes and thresholds for individual interventions, and evaluate the potential impact
of introducing a number of evidenced- informed programmes
Reducing the number of placements by:-
 Reviewing high cost, low outcome placements and all external placements: £600K
 Developing alternative provision with Stockport Homes for care leavers aged 16 plus: £100K
 Review edge of care non statutory operational costs including a review of the Supported Lodgings
Team, Short Breaks Team and Community Outreach Team and work more intensively with children
both on the edge of care as well as those that are received into care to avoid necessity for placement or
ensure those placed are provided effective rehabilitation to shorten time in care where
appropriate: £700K
 Develop the revenue stream generated within the interagency adoption fee budget area: £100K
Review of early education funding formula for 2,3 and 4 year olds: £140K
Renegotiation with schools of SLAs to support schools in meeting statutory responsibilities: £125K
Review with schools the targeted support provided for substance misuse work: £20K
Review of operational budgets across the services comprising Integrated Children’s Service (including Children’s
Centres), to benefit from efficiencies achieved by integration: £125K
Review of Children’s Centre provision and staffing redesign – potentially 5 FTE £90k

In 16/17 the reduction in spend by £3M will be achieved as follows:-

After close scrutiny of the new service model and detailed financial modelling and projections in 15/16 it is
anticipated that the 16/17 reduction will be able to be met as there will be significantly fewer children and
young people reaching child protection levels and placed into care. This reduction in demand will lead to
reduced placement costs and a reduction in the wider children’s workforce. A further business case will be
presented to the Executive in Summer 2015 to evidence the reductions in Council spend in 16/17.


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4. A Description of the New Service
The new Integrated Prevention and Safeguarding Children and Family Service will ensure that Children and
Families in Stockport receive an intensive seamless service at the point at which they need it. The Service will
have responsive, skilled, fully integrated teams that cover the four Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG) locality
areas in Stockport. The service will have a strong locality approach with a key focus on working closely with all
critical partners especially schools, employment and skills, GPs, local policing teams, and other neighbourhood
resources to serve children and young people more effectively. By integrating universal and targeted services
around localities the service will reduce barriers to timely and effective work.
The new service will be easier for families to navigate, families in need will not have to repeat their story to
multiple professionals, information will be readily available to families - to enable those who are able to do so,
to self-serve and will provide intensive support to the most vulnerable families to help them regain their
independence as quickly as possible.

The Project will ensure that families with complex needs have a Lead Professional (‘key worker’) working with
them who can build a trusting and effective relationship to address issues, rather than referring families to
multiple agencies and departments. The Common Assessment Framework and the Team around the Child and
Family approach will be embedded across all agencies. The Common Assessment Framework links prevention
and early intervention to more specialist services. Our commitment to the Lead Professional (key worker)
model will ensure that services are coordinated around the needs of the child and family.
The core aim is to improve outcomes for families, children and young people at risk of:
• Poor attendance, exclusion from school, antisocial behaviour, child sexual exploitation, reception into care
and not making a successful transition into adult life
• Not being able to maximise their capacity for independent living
• Adopting and sustaining risky and poor health behaviours that could lead to a reduced life expectancy
• Poor early years’ outcomes
• Unemployment and economic disadvantage
The service will ensure a strong focus on safeguarding, prevention and early identification of needs with clear
packages of support to children and families by radically re-thinking how prevention services are configured
and delivered. This is an aspirational approach that does not stop in 2017.
Community solutions underpin this approach; intensively supporting the most vulnerable people to deal with
emerging problems and regain their independence as quickly as possible.
If the pilot carried out in 15/16 is successful, the aim will be to use the learning to inform how it will be rolled
out across the Borough – this will be subject to a further business case in Summer 2015.
, promote community solutions and assure intelligent information sharing at the ‘front door’.
5. How we will achieve this
The Council with Partners will radically re-think how prevention services and safeguarding services are
configured and delivered.

The Troubled Families programme/Supporting Families Pathway/Multi Agency Safeguarding Hub will remain
central to this work and will facilitate further exploration of the full range of delivery models in existence across
the public, private and voluntary sector to understand commonality and duplication. This will include the
examination of existing/parallel structures and performance frameworks that have shared outcomes
e.g. Neighbourhood management structures; Community Safety structure; Support and Pathways into work;
Training and Skills offer; Life Leisure; Adult Services, Supporting People, Stockport Homes; Public Health, 0-25
SEND and Inclusion Support Services; Private and Voluntary sector provision and the available resources used

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by schools.

In order to achieve the ambitious programme of change the Council and its partners will:

1. Review 10% (30 placements) of the high cost, low outcome placements by end of September 2014,
followed by a review of all external placements by December 2014. The review will be supported by
colleagues across the system who can deliver skilled interventions with children and families to achieve
identified care plans for young people.

2. Undertake an in depth multi-systemic review of five high cost placements of young people 10-13 that
looks at their trajectory into the care system by December 2014. Care plans and the actions against
them will be evaluated to determine whether there is any efficiency that can be identified that may
require a re-working of priorities, the unblocking of potential solutions or additional resource to
achieve a speedier resolution. We will look at how the cases came into Children’s Social Care and how
we might have done things differently. This work will inform the way in which we shape, model and
sustain services, going forward.

3. Undertake detailed modelling and tracking in 2014 to identify and support children at greatest risk of
coming into care as adolescents and to use this information to re-design key aspects of children’s social
work. This work is to be completed by December 2014

4. Carry out an integrated pilot, to test new ways of working, which will commence by December 2014;
this will release a Children’s Social Care team manager and Social Work resource into one of the
Integrated Children’s Service locality areas to test delivering services differently, to a cohort of complex
families and children and young people on the edge of care. Core elements will include:

• A resource of Social Workers from both Children’s Social Care (CSC) and the Integrated Children’s
Service (ICS) will hold potentially high cost, low outcome cases in the locality.
 The Safeguarding Unit will underpin the work by providing support to all key agencies ensuring children
are safeguarded and that Looked after Children’s care and social work practice is of high quality. An
Independent Reviewing Officer will be seconded to the pilot to test new ways of working.
• The work will facilitate the modelling of the future integration with ICS at scale
• The locality area chosen will be freed up to take a creative and flexible approach to case management,
including wider flexibilities within the current Section 17 budget to be used to avoid higher cost
placements.
• The locality will trial the delivery of systematic support and resource to reduce the risk of reception into
care and to develop a rigorous model of rehabilitation activity where placement is not in the best
interest of the child/young person.
• The pilot will develop different approaches to Child Protection, including a ‘strengths based’ model.
This will include an investigation of the Signs of Safety approach – looking at best practice around
strength based methodology.
• It is proposed that the changes will allow for better use of expertise and evidence, and mean
professionals spend more time with children and families.
• The pilot will act as a blueprint for further changes to social work services and other areas focused on
practice, rather than process.
• The pilot will inform the Troubled Families workforce development strategy at a Greater Manchester
level.

5. Virtually Align Children’s Social Care with the four ICS locality areas by December 2014 and scale up
successful new ways of working.
Undertake a review of non statutory edge of care operational costs and delivery models by March 2015
6. Implement a workforce development programme at scale to develop an approach which would engage
the whole workforce to deliver a Stockport approach using a strengths based model delivered across the

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broad range of family issues. This will start in September 2014 with ambition to be fully implemented by
September 2015.

7. Undertake a review and renegotiation of our current service level agreements with schools and the
Schools Forum to discuss with Headteachers the most effective role for the council in supporting schools
to fulfil their legal responsibilities, but ensuring full cost recovery to the council where appropriate. This
will be completed by March 2015.

8. Review the level of funding for Early Education and Childcare across all providers, undertaking
consultation with key stakeholders to ensure that there is a fair balance to support sustainability across
the sector, and the funding is most effective. The focus will be consistent with the Council’s key role in
providing information advice and guidance to parents to enable them to make informed choices for their
children, and working with the sector to support the Council’s overall priorities. This will be implemented
by March 2015.

9. Building on the establishment of the Integrated Children’s Service during 2014, we will review the
current early years and children’s centre provision across Stockport to enable the most effective service
to children and families within the available resources, and that this is prioritised to those most in need.
We will consult with all key stakeholders to investigate a range of options for Children’s Centres,
including redesigning to become Children and Families Centres. This will be completed by August to
December 2014 with an ambition to implement by April to September 2015

10. Redesignate the offer to children and families in line with the Greater Manchester Public Service Reform
Programme – this will require different roles, functions, processes, practices and skill base. This may lead
to a reduction in the workforce by 2016.

11. Supporting Families Pathway/Multi Agency Safeguarding Hub – we will develop the front door digital in
interface to incorporate an easy to use ‘one public service’ approach that builds on the Supporting
Families Pathway/Multi agency Safeguarding Hub and has the service user at the heart by September
2015.

12. The Troubled Families cost calculator evaluation tool will be used to build in an understanding of the
costs and the benefits of investment in early intervention will inform commissioning and
decommissioning in relation to Stockport’s Prevention and Early Help offer, particularly investment in
services which have an evidence base that prevent the escalation of need. This work will commence in
September 2014 and run for the duration of the transformation programme.

13. Review the delivery model of accommodation for young people 16 plus with input from Stockport
Homes by March 2015.

14. Ensure that skilled business support is deployed to enable social workers to focus on delivering high
quality support and interventions to children and families by March 2105.

Appendix 4 outlines the project milestones.




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6. Impact on current service model



The proposal will radically re-think how we deliver services to children and families - the core aim is to provide
better services that respond to the level of need and/or risk faced by the child that enables better outcomes for
children and families.

The impact of changing the current service model is outlined below:

 Employees (Council and health)

o Input and support will be required from:
o Estates and Asset Management regarding relocation and colocation of staff as well as
appropriate meeting and interview rooms,
o Information and Communications regarding development of the ICT infrastructure to
enable both Council and Partner agencies online access to case management
documentation, and marketing and communications support,
o People and Organisational Development support for Workforce Development and HR
advice,
o Business Support for administrative support for the project itself as well as the collocated
teams. In addition, advice and guidance on Information Governance issues,
o Legal advice for any litigation queries,
o Financial support for modelling and cost benefit analysis,
o STaR regarding any contractual negotiations and savings or efficiencies that could benefit
the service.
o Longer term vision of the programme is that this should increase efficiency across the integrated
workforce, freeing up time to enable the workforce to work intensively with vulnerable families
with significant needs
o The proposal requires systemic cultural and behavioural change for service providers. The system
will only change when people think and see in new ways, therefore the proposal is reliant on being
able to influence, persuade and negotiate changes to front-line processes and practice; a significant
proportion of which are not under the control of the services leading the work.
o This will require very clear communication and access to materials/resource to support staff,
managers and organisations to understand the changing landscape and what is expected from their
area of work as well as that of others.

 Children and Families

o More joined up service – less duplication – people telling their story once
o Consistency in service provision - one key worker co-ordinating their support
o The proposal requires cultural and behavioural change for service users – greater emphasis on
individuals taking control – shaping and articulating their needs, desired outcomes and support
requirements.
o Families will know where to get support and navigate the system easier

 Voluntary and Community Sector

o The need to grow capacity and develop skills and knowledge to meet the needs of the new
service model

 Independent Sector

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- There will be opportunities for the redesign of some service areas that will be explored with a
range of partners including the Independent Sector.
 Health
o There will be further discussions with Stockport NHS Foundation Trust to ensure sound
financial planning and to agree the implications for proportionate share of the savings.

 Government agencies
o Negotiation with the Department for Education will be a priority to clearly communicate the
Stockport approach, to ensure an understanding of the benefits of the proposed integration, at
all levels, to meet the needs of Stockport’s Children and Families.
o There is a risk of capital claw back by the DFE for sites ceasing to be Children’s Centres. This will
be addressed by ensuring that all statutory Children’s Centre Services continue to be delivered
from Children and Family Centres. With the establishment of the Integrated Children’s Service
there is joint management by Council and health staff of integrated teams.

Appendix 2 explains the core activities of the project and what the impact will be.

An equality impact assessment will be considered and carried out as part of the process to ensure that actions
are put in place to mitigate any disproportionate impact on equality groups. See Appendix 4 for details.
(currently being prepared)

7. Interdependencies

This project cannot be viewed in isolation and is linked to a number of cross cutting Investing in Stockport
themes:

Information, Advice and Guidance

Fundamental to the new system is accurate, appropriate and timely advice, information and guidance.
Universal through to targeted and specialist services will require knowledge of all provision available to local
residents. We will require providers of services to be able to access details of service provision, self-referral or
referral routes and named contacts. The information should be digital by design. Service users should be able
to access information advice and guidance on local services, eligibility (and possible passport to other
services/benefits) and referral routes through both digital media and face to face for the more vulnerable
groups.

Digital by Design

The new model relies heavily on the use of digital media and other ICT developments, including:

 Integrated and aligned systems – launch of the eCommon Assessment Framework (CAF) giving
accessibility to a number of trusted and trained support organisations including schools as well as
aligned systems where we are not yet able to integrate e.g. Police systems
 The development if the Stockport Health Record where health and social care information will be
accessible to health and local authority professional staff
 Developing a central web presence to support both front-line staff and service users in identifying what
support is available and how to access or refer to more specialist support and assistance.

The project also closely relates to and incorporates other projects or work including:

• Prevention Services Strategy and re-commissioning Project

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• Health and Well-Being Strategy
• Public Service Reform Programme
• Supporting Families Programme
• Domestic Abuse Strategy
• Greater Manchester Early Years PSR Programme
• Prevention and Early Help Strategy
• New Belongings Pilot (Care Leavers)
• Children and Young People’s Strategic Plan
• Stockport Safeguarding Board Strategy
• 0-25 Education Health and Care Plan Strategy
• Joint Strategic Needs Assessment (JSNA)



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8. Stakeholders

This Business Case cannot be achieved alone and will require the support of a wide range of stakeholders. The
Management Team are working with a range of stakeholders to shape and progress this proposal. These
include:
Children in care
Staff – Integrated Children’s Services and Supporting Families Pathway
Parents
Children’s Safeguarding Board
Children’s Trust
Children in Care Council
Schools
Early Education and Childcare providers
Elected Members
Corporate parenting group
Voluntary and Community Sector
Children’s Homes
Stockport NHS Foundation Trust
Stockport Homes
Greater Manchester Police
Stockport Clinical Commissioning Group
Colleges
Health Partners
Adult social care
Employment and skills services
Independent providers
Corporate and Support Services


9. Consultation and Engagement

This Project will require formal consultation and engagement as it involves the development of a new delivery
model which will lead to the reconfiguration of existing staffing arrangements.

A Consultation Plan is attached at Appendix 1.



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APPENDICES
1. Consultation Plan (attached)
2. Activity and Impact (attached)
3. EIA (attached)
4. Project Milestones (attached)




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Appendix 1
Consultation
Please provide a rationale for choosing whether to consult or inform
If you intend to consult, please complete the table below:
Please indicate if you need to
consult internally and/ or
externally



Consultation internally and externally

Details of who you intend to
consult and whether there will be
a geographical focus
Consultation with:
- Staff
- Parents
- Local communities
- Early Years and Childcare providers
- Head teachers
- Partners
- Elected Members

What you intend to ask them or
the aim of the consultation
14/15

Reviewing the current early years and children’s centre provision
– consultation with stakeholders to investigate a range of options
including reviewing the use of children centre sites and re-
designing them to become Children and Families Centres. (August
to December 14)

Consultation with key stakeholders to review the level of funding
for early education and childcare across all providers to ensure
funding is most effective and there is a fair balance to support
sustainability across the sector.(August to December 2014)

Engagement/consultation on the pilot to be carried out in 15/16

15/16
Engaging and consulting with stakeholders on the proposed new
integrated service model

What methods of consultation will
be used
Focus groups
Online questionnaire
Paper questionnaire
The team that will be carrying out
the consultation
Officers in the Integrated Children’s Service with support from
Policy, Performance and Reform
Period of consultation

August 2014 onwards
What form the feedback will take Meetings, written, reports, verbal


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APPENDIX 2
ACTIVITY AND IMPACT SCHEDULE
Year Activity Potential Impact
2014/15
Pilot integrated delivery model to test new ways of working in
one locality to a cohort of complex families and children and
young people on the edge of care and use this learning to
inform the roll out to a Stockport-wide model
Cohort of families in the Pilot have their needs identified
earlier and are provided with intensive support to stop needs
escalating further.
Learning from the Pilot will be used for the rollout across the
Borough
Reduction in the number of children and young people
reaching child protection levels and placed into care.
Review and re-commission 10% of high cost-low outcome care
packages and all externally placed Looked after Children.
A reduction in external placements
Review 5 high cost placements of young people aged 10-13
Efficiencies identified, re-working of priorities, unblocking of
potential solutions/additional resource to achieve a speedier
solution.

Virtually align Children’s Social Care with the four ICS locality
Learning from the Pilot will be used for the rollout across the
Borough Learning from the Pilot will be used for the rollout

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Scale up successful new ways of working Learning from the Pilot and reviews will be used to shape
practice across the Borough, and inform increased integrated
working with all partners




Review Accommodation options for looked after young
people aged 16 plus with input from Stockport Homes
Improved accommodation offer for Care Leavers aged 16
plus
Detailed negotiation with universal and targeted services
Informed workforce who are able to contribute to the
development of the new service model
Communication, support, guidance and training for front line
practitioners in the new ways of working
Skilled workforce to meet the needs of the new service
model
Consultation on the Proposal to re-designate some or all of
the Children’s Centre provision to re-align available resources
to support children and families more holistically
Redefining of Children’s Centres to become children and
family centres, with the potential change of use for some
Children’s Centre Sites, ensuring the essential universal and
priority work is delivered
Consultation with Early Years sector on funding formula for Transfer of current council costs for administering payments

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early education for early education to be covered by the government grant
to the Council in line with most other local authorities
Review current service level agreements with schools
Ensure the most effective role for the Council in supporting
schools to fulfil their legal responsibilities
2015/16
Implement the full integration of Integrated Children’s Service
and Children’s Social Care
Longer term vision of the programme is this should increase
efficiency across the integrated workforce
Implement a workforce development programme at scale to
deliver a ‘Stockport’ approach using a strengths based delivery
model.
Skilled workforce
Review the current early years and children’s centre provision Potential closure of some Children’s Centres sites
Review process, practices and performance on reducing levels
of child protection plans and Looked after Children – to
include feedback from service users and providers
Looked after children are supported better through the
introduction of effective processes and practices.
Develop the front door digital interface building on the
SFP/MASH
Intelligent information sharing systems in place across
partners
Re-designate the offer to children and families This will require different roles, functions, processes and
skills base – this could lead to a reduction in the workforce
by 2016.

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Review other options to reduce costs if the proposed changes
don’t realise the reduction in demand on high cost Children’s
Social Care Commissioning and intervention.
Alternative model of delivery.
2016/17
Full implementation of an integrated prevention and
safeguarding children and family service
20% reduction in the numbers of Looked After Children and
those subject to child protection plans at Level 4 as well as
significant reduction in people needing repeat support. This
reduction in demand will lead to reduced placement costs
and a reduction in the wider children’s workforce.




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Potential milestones
Project Milestone Project Target
Date
CLT initial reading of the proposals (re-work proposal based on feedback) 15
th
July 14
Lib-Dem Briefing 26
th
July 14
Executive 12
th
Aug 2014
Consultation on the Children’s Centre proposals Aug – Dec 14
Final Business case Dec 14
Review 10% (30 placements) of the high cost low outcome placements July - Sept 14
In depth longitudinal review of 5 high cost placements (informing early intervention trigger
points and best practice intervention for front-line staff)
Aug - Sept 14
Work with Stockport Homes to identify new sites for supported living accommodation and
tenancies for looked after children from 16+
July - Sept 14
Introduction of new evidence based methodologies for those on the edge of social care (early
help) and on the edge of care proceedings (children in need)
Outcome based measures gathered and assessed to translate into whole workforce training
on family support the ‘Stockport Approach’
Nov 14


Nov 14
onwards
Review of all external placements Sept - Dec 14
Final Business case Dec 14
Evaluation of integrated pilot of ICS and CSC - model prototype developed for full roll out Mar 15
Review and renegotiation of Service Level Agreements with Schools ensuring principles of full
cost recovery applied
Mar 15
Review level of funding for early years and childcare providers Mar 15
Review and consultation on Children’s Centre provision Dec 15
New model of CC designation and delivery April 15
Virtual alignment of CSC and ICS will move to full integration with 4 locality hubs April 16
Sign Off
Submitted by Name Date Signed Off
Project Lead
Project SRO
IiS Programme Board
Executive Councillor
Executive



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Appendix 3

Title: Integrated Prevention and
Safeguarding Children and Family
Service
Date: 28 July 2014
Stage: consultation/ draft/ final
(delete as applicable)
Lead Officer: Kate Fitzhugh/Deborah
Woodcock/Viki Packman

Stage 1: Do you need to complete an Equality Impact Assessment (EIA)?
Not all policies will require an EIA: these key questions will help you to decide
whether you need to conduct an EIA (see guidance notes at the end of this form).

An EIA is required for this Project as it involves a service re-design. The project aims to
specifically support the Council’s following Equality Objectives:
 (#1) Improving life chances, opportunities and aspirations for all by tackling
inequalities across our borough – specifically looking at inequalities for vulnerable
children and families and Looked after children.
 (#3) Improving access to information about services and public spaces by increasing
the clarity of what we do, how we do it and how it can be accessed – specifically
through the Supporting Families Pathway and workforce development.
 (#4) Giving the people of Stockport equal opportunities to identify & voice their needs
and participate in developing and delivering services – through co-producing a new
model of service for vulnerable children and families.
However, it is anticipated that the Project will impact on the following Protected
Characteristics:
 Disability; (in relation to people accessing services)
 Age; (in relation to people accessing services)
 Gender; (in relation to existing staffing demographics)
As well as the protected characteristics outlined above the following group has also been
identified as potentially being impacted upon due to the implementation of a new
integrated service:
 Socio-economic (in relation to client and staffing demographics) - Professional
assumptions understand that social deprivation and low income cuts across a
number of protected characteristics, for example women are proportionally more
likely to be in part-time or low paid work.

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Analysis of emerging learning from the suggested pilot alongside feedback from engagement
will deepen our understanding of the nature of this impact and seek to understand
appropriate mitigating measures, including the way the new integrated service is designed
and developed.


Stage 2: What do you know?
An EIA should be based upon robust evidence. This stage will guide you through
potential sources of information and how to interpret it. Understanding the current
context is a key stage in all policy making and planning (see guidance notes at the end
of this form).

Data sources that will be considered include:
 Profiling Stockport
 Diversity and Equality Annual Report
 Ethnic diversity service data
 Performance data
 Staff data profiles
 Service user profile data
 Financial data
 Pilot projects
 JSNA data hub.

Specific areas that will be looked at include:

 Analysis of current looked after children
 Analysis of vulnerable families;
 Analysis of existing support/interventions available;
 Best practice and national or sub-regional analysis;
 Staff profile and skills mix;
 Analysis of current market;
 Feedback from any previous or existing consultation or engagement activity;
 Identification of gaps;
 Identification of any emerging impacts;
Next steps for further data analysis (e.g. consultation)

We will be identifying data sources available in relation to the above; where there are gaps
identified we will be considering what consultation /data gathering will be required.

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Stage 2a: Further Data and Consultation
If you feel that the data and past consultation feedback you have is not sufficient to
properly consider the impact before a decision is made then you may wish to
supplement your evidence base with more data or further consultation. This should
be proportionate to the scale of the decision and will depend on the gaps in your
current understanding (see guidance notes at the end of this form).
This section will be completed upon analysis undertaken at stage.2.
At stage 2 any gaps identified will be explored further in this stage. This section will
therefore include the outcomes of any consultation and engagement activity.




Stage 3: Results and Measures
As a result of what you have learned in Stage 2 what will you do to ensure that no
group is unfairly and unlawfully impacted upon as a result of the proposed
change(s)? (see guidance notes at the end of this form)

This section will be completed to reflect and build on the learning within section.2


Stage 4: Decision Stage
Once your plan/policy is fully developed it will need to go through the correct scrutiny
and approval channels: the EIA should be included as part of this (see guidance notes
at the end of this form).
This EIA is a live document and will accompany the decision at all points throughout the
process.


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Investing in Stockport - Business Case


IIS Programme:
IIS Board SRO: Andrew Webb
IIS Project Lead: Terry Dafter
Portfolio: Adult Care Services; Health and Wellbeing
Project Name: Integrated Health and Social Care

Project Board / Team Members
Terry Dafter
Sally Wilson
Joan Beresford
Roger Roberts (CCG)
Michelle Lee (FT)
Elaine Whittaker
Holly Rae

This will also include representation from the Voluntary and Community Sector and GP Federation.


INVESTING
IN REFORM
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1. Project Overview
The vision is for an integrated and joined up service health and care service with one pathway into services
wrapped around the individual. Building on the lessons from Stockport One the aim will be to have one
assessment, one care record, one key worker and one integrated team of professionals from all backgrounds.

The model is predicated on integrated teams based around four General Practice locality hubs. These will form
the focus for all general community health and social care services. The programme is currently developing the
customer journey, pathways and locations for the services that form part of the hub as well as those linked and
aligned to the hub.

The ambition is that locality hubs will offer a broad range of services, including; community health and social
care services, pro-active identification and management of people who are at high risk of readmission to
hospital, rapid response, co-ordinated management of people with complex needs, information and advice,
peer support, outpatient services, tests and investigations. The intention is to offer a comprehensive approach
to the whole of the local population including the community and voluntary sector and access to universal
services. As such self-care will be a fundamental principle.

A draft Equality Impact Assessment for this project is attached at Appendix 3 and will be further developed in
line with consultation.


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2. Regulation and Statutory Considerations
The following pieces of legislation, statute and national policy direction have a direct impact on the design and
sustainability of any new integrated Health and Social Care model:

 Care Act 2014:
o Finance – medium to longer term costs resulting from deferred payments and payments cap.
o Activity – potential increase in assessment and care management activity around carers and
self-funders. This is particularly an issue in the short-term and likely to have an impact on multi-
disciplinary teams.
o Finance – medium to longer term costs resulting from deferred payments and care accounts
which will result in a payments cap. Expected increase in requirement for financial
assessments.
o Activity – anticipated increase in assessment requests linked to potential changes in eligibility,
self-funders and carers. Models of assessment may need to be reviewed to respond to the
ethos of the Act and likely demand. This is likely to have an impact on multi-disciplinary teams.
o Information, advice, advocacy – increased expectations of the range of information and advice
available, including financial advice. A diversity of formats for information and advice to meet
individual needs including disability and ethnicity. Advocacy services to be available for people
throughout the process of having contact with the local authority where services and support is
being requested.
o Community support – emphasis on the development of ‘asset based’ community support. Links
with the requirement to ‘prevent, reduce, and delay needs’.
o Carers – new responsibilities for offering advice, services and support to carers including when
the ‘cared for’ person is not ‘eligible’ for services
o Personalisation – good practice linked to self-directed support now a requirement, with
expectations of giving people control throughout the process, transparent sharing of personal
budgets, support planning and Reviews linked to achievement of well-being outcomes.
Expectations of having a single holistic plan which brings together health and social care. Link
with the introduction of personal health budgets.
o Transition – expectations for children transiting to adult services; linked to statutory changes
affecting children’s services
o Commissioning, market development and market failure – changes in commissioning behaviour
to develop a diversity of provision available for people to choose. Changes to ‘top up’
arrangements for care home and community services. New requirement to step in, in the case
of provider failure to ensure continuity of care.
o Safeguarding – parity of esteem with Children’s Safeguarding will bring further operational
pressures

 Healthier Together – reconfiguration of hospitals across Greater Manchester part of a national drive to
reduce increasing costs within the acute sector;
 Existing Health and Adult Social Care legislation and frameworks which determine the Council’s
statutory responsibilities with regards to service provision and client groups.

Further interdependencies are outlined below including links to related projects.


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3. Investment Profile

The overall investment across these services currently stands at £45.5m. We anticipate that the future
(2016/17) in investment in this area will be £29.9m. In order to achieve this ambitious programme of change,
the total investment can be summarised as follows:

Year £000s
Baseline £45.5m
2015/16 £37.7m (£7.8m reduction)
2016/17 £29.9m (£15.6m aggregated reduction)
Beyond £TBC

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4. A Description of the New Service
Future Service Model
As outlined in the summary above, the model builds on having integrated teams based around four locality
hubs based on General Practice. These will form the focus for all general community health and social care
services and would be underpinned by an integrated commissioning budget allocated to each locality on a
pooled basis. The customer journey, pathways and locations for the services that will form part of the hub as
well as those linked and aligned to the hub now needs to be developed.
The objectives of an integrated service are to:

 To build a new integrated health and social care model for Stockport over the next two and a half
years, that is based on multidisciplinary integrated teams in the four localities
 To create an integrated hub in each locality (based upon the CCG footprint of four localities) which will
form the focus for the whole population requiring health and social care services
 To create seamless access to services in the locality hubs
 To develop one shared care record across health and social care
 To establish pro-active identification and management of people who are identified as having complex
health or care needs
 To review and expand Section 75 pooled budgets and establish integrated commissioning budgets

Methodology of change
This programme aims to deliver a whole-scale culture change both internally and externally to reduce
dependency on high cost health and social care interventions.

Fundamentally this will involve a review of existing spend to:
• A shift of resources from the acute (i.e. Hospital) sector to community based services. The details
and practicalities of this are under discussion.
• Integrated community based services, ensuring a more joined up approach across different
practitioners which would in turn reduce duplication.
• Review and reconfiguration of staffing across key provider partners to develop an integrated team.
• Emphasise on prevention and proactive identification to reduce demand for high packages of care
or health intervention.
• Emphasis on self-care in order to enable individuals to manage their own care independently or
within the community.

Benefits
Benefits of the programme are considered on a health and social care economy-wide basis:

• Reduction in the number of people unnecessarily accessing secondary care services, in particular
via the emergency department, leading to substantial financial savings within the acute sector;
• Benefits to people and their carers will include a reduction in the de-fragmentation and duplication
of services. This will not only lead to a more effective service for people and their carers but also a
financial saving from addressing duplications;
• Integrated support to people and their carers to die in the place of their choice;
• Improved wellbeing and feeling of control for people through the implementation of People
Powered Health principles;
• More joined-up support for people living in care homes;
• Integrated care records to reduce duplication
• Increased staff satisfaction resulting in improved efficiency and reduced staff turnover.

At present it is unclear that savings achieved through hospital deflections will be used to support services
within the community. Further work is required to model deflections and agree the distribution of savings
across the economy.
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Operational Hours 7 Day Working will operate. The exact details of this (and
hours) are still to be determined.
Staff Requirements Outlined within the staffing section.
Multi-agency or Integrated
Approach?
Both, an integrated locality team is a fundamental aspect to
the model. However, for this model to be sustainable, clearer
links and routes need to be made to teams or services
(including independent providers) outside of the locality
team.
Will there be any change to current
levels of service?
The vision of the programme is to reduce service
consumption within the acute sector and affect demand for
high cost adult social care by enabling individuals to self-care
and access low level support within the community. As such
the longer term would see a reduction in service levels.
Will customers notice any change to
the current service provision?
Not a change in level of service, but a change in who they are
receiving support from (e.g. Independence workers or other
locality team members)

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5. How we will achieve this
To achieve a new integrated service delivery model, this project will involve a review of existing spend to
enable a shift of resources from the acute (i.e. Hospital) sector to community based services and a review and
reconfiguration of staffing across key provider partners into an integrated service with a greater emphasis and
investment on prevention and self-care.

Headline Milestones for the Programme are outlined below:

2014/15
• Phase 1: Alignment of services in first hub (Marple & Werneth)
– Initial staffing alignment. There are no staffing reductions anticipated in this phase.

• Phase 2: Integration of services in first hub (Marple & Werneth)
– Continued staffing alignment and team integration. There are no staffing reductions
anticipated in this phase.

2015/16
• Phase 3: Alignment and Integration of services in 3 remaining locality hubs and borough wide review of
specialist services
– Staffing review and reconfiguration in order to deliver an integrated service. There are no
staffing reductions anticipated in this phase.
- Saving targets set against this year are expected to be met through a £3m transfer from the
NHS (Better Care Fund) and through deflections and contribution from the wider Health and
Social Care economy to support transition to a new service. Negotiations are underway with
Stockport CCG regarding deflections and contributions from the acute (i.e. hospital) sector
resulting from the implementation of a new integrated locality model.

2016/17
 Phase 4:
- Recommissioning exercise of existing contracts.
- Outcome of staffing review and reconfiguration to be implemented. It is unclear at this stage
whether there will be any reductions in staff levels.
- Negotiations are underway with Stockport CCG regarding deflections and contributions from
the acute (i.e. hospital) sector resulting from the implementation of a new integrated locality
model.

Further detail is set out in:

- Appendix 1 – Activity and Impact Schedule
- Appendix 4 – Project milestones


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6. Impact on current service model

The impact of changing the current service model is outlined below:

• Employees (Council)
o In the short-term there will be a need for additional capacity to transition into the new model of
delivery. This should also not be seen in isolation of other capacity requirements for social work teams
including; implications of the Care Act; implementation of the Resource Allocation System (RAS); ageing
population; review of safeguarding and anticipated demographic challenges, particularly in Older
Peoples Services.
o However, the longer term vision of the programme is this should increase efficiency across the
integrated workforce, freeing up time which would enable them to work with those individuals with
significant needs who require formal health or care support.

• Carers and Individuals
o More joined up service – less duplication – people telling their story once;
o Greater emphasis on individuals taking control - shaping and articulating their care needs, desired
outcomes and support requirements;
o Consistency in service provision (one key worker coordinating their care)
o People feel more connected to their local community

• Voluntary and Community Sector
o Potential for greater opportunities within local market for voluntary and community sector
organisations.
o The need to grow capacity and develop skills and knowledge to meet the challenges of the new service
model.

• Independent Providers
o Likely increase in demand.
o Potential for new opportunities for service developments requiring potential additional capacity, skills
and knowledge.
o Greater role in shaping new model.
o Potential new entrants coming into the market

• Health
o Initial modelling on the financial impact surmounting from deflections from Emergency Department are
outlined below:
PARR Category Cohort size Engagement
Rate
Deflection Rate Combined Rate Cost Savings

Very High 1,832 100% 75% 75% £7.6 million
High 4,679 100% 75% 75% £7.5 million
Moderate 14,331 80% 80% 64% £7.8 million
Low 218,450 10% 15% 1.5% £92,000
Total

£23 million
Further work is required to understand wider health implications from the implementation of a new
integrated model (e.g. reduced bed days)
o Similar issues for Community Health Services as outlined in the Employee (council) section with other
significant service developments (e.g. remodelling of Community Nursing Service)


The expected timeframes for these impacts are set out in Appendix 1 – Activity and Impact Schedule

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7. Interdependencies

This project cannot be viewed in isolation, ultimately the sustainability of a new integrated community based
care model is based on the following areas and programmes of work being developed and delivered alongside
each other:
 Sustainable Community Networks (i.e. developing community capacity, work on going within People
Powered Health);
 Appropriate Preventative Offer (i.e. review of Preventative Services contracts, review of Public Health);
 Sustainable Social Care model (i.e. implications of the Care Act; implementation of Resource Allocation
System (RAS); Review of other social care services including Learning Disability Services);
 Fit for purpose hospital provision (including any review of the Emergency Department)

Specifically, this programme links to cross-cutting IIS themes and other projects of work:

 Information, Advice and Guidance – Fundamental to a new integrated model will be a greater focus on
prevention, independence and self-care for all individuals whether they are already in receipt of services or
not. This underpins the principle of the programme to enable people to make positive lifestyle choices and
take control of their own care. Appropriate and timely advice, information and guidance is clearly key to
this. Specifically this IIS theme will link to the following projects (which contribute to or link in with the
Integration Programme):
o Targeted Prevention (including People Powered Health)
o Preventative Services
 Digital by Design – An element of the new model will involve capitalising on the use of digital by design and
other Information Management & Technology developments, including:
o Tele-health and tele-consultation;
o Integrated Health and Social Care Record;
o Integrated (or aligned) systems
 Preventative Services Strategy and recommissioning exercise.
 Learning Disability Review
 0-25 Disability Review
 Whole Health and Care economy transformation programme, including the following specific programmes
and projects:
o Urgent Care
o Reform of General Practice
o GP Cover for Care Homes
o Prevention and Health Literacy
 Better Care Fund – single pooled fund to support integrated working. Currently undergoing a review by
Government.
 Any work or review within Public Health.
 Review of Community Services within the Foundation Trust.
 Review of Community Mental Health Services within Pennine FT.
 My Place project (linked to community capacity building)
 Implementation of the Learning Disability Self-Assessment Framework (SAF)
 Adult Social Care Customer Journey programme
 End of Life Reconfiguration


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8. Stakeholders

This Business Case cannot be achieved alone and will require the support of a wide range of stakeholders. The
Management Team are working with a range of stakeholders to shape and progress this proposal. These
include:

 Pennine Care FT
 Independent Providers
 Client Groups
 Community Sector
 Carers
 Elected Members
 Stockport FT
 Stockport CCG
 Voluntary Sector


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9. Consultation and Engagement

This Programme will require formal consultation alongside engagement and co-production activity as it involves
a major service restructure, recommissioning exercise and reconfiguration of existing staffing arrangements. To
date, consultation has taken place in Marple and Werneth and this is part on an on-going programme of
activity. Consultation and engagement will need to take place across the Borough as the new model is
developed and in preparation for implementation.

A Consultation Plan is attached at Appendix 2


APPENDICES
1. Activity and Impact
2. Consultation Plan
3. EIA
4. Project Milestones
5. Staffing Profile

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APPENDIX 1
ACTIVITY AND IMPACT SCHEDULE
Year Activity Potential Impact
2014/15
Expand the work in the Marple and Werneth area to test out the new model
of provision at scale.
People and their Carers
Development of stronger community networks and support

People supported closer to home

Testing of new model in Marple and Werneth may result in
inconsistency of services in the short-term

Employees
In the short-term there will be a need for additional capacity
to transition into the new model of delivery.
Continue to co-produce the model of services involving staff, service users,
residents and carers
Untested nature of some of the assumptions make it difficult to quantify the
impacts exactly in terms of the level of resource required and released.
Build on current borough wide services to introduce further aspects of the
new model
Negotiation with Health Partners to agree deflection rates and
consequential release of funding from acute provision
Delivering the statutory duty of the Care Act will have consequences on
resources and the delivery model
Development of capacity, skills and knowledge within the Voluntary and
Independent Sector to deliver services required in the new model.
2015/16
Scaling up the tested model borough wide Voluntary and Community Sector
Potential for greater opportunities within local market for
voluntary and community sector organisations.
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The need to grow capacity and develop skills and knowledge
to meet the challenges of the new service model.
Independent Providers
Likely increase in demand for Independent Providers.

Potential for new opportunities for service developments
requiring potential additional capacity, skills and knowledge.

Greater role in shaping new model.

Potential new entrants coming into the market

System
Risk of failure to reduce demand leading to an escalation in
costs
Reduced hospital admissions and readmissions leading to
closure of non-acute beds.
People and their Carers
More joined up service – less duplication – people telling
their story once;
Greater emphasis on individuals taking control - shaping and
articulating their care needs, desired outcomes and support
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requirements;
Consistency in service provision (one key worker
coordinating their care)
People feel more connected to their local community
Employees
Longer term vision of the programme is this should increase
efficiency across the integrated workforce, freeing up time
which would enable them to work with those individuals
with significant needs who require formal health or care
support.

System
Risk of system failure as move from current model of
provision to a more community based model is
implemented


2016/17
Full Implementation of the Integrated Health and Social Care model and
consequent changes in acute health services.

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APPENDIX 2
CONSULTATION PLAN
Please indicate if you need
to consult internally and/ or
externally
Consultation will be required both internally and externally.
Details of who you intend to
consult and whether there
will be a geographical focus
Internal Audience
o Affected Staff (Co-production and Engagement as well as formal
communications and consultation)
o Trade Unions (Consultation and Engagement)
o All Staff (Inform)

External
o All Public (Consultation)
o Current service users/patients (Co-production and Engagement as well as
formal communications and consultation)
o Carers (Co-production and Engagement as well as formal communications
and consultation)
o GPs (Co-production and Engagement as well as formal communications
and consultation)
o Elected Members (Consultation and Engagement)
o Representative Organisations e.g. Healthwatch, Disability Stockport (Co-
production and Engagement as well as formal communications and
consultation)
o Independent Providers (Co-production and Engagement as well as formal
communications and consultation)
o Partner Organisations (Consultation and Engagement)

There will be an initial focus on Marple and Werneth however all areas of the
borough will require consultation activity.
What you intend to ask
them or the aim of the
consultation
The aim of the consultation will vary depending on the audience. An indication
has been provided above about the suggested nature of the activity
(consultation/ engagement/co-production). Fundamentally the aim will fall into
one or more of the following areas:
 Develop and shape the new integrated model;
 Engender ownership of a new model;
 Validate assumptions made about the new model;
 Understand implications and/or concerns from implementing the model
What methods of
consultation will be used
Wide range of methods including (but not exclusively): focus groups; 1-2-1s and
consultation forms;
The team that will be
carrying out the consultation
Consultation within PPR will support Services to People in delivering this.

The Programme has established a Communication, Engagement and Co-
Production work stream which has coordinated this to date. In order to progress
this work this group is going to be refocused to lead on co-production and
engagement as part of the development of the model and piloting in Marple and
Werneth.
Period of consultation

Consultation and engagement is an on-going process through the development
of the model. This is building on work that has already taken place. Formal
consultation will be required ahead of implementing a new model in April 2015.
Form of feedback To be determined.
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APPENDIX 3
EQUALITY IMPACT ASSESSMENT
Title: Health and Social Care
Integration
Date: 22
nd
July 2014
Stage: draft
Lead Officer: Sally Wilson / Joan
Beresford / Holly Rae

Stage 1: Do you need to complete an Equality Impact Assessment (EIA)?
An EIA is required for this Programme as it involves a major service restructure,
recommissioning exercise and reconfiguration of existing staffing arrangements. The
programme is aimed to specifically support the Council’s following Equality Objectives:
 (#1) Improving life chances, opportunities and aspirations for all by tackling
inequalities across our borough – specifically looking at Health inequalities and those
with Long-term conditions or Complex Care needs.
 (#3) Improving access to information about services and public spaces by increasing
the clarity of what we do, how we do it and how it can be accessed – through People
Powered Health and Community Navigators.
 (#4) Giving the people of Stockport equal opportunities to identify & voice their needs
and participate in developing and delivering services – through coproducing a new
model of community care services.
However, it is anticipated that based on initial assumptions it is anticipated that this
Programme will impact on the following Protected Characteristics:
 Disability; (in relation to people accessing services)
 Age; (in relation to people accessing services)
 Gender; (in relation to existing staffing demographics)
As well as the protected characteristics outlined above the following groups have also been
identified as potentially being impacted upon due to the implementation of a new
integrated service:
 Out of Borough population (in relation to availability of services) - Due to the
integrated nature of the new service there are likely to be differences in service
eligibility, particularly in the case of where people reside outside of the Stockport
Borough but are registered with a Stockport GP. These individuals would not be in
receipt of social care support from the Council but would be in receipt of Stockport
health care services. Furthermore, people who are resident within Stockport are
potential recipients of social care support but would not be in receipt of Stockport
health services. These are complex issues where further work is required to address
the issues raised quickly. Work is already being undertaken on a Greater Manchester
footprint to consider this issue on a wider level.
 Socio-economic (in relation to client and staffing demographics) - Professional
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assumptions understand that social deprivation and low income cuts across a
number of protected characteristics, for example women are proportionally more
likely to be in part-time or low paid work. Given that this programme of work is
seeking to implement a new and integrated approach to community care services of
which some of the clients may be particularly vulnerable due to the complexity of
their needs. Underlying principles of the programme are to empower individuals to
take control over their care as such it is expected that this would see a positive
impact on individuals who may fall within this group. Therefore consideration will
need to be given to socio-economic status throughout the consultation and testing
phase to check whether this assumption is correct.
Further data analysis of emerging learning within Marple and Werneth alongside feedback
from engagement will deepen our understanding of the nature of this impact and seek to
understand appropriate mitigating measures, including the way the new integrated service is
designed and developed.
Given that Health and Social Care integration spans a number of public sector organisations
(Stockport Foundation Trust – both acute and community services, Clinical Commissioning
Group, Pennine Care FT as well as Stockport Council) there will be a requirement within each
organisation to undertake an Equality Impact Assessment on their aspect of the programme.
This EIA will seek to draw in analysis and assessments from all organisations to ensure there
is an overarching understanding of the impact of implementing a borough-wide, cross-
organisation integrated service.

Stage 2: What do you know?
In terms of demographics existing data demonstrates the following headline trends:
 Ageing Population - by 2019 there will be an additional 9,200 people in Stockport
aged 65+. This is particularly acute within Marple.
 Increased demand for services – currently over 8000 people in receipt of Adult Social
Care services.
 The number of people with long term conditions (such as diabetes, hypertension or
heart disease) is growing – for example 30% of Stockport’s population have one or
more long-term conditions
Further analysis is required to build on this headline information to inform a more detailed
current picture of need and service consumption across the health and social care economy.
Data that will be considered includes:
 Analysis of current clients/patients;
 Analysis of existing care and support packages;
 Based on the two areas identified previously, analysis of complex needs and risk
stratification beyond PARR which understands complexity within an Adult Social
Care context.
 Best practice and national or sub regional analysis;
 Staff profile and skills mix;
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 Analysis of current market;
 Feedback from any previous or existing consultation or engagement activity;
 Identification of gaps;
 Identification of any emerging impacts;
 Next steps for further data analysis (e.g. consultation)

Stage 2a: Further Data and Consultation
This section will be completed upon analysis undertaken at stage.2.
At stage.2 any gaps identified will be explored further in this stage. This section will
therefore include the outcomes of any consultation and engagement activity.

Stage 3: Results and Measures
This section will be completed to reflect and build on the learning within section.2

Stage 4: Decision Stage
This EIA is a live document and will accompany the decision at all points throughout the
process.


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APPENDIX 4

Potential milestones
Learning Phase: Marple and Werneth

An integrated model is currently being tested and rolled out in Marple and Werneth. This
is an iterative process which will inform the final model.
On going
Consultation Period To be determined
Final Business Case Feb 2015
provis
Executive Approval to Implement Borough-wide Model Feb/ March 2015
provis
Implementation Date
(to all Borough)
From April 2015



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APPENDIX 5
Current Staff Profile

The current staff profile is summarised below for SMBC Adult Social Care:

Service area Headcount No of FTEs
All Client Group 5 2.50
OP Int Care Pooled budget 8 7.50
OP Reablement Pooled Budget 6 5.50
OP REACH Service 97 83.67
OP Staff Costs 97 83.34
Social Fund 7 6.11
Strategy & Performance 28 25.78
YA Equipment 4 3.81
YA Preventative Services 1 0.50
YA Staff Costs 95 84.58
YA Tenancies 11 9.46
Total 359 312.75

Employee modelling for the new integrated locality teams is still taking place and final numbers will need
to be based upon learning from Marple and Werneth. However, it is anticipated that this new team will
draw on SMBC staff based within the Older Peoples Service; Younger Person Disability Team; Choosing
and Purchasing.

The Marple and Werneth locality team is made up on the following roles (and includes GPs):
 Social Workers (SMBC Older Peoples Services and Younger Person Disability Team);
 Occupational Therapist (SMBC);
 Support Broker (SMBC);
 Assistant Practitioners / Home Care (SMBC);
 Community Nurses (Stockport Foundation Trust);
 Independence Support Workers (Various Voluntary and Community Sector Organisations);
 Medicines Manager (CCG);



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Investing in Stockport - Business Case


IIS Programme:
IIS Board SRO: Andrew Webb
IIS Project Lead: Chris McLoughlin /Phil Beswick
Portfolio: Life Long Learning and Achievement/Children and Young People
Project Name: 0-25 SEND Reform

Project Board / Team Members
Cath Millington Head of Service Children with Disabilities
Mark Warren Head of Service Disability Services (Adults)
Andy Simpkins Head of Service Inclusion and SEN
Alison Cresswell Head of Service 14-19
Heidi Shaw Deputy Head of Service Integrated Children’s Service
Sherann Hillman PIPS (Co-production)
Jeremy Longman PIPS (Co-production)
Geraldine Gerrard Head of Business Support (People)
Mark Chidgey Clinical Commissioning Group
Simon Finch Finance
Angela Daniel Project Manager - Local Offer
Pam Jones Business Support Officer
Stephanie Perry Project Manager

INVESTING
IN REFORM

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1. Project Overview

This project contains 4 savings proposals relating to Children and Young People’s SEND services:

1 Disability Partnership:
The aim of this project is to reconfigure short breaks and respite provision for children and young people with
special educational needs and disabilities in Stockport as part of the reform programme. The service will
provide a range of short breaks for children, young people and their families, encompassing centrally
commissioned individual packages of one to one support and overnight provision and direct payments to
families which could be managed by the family, by brokerage services or a combination of management
arrangements. The proposal is to target respite and short break support to those young people who are
eligible for social care intervention.
Within aiming high and social care, where young people are continuing care eligible due to their health needs,
the packages are joint-funded with the CCG.

2. SEN Transport:
A review of SEN Transport will take place leading up to April 2015 and the service will be redesigned in the light
of this review.

3. Educational Psychology:
Define the team’s professional identity as providers of educational psychology within various multi-agency
contexts. Focus the work of the EP’s to ensure the needs of the most vulnerable are met.

4. Early Years:
The EYFS Improvement Team project will put in place a change to the current service delivery and a reduction
in its workforce whilst ensuring that the Local Authority meets its legal duty in relation to Early Education and
continues to raise the educational attainment of all children. This will be achieved through a reduction in the
level of support to settings and schools which are graded Good or better and the focus of the reduced staff
team with those settings and schools whom require improvement and are in decline and at risk of failing. We
will continue to develop the use of digital technologies to increase the working capacity of the remaining team
wherever possible.

2. Regulation and Statutory Considerations
 Education Act 1996 s321-331 (SI2001/3455 for consolidated SEN regulations) to be replaced by The
Children and Families Act 2014
 Education and Inspections Act 2006 s74
 Childcare Act 2006
 The Special Educational Needs and Disability Act 2001
 Section 2 of the Children, Schools and Families Act 2010, which provides a new parental right of appeal
to the First tier Tribunal (Special Educational Needs and Disability)
 The SEN Code of Practice (2001) states that under Part IV of the 1996 Education Act LEAs, maintained
schools and early year’s settings receiving government funding are required to have regard to this
code.
 Children Act 1989 relating to the social care element
 Section 25 of the Children and Young Person Act 2008. This duty is around providing short breaks for
parents and carers of children with a disability
 Children and Families Act introducing the new 0-25 SEND reforms.


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3. Investment Profile
The overall investment across these services currently stands at £6.0 We anticipate that the future in
investment in this area will be £5.0. In order to achieve this ambitious programme of change, the total
investment can be summarised as follows:
Baseline 15/16 16/17
£6.0m £5.5m £5.0m

Spend Profile Disability Partnership:
Allocated budget for this project over the next three years and beyond.
Year £000s
Baseline £1,893
2015/16 £1,791
2016/17 £1,591
Beyond £TBC
Spend Profile SEN Transport:
Allocated budget for this project over the next three years and beyond.
Year £000s
Baseline £2,883
2015/16 £2,583
2016/17 £2,488
Beyond £TBC
Spend Profile Educational Psychology:
The budget profile will allow the service to develop to manage the budget reduction target by March 2017.
Year £000s
Baseline £526
2015/16 £414
2016/17 £344
Beyond £TBC
Spend Profile Early Years:
The budget profile will enable the transition to the new service profile for the start of the financial year 2017
Year £000s
Baseline £452
2015/16 £406
2016/17 £336
Beyond £TBC
Spend Profile SEN Support:
Allocated budget for this project over the next three years and beyond.
Year £000s
Baseline £344
2015/16 £344
2016/17 £344
Beyond £TBC


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4. A Description of the New Service
A Description of the New Disability Service
It is proposed that the new service will maintain targeted respite and short break support for those young
people who are eligible for social care intervention, being deemed as level 3 or 4 and will support families using
personal budgets introduced by the Children and Families Act. The staffing element of the service will be made
up of current social workers and their team manager.
What it will provide:
The service will provide social care intervention and associated support packages for those families where
there is assessed need. There will be a review of packages that are funded to maintain stability in families.
The service will provide a range of short breaks for children, young people and their families, encompassing
centrally commissioned individual packages of one to one support and overnight provision and direct payments
to families which could be managed by the family, by brokerage services or a combination of management
arrangements. The service will need to have closer links to locality based services, and where cases are closed
to the social workers, be stepped down to access support in local communities via a range of provision,
including the Integrated Children’s Service, local voluntary sector organisations and volunteer networks where
available.
What hours it will operate:
The service will not change its operating hours and have a full complement of social care staff during office
hours and utilise the contact centre for new referrals via the CAF process and out of hours provision.
Staff structure:
It is proposed that the children with disabilities social care team continue to manage the service for those
children where there is an allocated social worker. It is proposed that additional capacity is sought via CSS to
take on the support role in the social care team and to release the current support officer to support a package
review process. An audit has just been completed recommending the monitoring of direct payments is brought
back within the partnership. It is envisaged that this post would be able to pay for itself within 18 months, due
to the focussed monitoring of packages and claim back of unspent direct payments. This builds on work that
has now commenced in the partnership. The local offer being developed as part of the 0-25 SEND review will
provide targeted advice, information and support.
Multi-agency or integrated approach:
The disability partnership is an integrated service across local authority and the Foundation Trust. It will further
integrate work with a number of organisations including Pennine Care as we move to a 0-25 approach in line
with the new SEND reforms. There will continue to be a push on aligning and pooling budgets in this area to
improve outcomes and ensure value for money and children with disability joint commissioning strategy is in
draft at present outlining our intentions. As part of the newly developed flow to produce an education, health
and care plan, there are a number of occasions when families will be screened via the supporting family’s
pathway, which may offer some families an alternative route to access a wider range of services in their
localities via the integrated children’s services. The increased demand, capacity and skills of these services
would need to be considered. The developing local offer will also be the main point for families to access their
own information, advice and support.
How it differs from the current service:
As outlined above, the proposal is to review the current aiming high short breaks service, which is a
preventative service for children with disabilities. This review will include reviewing short breaks commissioned
for children and young people who do not meet the social care threshold.
Any noticeable difference for customers:
There will be a noticeable difference for customers. Families of disabled children access information, advice
and support from this team in addition to short breaks. Below is a table outlining the short breaks and respite
provision for children and young people over a number of years. The low level provision is that provided by the
current aiming high team and the high level provision is that provided via the social care team.




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Year

2009/10

2010/11

2011/12


2012/13

2013/14

Level of short
break

Low
level


High
level


Low
level


High
level



Low
level

High
level

Low
Level

High
Level

Low
Level


High
Level
Number of
individuals
receiving a
short break
464 334 550 307 448 296 477 179 486 242
Number of
overnight short
breaks

131

2,110

412

2,132

264

2,122

140

2,401

78

2209
Number of
family based or
day care
sessional
hours provided

22,192

56,265

17,458

54,154

9256

35300

16,168

40,108

23,608

41,963
Number of
group based
specialist
support hours
provided

8,435

2,885

8,895

2,149

15350

1465

19,607

554

14,713

368

A Description of the New Transport Service supporting SEND

The service will provide support for travel for SEND pupils who are eligible. The service will seek to develop the
independence of YP. It will not greatly differ from the existing service but will build upon the developments
over the last two years to develop independent travel.

A Summary of the New Educational Psychology Service

What the new service will provide:
The service will reduce from 8.25 FTEs to ensure the retention of a team of 5.5 FTE Educational Psychologists
(including a lead psychologist), which will prioritise the needs of vulnerable children and families and respond
to new statutory duties, as part of the 0-25 agenda (Children’s and Families Act, 2014). The aspiration would
be to make incremental steps to income generation-based activities in order to reduce the likelihood of
(enforced) workforce reductions. Increased capacity would be greatly assisted by the development of associate
partnerships, which would ensure that the new service is able to deliver effective early intervention and
prevention whilst also responding to those with the greatest level of need.

If it is possible to make the changes on a phased basis the aspiration would be to make incremental steps to
income generation-based activities in order to reduce the likelihood of workforce reductions.

What sorts of teams
Educational psychologists only.

What hours it will operate:
8.30am – 5.00pm

What staff will be required:
Retention of the team’s professional identity as providers of educational psychology within various multi-agency
contexts.


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Employees (Please specify the expected number of staff that the new service will
require as FTE)

Service area Salary
Grade/Band
No of FTEs Headcount Cost Funding source
(cash limit /
non cash limit)
Psychology Scale B (lead) 1 1 70 Cash limit
“ Scale A Approx. 4.5 6 274 “

How it differs from the current service:
A more focused service will mean a reduction in the support to some children, families and schools, but those
in greatest need will remain the target group.
Any noticeable difference for customers:
All of the following are likely to some extent, despite re-focused priorities:
The threshold for involvement of the Psychology Service will be raised. This means that some children who
might have expected a service under previous arrangements will not be eligible but will have their needs met
by other services such as schools.

The input to multi-agency teams, such as CAMHS or the Autism Pathway, will be reduced; the current pattern
of providing training and consultation to other staff groups will either be reduced or charged for.

A Description of the New Early Years’ Service

There will be a staffing reduction of 1.2FTE (2 members of staff). This will involve ending a temporary contract
and releasing a staff member who has requested VR. The service spend will ensure the retention of a Lead EYFS
Consultant, EYFS Consultant and Childminding officers front line workers working in early education settings
and schools in most need and in areas of disadvantage. In the future additional improvement support and
leadership programmes will be provided through associate partnerships and through a co-production model
with outstanding early education providers and schools. This will ensure that a core element of local expertise
is retained with a strong relationship with providers and schools and an on-going local knowledge of the
provision, quality and standards. It will enable a move towards a more efficient investment of future resources
which has greater flexibility over time as the workforce is gradually reduced and resources are targeted at
those with the greatest level of need.

What the new service will provide:
Targeted support to early year’s settings and schools graded less than Good.
What hours it will operate:
8.30 – 5.00 all year round, with some flexibility for visits and activities through twilight delivery.
What staff will be required:
A core team of EYFS Improvement Consultants and Childminding Improvement Officers.
multi-agency or integrated approach:
Yes – ensuring that the work of the team is aligned and integrated within wider council early years - sufficiency
of high quality childcare, SEND 0-25 early intervention and the LA school improvement plan.
Will there be any change to current levels of service:
Yes – there will be a reduction in support and challenge to early year’s settings and schools graded Good or
better.
Any noticeable difference to customers:
Early years settings and schools graded Good or better will see a change to the service provision.







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EYFS Improvement FTE Headcou
nt
Costs
Lead EYFS Consultant 0.86 1 £55,488
EYFS Consultants 2.6 3 £151,892
Lead Child-minding Improvement officer 0.81 1 £37,171
Community Child-minding Improvement Officers 1.81 2 £64,835
CM network co-ordinators 1 TBC £25,976

5. How we will achieve this

Detail are set out in:

- Appendix 1 – Activity and Impact Schedule
- Appendix 4 – Project milestones



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6. Impact on current service model

Detail are set out in Appendix 1 – Activity and Impact Schedule
Disability Service:
The impact on the implementation of the above proposals will be that some children and young people with a
disability who do not need social care intervention, may not have access to some short break services, but this
will remain under review.

The potential impact on implementing this proposal is that more families may need to rely on other resources
when the pressure of caring increases. This may have an impact on the integrated children’s service and
voluntary sector providers were demand may grow from children and young people with disabilities and their
families to support them to maintain stability within their families.

As the 0-25 SEND reforms are introduced, families will be supported to access respite and short break provision
in new ways that are more personalised and flexible. As yet, it is unclear as to families demand for a direct
payment element of their personal budget, which could reduce costs and release funding for a wider portfolio
of short breaks. A sea change in this area is not anticipated in the first few years of SEND implementation.

The risks associated with this proposal are outlined below:
Description of Risk Mitigating Action Likelihood Impact

An increase in demand for
social care intervention
Families having good access to information,
advice and support

Reduction in preventative
services available to children
and young people with a
disability
Families having good access to information,
advice and support. Families building better
support networks within their local
communities

Children with disabilities and
their families not having
access to a short breaks
Families having good access to information,
advice and support. Families building better
support networks within their local
communities

Social costs may rise if more
intensive respite is needed as
families hit crisis point
Families having good access to information,
advice and support. Families building better
support networks within their local
communities

VCS may not be fit for purpose
to provide short breaks for
families.
Support to VCS to access additional funds to
provide short breaks for families



Transport:
Description of Risk Mitigating Action Likelihood Impact

Possible increased pressure on DSG

Work with schools to consider priorities within the DSG
Contractors declining to offer tender

Offer longer term contracts for security of tenure
Uncertainty of personal budgets

Work with partners to understand and agree the parameters
of the use of personal budgets and how they apply to this area
Consider greater use of public transport with passenger
assistance meeting pupils at bus stations and other terminus
points. Parents to take children to such pick up points. Level
of savings to be determined

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Educational Psychology:
Description of Risk Mitigating Action Likelihood Impact

There are currently 1700 cash-limit funded
EP sessions-this will reduce to 1100
Work with schools and settings and other partners to ensure
focussed support to those identified as the most vulnerable
Reduction in capacity to deliver LA
contributions to multi-agency working and
staff training

Possible increased demand on other
services (inclusion services, CAMHS, etc.)
because of consequently increased
demands upon other services

Reduction in our capacity to deliver
preventative work (this could lead to an
increasing demand for statutory
assessments)

Reduced contribution to local authority
initiatives (e.g., recent Scrutiny Committee
recommendations regarding mental
health.)
To work with partners to consider possible areas for funding
training and development.


Consider the targeting of training a development to meet the
highest areas of need.



Consider evidence informed practice and its cost effectiveness
compared to other interventions



Prioritise and reduce expectations to contribute/or fund these
in addition through other means including charging other
services.


Early Years:
With the reduction in the EYFS Improvement staff team there will be less capacity to deliver support to settings
and schools who are Good or better. This may impact on a decline in quality and standards over time due to
less contact and local knowledge of the leadership and provision for children’s learning and progress in all
settings and schools. There may be a reduction in high quality local childcare and early education places

Description of Risk Mitigating Action Likelihood Impact

Reduction in the number of visits to good or
better settings may not alert LA to possible
decline in an area.
Evaluation data to focus support and prioritise workflow

Deploy associates to meet need.
A decrease in high quality childcare and
early education places. Possible increase in
Safeguarding and Welfare concerns and
children not meeting milestones in early
learning and development
Early years settings and schools
Access to additional support and advice through local
partnerships.

7. Interdependencies

This proposal is inextricably linked to the 0-25 SEND reforms, joint commissioning strategies and their
implementation and the other IIS proposals within this particular outcome that will impact on children and
young people with a disability and/or special educational needs.


• SEND 0-25 - Access to Early Education Entitlement of children with additional needs.
• Early Help and Prevention
• Trouble Families agenda

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• Economic regeneration agenda
• AGMA
• Other local authority providers
• School Improvement
• Childcare sufficiency
• Integrated children’s service
• Children’s social care team
• Digital design

8. Stakeholders
Key Stakeholders









Interest





high



Local Authority Staff
Children’s Therapists
CCG continuing care team
Voluntary and community sector
providers
Clinical commissioning group
Schools/PVI settings
School Governors
Early Years Providers
Providers of Transport
Agencies linked aligned to the
work of the EP service


Parents and carers and their children
PIPS group
Children’s disability social care team




low








low high
Influence

9. Consultation and Engagement


A Consultation Plan is attached at Appendix 2






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APPENDICES
1. Activity and Impact
2. Consultation Plan
3. EIA
4. Project Milestones


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APPENDIX 1
ACTIVITY AND IMPACT SCHEDULE
Year Activity Potential Impact
2014/15
The web-based Local Offer will be advertised widely to both
the community and practitioners and will be the central point
for all information on SEND provision
Families who are not receiving support from a social worker
will rely solely on the local offer to access their own
information and support, rather than from a dedicated
service providing targeted short breaks
Cultural and behaviour change to embed new processes ,
practices and workflows which are part of the borough-wide
IAG review and restructuring of locality services which will
also be underpinned by the new EHC Plan.
The proposal will need to align with this area of work as this
is part of the 0-25 SEND reform developments. The impacts
may include a greater number of referrals and open cases to
social care and into the CAF TAC system as families will not
be able to access to the same services as before.
Transition from statements of SEN to EHC Plans will begin and
continue to Mar 2018
This area of work does not relate to the proposals
Consultation will need to be undertaken with children and
young people with SEN and Disabilities , particularly those
eligible for short-breaks and respite provision as this will now
focus on the most in need
Families who did not require social work intervention and
more costly short breaks previously due to access more
preventative targeted short breaks may be more likely to
request a higher level of support.
All options to reduce SEND transport costs will be considered Lack of provision as the contract is considered not profitable.

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including renegotiating contract prices. Travel costs will be
part of the personal budget offer
Use of personal budgets for this aspect are not used
challenging the financial efficiencies sought over time
The Education Psychology Team will make incremental steps
to income generation-based activities. Increased capacity
would be greatly assisted by the development of associate
partnerships, ensuring that the new service is able to deliver
effective early intervention and prevention whilst also
responding to those with the greatest level of need
The development of the process in this way could affect the
capacity to meet the needs of the most vulnerable but
targeting will remain a priority.
The Early Years Improvement Team will be refocused so that
support is provided in early education settings and schools in
most need or those which are in decline and at risk of failing,
and those in areas of disadvantage
An increase in the number of EY settings which are in a
category or require improvement. Those at risk of failing
who are currently good may not be identified from data
alone, but this is an issue common to all aspects of Ofsted’s
inspection regime.
2015/16
Short-breaks and respite provision will be available to families
with Social Worker intervention only; other support
arrangements may be perceived to be insufficient.
There will be a greater demand on the children’s disability
social care team and on higher cost respite provision for
those who reach this threshold.
Reduced payments to contractors providing travel contracts
as well as support to ensure independent travel on public
transport
If the travel contracts are not seen as profitable then there
could be a loss of provision
There should be an increase of early years provision rated
good or better overall but particularly in priority areas which
The evidence suggest that good or better provision is vital for
0-5 to have good start to school and do well at each key

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will support the aspiration of a good start at school and a
narrowing of the attainment gap
stage Narrowing the attainment gap could be at risk at each
key stage as the capacity to intervene early is reduced.
Review of the SEND marketplace/providers Capacity will need to be sourced to support the VC Sector to
support families in different ways and to review the current
state of play. It is known that this sector also require support
to be fit for purpose for families known to social care to
purchase support through direct payments as part of a
personal budget.
2016/17
Full Implementation of the 0-25 SEND reform The reduction in access to freely available short breaks
within the Local Offer may put strain on some families.

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APPENDIX 2
CONSULTATION PLAN
Consultation
A consultation will need to be undertaken to understand the wider impacts of this proposal and because it
affects a specific group of children and young people in Stockport.
This proposal will also have impacts on the voluntary and community sector and businesses

Please indicate if you need to
consult internally and/ or
externally
Internally and externally
SEN Transport: Externally
There is no specific geographical focus; this would be a borough
wide consultation with specific groups, particularly children with
disabilities and their families, CCG, VCS, and internal services
where there may be an impact on demand. Staff that will be
directly affected by the proposal. The services directly involved
will be the existing Disability Service, the Early Years Improvement
Service and the Educational Psychology Services. Including:

o Children with disabilities & their families
o CCG
o VCS
o Internal Services
o Staff of the named services
o Early years settings
o Schools


SEN Transport will also need to consult with
o Independent Education providers re fee structure changes
o Transport contractors re changed payments schedule.
What you intend to ask them or
the aim of the consultation
Disability Service:
Families will be consulted on the impact of not being able to
access a short break from this service and what other breaks are
available to access for their children. How best local authority can
support families in accessing any available provision from other
providers.
Consultation with VCS providers to ascertain possibilities of
alternative funding sources and how local authority can support
them in developing alternative provision.
Educational Psychology:
Early Years: If the reduction in LA improvement support visits to
Good and Outstanding providers will impact on the quality and
standards of their provision.
SEN Transport: If fees for transport can be included in overall fees
and if contractors will accept reduced payments for security of
contract.
What methods of consultation will Disability Service:

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be used On line, face to face , focus groups
EY and EP: Face to face as part of existing networks and online.
SEN Transport: Written communication.
The team that will be carrying out
the consultation
Disability Service:
Services to People supported by additional capacity by Policy,
Performance and Reform within CSS.
SEN Transport: SEN Transport Team - Services to People
supported by additional capacity by Policy, Performance and
Reform within CSS.
Period of consultation
(managers discretion re
consultation with customers, HR
to specify staff consultation
length required)
Disability Service:
HR to specify staff consultation requirement. Consultation with
HR from CCG where one member of staff is seconded from
Wider consultation will commence Sept 14 for initial period and
continue to new financial year for further reductions to be met
15/16.
EY: HR to specify staff consultation requirement
SEN Transport: December 2014
What form the feedback will take


Title:
IIS 0-25
Children’s Disability Partnership
element
Date: July 2014
Stage: 1
Service Area: Children and Young People’s Disability
Partnership
Lead Officer: Cath Millington. Head of Service.

Stage 1: Do you need to complete an Equality Impact Assessment (EIA)?
Not all policies will require an EIA: these key questions will help you to decide whether you
need to conduct an EIA (see guidance notes at the end of this form).
Yes.

There is a decision to be taken to look at the viability of delivering the Short Breaks For
Disabled Children Service currently offered by the Children and Young People’s Disability
Partnership to those children and young people with Special Educational Needs and/or
Disability (SEND) who are not known to social care. The other aspects of the proposal will also
affect a specific group of children and young people; those with SEND.

This service and provision is funded via cash limit and was part of the Early Intervention Grant.
It is proposed that the funding for this service will be reduced from £400k to £100k, equating to
a reduction of £300K over the financial years 15/16 and 16/17. This reduction in budget will
impact on a specific group of children and young people in Stockport.


Stage 2: What do you know?
An EIA should be based upon robust evidence. This stage will guide you through potential
sources of information and how to interpret it. Understanding the current context is a key stage
in all policy making and planning (see guidance notes at the end of this form).
Context
A new statutory duty came into place on the 1
st
April 2011 requiring Local Authorities to deliver
short breaks for disabled children and their families under section 25 of the Children and
Young Person Act 2008. This duty is around providing a full service offer for short break
provision which was developed through the Aiming High short breaks agenda.

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Initially, this duty was funded through a ring fenced pot of money (Aiming High) that was to be
allocated to transform the delivery of short breaks to children and young people with a disability
and their families, particularly for those young people who do not meet social care thresholds
but do need some short break to support stability and parents and carers to continue to care
effectively. In 2010/11 the grant allocated was £1M. This ring fenced funding ended in March
2011 and £720K was allocated from the cash limit. Over the subsequent years this budget has
reduced further as funds have been transferred between respite budgets in the Disability
Partnership (220K), CSS Business Support has been centralised (36K) and savings have been
realised (70K). The current cash-limit for this service is £400K.

It is proposed that the budget for the short breaks service will be further reduced by £300k
leaving a budget of £100k in place.

This Equality Impact Assessment will enable consideration of the impact to groups of children,
young people and their families in the provision of short breaks and the impact of the proposed
reduction in funding to the planning of this provision from April 2014 and beyond.

The Short Breaks Service
Through delivering the Aiming High Service since 2008 within the disability partnership, there
is overwhelming evidence that there is a need for a service to provide a wide range of short
breaks for disabled children and their families both locally and nationally.

The current service funds a variety of short breaks according to individual needs. These
include:
 one to one support for those children and young people who are unable to engage in
group activities due to the nature of their disability
 direct payments for families to provide opportunities for families to personalised the
support received, again where children are unable to engage in group activities
 A range of commissioned group based activities particularly over the school holidays,
at weekends and in the evenings. The majority of these short breaks are
commissioned via the voluntary and community sector. The commissioning cycle is
reviewed annually with contracts either renewed, where meeting need, revised, due to
feedback from families or ceased. All current contracts in place with providers come to
an end in March 2015.

A new statutory duty came into place on the 1
st
April 2011 requiring Local Authorities to deliver
short breaks for disabled children and their families under section 25 of the Children and
Young Person Act 2008. This duty is around providing a full service offer for short break
provision which was developed through the Aiming High short breaks agenda.

The Local Authority is also required to publish information annually for parents and carers
about the services available through the short breaks service and any eligibility criteria which
apply. The purpose of this statement is to ensure parents and carers can challenge Local
Authorities which are not providing an adequate range of short breaks, or which are illegally
limiting access to them. From September 2014, the Local authority will also have new
responsibilities under the Children and Families Act 2014 as part of the new 0-25 SEND
agenda. This will include the publication of the local offer, which must include the publication of
the short breaks statement.

Profiling Stockport
National profiling shows that around 1.2% of our child population have a disability equating to
an estimated 746 children with a disability in Stockport. The Social Care Disability Team within
the Partnership provides more intense respite packages to those disabled children and their
families who are in crisis, or where there are safeguarding or child protection issues. There are
around 250 families at this level receiving this provision. To receive this level of provision, the

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case must be open and allocated to a social worker.

It is expected that with the reduction in funding for short break activity there will be a reduction
in the amount of short breaks offered and therefore a reduction in the numbers of disabled
children and young people who will be able to access a preventative short breaks.

Through the series of reductions in the short breaks area over previous years, service
providers have been encouraged to explore sustainability strategies including the sourcing of
alternate funding. This has proved difficult for partners.

Data around Short break Provision
In the financial years 2013/14 our short breaks Aiming High team have provided short breaks
for 486 children and young people with SEN/Disability.

Breaks have included overnight (78), family based or individual day care (23,608 hours), group
based specialist services (14,713 hours) and direct payments to families to provide their own
short breaks; offering more choice and control.

We know that it is more difficult for children with autism and those with complex needs to
access universal provision and the short breaks service has continued to target these specific
groups. The team have been working with universal service provision to look at building the
required capacity and skills to enable better access to children with a disability reducing
demand for short breaks from more specialist, more targeted and more expensive provision.

What Will Change
The Aiming High Short Breaks Service will in effect end, and the remaining budget for this
service will be utilised to target those young people in priority need of short breaks provision,
predominantly based at our special schools.

The team members in the Aiming High Short Breaks Service have worked closely over the
years with Children with Disabilities Social Care Team to ensure a step up step down approach
as and when needs change for children and families. It is envisaged, that with the absence of
this service, children will be stepped down into the supporting families pathway to access more
generic intervention when it is required.

It is also envisaged that changes will mean cases remain open longer to our social care team
as they will not be able to close cases if there isn’t a package of support in place via the respite
budget. There will also be an impact on the Children with Disabilities Social Care Team with
more families needing a package of support to maintain stability in caring, which will increase
caseloads for social workers.

Consultations and Evaluations

Consultation has been undertaken throughout the life of the aiming high short breaks
programme to ensure service provision was meeting need. Work has included:
 A major consultation with disabled children and young people to look at what activities
they would like to engage in, when and where, to inform delivery
 Consultation with parents and carers about what, when and where short breaks should
be delivered
 Parents and carers involved in the commissioning of projects
 Feedback gained form children, young people and their families around experiences of
short breaks
 Feedback from short break providers
 Holding of a large conference to engage universal service providers in the inclusion of
children with a disability in their provision


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There have been both national and local evaluations undertaken around short break delivery
through the Aiming High Programme.

Headline feedback has included:
 Short breaks have prevented disabled children entering the looked after children system
 Short breaks provide support preventing disabled children from requiring emergency
provision
 Short breaks during holiday time prevent the peak in demand to social care services for
emergency support
 Short breaks have reduced the need for costly out of borough placements
 In staying closer to home, disabled children are potentially enabled to have improved
engagement in their local communities and reduced transition issues
 Targeted support via the common assessment framework has had the added value of
multi-disciplinary working relationships
 Through the development of PIPS (Parents in Partnership Stockport), this has meant a
step change in the way we are working in partnership with parents and carers to develop,
commission, plan and evaluate services to disabled children.

What is the data telling us
Our research, consultations and evaluations have shown us that:
 There is a large demand for short breaks for disabled children and their families
 This particular vulnerable group of children and young people do need some form of
specialist short break, additional and above universal service provision.
 There is a higher demand for children with autism and with complex needs for short
breaks.
 Services need specific training to enable equal access of children and young people
with a disability
 Children and families, would, where possible prefer a day, evening or holiday short
break, than an overnight short break.
 Parents and carers are happy to contribute financially to a short break provision.
 It is vital to engage both children and young people and their families in planning,
delivery and evaluation of short break provision to ensure actual need is met.

The Children and Young People’s Disability Partnership has contact with most children and
young people with a disability or additional need in Stockport and therefore this makes it easier
to disseminate information around any changes to service provision. In addition, the
Partnership has built strong links with parents and carers through PIPS and other support
groups to disseminate information directly to families of children with a disability.

Impact

Disability
Children and young people with a disability will be the main group that will be impacted on, as
the short breaks services specifically targets this group of children and young people. The
main impact will be the reduction of short breaks accessible to families of children with SEN
and a disability who need a short break to support them in continuing to care. Short breaks /
respite provision will only be available to those who are known to social care and who are
attending our special school provision via the holiday and after school provision.

As outlined above, strategies have been put in place to mitigate some of these impacts,
including:
 More robust linkages to the supporting families pathway to access a wider range of
early intervention
 Consideration of a charging policy to access some short breaks
 Targeting short breaks at those groups of disabled children and young people

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where the need is greatest
 Training given to other providers to ensure inclusion of children with disabilities in
more universal provision.
 Travel training, to enable children and young people with a disability to access
alternative short breaks

Race
Data collected and collated through the short breaks programme shows around 1% of the total
population of children with a disability accessing a short break though aiming high are from
black, Asian minority ethnic groups. (BAME). It is not envisaged that this group with be
adversely or positively impacted on. But it is apparent that this is a disproportionate number of
children in relation to the overall BAME population in Stockport. The short breaks service will
ensure that BAME groups are not disadvantaged in accessing support.

Age
Most children and young people with a disability accessing a short break are between the ages
of 5-18, and specific breaks are targeted towards specific age groups. It is therefore not
envisaged that a certain age bracket of children or young person with a disability will be
adversely or positively impacted on.

Gender
There is a mix of genders accessing the short breaks provision, with some breaks specifically
targeting specific genders. It is therefore not thought that individual gender groups will be
adversely or positively impacted on. Although according to national research we do know that
disability, particularly autism is more prevalent in boys than girls.


Religion and Belief
The Children and Young People’s Disability Partnership is not aware of any evidence that
suggests the delivery of short breaks through the early intervention grant will adversely or
positively affect any specific religious group.

All services to children and young people with a disability and their families ensure that the
religious needs of individuals are taken into account when planning and delivering service
provision can particularly meet their needs and are culturally appropriate.

Gender identity
The Children and Young People’s Disability Partnership have no evidence to suggest that the
delivery of short breaks will adversely or positively affect those of a specified gender identity.

Sexual orientation
The Children and Young People’s Disability Partnership have no evidence to suggest that the
delivery of short breaks will adversely or positively affect those of a specific sexual orientation.

Will the changes we are proposing impact on other services
Impact on other services would include:
 A potential rise in demand for social care intervention and more costly respite provision.
 A potential rise in demand via the Children’s integrated service as families are now
stepped down via the supporting families pathway
 As evidence from the national evaluation shows, through providing this short breaks
service, demand for emergency respite or disabled children becoming looked after
reduces.
 Possible increase in demand on universal services from children and young people with
a disability
 Reduction in funding going into the voluntary and community sector to provide short
breaks for children and young people with a disability

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Stage 2a: Further Data and Consultation
If you feel that the data and past consultation feedback you have is not sufficient to properly
consider the impact before a decision is made then you may wish to supplement your evidence
base with more data or further consultation. This should be proportionate to the scale of the
decision and will depend on the gaps in your current understanding (see guidance notes at the
end of this form).
As there has been a large national pilot of the short breaks programme through Aiming High,
there is enough evidence and past consultation feedback to inform the future shape of
provision and understand the impact in the potential reduction of funding to this area.





Stage 3: Results and Measures
As a result of what you have learned in Stage 2 what will you do to ensure that no group is
unfairly and unlawfully impacted upon as a result of the proposed change(s)? (see guidance
notes at the end of this form)
Monitoring and Evaluation
Over the past three years there has been heavy monitoring and evaluation of the programme
nationally and process and procedures have been put in place locally to gather the specific
data required. These systems will continue to be used to monitor and evaluate the services
locally and inform on going planning.
Measures will include:
 Number of short breaks being delivered in hours and sessions
 Varieties of short breaks delivered i.e. holiday provision, overnights, evening and
weekend.
 Types of short breaks will be measured aligned to targeted provision for specific
groups, particularly those with autism and those with complex needs
 Impact on referrals and appropriate cases held within the social care disabilities team

As we introduce the implementation of the 0-25 SEND reforms, we will develop work around
personal budgets to enable those with packages of support through social care to be more
personalised and flexible in the way these needs are met for this particular group of children
and young people. The local offer will be published by the 1
st
September 214, which will offer a
one stop shop for this group of families to access advice, information and support. A joint
commissioning strategy is currently in development, to explore how best to utilise remaining
funds across partner’s organisation to best meet the needs of this particular group. This will be
published by the 1
st
September and feed into the health and wellbeing board.

Further understanding and analysis around our population of children with a disability in
Stockport needs to be undertaken to gather specific data to inform the development and
delivery of the short breaks service.


Stage 4: Decision Stage
Once your plan/policy is fully developed it will need to go through the correct scrutiny and
approval channels: the EIA should be included as part of this (see guidance notes at the end of
this form).





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APPENDIX 4

Potential milestones

A New Disability Service:

15/16 – Initial reduction in commissioning budget
Work with families to look at alternate ways of accessing support and information
Review and further development of the local offer
Work with families to explore use of personal budgets
Project to review all packages of support currently provided across social care and
short breaks

16/17 – Retention of special school short breaks service
Reduction of staffing establishment in line with the proposal
Realignment of existing packages of support
Possible introduction of resource allocation system to support personal budgets

SEN Transport

15/16-Review the DSG priority with stakeholders
-work with transport providers to maximise effectiveness
-continue to develop independent travel training
16/17-implement changes to charging


Educational Psychology

15/16-review service delivery models
-consider reprioritising workflow and capacity
-consider partners views in constructing the service requirements

16/17-implement service review
-consider use and deployment of associates
-consider SLA for aspects of work

Early Years

15/16-audit current support
-review the analysis of data to prioritise workflow
-review child minding support and digital support

16/17 -Implement new workflow focussing on the priorities identified
-consider SLA for aspects of work




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Appendix 5
0-25 SEND Review
Current Staff Profile
The table below provides information about the staff in scope of this project. Further details can be found in
the Business Case.
Service Area Headcount FTE
Children with Disabilities 9 8.50
Home to School Transport and Travel Passes 4 4.00
Psychologists 11 8.25
SEN Support Services 8 7.62
Early Years’ Service 11 7.81
Total 43 36.18


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Investing in Stockport - Business Case


IIS Programme:
IIS Board SRO: Andrew Webb
IIS Project Lead: Terry Dafter
Portfolio: Adult Care Services
Project Name: Learning Disability Review

Project Board / Team Members
Terry Dafter
Mark Warren
Vince Fraga
Barbara Mitchell
Austin Broomhead
Holly Rae
Rachel Cobley


INVESTING
IN REFORM

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1. Project Overview
The vision is to ensure people with a learning disability are not excluded and marginalised with regards to their
health and social care needs. The aim is for the Council and its health and independent sector partners to work
with people with learning disabilities and other key stakeholders, to ensure that people can be enabled to have
equal access to the community, health services and local services tailored to meet often complex needs.

The promotion of person centred planning and support has made a significant contribution to the way people
are supported, primarily as a result of individual’s themselves saying what they want, how they want it and
when they want it. The ambition is for services such as children’s social care, education, adult social care and
providers, to streamline the system with the purpose of ensuring a more joined up approach to supporting
people to maintain and maximise opportunities for independence.

A draft Equality Impact Assessment for this project is attached at Appendix 3 and will be further developed to
reflect more detailed data analysis and consultation feedback.

2. Regulation and Statutory Considerations
Existing Legislation:
 Existing Health and Adult Social Care legislation and frameworks including the full implementation of the
Mental Capacity Act (2007) and the recent Supreme Court ruling relating to Deprivation of Liberties (DoLs);
 The Council and the CCG is required to conform to the Learning Disability Self-Assessment framework by
NHS England and the Local Government Association;
 Autism Act;
 Education Act.

New Legislation/ Direction:
 Care Act 2014;
 Healthier Together;
 Winterbourne View Concordat - The Council is required to implement the requirements of the
Winterbourne View Concordat and reduce the number of people being placed out of borough and support
those already outside to return to Stockport. The name of any council not conforming to the requirements
will be published.



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3. Investment Profile

The overall investment across these services currently stands at £23.5m. We anticipate that the future
(2016/17) in investment in this area will be £21.5m In order to achieve this ambitious programme of change,
the total investment can be summarised as follows:

Pooled
Budget
Baseline 15/16 16/17
£23m £22.5m £21m

Trajectory of budget reductions is outlined below

Year £000s
Baseline It should be noted a £1m savings target has already
been set for the current financial year and is in the
process of being realised.
2015/16 £0.5m
2016/17 £1.5m (agg. £2m)
Beyond £TBC


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4. A Description of the New Service
Long-term Vision
The vision is to ensure people with a learning disability are not excluded and marginalised with regards to their
health and social care needs. Learning disabled people die younger and do not have the same opportunities for
health care, education and employment opportunities when compared to other citizen groups in communities.

Aim of the Service
The aim is therefore for the Council and its health and independent sector partners to work with people with
learning disabilities and other key stakeholders, to ensure that people can be enabled to have equal access to
the community, health services and local services tailored to meet often complex needs. The promotion of
person centred planning and support has made a significant contribution to the way people are supported,
primarily as a result of individual’s themselves saying what they want, how they want it and when they want it.
A key challenge is to shape the market so as to ensure that people have choices and take control whilst at the
same time ensuring best value for the council.

Key stages of the journey to adulthood are often times of anxiety for young people with a learning disability as
a consequence of disjointed services and different eligible criteria. The ambition is for services such as
children’s social care, education, adult social care and providers, to streamline the system with the purpose of
ensuring a more joined up approach to supporting people to maintain and maximise opportunities for
independence.

How the reviewed service will be different for...

(1) People who use the service
 The service will refocus on only working with those people with a diagnosed learning disability.
Vulnerable adults and people with autism, who are not eligible for funded services, will not be
supported via the service and will be signposted to suitable alternative support.
 People with a learning disability will have access to a multi-disciplinary team of health and social care
professionals able to help plan for the future and provide support in times of crisis
 A more seamless service interface between Adult, Education and Children’s services
 For those that are eligible, the service will work with them in a personalised way. People will be
supported to maximise their independence through the use of community capacity and therapeutic
services in the first instance
 Often feel marginalised and people will be supported to access health action plans and housing with
care and support options
 For those whose lives are not in crisis and are eligible, people will be entitled to a personal budget and
can expect help to plan for their eligible support needs and meeting their outcomes

(2) People who work in the service
 The theme of an integrated multi-disciplinary service will be strengthened
 Practitioners will be smaller in number and focus on key objectives of maximising independence and
ensuring people are supported to purchase services locally
 Stockport Council currently manages the service and has control of the budgets. The option of this
changing and the Pennine Care Foundation Trust managing and running the service on a contractual
basis will be explored
 The service will be smaller as parts of it are contracted out to private providers and other services
discontinued
 Practitioners will be expected to ensure eligibility criteria is strictly applied and support the
development of market opportunities
 Will use the Resource Allocation System as the tool for calculating a budget
 Work more closely with partner agencies who are involved in supporting a person with learning

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disabilities to find employment, education, housing and care support.
 Ensure people with a learning disability are safeguarded against abuse
 Work together to fully utilise the multi-disciplinary skills of the team and in ensuring the potential for
out of borough placements is reduced

What will the new service provide? Reduced service focussed on FACs eligibility
What hours will it operate? As current service (provider service works 7 days)
What staff will be required? Staff mix will remain as per the current service (combination
of Pennine Care Foundation Trust staff and Stockport Council
staff)
Does it involve a multi-agency or
integrated approach?
Service is currently integrated with Health (Pennine Care
Foundation Trust).
Will there be any change to current
levels of service?
There will be a reduced in-house service (e.g. day services
and respite) and an increase responsibility to use Personal
Budgets to support and fund these activities. Significant
reductions in respite and day service availability.
Will customers notice any change to
the current service provision?
Yes, some clients will experience a reduction in service
provision in line with assessed need and eligibility.


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5. How we will achieve this
Approach to delivering change
Methodology of Change:
Fundamentally this will involve a review of existing spend over a two-year period to:
 Embed consistent approach to care package allocations (utilising the Resource Allocation System)
 Review some non-statutory in-house service
 Place a greater responsibility on the use of Personal Budgets
 Rigidly apply eligibility criteria
 Only work with people with a learning disability
 Independent sector to work with less complex cohorts, in-house with the most complex
 Much closer working relationships with children’s social care, education and health services at the
point of transition, through the 0 – 25 program.

This review will be carried out in the following phases:
Phase.1 (2014-15) – Initial consultation with families and provider organisations. Understanding scope and
impact of decisions.

Phase.2 (2015-16) – Market development, eligibility review and implementation of Resource Allocation System
(RAS). The savings for this year will be delivered through a review of existing packages of support, there are not
anticipated to be any impact on staffing in this year.

Phase.3 (2016-17) - Full Implementation of the new Learning Disability Service


Further detail is set out in:
- Appendix 1 – Activity and Impact Schedule
- Appendix 4 – Project milestones




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6. Impact on current service model

An overview of the impact from changes is summarised by group below:

Service
 Consistent approach to determining packages of care
 Fewer out of borough placements
 Potential reputational risk to Council (e.g. through Judicial Review)

Employees
 Fewer staff within the provider arm of the service (e.g. tenancies, respite and specialist support)
 In the short-term there will be a need for additional capacity to assess and review current cases in the
light of revised approach to service eligibility

Providers
 Greater opportunities within local market for new providers (e.g. within tenancies and resulting from
different use of Personal Budgets)
 Loss of income and potential closure of some organisations

Service Users and their Families
 Increased pressure on Social Care Personal Budget for the provision of respite and day services
 Less opportunity to secure placements in the accommodation of their choice (i.e. Out of Borough
placements)
 More people located close to their networks
 Potential increased stress at time of transition
 Promoting personalisation, therefore increasing choice and control albeit within a limited financial
envelope.
 Focus on using personal budgets in a more creative way using market capacity
 Withdrawal of low level support to people who are not FACs eligible may result in breakdown of care
leading to more expensive service provision at a later date.

The expected timeframes for these impacts are set out in Appendix 1 – Activity and Impact Schedule



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7. Interdependencies

This project cannot be viewed in isolation and is linked to a number of cross cutting IIS themes and projects:

 The CSS Information, Advice and Guidance project will need to consider the information advice and
guidance provided to individuals, parents and carers about Learning Disability services and provision.
 Health and Social Care Integration Programme
 O-25 and Children’s Act delivery
 Care Act implementation group
 Winterbourne View Action Plan
 Learning Disability Self-Assessment Framework returns
 Autism strategy to reduce the number of people financially supported via the Learning Disability adults
team
 Full partnership agreement with Pennine Trust who have stakes in building the staff and building
resource.
 Full involvement of CCG as pooled budget in place under section 75 arrangement.



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8. Stakeholders

This Business Case cannot be achieved alone and will require the support of a wide range of stakeholders. The
Management Team are working with a range of stakeholders to shape and progress this proposal. These
include:
 CCG
 Pennine Care Foundation Trust
 Children and Young People Services
 Parents and Carers
 Clients
 Independent Providers
 Stockport Advocacy
 Parents in Partnership (PIPS)
 Learning Disability Organisations
 Valuing People Partnership board



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9. Consultation and Engagement

Extensive consultation and engagement is essential for this project as it involves changes to current service
provision which is likely to affect current clients, their families and carers, employees and independent
providers.

Involvement from these groups in the development, design and implementation of any changes will be key to
ensuring that any changes are fully understood, negative impacts identified and mitigated, and strong positive
relationships remain between the organisation and key partners (including families and carers).

As well as this, individual discussions with clients will take place during 2014/15 about any changes to specific
care packages.

A Consultation Plan is attached at Appendix 2


APPENDICES
1. Activity and Impact
2. Consultation Plan
3. EIA
4. Project Milestones
5. Current staffing profile


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APPENDIX 1
ACTIVITY AND IMPACT SCHEDULE
Year Activity Potential Impact
2014/15
Service users and families involved in the process of tendering
to outsource.
Reduction in provider services

Outline impact and effect of personalisation/personal budgets
for those eligible.

Consultation on proposals to reduce or remove packages of
care.

Negotiations with Pennine Care Foundation Trust who also
employ staff within the Learning Disability Partnership and
who will be affected by the closures / redundancies

2015/16
Further savings to be identified through review process which
will inform the development of the market.
Reduction in price paid for care services could lead to market
instability

Closure of some services and continued outsourcing of some
in house Disability provider services

Up to a third of the total tenancies (60) will be retendered
over a two year period.

Removal or reduction of packages of care leading to
increased support required in the longer term.
Negotiate with CCG the health cost elements.

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Work with Education and Children`s Services (SEN and CYP
Disability Services) to reduce expenditure in high cost
residential placements at time of transition.

Active work to enable people to return from out of borough
(Return of 6 out of borough placements)

Options will need to be scoped to ensure that the Council’s
legal responsibility under the Care Act to ensure the market
can meet assessed needs to be further explored.

Work to further establish lead partnership role with Pennine
Trust

Full implementation of the RAS once the market has been
strengthened to respond to need

Cessation of daytime activities for those in registered
residential care.

2016/17 Full Implementation of the new Learning Disability Service

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APPENDIX 2
CONSULTATION PLAN
Please indicate if you
need to consult
internally and/ or
externally
Yes, extensive internal and external consultations will be required and corporate
support will be required. Consultation will be required with Individuals, Families and
Carers, representative organisations and staff.
 Externally with service users and providers regarding the transfer of third of
tenancies to private sector
 Externally with individuals, parents and carers regarding any changes in
service delivery and coverage.
 Internally with staff
 Externally with all service users who would be affected by reduced services
 Consultation with Valuing People Partnership Board.

Details of who you
intend to consult and
whether there will be a
geographical focus
No geographical focus.
What you intend to ask
them or the aim of the
consultation
The Consultation and engagement exercise will seek to understand:

(1) Unintended or Unknown impacts and concerns of the new model on:
 current service users
 carers and their families
 staff
 independent providers

(2) Feedback on the proposals
 representative organisations
 current service users
 carers and their families
 staff
 independent providers
 elected Members

(3) Other considerations / suggestions
 All of the above.

Specific questions will depend on the nature of the option progressed.

What methods of
consultation will be
used
Variety of methods depending on audience including: Focus Groups; 1-2-1;
Consultation documentation; Surveys
The team that will be
carrying out the
consultation
To be determined, depending on which option is chosen, Services to People with
Consultation support from Policy Performance and Reform. Likely that Project Officer
support will be required for the given the risks highlighted in the business case.
Period of consultation

Over 12 -18 months period starting within 2015/16. Individual discussions with clients
will take place during 2014/15 about any changes to specific care packages.
What form the feedback
will take
To be determined.

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APPENDIX 3
EQUALITY IMPACT ASSESSMENT
Title: Learning Disability Review Date: 21
st
June 2014
Stage: Draft
Lead Officer: Mark Warren / Holly Rae /
Rachel Cobley

Stage 1: Do you need to complete an Equality Impact Assessment (EIA)?
An EIA is required for this proposal as it entails a change to service delivery model. This will
have an impact on:
 Adults with Learning Disabilities in receipt of social care services (as well as those
who may not currently access the service but who may be soon to transition from
Children and Young People’s services or who are new to Social Care entirely).
 Current employees as job roles within the in-house service will need to be
renegotiated.
The outsourcing of Learning Disability tenancies will require full consultation with key
stakeholders as will any attempts to enable people placed out of borough to return if the
proposals are opposed. Key stakeholder groups include:
 Individuals and their families or carers;
 Representative organisations (e.g. Disability Stockport);
 Trade Unions;
 Elected Members and MPs;
 Partner Organisations including the Valuing People Partnership Board who are
responsible for the overall vision for Learning Disability services.
This EIA will require further development to analyse the impact on staff groups (e.g.
equalities breakdown), current client groups and their carers (e.g. engagement feedback and
service user breakdown) and wider implications in line with proposals around the 0-25
programme, health and social care integration and the care act on the long-term
sustainability of this proposal.

Stage 2: What do you know?
Further analysis is required to inform a current picture of the service, data that will be
considered includes:
 Analysis of current clients;
 Analysis of existing care and support packages;
 Best practice and national or sub regional analysis;

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 Staff profile;
 Analysis of current Learning Disability market;
 Feedback from any previous or existing consultation or engagement activity;
 Identification of gaps;
 Identification of any emerging impacts;
 Next steps for further data analysis (e.g. consultation)

Stage 2a: Further Data and Consultation
This section will be completed upon analysis undertaken at stage.2.
At stage.2 any gaps identified will be explored further in this stage. This section will
therefore include the outcomes of any consultation and engagement activity.

Stage 3: Results and Measures
This section will be completed to reflect and build on the learning within section.2

Stage 4: Decision Stage
This EIA is a live document and will accompany the decision at all points throughout the
process.


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APPENDIX 4

Potential milestones
Saving Target Identified July 2014
Initial Executive Agreement August 2014
Consultation Period August – October
2014
Contract Notice Period
n.b. This will vary depending on the service redesign model
To be determined
Final Business Case (seeking approval to implement) Feb 2015
Phase.1 Implementation
 11 tenancies transferred to the private sector (to secure the £1m for 2014/15)
 Work will commence on building Hayes Court invest to save model
 Out of Borough reviews will have been undertaken
 Significant LD contracts will have been reviewed

April 2015



Page 17 of 17
Learning Disability Review – 4
th
August 2014

APPENDIX 5
Current Staff Profile

The table below provides information about the staff in scope of this project. Further details can be found
in the Business Case.

Service area Headcount No of FTEs
Learning Disability Services CTPLD 28 23.85
Provider Services 225 200.44
Total 253 224.29

Please note recent judgment on payment for sleep ins will also have impact on costings.


Page 1 of 17
Leisure Facilities – 4
th
August 2014

Investing in Stockport - Business Case


IIS Programme:
IIS Board SRO: Paul Lawrence
IIS Project Lead: Peter Ashworth
Portfolio: Economic Development & Regeneration
Project Name: Leisure Facilities

Project Board / Team Members
Peter Ashworth, Head of Culture and Leisure
Malcolm McPhail, Martin Harriman, Kate Edgell (Life Leisure)
Denise Irving, Active Stockport Manager
Stephen Bell, Head of Commissioning School Places
Murray Carr, Head of Estates and Asset Management
Michael Cullen, Strategic Accountant
Parveen Akhtar, Head of Legal and Democratic Services
Joseph Conmee, Policy, Performance and Reform


INVESTING
IN REFORM
Page 2 of 17
Leisure Facilities – 4
th
August 2014

1. Project Overview

This project will take forward proposals for the provision of existing facilities and interventions and significantly
reduced cost to enable:

(a) Those Stockport residents who are currently physically active to remain physically active.
(b) Those Stockport residents who are not currently physically active to become physically active.


It comprises two elements which will maintain the existing leisure offer to residents at lower cost to the Council
by potentially transferring dual-use facilities to schools and single-use facilities to Life Leisure on long-term
leases.

As negotiations and financial modelling progresses, it will be possible to develop more detailed business cases
for each of the two elements. It is anticipated that these will be finalised as follows:

Dual Use Sites – October 2014
Leisure Centres Stage 1(Financial Appraisal) – January 2015
Leisure Centres Stage 2 (Detailed Business Case) – April 2015

No Council employees would be affected by the transfer of dual use facilities proposal but it is possible that
TUPE may apply.


A draft Equality Impact Assessment for this project is attached at Appendix 3 and will be further developed in
line with consultation.



Page 3 of 17
Leisure Facilities – 4
th
August 2014

2. Regulation and Statutory Considerations
Not applicable.



Page 4 of 17
Leisure Facilities – 4
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August 2014

3. Investment Profile

The overall investment across these services currently stands at £1.5m. We will aim to achieve a future
investment figure of £0.64m. In order to achieve this ambitious programme of change, the total investment
can be summarised as follows:

Year £000s
2014/15 £1.5m
2015/16 £1.07m
2016/17 £0.64m
Beyond £TBC

The retained figure includes the funding for Sports Development activity.


Page 5 of 17
Leisure Facilities – 4
th
August 2014

4. A Description of the New Service

It is not anticipated that the service to users will change and protection of access to facilities and service will be
preserved in any new agreement with Life Leisure.

The Leisure Facilities proposal is made up of two parts. The first is a proposal to transfer ownership of dual use
leisure facilities from SMBC to the relevant school. The second part is the proposed transfer of existing leisure
facilities from SMBC ownership to Life Leisure on a long-term lease and the reduction / withdrawal of the
revenue funding currently paid by SMBC to Life Leisure.

Transfer of Dual Use Facilities
This proposal is to transfer ownership and operation of dual use facilities to schools so they are in complete
control of the sites. It will be put forward on condition that current public provision - both in terms of facilities
and opening hours - is maintained. In order to facilitate the transfer of responsibility for the facilities the
Council may need to consider a one-off capital sum to bring the facilities up to an acceptable standard.

The dual use sites provide leisure facilities for the community which are not available through private providers
or the remainder of Life Leisure’s portfolio. These include squash courts, sports halls, and AstroTurf pitches.

Putting the schools in direct control of the leisure provision on the site would enable them to take their own
decisions about maintenance and investment and retain the entire income from the facility to cover direct
costs and future equipment investment requirements. This would also enable them to build stronger links into
their local communities as the provider of wider services to people in the neighbourhood.

If schools do not wish to be responsible for the day to day operation of dual use facilities, a new management
arrangement would be negotiated between Life Leisure and the school, which protects public access. It is
proposed that overall responsibility for the asset, including maintenance and equipment, would sit with the
school, as the primary user of the facility.

Transfer of Facilities to Life Leisure

This proposal is to amend and extend existing agreements with Life Leisure to include full repairing and insuring
responsibility for the leisure centres with significantly reduced SMBC investment. As part of the proposal, lease
periods would be extended (with a new end date) on the following centres:

 Avondale
 Cheadle
 Grand Central Pool
 Hazel Grove
 Houldsworth Village
 Lapwing (to be replaced by Brinnington Leisure Centre)
 Marple
 Offerton (to be replaced by Alan Newton Centre)
 Romiley

The following conditions will need to be addressed in any new agreement(s):

 The number and location of leisure facilities, and a process for the agreement of any changes;
 Continuation of reduced price access to facilities for vulnerable groups and those on a low income;
 Quality of provision;
 Limitations on charging rates;
 Consideration of different financial performance scenarios;
Page 6 of 17
Leisure Facilities – 4
th
August 2014

 Potential capital expenditure requirement;
 New partnership plan setting out how leisure/physical activity can contribute towards positive
outcomes in the borough;
 Potential alternative sources of funding as a result of a new plan, on a commissioned, rather than
deficit funding basis.

A separate new agreement would be developed in relation to sport & physical activity development work,
which would take account of the changed arrangements.

The proposal is based on the premise that, if Life Leisure has sufficient security of tenure over assets, they will
be able to borrow capital sums which will improve business performance and remove the need for the SMBC
revenue deficit subsidy.

In addition as part of the negotiations with Life Leisure we would hope to mitigate the impact on the
organisation through:

• Investigation and identification of alternative funding opportunities that help deliver the sport, physical
and health outcome aspirations of the Council and Life Leisure; and,
• Consideration of the capital expenditure requirements.

Page 7 of 17
Leisure Facilities – 4
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August 2014

5. How we will achieve this
The project will be delivered in negotiation with Life Leisure to adapt and extend current agreements. It will be
delivered on staged basis in 2015/16 and 2016/17, with detailed plans to be confirmed once financial modelling
has taken place and the outcome of dual use discussions is known.


Detail are set out in:

- Appendix 1 – Activity and Impact Schedule
- Appendix 4 – Project milestones


Page 8 of 17
Leisure Facilities – 4
th
August 2014

6. Impact on current service model


Dual Use Facilities
This proposal would keep dual use sites operational in the event of transfer of other leisure assets to Life
Leisure on a long term lease. As part of the transfer agreement, the school would be required to retain the
current range of facilities and opening times. They would need to accept Leisure Key to provide discounted
usage to vulnerable groups. Consequently, there should be no impact on customers who use these centres.

Transfer of Facilities to Life Leisure
Providing Life Leisure consent to amend existing agreements and take on long term leases on the facilities in
exchange for reduced revenue deficit subsidy would be on condition that existing service provision is
maintained and that current affordability and access schemes are retained. If these conditions are enforced
there should be no direct impact on service users.


Detail are set out in Appendix 1 – Activity and Impact Schedule



Page 9 of 17
Leisure Facilities – 4
th
August 2014

7. Interdependencies

This project cannot be viewed in isolation and is linked to a number of cross cutting IIS themes:

There are relations to the Digital or Information, Advice and Guidance IIS themes linking customers to Life
Leisure Information

The project will have a bearing on the Council’s wider approach to estates and asset management strategy.
There are also potentially links to new approaches to the IIS Locality Operating Model both in terms of facility
provision.


Page 10 of 17
Leisure Facilities – 4
th
August 2014

8. Stakeholders

This Business Case cannot be achieved alone and will require the support of a wide range of stakeholders. The
Management Team are working with a range of stakeholders to shape and progress this proposal. These
include:


 Schools – pupils, staff, governors and parents
 Life Leisure – board, management and staff
 Ward members
 Sports Clubs (in particular Bramhall Queensgate Sports Club)
 Local residents
 Facility users – current and potential


Page 11 of 17
Leisure Facilities – 4
th
August 2014

9. Consultation and Engagement

Public / service user consultation would not be necessary. It may, however, be appropriate to involve
stakeholders in helping to define the future performance expectations of Life Leisure.


A Consultation Plan is attached at Appendix 2


APPENDICES
1. Activity and Impact
2. Consultation Plan
3. EIA
4. Project Milestones
5. Staff Profile

Page 12 of 17
Leisure Facilities – 4
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August 2014

APPENDIX 1
ACTIVITY AND IMPACT SCHEDULE
Year Activity Potential Impact
2014/15
Negotiation with schools regarding future Dual Use provision.
Schools may view this as an opportunity to restrict public
access. Need to make clear that existing public provision
needs to be retained.
Potential TUPE implications for Life Leisure staff at dual use
sites.
Negotiation with Life Leisure regarding future Leisure
provision.
Need to ensure that public access is retained.
2015/16
Potential change of operation for dual use sites
Life Leisure users are no longer able to access facilities with
multi-site passes
TUPE implications for Life Leisure staff
Potentially reduced opportunities for Leisure Key Holders

Changed operating agreement for Leisure Centres Protected access and pricing for vulnerable groups
Potentially reduced opportunities for Leisure Key Holders
Page 13 of 17
Leisure Facilities – 4
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August 2014

Potential changes to programmes to enable Life Leisure to
maximise commercial opportunities.
Changed agreement for sports/physical activity development More targeted support in line with Public Health outcomes
which may impact on levels of support to sports clubs.
2016/17 As for 2015/16 as programme is progressed in stages. As for 2015/16 as programme is progressed in stages.
Page 14 of 17
Leisure Facilities – 4
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August 2014

APPENDIX 2
CONSULTATION PLAN
If you intend to consult, please complete the table below:
Please indicate if you need to
consult internally and/ or
externally
Engagement will only be required with Life Leisure and Dual Use
Sites (schools)
Details of who you intend to
consult and whether there will be
a geographical focus
o Life Leisure
o Schools


What you intend to ask them or
the aim of the consultation
Reaching agreement between the Council, Life Leisure and
schools to transfer ownership of Leisure Facilities.


What methods of consultation will
be used
Meetings
The team that will be carrying out
the consultation
Services to Place
Period of consultation

On-going until the end of 2014
What form the feedback will take Executive reports, Council website, Council newspaper

Page 15 of 17
Leisure Facilities – 4
th
August 2014

APPENDIX 3
EQUALITY IMPACT ASSESSMENT
Title: Leisure Date: 30 July 2014
Stage: consultation (delete as applicable)
Lead Officer: Peter Ashworth
Stage 1: Do you need to complete an Equality Impact Assessment (EIA)?

Given that the proposals will maintain existing numbers of facilities, levels of access and
affordability, and terms and conditions for any Life Leisure staff subject to TUPE agreements
with schools, no equality impact assessment is required.
Stage 2: What do you know?

Stage 2a: Further Data and Consultation

Stage 3: Results and Measures

Stage 4: Decision Stage



Page 16 of 17
Leisure Facilities – 4
th
August 2014


APPENDIX 4

Potential milestones
Project Milestone

Transfer of Dual Use Facilities

Operating Information Provided to Schools
Deadline for schools expressing an interest in operating facility
Alternative offer made
Confirmation of future operating model to Life Leisure/notice served
Tender for alternative operator advertised (if necessary)
Agreements with schools drafted
Alternative operators appointed
New operating model takes effect

Transfer of Facilities to Life Leisure

Secure definitive legal advice on options for termination
Issue proposal to Life Leisure
Financial Appraisal Completed
Detailed Business Case
New agreements completed

Project Target
Date


30/05/14
31/07/14
30/08/14
30/09/14
30/09/14
31/10/14
31/12/14
01/04/15



30/06/14
09/07/14
31/01/15
01/04/15
01/06/15















Page 17 of 17
Leisure Facilities – 4
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August 2014

Appendix 5
Leisure Facilities
Current Staff Profile

No SMBC employees would be affected by the transfer of dual use facilities proposal but it is possible that a
TUPE staff transfer agreement between Life Leisure and schools may be required for approximately 20 Life
Leisure employees.

Page 1 of 15
Museums and Cultural Attractions – 4
th
August 2014

Investing in Stockport - Business Case


IIS Programme:
IIS Board SRO: Paul Lawrence
IIS Project Lead: Peter Ashworth
Portfolio: Economic Development & Regeneration
Project Name: Museums and Cultural Attractions

Project Board / Team Members
Peter Ashworth, Head of Culture and Leisure
Alison Farthing, Culture & Leisure Manager
Murray Carr, Head of Estates and Asset Management
Joseph Conmee, Policy, Performance and Reform


INVESTING
IN REFORM

Page 2 of 15
Museums and Cultural Attractions – 4
th
August 2014

1. Project Overview
The overall vision for this project is to safeguard Stockport’s cultural and heritage assets with significantly
reduced revenue budget. The development of these assets through external funding sources (primarily
Heritage Lottery Fund) has been a significant component of regeneration strategy over the past 15 years. We
see Stockport’s heritage assets as playing an integral role in defining the identity of the town and attracting
visitors and boosting local tourism.

This project will establish a new delivery model for museums and cultural attractions at arms length from the
Council based on a reduced cost-base, increased income generation, and greater volunteering/community
involvement. The model will be required to safeguard SMBC’s cultural assets, protect existing income streams,
and avoid the risk of financial penalties from external funders.

The project will also re-target a revised Stockport Market budget to support current Town Centre
regeneration priorities.



There are 42 people (35.32 fte) staff in scope of this proposal

A draft Equality Impact Assessment for this project is attached at Appendix 3 and will be further developed in
line with consultation.




Page 3 of 15
Museums and Cultural Attractions – 4
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August 2014

2. Regulation and Statutory Considerations
No regulatory and statutory considerations affect services within this proposal.




Page 4 of 15
Museums and Cultural Attractions – 4
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August 2014

3. Investment Profile

The overall investment across these services currently stands At £1.0m. We anticipate that the future in
investment in this area will be £0.6m In order to achieve this ambitious programme of change, the total
investment can be summarised as follows:

Year £000s
2014/15 £1.0m
2015/16 £1.0m
2016/17 £0.6m
Beyond


Page 5 of 15
Museums and Cultural Attractions – 4
th
August 2014

4. A Description of the New Service
Museums

The Council currently operates the following museums:

 Air Raid Shelters
 Bramall Hall
 Chadkirk Chapel
 Stockport Museum / Staircase House
 Stockport Art Gallery (exhibitions programmed by group of volunteers)
 Hatworks

The service also has responsibility for custodianship and care of the Council’s museum collections.

A new service delivery model will be developed which will take responsibility for the operation of the Council’s
museums. This will operate at arms-length from the Council. The organisation will be expected to maintain
and/or increase current income generation levels, with a reduced staffing establishment and a more flexible
structure.

Stockport’s unique and diverse museums have the potential to attract visitors to the town and generate
income through admissions, special events, hospitality and retail. Income generation and footfall have been
constrained in recent years by reduced staffing levels and less efficient use of resources. By redefining the role
of the museums, freeing up staff innovation and creativity and investing in publicity and product development,
it is anticipated that income levels can be improved. An arms-length organisation will also be able to make
greater use of volunteers and so should be able to operate at a reduced cost.

The service is committed to delivering the Bramall Hall and Park project which is due to be largely complete by
September 2016 on time and to schedule. Therefore it is important to maintain a degree of staffing stability in
the museums service during this period, as the delivery of the project is being managed in-house and there are
significant risks that instability could cause the delivery of the project to be compromised, leading to it taking
longer than is currently scheduled and costs rising significantly.

Market

The current management and operation of the Market will be reformed to maximise income and secure an
improved offer for the future at a reduced cost. This will involve working closely with market stakeholders to
develop a new operating model which builds on current successes but widens trader profile.


Page 6 of 15
Museums and Cultural Attractions – 4
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August 2014

5. How we will achieve this
Museums

14/15

Options appraisal (with appropriate specialist advice) and stakeholder engagement will take place from
September 2014 to determine the form and function of a new organisation.

15/16 & 16/17

Once the form and function of the new organisation is agreed, detailed implementation will be progressed to
coincide with the completion of the Bramall Hall and Park project. Detailed stakeholder and staff engagement
will need to take place at different stages of the project.

Market

14/15

Operational review will be completed to release resources from current delivery model to invest in
improvement of the quality and offer, drive additional income and compensate for reduced budget. Staff
consultation will be required.

A stakeholder-led markets management board will be created to oversee the future operation and
development of the market to improve the quality and offer and drive additional income.



Detail are set out in:

- Appendix 1 – Activity and Impact Schedule
- Appendix 4 – Project milestones



Page 7 of 15
Museums and Cultural Attractions – 4
th
August 2014

6. Impact on current service model

Across this range of services, the intended impacts will be a reinvigorated offer operating with greater
commercial flexibility with stronger staff and stakeholder ownership. However impacts on issues such as
quality, terms and conditions and income targets will be important in achieving savings.

There will be a potential reduction in the workforce.

Museums

Although the current portfolio of museums will remain operational with the current opening times, some
activity will be subject to change. The response service to enquiries about collections will stop and
participation in local initiatives which do not generate a financial return may be discontinued. Care and
maintenance of museum collections will be reduced, which could compromise museum accreditation standards
and potential for future external funding.

The proposed new organisation will have to operate with reduced staffing costs. This will mean a reduction in
the staffing establishment, more generic roles and possible change to terms and conditions.

Market

The Market offer will be subject to review although the current operating times will be unaffected. The initial
focus will be developing a critical mass of higher quality stalls for the outdoor market, improving the retail offer
for shoppers. The Council will also be looking for an alternative support mechanism from the current market
team for future community events.



Detail are set out in Appendix 1 – Activity and Impact Schedule




Page 8 of 15
Museums and Cultural Attractions – 4
th
August 2014

7. Interdependencies

This project cannot be viewed in isolation and is linked to a number of cross cutting IIS themes:

There are links to the Digital or Information, Advice and Guidance IIS themes.

The project will have a bearing on the Council’s wider approach to estates and asset management strategy.



Page 9 of 15
Museums and Cultural Attractions – 4
th
August 2014

8. Stakeholders

This Business Case cannot be achieved alone and will require the support of a wide range of stakeholders. The
Management Team are working with a range of stakeholders to shape and progress this proposal. These
include:

 Staff

 Portas Delivery Group

 Market Traders / National Market Traders Federation

 Stockport Heritage Trust

 Stockport Heritage and Conservation Forum

 Heritage Lottery Fund

 Customers

 Arts Council England

 Greater Manchester Museum’s Group



Page 10 of 15
Museums and Cultural Attractions – 4
th
August 2014

9. Consultation and Engagement

Public/service user consultation would be necessary.


A Consultation Plan is attached at Appendix 2


APPENDICES
1. Activity and Impact
2. Consultation Plan
3. EIA
4. Project Milestones
5. Current Staffing Profile


Page 11 of 15
Museums and Cultural Attractions – 4
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August 2014

APPENDIX 1
ACTIVITY AND IMPACT SCHEDULE
Year Activity Potential Impact
2014/15
Museums: Specialist advice sought on form and function of
new organisation.
Investment in consultancy support may be negatively viewed
when future service reductions are planned.
Museums: Stakeholder engagement to inform the form and
function of a new organisation
Gives interested organisations and individuals a chance to
‘have a say’ in the services offered at Stockport Museums in
the future and their governance.
Market: Operational review.
Will potentially reduce staffing and service levels in 14/15.
Will involve staff consultation and possibly changes to the
levels of service received by market traders, community
organisations and stakeholders.
2015/16 Progress implementation of new organisation.
Will have detailed legal, financial and governance
implications, depending on the form and function to be
adopted.
2016/17
Implementation of new organisation to run museums. Could lead to changed service offer and implementation of a
more commercial relationship between the Council and
museums service. Depending on timing/phasing, could
undermine Bramall Hall and Park HLF project.

Page 12 of 15
Museums and Cultural Attractions – 4
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August 2014

APPENDIX 2
CONSULTATION PLAN
If you intend to consult, please complete the table below:
Please indicate if you need to
consult internally and/ or
externally
Internal and external
Details of who you intend to
consult and whether there will be
a geographical focus
o Staff
o Portas Delivery Group
o Market Traders / National Market Traders Federation
o Stockport Heritage Trust
o Stockport Heritage and Conservation Forum
o Heritage Lottery Fund
o Customers
o Arts Council England
o Greater Manchester Museums Group

What you intend to ask them or
the aim of the consultation
Engaging with stakeholders to develop alternative service
delivery models. The public and staff may need to be consulted
following the outcome of this.

What methods of consultation will
be used
Various quantitative and qualitative methods
The team that will be carrying out
the consultation
Services to Place, supported by Consultation within PPR where
necessary
Period of consultation

On-going from September 2014
What form the feedback will take TBC


Page 13 of 15
Museums and Cultural Attractions – 4
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August 2014

APPENDIX 3
EQUALITY IMPACT ASSESSMENT

Title:
Museums and Cultural Attractions

Date: 30/07/2014
Stage: consultation

Lead Officer: Peter Ashworth

Stage 1: Do you need to complete an Equality Impact Assessment (EIA)?
Separate EIAs will be required for the constituent parts of the project. These will need to be
developed once the proposals are clearer.

Stage 2: What do you know?


Stage 2a: Further Data and Consultation


Stage 3: Results and Measures


Stage 4: Decision Stage






Page 14 of 15
Museums and Cultural Attractions – 4
th
August 2014

APPENDIX 4

Potential milestones
Project Milestone


Reconfigured Staff resource for the Market

Stakeholder engagement strategy designed
Draft role and structure of future market team defined
Staff consultation complete
New staffing structure & service proposition in place

New Operating Model for Museums

Specialist advice on options for form of new organisation received
Stakeholder and staff consultation on role and form of new organisation complete
Governance and organisational aspects of new organisation finalised
Bramall Hall project complete
Staff consultation on new organisational model complete
New organisation becomes effective
Project Target
Date



30/09/14
30/09/14
31/12/14
01/04/15



31/08/14
31/12/14
31/12/15
30/09/16
31/12/16
01/04/17

















Page 15 of 15
Museums and Cultural Attractions – 4
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August 2014


Appendix 5
Markets, Museums and Cultural Attractions
Current Staff Profile
The table below provides information about the staff in scope of this project. Further details can be found in
the Business Case.
Service Area Headcount FTE
Market 7 7.00
Museums and Arts 35 28.32
Total 42 35.32



Page 1 of 15
Highways and Engineering Services – 4
th
August 2014

Investing in Stockport - Business Case


IIS Programme:
IIS Board SRO: Paul Lawrence
IIS Project Lead: Megan Black
Portfolio: Communities and Sustainability
Project Name: Highways and Engineering Services

Project Board / Team Members
Paul Lawrence, Corporate Director – Place
Megan Black, Head of Public Realm
Michael Cullen, Strategic Accountant
Ian O’Donnell, Head of Public Protection


INVESTING
IN REFORM
Page 2 of 15
Highways and Engineering Services – 4
th
August 2014

1. Project Overview
This proposal covers the potential to create a shared service for local highway services by a number of local
authorities within GM. This work is currently being developed by Local Authorities and Transport for Greater
Manchester.

The project will be developed based on the following principles:
 Maintain local accountability for highways services
 Improve resilience in these services across the conurbation
 Generate significant efficiencies and greater improvements in the delivery of highway services across
Greater Manchester
 Prioritise investment to facilitate growth, jobs and access to services (Delivery of the Greater
Manchester Strategy)
 Increase reliability and consistency of service delivery to all road users
 Improve overall service provision through greater collaborative working
 Development of a stronger skill base and organisational capability

There are 140 people (93.56 fte) included within the scope of this proposal

A draft Equality Impact Assessment for this project is attached at Appendix 3 and will be further developed in
line with consultation.



Page 3 of 15
Highways and Engineering Services – 4
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August 2014

2. Regulation and Statutory Considerations
Under the Highways Act 1980 (Section 41), highway authorities are under a duty to inspect and repair road
surfaces.

The Highways Act 1980 places a duty on Highway Authorities in respect of winter conditions as a Highway
Authority we are under a duty to ensure, so far as is reasonably practicable, that safe passage along a highway
is not endangered by snow or ice.

The authority has statutory duties to provide Road Safety functions, Traffic Management functions and a Public
Rights of Way role.


Page 4 of 15
Highways and Engineering Services – 4
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August 2014

3. Investment Profile

The overall investment across these services currently stands at £4.5m. We anticipate that the future in
investment in this area will be £4.0m. In order to achieve this ambitious programme of change, the total
investment can be summarised as follows:


Year £000s
2014/15 £4.5m
2015/16 £4.5m
2016/17 £4.0m
Beyond £TBC

Page 5 of 15
Highways and Engineering Services – 4
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August 2014

4. A Description of the New Service
Highways services in Stockport are currently delivered through a combination of in-house services and
Solutions SK but a range of different delivery models exists across Greater Manchester. The development of a
new delivery model will need to maintain local accountability, protect front line delivery, improve resilience
available for highways service at a time of reduced resources, and achieve economies of scale and consistency
in highways management across Greater Manchester.

The provisional services in-scope of the project are:

Management of the Network
 Transport strategy
 Traffic management
 UTC (Urban Traffic Control)
 HFAS (Highways Forecasting and Analytical Services)
 GM Road Activities Permits Scheme
 Asset Management

Skills & Expertise
 Highways Design
 Street Lighting
 Bridges and Structures
 Contract management
 Programme and Project management
 Cyclical maintenance
 Safety inspections and insurance
 Road Safety

Regulation & Enforcement
 Parking enforcement
 Highways enforcement
.

Page 6 of 15
Highways and Engineering Services – 4
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August 2014

5. How we will achieve this
15/16
 Agreement in principle by individual Local Authorities and Transport for Greater Manchester
 Development of full business case
 Agreement of transition plan

Detail are set out in:

- Appendix 1 – Activity and Impact Schedule
- Appendix 4 – Project milestones


Page 7 of 15
Highways and Engineering Services – 4
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August 2014

6. Impact on current service model

The objective of the project is to minimise public impact whilst offering cost savings to each participating
authority. New arrangements to maintain local accountability of the shared service will need to be carefully
agreed.


Detail are set out in Appendix 1 – Activity and Impact Schedule



Page 8 of 15
Highways and Engineering Services – 4
th
August 2014

7. Interdependencies

This project cannot be viewed in isolation and is linked to a number of cross cutting IIS themes:

There are indirect links to the Digital or Information, Advice and Guidance IIS themes. However the project
may have a bearing on the Estates and Asset Management Strategy and to the IIS Locality Operating Model.



Page 9 of 15
Highways and Engineering Services – 4
th
August 2014

8. Stakeholders

This Business Case cannot be achieved alone and will require the support of a wide range of stakeholders. The
Management Team are working with a range of stakeholders to shape and progress this proposal. These
include:

 Transport for Greater Manchester
 Solutions SK
 Elected Members
 Local residents


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9. Consultation and Engagement

This proposal involves considerable legal, constitutional, human resources, financial, and contractual change. A
consultation framework to engage with the public and with stakeholders will be developed for the overall
Greater Manchester business case should Leaders approve it.


A Consultation Plan is attached at Appendix 2


APPENDICES
1. Activity and Impact
2. Consultation Plan
3. EIA
4. Project Milestones
5. Current Staffing Profile

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APPENDIX 1
ACTIVITY AND IMPACT SCHEDULE
Year Activity Potential Impact
2014/15
Agreement in principle will be required by individual local
authorities and TfGM

Development of a full business case by TfGM for the
shared service

Agreement of transition plan
2015/16
The transition to a shared service will take place during
15/16 for implementation in 2016/17.
This will have staff implications for SMBC (potential TUPE
arrangements).
2016/17
Full Implementation of the new service


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APPENDIX 2
CONSULTATION PLAN
If you intend to consult, please complete the table below:
Please indicate if you need to
consult internally and/ or
externally
Internal and external
Details of who you intend to
consult and whether there will be
a geographical focus
o Public
o Partners
o AGMA


What you intend to ask them or
the aim of the consultation
This proposal is the potential to create a shared service for local
highway services by a number of local authorities within GM.
Any new service delivery model will need to maintain local
accountability, protect front line delivery, improve resilience
available for highways services at a time of reduced resources,
and achieve economies of scale and consistency in highways
management across Greater Manchester.
Once the new arrangements have been agreed staff and partners
will need to be consulted.

What methods of consultation will
be used
TBC
The team that will be carrying out
the consultation
Services to Place along with AGMA, supported by Consultation
within PPR where necessary
Period of consultation

TBC
What form the feedback will take TBC












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APPENDIX 3
EQUALITY IMPACT ASSESSMENT
Title:
Highways and Engineering
Services
Date: 30 July 2014
Stage: consultation
Lead Officer: Megan Black
Stage 1: Do you need to complete an Equality Impact Assessment (EIA)?
The proposal will have no impact on transport accessibility. An EIA will be required but this should be
developed for the overall Greater Manchester business case should Leaders approve it.
Stage 2: What do you know?

Stage 2a: Further Data and Consultation

Stage 3: Results and Measures

Stage 4: Decision Stage



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APPENDIX 4

Potential milestones
Project Milestone


Agreement in principle by individual Local Authority’s and TFGM
Development of full business case
Agreement of transition plan

Project Target
Date























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Appendix 5
Highways and Engineering
Current Staff Profile
The table below provides information about the staff in scope of this project. Further details can be found in
the Business Case.
Service Area Headcount FTE
Engineering Services 37 36.20
Highways and Engineering Service 1 1.00
Highways Maintenance 11 10.78
School Crossing Patrol 50 10.05
Street Cleaning 3 3.00
Traffic Services (Parking) 26 25.43
Engineering Services (50%) 1 0.50
Street Cleaning (60%) 11 6.60
Total 140 93.56



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Investing in Stockport - Business Case


IIS Programme: Alternative Service Delivery Models
IIS Board SRO: Paul Lawrence
IIS Project Lead: Ian O’Donnell
Portfolio: Communities and Sustainability
Project Name: New Model for Regulation

Project Board / Team Members

Ian O’Donnell, Head of Public Protection
Emma Curle, Head of Development Management
Megan Black, Head of Public Realm
Louise Chadderton, CSS Manager - Refom


INVESTING
IN REFORM

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1. Project Overview

The current configuration of regulatory and enforcement services is made up of several distinct professional
specialisms which operate within their own distinct policy frameworks. This project will review regulatory and
enforcement standards and redesign the existing configuration of services accordingly while still enabling a
quality, responsive service.

It will involve the development of :
• an agreed set of parameters for intervention, and
• A new set of standards giving consistency in the approach to regulation.
The project will be informed by a clear assessment of the minimum standard of service provision that the
Council can legally provide.

The teams included in the scope of this project:
 Environmental Protection
 Trading Standards
 Licensing
 Commercial
 Community
 Hygiene Action / Pest Control
 Building Control
 Public Realm Enforcement
 Conservation
 Planning Enforcement

There are currently 80 people (73.91fte) working in the above services. There will be a reduction is staff of up
to 7 fte.

The project will roll-out over two phases from 15/16 to 16/17. Reconfigure and reduce current enforcement
staffing resource and potentially charge for services that have previously been offered free of charge in year 1,
and developing a model across the entire range of services which is integrated with Locality Working in year 2.

A draft Equality Impact Assessment for this project is attached at Appendix 3 and will be further developed in
line with consultation.



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2. Regulation and Statutory Considerations

• Environmental Protection Act
• Clean Neighbourhoods Act
• Planning and Conservation Legislation



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3. Investment Profile

The overall investment across these services currently stands at £1.5m. We anticipate that the future in
investment in this area will be £1m. In order to achieve this ambitious programme of change, the total
investment can be summarised as follows:

Year £000s
2014/15 £1.5m
2015/16 £1.25m
2016/17 £1.00m
Beyond


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4. A Description of the New Service

In 15/16 this proposal will reduce front-line functions that deal with development and environmental
enforcement. It will look at the current thresholds for regulation and enforcement set out in the agreed policy
frameworks. An assessment will be made whether the demand for intervention can be reduced, while still
enabling a quality, responsive service. Environmental Protection; Public Realm; Conservation and Planning
enforcement teams will become an integrated environmental enforcement team within the Public Protection
service It is anticipated that this will involve a reduction of up to 7 fte.

A number of services are income generating including Pest Control, Hygiene Action and Building Control. An
appraisal will take place of potential options to generate additional income and operate these services on a
self-financing basis where practical.

In 16/17 the project will look to reconfigure all regulatory services into either multi-disciplinary teams working
at the neighbourhood level or specialist technical functions working across the borough.

The framework for the reconfigured service will have an agreed set of parameters for intervention which will
balance the need for public protection with the need to provide growth and a thriving economy. It will also
impact on outcomes aligned to safe and resilient communities; the service will involve the development of a
new set of standards which will give consistency in the approach to regulation, ensuring that resources can be
allocated to those areas which are of most potential harm to the community.


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5. How we will achieve this

2014/15:
• Develop a model for the integrated environmental enforcement function. The detailed new structure
will be available by the end of September 2014.

Phase 1 (15/16):
 A reduction in front-line functions that deal with Conservation; Planning; Public Realm and Public
Protection Enforcement.
 An appraisal of potential options to generate additional income from Pest Control, Hygiene Action and
Building Control so these services can operate on a self-financing basis where practical.
• Conservation integrated further with Development Management services.

Phase 2 (16/17):
• Reconfiguration of all regulatory services (as detailed above and also including Trading Standards,
Licensing and Building Control) into either multi-disciplinary teams working at the neighbourhood level
or specialist technical functions working across the borough.

Detail are set out in:

- Appendix 1 – Activity and Impact Schedule
- Appendix 4 – Project milestones



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6. Impact on current service model


There will be a greater reliance on the private sector working to standard guidance. If there are breaches then
there will be a reduced capacity to retrospectively enforce and the most significant cases are likely to be
investigated.

There will be a reduction in staffing.

There will be a more limited response to complaints from both Elected Members and members of the public.

The Council would have a reduced ability to investigate offences. This will lead to some breaches not being
followed up and only more significant cases being investigated.

Some cases involving visual amenity will no longer be investigated unless there is the potential for significant
harm, e.g. advertising banners without planning permission will not be removed unless there is a risk to the
public.

Detail are set out in Appendix 1 – Activity and Impact Schedule




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7. Interdependencies

This project cannot be viewed in isolation and is linked to a number of cross cutting IIS themes:

• In order to be successful the project would need to be developed alongside a model for locality
working, especially for the second phase of the proposal to be delivered in 16/17.

• The project will rely heavily on the incorporation of digital access to transactional services to reduce
demand.




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8. Stakeholders

This Business Case cannot be achieved alone and will require the support of a wide range of stakeholders. The
Management Team are working with a range of stakeholders to shape and progress this proposal. These
include:

 Businesses
 Residents
 Elected Members
 GM Fire & Rescue Service
 GMP (particularly Neighbourhood Policing Teams)



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9. Consultation and Engagement

This project will require external consultation with the public (borough wide), plus community organisations,
businesses and Trade Unions. General consultation around the principles needs to start as soon as possible
with more detailed conversations within localities in mid-2015. The format for the consultation will be online
surveys, meetings, focus groups and 1-2-1 meetings. It will be carried out by Services to Place staff supported
by Consultation within Policy, Performance and Reform. The period of consultation on the new staffing
structure is expected to be 8-12 weeks starting at the end of September. More detailed consultation will be
carried out in localities in mid-2015 as part of the Locality Operating Model Project. Feedback from the
consultation will be communicated through Executive reports, the Council website and the Council newspaper
(The Review).

A Consultation Plan is attached at Appendix 2


APPENDICES
1. Activity and Impact
2. Consultation Plan
3. EIA
4. Project Milestones
5. Current staffing profile


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APPENDIX 1
ACTIVITY AND IMPACT SCHEDULE
Year Activity Potential Impact
2014/15 Develop a model for the new service
2015/16
A reduction and integration in front-line functions
that deal with Conservation; Planning, Public
Realm and Public Protection Enforcement.
There will be a greater reliance on the private sector working to standard guidance. If there are
breaches then there will be a reduced capacity to retrospectively enforce and the most
significant cases are likely to be investigated.
There will be a reduction in staffing.
There will be a more limited response to complaints from both Elected Members and members
of the public.
The Council would have a reduced ability to investigate offences. This will lead to some breaches
not being followed up and only more significant cases being investigated.
Some cases involving visual amenity will no longer be investigated unless there is the potential
for significant harm, e.g. advertising banners without planning permission will not be removed
unless there is a risk to the public.
This will lead to paid for Pest Control services
(previously free) and reduced environmental
enforcement.

2016/17
Reconfiguration of all regulatory services (as
detailed above and also including Trading
Standards, Licensing and Building Control) into
either multi-disciplinary teams working at the
neighbourhood level or specialist technical
functions working across the borough.


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APPENDIX 2
CONSULTATION PLAN

Please indicate if you need to
consult internally and/ or
externally
This project will require external consultation.
Details of who you intend to
consult and whether there will be
a geographical focus
o Public borough-wide
o Community organisations
o Businesses
o Trade Unions


What you intend to ask them or
the aim of the consultation
General consultation around the principles needs to start as soon
as possible with more detailed conversations within localities in
mid- 2015.

What methods of consultation will
be used
Online, meetings, focus groups, 1-2-1’s
The team that will be carrying out
the consultation
Services to Place supported by Consultation within PPR
Period of consultation

8-12 weeks starting at the end of September 2014
What form the feedback will take Executive reports, Council website, Council newspaper

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APPENDIX 3
EQUALITY IMPACT ASSESSMENT

Title: New Model for Regulation Date: 30 July 2014
Stage: consultation
Lead Officer: Ian O’Donnell

Stage 1: Do you need to complete an Equality Impact Assessment (EIA)?
Yes. An equalities impact assessment showing the geographic distribution of service delivery
and the impact of these proposals for priority areas will be carried out. This process will be
similar to EIA for previous reductions exercises.

Stage 2: What do you know?



Stage 2a: Further Data and Consultation



Stage 3: Results and Measures



Stage 4: Decision Stage




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APPENDIX 4

Potential milestones
Project Milestone Project Target
Date
Detailed Structure for Consultation End Sept 14
Implementation of reduced Enforcement Services April 2015






















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Appendix 5
New Model for Regulation
Current Staff Profile
The table below provides information about the staff in scope of this project. Further details can be found in
the Business Case.
Service Area Headcount FTE
Building Control 11 9.31
Environmental Health & Trading Standards 54 49.60
Housing Standards 2 2.00
Planning 5 5.00
Street Cleaning 7 7.00
Trainee 1 1.00
Total 80 73.91


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Locality Operating Model – 4
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Investing in Stockport - Business Case


IIS Programme: Locality Working
IIS Board SRO: Paul Lawrence
IIS Project Lead: Janet Wood
Portfolio: Corporate, Customer and Community Services
Project Name: Locality Operating Model

Project Board / Team Members
Project Board
 Paul Lawrence, Corporate Director – Place
 Janet Wood, Head of Service: Customer Engagement
 Megan Black, Head of Public Realm
 Viki Packman, Head of the Integrated Children's Service
 Sally Wilson, Head of Business, Intelligence & Service Redesign
 Joan Beresford, Head of Integrated Commissioning / Vince Fraga, Head of Service - Market
Development, Quality & Commissioning
 Steve Skelton, Head of Policy, Performance and Reform
 Plus representatives from:
o Stockport Homes
o Greater Manchester Police
o GM Fire and Rescue Service

Project Team for Place Based Locality Working
 Janet Wood, Head of Service: Customer Engagement
 Darren Pegram, Sustainability Manager
 Ian O’Donnell, Head of Public Protection
 Megan Black, Head of Public Realm
 Helen Boyle, Deputy Head of Service, Community Safety and Neighbourhoods
 Claire Grindlay, Head of Business Support – Place Directorate
 Louise Chadderton, CSS Manager - Reform
 Mark Murray, Spatial Intelligence Manager (as required)
 Michael Cullen (as required)


INVESTING
IN REFORM
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1. Project Overview

The development of a new way of delivering services at a locality level which will aim to get people more
involved in service delivery, and ensure that local needs and priorities can be clearly discussed and agreed. This
is becoming a common approach across local authorities and Councils such as Tameside, Lambeth, Oldham,
Manchester and Sunderland are among those whose experience we hope to draw on.

The project will also take into account spend on public services in localities from partners agencies and will be
an opportunity to align and integrate service delivery by local partners, including Stockport Homes and the
deployment of the Housing Revenue Account.

A wide range of ’place based’ services will be in scope of the project, and spending and savings proposals will
result from a detailed and informed dialogue with local communities in time for the 2016/17 financial year.

There are currently 194 SMBC employees (137.23fte) in scope of the project working in services such as
Libraries, Neighbourhood Management & Community Safety, Public Realm, plus staff in SSK.

A draft Equality Impact Assessment for this project is attached at Appendix 3 and will be further developed in
line with consultation.



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2. Regulation and Statutory Considerations

There is a range of service specific regulation and statute relating to the services in scope but Locality Working
itself is not statutory.



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3. Investment Profile

The overall investment across these services currently stands at £12m We anticipate that the future in
investment in this area will be £7.9m In order to achieve this ambitious programme of change, the total
investment can be summarised as follows:

Year £000s
2014/15 £12m
2015/16 £11.5m (Achieved through realignment of Housing Revenue Account)
2016/17 £7.9m (Achieved through new service delivery model)
Beyond

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4. A Description of the New Service

Locality Working is a new model of engagement, commissioning and delivery of services. The premise of
locality working is that co-designing and commissioning the delivery of services with people at a
neighbourhood level allows for greater use of community capacity, and a shared dialogue about future
priorities.

There are a number of separate service focused approaches to Locality Working that will be brought together
into a coherent single approach. The service specific approaches comprise the following areas of work:

a) As part of the integration of Adult Social Care and Health services, we are developing locality hubs in four
areas. As well as deep integration of the service supply side between SMBC and NHS providers and
commissioners, we are planning to roll-out a People Powered Health approach to building community
capacity to improve health and wellbeing outcomes and reduce demand for certain services. The approach
aims to change the way traditional NHS services are provided in order to offer more community based
solutions, designed and jointly delivered by service users and carers.

b) Integrated Children’s Services, which aims to provide intensive, integrated whole family support for
children, young people, families and younger adults age 0-25 by integrated teams that cover the four
Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG) locality areas in Stockport.

c) A new approach to regulation will aim to base multi-disciplinary regulation and enforcement services at the
neighbourhood level, based on specifications designed by local communities.

d) A place based approach which will establish a new locality operating model which supports the co-design,
commissioning and delivery of services with people and communities at a neighbourhood level. This aim is
to develop a strong vision for communities; improve outcomes; and support the council and public sector
partners to reduce costs.

Locality working contributes to all of the outcomes and there will be a varying degree of impact on a number of
the associated sub outcomes. People in localities will be empowered to get involved in agreeing priorities for
their area and in designing and delivering the services that are important to making their community a place
people want to live.

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5. How we will achieve this

Locality working for place-based services

This involves engaging with residents to identify local priorities; making best use of local assets and resources;
co-developing and co-designing new ways to deliver services.
The Place-based Locality Working programme will be made up of three phases:
2014/15
1. The first phase of the work aims to deliver early financial savings through a re-alignment of the Housing
Revenue Account with the Council’s general fund expenditure. Housing related services are central to working
effectively in localities and any changes will protect and potentially enhance front line services to tenants.

2. The second phase will be to develop a locality-based service delivery model through the following approach
(Autumn 14- Spring 2015)

i. Preparatory work consisting of intelligence and data gathering to show current levels of
spend, assets, service provision, and key issues in localities (including Dedicated Schools Grant,
Housing Revenue Account, and Solutions SK spend)
ii. Establish the de-minimis level of service provision as the baseline to inform future decisions
about resource allocation and levels of service delivery
iii. Agree the principles of universal Information, Advice and Guidance, digital-by-design, and self-
service to inform delivery / commissioning
iv. Definition of, and political agreement for, appropriate geographies (potentially
geographies based on areas served by district centres)
v. Initiation of an opening dialogue with communities as one component of a wider single
approach to engagement that includes public conversations about Heath & Social Care
Integration – physically and digitally
vi. Programme launch based on the lessons learned from the Our Place project in Cheadle and
the work carried out in points i-iii (launch timing to be agreed)
2015/16

3. The third phase is the establishment of a dialogue/’community conversation’ (with the inclusion of public
sector partners) with Members and local areas to define future spending priorities and means of enabling
community involvement in service planning and delivery (June 2015 – September 2015). This will address what
services should remain as priorities and where the council can consider reductions.

2016/17

4. Implementation of the new locality model from April 16

Detail are set out in:
- Appendix 1 – Activity and Impact Schedule
- Appendix 4 – Project milestones

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6. Impact on current service model


 The vision is that communities will work with the Council and other public sector providers to develop and
deliver services which are more responsive to local need.
 Reduced service offer at the neighbourhood level – it is anticipated that the Council could withdraw, fully
or partially, from delivering some services in localities and that the community will work with the Council to
develop local solutions.
 Opportunities for greater voluntary involvement – there will be more opportunity for residents and local
organisations to get involved in community activities.


Detail are set out in Appendix 1 – Activity and Impact Schedule



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7. Interdependencies

This project cannot be viewed in isolation and is linked to a number of cross cutting IIS themes:

Digital by design; information, advice and guidance; local democracy and area governance.


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8. Stakeholders

This Business Case cannot be achieved alone and will require the support of a wide range of stakeholders. The
Management Team are working with a range of stakeholders to shape and progress this proposal. These
include:

 Voluntary Sector Organisations
 Residents and Community Groups
 Elected Members
 GMP
 Stockport Homes
 GMFRS









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9. Consultation and Engagement

The consultation for the Locality Operating model will include both internal and external stakeholders. It will
comprise of service users and providers (re transfer of a third of tenancies to private sector), the general public,
existing community groups and elected members. The aim of the consultation is ask the stakeholders for their
views on local priorities, how services can be co-designed to make the most effective use of public sector
budgets and about developing a scope for increased community-led activity. The format for the consultation
will consist of local discussions, internet communication (web and social media) and potential participatory
budgeting. It may also involve other quantitative/qualitative methods. The team that will be carrying out the
consultation will be a newly formed Community Engagement Team, which will be created from seconded or
appointed staff from across the Council. The consultation will be co-ordinated and supported by Consultation
within Policy, Performance and Reform. The consultation is expected to take place between October 2014 and
September 2015. Feedback from the consultation will be provided via on-going dialogue with localities, which
will inform service redesign and budget allocation.


A Consultation Plan is attached at Appendix 2


APPENDICES
1. Activity and Impact
2. Consultation Plan
3. EIA
4. Project Milestones

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APPENDIX 1
ACTIVITY AND IMPACT SCHEDULE
Year Activity Potential Impact
2014/2015
Intelligence and data gathering
Establishing de-minimis level of service provision
Agree the principles of universal IAG, digital-by-
design, and self-service

Definition of, and political agreement for,
appropriate geographies and Member
leadership/governance

Initiation of an opening dialogue with communities
Delivery of Our Place in Cheadle
2015/16
Establishment of community conversations (with
the inclusion of public sector partners) to define
service priorities and new ways of working
together.
Greater local control over public service delivery – neighbourhoods will set out their
vision for their area and define their local priorities. The vision is that communities
will work with the Council and other public sector providers to develop and deliver
services which are more responsive to local need.
Opportunities for greater voluntary involvement – there will be more opportunity
for residents and local organisations to get involved in community activities.
Re-alignment of Housing Revenue Account of
£.5m. Detailed mechanism tba with Stockport
Homes.
No service delivery impact.
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Year Activity Potential Impact
2016/17
Roll out of the new locality model from April 16
within the new reduced cash limit
Reduced service offer at the neighbourhood level – it is anticipated that the Council
could withdraw, fully or partially, from delivering some services in localities and that
the community will work with the Council to develop local solutions.

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APPENDIX 2
CONSULTATION PLAN

Please indicate if you need to
consult internally and/ or
externally
Internal and external
Details of who you intend to
consult and whether there will be
a geographical focus
o Service users and providers re transfer of a third of
tenancies to private sector
o Residents
o Community organisations
o Local businesses
o Elected members
What you intend to ask them or
the aim of the consultation
Identify local priorities, co-design most effective use of public
sector budgets and scope for increased community-led
activity.
What methods of consultation
will be used
Local Discussions, Internet (web and social media) and
potential participatory budgeting. Possibly various other
quantitative/qualitative methods.
The team that will be carrying out
the consultation
Community engagement team – to be seconded/appointed.
Co-ordinated/supported by Consultation within PPR.
Period of consultation

Oct 2014 – Sept 2015
What form the feedback will take On-going dialogue with localities which will inform service
redesign and budget allocation.
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APPENDIX 3
EQUALITY IMPACT ASSESSMENT
Title: Locality Operating Model Date: 30 July 2014
Stage: consultation/ draft/ final
(delete as applicable)
Lead Officer: Janet Wood

Stage 1: Do you need to complete an Equality Impact Assessment (EIA)?
Not all policies will require an EIA: these key questions will help you to decide
whether you need to conduct an EIA (see guidance notes at the end of this form).
Yes an EIA will be required.

Stage 2: What do you know?
An EIA should be based upon robust evidence. This stage will guide you through
potential sources of information and how to interpret it. Understanding the current
context is a key stage in all policy making and planning (see guidance notes at the
end of this form).


Stage 2a: Further Data and Consultation
If you feel that the data and past consultation feedback you have is not sufficient to
properly consider the impact before a decision is made then you may wish to
supplement your evidence base with more data or further consultation. This should
be proportionate to the scale of the decision and will depend on the gaps in your
current understanding (see guidance notes at the end of this form).


Stage 3: Results and Measures
As a result of what you have learned in Stage 2 what will you do to ensure that no
group is unfairly and unlawfully impacted upon as a result of the proposed
change(s)? (see guidance notes at the end of this form)

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Stage 4: Decision Stage
Once your plan/policy is fully developed it will need to go through the correct scrutiny
and approval channels: the EIA should be included as part of this (see guidance
notes at the end of this form).



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APPENDIX 4

Potential milestones
Project Milestone Project Target
Date
Phase 1 budget proposals agreed Aug-14
Cheadle conversation starts Aug-14
Community engagement delivery team established Sep-14
Community engagement strategy approved Sep-14
Draft Our Place operational plan approved Oct-14
Neighbourhood conversations start Nov-14
Final Our Place operation Plan approved Jan-15
Implementation of Locality Operating Models April 16



















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Appendix 5
Locality Operating Model
Current Staff Profile
The table below provides information about the staff in scope of this project. Further details can be found in
the Business Case.
Service Area Headcount FTE
Cemeteries & Crematoria 9 7.66
CSS Community Safety and Neighbourhood Management 44 40.57
CSS Customer Engagement - Libraries 110 67.88
Parks & Open Spaces 13 10.79
Street Cleaning 3 2.43
Sustainable Policy 1 1.00
Public Realm 2 2.00
Street Cleaning (40%) 11 4.40
Waste Collection 1 0.50
Total 194 137.23

Page 1 of 15
Solutions SK Operating Model – 4
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August 2014

Investing in Stockport - Business Case


IIS Programme:
IIS Board SRO: Paul Lawrence
IIS Project Lead: Michael Cullen / Megan Black
Portfolio: Communities and Sustainability
Project Name: Solutions SK Operating Model

Project Board / Team Members
Megan Black, Head of Public Realm
Michael Cullen, Strategic Accountant


INVESTING
IN REFORM
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1. Project Overview
This proposal includes the Council and SSK jointly commissioning a review that appraises the strategic future of
the Company in the light of both the financial pressures facing the Council and the Company’s own position and
aspirations. The review will include a consideration of the charging regime (Cost Plus) that underpins SSK’s
delivery of contracted public realm services on behalf of the Council. These services comprise:
 Highways maintenance
 Street cleaning
 Grounds maintenance
 Parks
 Refuse collection services

It is suggested that the consequences of the review should include the ability to reduce the costs of current
service provision by at least the equivalent of the ‘profit’ element that is a feature of the current ‘cost plus’
arrangement (c. £0.8m) from 2016/17 onwards. For 2015/16 the desired impact on the client budget can be
achieved by freeing up a proportion of the earmarked reserve established to support the delivery of the SSK
recovery plan.

The proposal does not carry any staffing implications.

A draft Equality Impact Assessment for this project is attached at Appendix 3 and will be further developed in
line with consultation.



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2. Regulation and Statutory Considerations
None

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3. Investment Profile

The Council reimburses the relevant direct and overhead costs of SSK and pays a percentage ‘profit’ of between
3-5% of the cost base for the services provided.

Year £000s
2014/15
2015/16 -£0.8m
2016/17
Beyond

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4. A Description of the New Service
Current contract arrangements for Public Realm services provided by SSK to the Council are arranged on a cost
plus basis, whereby the Council reimburses the relevant direct and overhead costs of SSK and pays a
percentage ‘profit’ of between 3-5% of the cost base for the services provided. This profit element totals
£0.770m for the revenue contracts.

The basis for the introduction of the profit element at the above levels was twofold:
 It allowed SSK to repair its balance sheet from the issues encountered previously; and,
 It allowed SSK to demonstrate profitability to commercially assist in winning new contracts.

The proposal includes the Council and SSK jointly commissioning a review that appraises the strategic future of
the company. The review will determine, through an assessment of the financial, legal, commercial,
operational, and risk related issues, the best way to meet future strategic requirements and aspirations.

It is suggested that the consequences of the review should include the ability to reduce the costs of current
service provision by at least the equivalent of the ‘profit’ element from 2016/17 onwards. For 2015/16 the
desired impact on the client budget can be achieved by freeing up a proportion of the earmarked reserve
established to support the delivery of the SSK recovery plan. This reserve currently stands at £1.162m and
given that the recovery plan is progressing well it is felt that resources can be released from this reserve in
2015/16.

There will be no change in service provision, standards, staffing or operating hours., promote



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5. How we will achieve this

The review will commence in early Autumn 2014 and be concluded by Spring 2015. Negotiations between the
Council and SSK will then be necessary and an agreement on a future operating model will be concluded by
Summer 2015.


Detail are set out in:

- Appendix 1 – Activity and Impact Schedule
- Appendix 4 – Project milestones


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6. Impact on current service model


Detail are set out in Appendix 1 – Activity and Impact Schedule



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7. Interdependencies

There are no interdependencies aligned with this proposal



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8. Stakeholders

This Business Case cannot be achieved alone and will require the support of a wide range of stakeholders. The
Management Team are working with a range of stakeholders to shape and progress this proposal. These
include:

 Solutions SK

 Elected Members






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9. Consultation and Engagement

This proposal will not require public or staff consultation but will require mutual consent from SSK and SMBC.



APPENDICES
1. Activity and Impact
2. Consultation Plan
3. EIA
4. Project Milestones

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APPENDIX 1
ACTIVITY AND IMPACT SCHEDULE
Year Activity Potential Impact
2014/15
Commencement of Option Appraisal


2015/16
Conclusion of Option Appraisal
Agreement of future operating model Dependent upon operating model

2016/17
Reduced cost of current service provision. Potential amendment to the charging regime between the
Council and SSK.

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APPENDIX 2
CONSULTATION PLAN
No Staff or Public Consultation Required
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APPENDIX 3
EQUALITY IMPACT ASSESSMENT
Title:
SSK Operating Model
Date: 30 July 2014
Stage: consultation
Lead Officer: Michael Cullen
Stage 1: Do you need to complete an Equality Impact Assessment (EIA)?
Not all policies will require an EIA: these key questions will help you to decide
whether you need to conduct an EIA (see guidance notes at the end of this form).
Given that the proposals will maintain existing levels of service, and terms and
conditions for SSK staff will not be affected no equality impact assessment is
required.
Stage 2: What do you know?
An EIA should be based upon robust evidence. This stage will guide you through
potential sources of information and how to interpret it. Understanding the current
context is a key stage in all policy making and planning (see guidance notes at the
end of this form).

Stage 2a: Further Data and Consultation
If you feel that the data and past consultation feedback you have is not sufficient to
properly consider the impact before a decision is made then you may wish to
supplement your evidence base with more data or further consultation. This should
be proportionate to the scale of the decision and will depend on the gaps in your
current understanding (see guidance notes at the end of this form).

Stage 3: Results and Measures
As a result of what you have learned in Stage 2 what will you do to ensure that no
group is unfairly and unlawfully impacted upon as a result of the proposed
change(s)? (see guidance notes at the end of this form)

Stage 4: Decision Stage
Once your plan/policy is fully developed it will need to go through the correct scrutiny
and approval channels: the EIA should be included as part of this (see guidance
notes at the end of this form).


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APPENDIX 4

Potential milestones
Project Milestone Project Target
Date
Commencement of Option Appraisal Autumn 2014
Conclusion of Option Appraisal Spring 2015
Agreement on future Operating Model Summer 2015




















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Appendix 5
Solutions SK Operating Model

This proposal does not carry any staffing implications.
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Investing in Stockport - Business Case


IIS Programme:
IIS Board SRO: Paul Lawrence
IIS Project Lead: Andy Kippax, Emma Curle, Nicola Turner
Portfolio: Economic Development & Regeneration (including Housing)
Project Name: Facilitating Accelerated Growth


Project Board / Team Members
Paul Lawrence, Corporate Director - Place
Andy Kippax, Head of Strategic Housing
Emma Curle, Head of Development Management
Nicola Turner, Head of Economic Development & Regeneration


INVESTING
IN REFORM
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1. Project Overview
This proposal focusses on maintaining sustainable economic and demographic growth and accelerating the
pace of that growth.

The government has provided new tools for local authorities to benefit from the proceeds of growth and we
need to capture the twin benefits of increased revenue and sustainable regeneration. This means new homes,
new offices, new development delivered in the right way in the right locations and taking into account key
social and economic factors, as well as simple financial considerations.

If we can accelerate the pace of sustainable development we can increase locally retained business rates, New
Homes Bonus, and Council tax all of which support the delivery of local public services.

To accelerate the pace of regeneration we need to do three things:
 We need to review whether our relevant policies are fit for purpose and if any changes are required
 We need to continue to work closely with partners and agencies and with the private sector to remove
barriers to delivery and to create delivery partnerships where required
 We need to re-shape our own services to ensure a more co-ordinated and proactive approach to
growth is pursued


There are 53 people (49.05fte) in scope of this proposal. There will be a reduction in staff of up to 10fte.

A draft Equality Impact Assessment for this project is attached at Appendix 3 and will be further developed in
line with consultation.



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2. Regulation and Statutory Considerations

The Council has a statutory duty to:
 deliver a Local Planning Authority function in its stewardship of the environment.
 Understand housing needs, market and property conditions and to make provision accordingly



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3. Investment Profile

The overall investment across these services currently stands at £2.5m. We anticipate that the future in
investment in this area will be £2.0m. In order to achieve this ambitious programme of change, the total
investment can be summarised as follows:

Year £000s
2014/15 £2.5m
2015/16 £2.0m
2016/17 £2.0m (-£0.6m additional income from Business Rates, Council tax and New
Homes Bonus)
Beyond

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4. A Description of the New Service
New ways of working will be created from three current service areas – Strategic Housing, Economic
Development and Regeneration, and Development Management.

This new approach will improve efficiencies in current ways of working by the creation of multi-disciplinary
teams based on the following thematic areas:

 Town Centre Development and Regeneration
 Residential Growth and regeneration
 Business and Employment Growth
 Borough Wide Development Management

CSS staff structures currently supporting this service are not included in these proposals.

Current services will be reviewed against the Council’s outcomes framework. We will explore ways of
maintaining some services on a nil or reduced cost basis to the Councils revenue budget. In addition new ways
of working in partnership with GM Economic Development Agencies will be explored


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5. How we will achieve this

15/16

This saving will be achieved by the development of a new staffing structure which will reduce the total staff by
up to 10 fte and will affect all staff in scope of this proposal other than the following:
 Regeneration and Development
 Planning Officers
 Highway Engineers (in Development Management)

A detailed new structure will be published by the end of September 2014.

Look to private sector/stakeholder led arrangements where possible, and greater integration with GM
agencies.

Alternative sources of funding for some functions will also be explored.


16/17

Completing projects with Council legal and financial commitments

Detail are set out in:

- Appendix 1 – Activity and Impact Schedule
- Appendix 4 – Project milestones


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6. Impact on current service model


Although the new service will deliver an expansion of growth activity in the borough, it should be noted that
the following functions will be significantly impacted on although alternative means of delivery will be
explored:
 Specialist and supported housing strategy, policy and research
 The gating of any additional rear alleyways to address crime and anti-social behaviour
 Support and property checks in accordance with private contract for the housing of asylum seekers
 Private sector landlords forum and news letter
 Management of business workspace
 Support for area and sector business groups
 Support for external groups for funding advice
 Internal support for the securing and managing of external funds
 Reduced capacity to support new economic development initiatives at local or GM level

Detail are set out in Appendix 1 – Activity and Impact Schedule



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7. Interdependencies

The proposal is not dependent on other aspects of the Investing in Stockport programme but the emergence of
the digital by design workstream should be influenced in order to help the management of , for example,
business enquiries, business group events, grant applications.




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8. Stakeholders

This Business Case cannot be achieved alone and will require the support of a wide range of stakeholders. The
Management Team are working with a range of stakeholders to shape and progress this proposal. These
include:


 Commercial & Residential Property Developers
 Stockport Homes
 Housing Associations
 Stockport Economic Alliance
 Chamber of Commerce
 New Economy
 Business Growth Hub
 Sector and area based business and stakeholder groups
 Contracted Delivery Partners
 Elected Members
 Stockport Landlords’ Forum







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9. Consultation and Engagement

Consultation will be required with sector and geographic business groups, housing groups, GM partners,
voluntary sector organisations.

A Consultation Plan is attached at Appendix 2


APPENDICES
1. Activity and Impact
2. Consultation Plan
3. EIA
4. Project Milestones

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APPENDIX 1
ACTIVITY AND IMPACT SCHEDULE
Year Activity Potential Impact
2014/15
Work with Stockport Homes on new models
Development of the new ways of working
Work with GM organisations to develop future models of joint
working to enhance business and employment growth
Service based on GM wide model rather than locally based
service
Consultation will be required with sector and geographic
business groups as well as with housing groups.

2015/16
There will be a decommissioning of some aspects of Strategic
Housing and Economic Development & Regeneration services,
from 15/16 to realise the required savings. Sustaining current
arrangements where there is demand will be explored on a nil
or reduced cost basis.

New ways of working will be created from three current
service areas – Strategic Housing, Economic Development and
Regeneration, and Development Management.
This new approach will improve efficiencies in current ways of
Reorganise current structure and reduce establishment by
up to 10 FTEs
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working by the creation of multi-disciplinary teams based on
the following thematic areas:
• Town Centre Development and Regeneration
• Residential Growth and regeneration
• Business and Employment Growth
• Borough Wide Development Management

Work with Stockport Homes to achieve efficiencies in the
homelessness function
Potential for increase in homelessness. May be mitigated by
better integration of SH services.
Capacity building with private sector/stakeholders to take
lead responsibility for sector and area based
business/stakeholder groups

Alternative sources of funding for some functions will be
explored

Develop digital by design solutions to organising business
meetings and events, applying for grants, dealing with
business enquiries

2016/17
Completing projects with Council legal and financial
commitments

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APPENDIX 2
CONSULTATION PLAN
If you intend to consult, please complete the table below:
Please indicate if you need to
consult internally and/ or
externally
Internal and with targeted stakeholders
Details of who you intend to
consult and whether there will be
a geographical focus
o Staff
o Trade unions
o Sector and geographic business groups as well as with
housing groups.


What you intend to ask them or
the aim of the consultation
Developing new service delivery models and opportunities for
joint working
Assessing impact and capacity of private sector/stakeholders to
take lead

What methods of consultation will
be used
Meetings; online/email
The team that will be carrying out
the consultation
Services to Place
Period of consultation

Between September - December 2014
What form the feedback will take Meetings; online/emails

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APPENDIX 3
EQUALITY IMPACT ASSESSMENT

Title:
Facilitating Accelerated Growth

Date: 30 July 2014
Stage: consultation
Lead Officer: Andy Kippax, Emma Curle, Nicola
Turner

Stage 1: Do you need to complete an Equality Impact Assessment (EIA)?
Not all policies will require an EIA: these key questions will help you to decide
whether you need to conduct an EIA (see guidance notes at the end of this form).
An Equality Impact Assessment will be required to ensure that proposals that have an
impact on groups with protected characteristics are taken into account. Any reduction in
support for integrated neighbourhood working in Priority areas will also have to be
considered.

Stage 2: What do you know?
An EIA should be based upon robust evidence. This stage will guide you through
potential sources of information and how to interpret it. Understanding the current
context is a key stage in all policy making and planning (see guidance notes at the
end of this form).


Stage 2a: Further Data and Consultation
If you feel that the data and past consultation feedback you have is not sufficient to
properly consider the impact before a decision is made then you may wish to
supplement your evidence base with more data or further consultation. This should
be proportionate to the scale of the decision and will depend on the gaps in your
current understanding (see guidance notes at the end of this form).


Stage 3: Results and Measures
As a result of what you have learned in Stage 2 what will you do to ensure that no
group is unfairly and unlawfully impacted upon as a result of the proposed
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change(s)? (see guidance notes at the end of this form)


Stage 4: Decision Stage
Once your plan/policy is fully developed it will need to go through the correct scrutiny
and approval channels: the EIA should be included as part of this (see guidance
notes at the end of this form).



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APPENDIX 4

Potential milestones
Project Milestone


Executive decision
Detailed Staffing Structure
Stakeholder Consultation
Executive Decision
Implementation
Project Target
Date

August 14
September 14
November 14
December 14
January 15





















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Appendix 5
Facilitating Accelerated Growth
Current Staff Profile
The table below provides information about the staff in scope of this project. Further details can be found in
the Business Case.
Service Area Headcount FTE
Economic Development and Regeneration 23 20.82
Planning 16 15.43
Strategic Housing 11 10.20
Business Incubator 3 2.60
Total
53 49.05

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Investing in Stockport - Business Case


IIS Programme: Not applicable, cross cutting
IIS Board SRO: Janine Watson
IIS Project Lead: Geraldine Gerrard, Alison Blount
Portfolio: Corporate, Customer and Community Services
Project Name: Information, Advice and Guidance

Project Board / Team Members
Janine Watson, Assistant Chief Executive (Comms and Customer Engagement)
Geraldine Gerrard, Head of Business Support
Alison Blount, Head of Revenues and Benefits
Martin Whiteside, Advice Manager
Denise Rankin, Contact Centre Manager
Sue Griffiths, Change Manager - Reform
Norman King, Change Manager – Reform
Dave Hulley Business Support Commissioning Support Manager


INVESTING
IN REFORM
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1. Project Overview
This project will aim to deliver access to high quality sources of information, advice and guidance. It will
assess and implement optimal service delivery models and consolidate provision, providing citizens with a
proportionate service based on their needs.

Primary Services within the scope of the project are:

 Contact Centre (Fred Perry House);
 Welfare Rights Service;
 Health and Social Care Welfare Rights Team;
 Debt Team;
 Stockport Direct Centre (Reception at Fred Perry House); and
 Stockport Direct Local Centres (various sites).

Technology will be used to enhance signposting, provide self-service, assessment and referral options and
be a more responsive and personalised service. Consequently, this project will be closely aligned to the
Digital by Design and Locality Operating Model projects. There will also be robust links to People-related
projects and programmes, for example work around Targeted Prevention, Preventative Commissioning
Strategy and Integrated Care.

There are currently 93.78 FTE / 113 (111 actual) people in scope of this proposal.

There are other IAG services either delivered directly by other council services or commissioned by
Directorates from local organisations which target specifically vulnerable groups of people within the local
community. These areas will be considered as a secondary task to review in the context of providing a
coherent IAG offer to the residents of Stockport eg:
 Childcare, early education and family information
 Special Education Needs and Disability (SEND) ‘Local Offer’
 Supporting People (inc. Stockport Local Assistance Scheme and the Social Fund Discretionary
Housing Payments)
 The Prevention Strategy commissioning of information, advice and supported signposting services
 Adults Social Care inc FLAG (For Local Advice and Guidance)
This is not an exhaustive list and further details are outlined in the other Outline Business Cases.

A draft Equality Impact Assessment for this project is attached at Appendix 3 and will be further developed in
line with consultation.




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2. Regulation and Statutory Considerations

Stockport Council has a statutory duty to deliver a range of IAG services to local people but the way these are
configured and delivered can be decided locally. Relevant legislative frameworks include:

 The Care Act 2014 which places a duty on local authorities to establish and maintain a service for
providing people with information and advice relating to care and support for adults, and support for
carers.
 The Children and Families Act 2014 which places a duty on local authorities to provide information
about what services are available, and information and advice for parents and young people via the
SEND Local Offer.
 The Childcare Act 2006 (‘the 2006 Act’) extends local authorities’ existing duty to provide information
to the public on childcare and a range of information (prescribed by regulations) which parents may
need to support their children through to their 20th birthday. Local authorities are also required to
ensure that the information is made accessible to all parents who might benefit from it.

There are also a number of transactional statutory services and requirements that are in part provided through
the Council’s current IAG provision, for example:

 Council Tax administration and collection;
 Housing Benefit administration and payment;
 Universal Credit;
 School admission and transfer.

In addition to this, the Council’s statutory duty and responsibilities to provide IAG must be considered when
redesigning services that include an IAG responsibility. An example of this is IAG for housing problems and
homelessness, currently commissioned as part of an overall service from Stockport Homes.


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3. Investment Profile

The overall investment across these services currently stands at £3m. We anticipate that the future in
investment in this area will be £2.5m. In order to achieve this ambitious programme of change, the total
investment can be summarised as follows:

Year £000s
2014/15 £3m
2015/16 £3m
2016/17 £2.5m
Beyond



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4. A Description of the New Service
The Council needs to ensure the continued provision of high quality, efficient and impartial access to IAG.
Appropriate IAG enables issues to be resolved quickly and helps to prevent escalation of problems which could
otherwise become more costly to resolve.
The project will develop an approach for future service provision which will primarily be digital with intelligent
provision of information, through the use of web-based resources and social media. The assisted media
approach will address a significant proportion of demand and reduce the demand for more costly
interventions.

The enhanced service that intelligent, digital provision gives will make it the most attractive and preferred
option for most customers and reduce the dependency on both face-to-face and telephone channels.

Intelligent IAG digital provision will primarily enable residents to self-serve but also will signpost to other
solutions within the community. Existing community assets will be encouraged and developed to meet IAG
needs wherever possible.

Support to use digital IAG service provision will be available across the borough; the location of this support will
be considered alongside the Locality Operating Model project.

In addition to core IAG services, a more bespoke IAG service will be available for certain ‘at risk’ groups of
people. Access to this high level support will be determined by need and will be directed to the most vulnerable
and those with complex needs.

The approach for IAG will be developed and implemented for the core IAG service provision but it will also act
as blue print for the format of commissioned IAG provision targeted specifically at vulnerable groups of people
deemed to be at risk. Work to develop these will form part of People-related projects (Targeted Prevention,
Preventative Commissioning Strategy and Integrated Care).

The future provision will be

 and more targeted use of re
sources, promote community solutions and assulligent information sharing at the ‘front door’.

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5. How we will achieve this
2014/15
Critical to the success of this project is the success of the Digital by Design project and the Locality Operating
Model project.

During 2014/15 the new model of provision will need to be developed and tested. Alongside this, work will
continue to coordinate and consolidate existing provision, ensuring it is fit for purpose and compatible with the
long term structure of the service.

2015/16
Implementation of the digital and self-service solutions as and when they are available.

2016/17
Fully move to the new service provision model, decommissioning existing services as appropriate.



Detail are set out in:

- Appendix 1 – Activity and Impact Schedule
- Appendix 4 – Project milestones.


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6. Impact on current service model


There will be a much greater emphasis on service provision via digital channels. Significantly though, this will
not be the current passive approach to digital, but will be more intelligent and proactive. This new approach to
digital will mean it is easier to use and will result in an improved customer experience for customers choosing
this channel. This will facilitate digital becoming resident’s preferred method of interaction with the council.
Enhanced triage services will enable people who are struggling with web usage to be identified and supported,
either remotely using ‘web chat’ or face-to-face in some circumstances.

There may be fewer places to go to receive IAG directly from the council but there will be greater involvement
of neighbourhoods and communities providing mutual support both physically and virtually.

There will be a reduction in staffing numbers. Roles for many remaining staff will change to be more enabling
self-service rather than directly providing an IAG service.

Customers who visit advice centres will find the approach is no longer for staff to directly answer questions but
for them to be supported to use digital channels to self-serve, ensuring satisfactory resolution but also aiming
to divert future contacts to digital. Use of technology will aim to ensure that all initial customer contacts
address immediate needs and, where possible, anticipate imminent needs to eliminate further contact.

This will allow remaining resources to be directed to the most vulnerable who will be able to receive a more
considered, tailored and integrated response to their needs. The support which is provided for vulnerable
customers may be provided by other organisations commissioned to provide this on our behalf and
consideration will be given to a limited home visiting service for the most vulnerable people who are unable to
self-serve and who cannot access community based options.







Details are set out in Appendix 1 – Activity and Impact Schedule.



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7. Interdependencies

This project cannot be viewed in isolation and is linked to a number of cross cutting IIS themes:

 The main enabler of this work will be the Digital by Design project.
A comprehensive, intelligent digital offer is key to the success of the redesign of IAG services within the
council. It will ensure that online resources are available to enable the majority of customers to self-
serve and to receive a consistent and proportionate response to their IAG needs. This will reduce
demand on council services and allow the remaining resources to de directed appropriately to
vulnerable and ‘at risk’ groups within the community.

 This project itself is closely linked with the Locality Operating Model project.
New locality operating models, offering local discretion on priority spend to give communities more
power over local services and budgets, will include the development of hub-based models of service
delivery and will impact on physical and supported access to IAG services for some customers.

There will also be robust links to People-related projects and programmes, for example work around Targeted
Prevention, Preventative Commissioning Strategy and Integrated Care. These will all include an element of IAG
provision aimed specifically at vulnerable members of the community and commissioned from a range of
voluntary and community organisations.


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8. Stakeholders

This Business Case cannot be achieved alone and will require the support of a wide range of stakeholders. The
Management Team are working with a range of stakeholders to shape and progress this proposal. These
include:

 Residents;
 Community and voluntary sector organisations;
 Elected Members;
 GMP;
 Stockport Homes;
 Health partners.



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9. Consultation and Engagement

This project will require external consultation the public (borough wide), plus community and voluntary
organisations, local businesses and Trade Unions.
General consultation around the principles needs to start as soon as possible with more detailed conversations
during 2015 scheduled as and when proposals are developed. The format for the consultation will be online
surveys, meetings, focus groups and 1-2-1 meetings. It will be carried out by CSS and Services to People staff
supported by Consultation within Policy, Performance and Reform.
The period of consultation on the general principles is expected to be 8-12 weeks; the start time has yet to be
determined. Feedback from the consultation will be communicated through Executive reports, the Council
website and the Council newspaper (The Review).


A Consultation Plan is attached at Appendix 2.


APPENDICES
1. Activity and Impact
2. Consultation Plan
3. EIA
4. Project Milestones
5. Current Staff Profile

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APPENDIX 1
ACTIVITY AND IMPACT SCHEDULE
Year Activity Potential Impact
14/15 to
receive IAG
directly from
the council but
there will be
greater
involvement of
neighbourhood
s and
communities
providing
mutual
support.

Review of how IAG is currently delivered and change plans underway.

Refine customer insight around experience and future aspirations.

Understand options for coordinated action with partner organisations.

Within Digital By Design programme identify robust, secure and accessible
solutions that enable citizens to act independently.

Define over-arching model that takes into account existing and developing best
practice.

Consolidation and coordination of provision which may impact on existing
providers of IAG services.

Design and implementation of self-serve solutions and improved signposting.

Staff and public consultations where radical change has been proposed.
Engagement with existing service providers,
particularly in Services to People, will need to be
carefully managed to ensure current service
provision is unaffected until new arrangements are
put in place.


15/16 Continued consolidation and coordination of provision which may impact on
existing providers of IAG services.

Continued implementation of self-serve solutions and improved signposting.
The impact of other work streams may start to
impact on service provision, in particular the
Localities Operating Model programme of work
which may affect the physical location of IAG
services and the Digital by Design project that will
seek to enhance and promote digital options.


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16/17 Implementation of a more digital enabled service that focuses on channel shift.

Decommissioning more traditional channels of engagement with the Council.

Implement safeguards and transitional arrangements where necessary.



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APPENDIX 2
CONSULTATION PLAN
Please indicate if you need to
consult internally and/ or
externally
Internal and external
Details of who you intend to
consult and whether there will be
a geographical focus
 Residents (Borough wide)
 Community and voluntary sector organisations
 Elected Members
 GMP
 Stockport Homes
 Health partners
What you intend to ask them or
the aim of the consultation
Identify local priorities, co-design most effective use of available
resources, insight to support the development of community-based
options.
What methods of consultation
will be used
 Online surveys
 Internet via use of web and social media
 Public meetings
 Focus groups
 1-2-1 meetings.
The team that will be carrying out
the consultation
Staff within CSS and Services to People, co-ordinated and supported
by Consultation within Policy, Performance and Reform.
Period of consultation

Oct 2014 – Sept 2015
What form the feedback will take Written feedback from the consultation will be communicated
through Executive reports and the Council newspaper (The Review).
This will also be available online via the Council website and social
media channels.
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APPENDIX 3
EQUALITY IMPACT ASSESSMENT
Title:
Information, Advice and Guidance
Date: 28/07/2014
Stage: Consultation

Lead Officer: Geraldine Gerrard, Alison
Blount

Stage 1: Do you need to complete an Equality Impact Assessment (EIA)?
It will be necessary to complete an EIA. An EIA will be undertaken as this project will impact
on the way that core IAG services are provided and will directly affect residents and how
they contact the Council. This will include groups of people covered by the Equality Act and
it will be necessary to ensure all equality issues have been addressed.
It is anticipated that, based on initial assumptions, the project will impact on groups of
people with the following Protected Characteristics as defined in the Equality Act 2010:
 Age (in relation to older people accessing services);
 Disability (in relation to people with physical/learning disabilities accessing services);
 Race (in relation to people whose first language is not English accessing services).
This EIA will require further development to analyse the impact on voluntary and community
organisations (e.g. any indirect equality implications), and wider implications in line with the
changes proposed.

Stage 2: What do you know?
Further analysis is required to inform a current picture of the service, data that will be
considered includes:
 Analysis of current customer contacts;
 Analysis of existing service provision;
 Analysis of need (using JSNA);
 Local and national best practice;
 Analysis of current voluntary and community sector IAG provision;
 Feedback from any previous consultation or review;
 Identification of gaps;
 Identification of any emerging impacts;
 Next steps for further data analysis (e.g. consultation)



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Stage 2a: Further Data and Consultation
This section will be completed upon analysis undertaken at Stage 2.
At Stage 2 any gaps identified will be explored further in this stage. This section will
therefore include the outcomes of any consultation and engagement activity.

Stage 3: Results and Measures
This section will be completed to reflect and build on the consultation and learning
outcomes.

Stage 4: Decision Stage
This EIA is a live document and will accompany the decision at all points throughout the
process.



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APPENDIX 4

Potential milestones
Project Milestone



Alignment agreed with Digital by Design and Locality Operating Model projects

Start implementation of self service solutions (as and when they are available)

Fully move to the new service provision model
Project Target
Date


Dec 2014

Oct 2015

Mar 2017


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APPENDIX 5

CURRENT STAFF PROFILE

The table below provides information about the staff in scope of this project. Further details can be found in
the Business Case.
Service Area Headcount FTE
Contact Centre 53 44.53
Stockport Direct Centre 18 14.38
Stockport Direct Local Centres 42 34.87
Total
113* 93.78


*Actual 111 (2 staff hold 2 different posts)











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Investing in Stockport - Business Case


IIS Programme: Corporate and Support Services
IIS Board SRO: Steve Houston
IIS Project Lead: Andrea Stewart
Portfolio: Corporate, Customer and Community Services
Project Name: Corporate and Support Services

Project Board / Team Members
Steve Houston – Corporate Director
Laureen Donnan – Deputy Chief Executive

CSS Heads of Service
 Business Support - Andrea Stewart, Geraldine Gerard, Claire Grindlay
 Estate and Asset Management – Murray Carr
 Finance – Christine Buxton
 Information and Communication – Paul James
 Legal and Democratic Governance – Parveen Akhtar
 People and Organisational Development – Sue Williams
 Policy, Performance and Reform – Steve Skelton

Sue Wood – Strategic Financial Adviser
Change Manager - tbc

INVESTING
IN REFORM
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1. Project Overview

A key element of the current budget savings programme (2013/15) is the review and redesign of corporate and
support services (CSS). The CSS Review and Redesign exercise unified nineteen services into the seven
Functions. A new structure and delivery model was implemented in June 2014. This will enable services to be
better targeted and provided in a more integrated manner and is well placed to continue to support and help
lead the organisation as it reshapes and transforms itself to respond to the challenges of the coming years.

The flexibility inherent within the new arrangements, including more generic posts and standardised working
practices, will also facilitate further savings as the rest of the organisation is transformed and the demands for
CSS services are reduced.

The functions incorporated within CSS are as follows

 Business Support
 Estate and Asset Management
 Finance
 Information and Communication
 Legal and Democratic Governance
 People and Organisational Development
 Policy, Performance and Reform

CSS will also be responsible for providing the means by which cross cutting budget reductions will be achieved
in the areas of property and procurement, through the Strategic Property Alliance (SPA) with Carillion and
CBRE, and the STaR procurement shared service with Trafford and Rochdale Councils. In addition, the new
delivery models that emerge within the IIS workstreams all have aspects which require changes to the
Council’s estate, information technology infrastructures and support arrangements (including the drive to
more digital solutions) and the levels of support required across the range of CSS services.

The Executive has stated that members expect to see propositions which facilitate an even more integrated
and cross cutting approach to be taken and which enable CSS managers to further streamline and prioritise
their activities following the substantial savings already made in this area. For 2016/17 in particular the
Executive will be looking for a reduction in CSS costs consequential and proportionate to the reductions being
delivered across all other service areas.

For 2015/16 the emphasis will be on the delivery of reductions in the Single Property Budget (SPB) required of
the SPA. It is evident that during 2015/16 in particular the Investing in Stockport programme and the projects
therein will require additional CSS staffing resources to be made available on a temporary basis; in addition the
‘core’ CSS model will require time to bed in before any further reductions can be considered.

The indicative budget for 2016/17 is predicated on reductions in demand for CSS services resulting from the
reconfiguration of council services and the introduction of new delivery models providing opportunities for the
further streamlining of CSS activities. Without a significant reduction in demand the proposed reduction of CSS
resources will increase the levels of risk borne by and across the Council. The functions and activities
undertaken are extremely important to the wellbeing of the Council, helping ensure it makes the most effective
use of its resources - people, money, assets and information, and that it is governed and operated in a manner
befitting a major public service organisation. It is vital, therefore, that agreement is reached on the activities
that are of most importance and that the new structures and working arrangements enable resources to be
deployed to minimise the risks to the Council.

A draft Equality Impact Assessment for this project is attached at Appendix 3 and will be further developed in
line with consultation.

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2. Regulation and Statutory Considerations

One of the main responsibilities for CSS is helping officers across the Council to be both aware of and act in
accordance with all relevant regulatory and statutory requirements.

CSS directly supports the statutory roles of the Head of Paid Service, Section 151 Officer, Monitoring Officer
and Senior Information Risk Owner (SIRO).

CSS heads of service and their teams are responsible for ensuring the Council complies with all the relevant
legislation, regulation, advice and guidance relating to their service areas and supports front line services in
implementing service specific legislation. There are numerous such requirements, of which some examples are
listed below

 Business Support – Data Protection Act (DPA) 1998, Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) 2000,
Environmental Information Regulations (EIR) 2004, Civil Contingencies Act 2004
 Estate and Asset Management
 Finance – Local Government Act 1972 – Section 151, Local Government Finance Act 2012 – Section 113
and 114
 Information and Communication
 Legal and Democratic Governance - Local Government and Housing Act 1989 – Section 5
 People and Organisational Development – Health And Safety at Work Act (HASAWA) 1974 and HASAWA
Regulations 1999
 Policy, Performance and Reform – Local Government Act 2000





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3. Investment Profile

The overall investment across these services currently stands at £21.5m. We anticipate that the future
investment in this area (i.e. by 2016/17) will be £18.5m. In achieving this change, the total investment planned
over the next couple of years can be summarised as follows:

Year £m
2014/15 21.5
2015/16 20.5
2016/17 18.5
Beyond ?

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4. A Description of the New Service

Over the next two years the CSS delivery model will be fully developed, providing opportunities for it to
become even more flexible and responsive, making the best use of the considerable skills and qualities that
exist within the CSS workforce. The new service delivery model will be fully implemented during 2014/15
In consultation with service users there will be a prioritisation exercise to ensure that key activities are
preserved / enhanced while those in lower priority areas can be reduced

The CSS model has been designed to be able to respond to changes in demand, priorities and budgetary
requirements without the need for major restructuring and the disruption that would bring. The key principles
and components of the delivery model will continue to be developed, i.e.:

• ‘One service, one budget’
• Centrally managed and delivered (locally or centrally) appropriate to the Council’s needs
• Heads of Business Support (HoBs) providing the key interface between and within providers and
customers
• Integrated / unified functions and services with appropriate an appropriate management structure
• Continuing with an appropriate mix of ‘specialist’ and ‘generic’ roles (significantly decreasing proportion
of former and increasing latter)
• Corporately agreed priorities, specifications, service agreements and performance management
arrangements, recognise the differing requirements of and for ‘corporate’ and ’support’ services
• Services delivered through an appropriate mix of:
• ‘fixed’ in-house resource to meet constant / core demand
• ‘fixed’ external resource (e.g. procurement shared service, new property vehicle)
• ‘flexible’ in-house resource to meet changing / variable demands
• ‘flexible’ budget for external resource to meet changing / variable demands – ‘buy-in’ from other
public and private providers as appropriate
• Single (centralised) budgets for related spend – in particular property (SPB); ICT equipment, systems and
associated expenditure; training and development – to maximise efficiencies
• Extending an agreed approach to delivering and charging for ‘traded services’ provided to more external
customers (e.g. schools)

It is not anticipated that any further major changes will be required to the nature and structure of CSS, rather it
will be about responding differently to the requirements for corporate and support services which themselves
will have to be reduced as front-line services transform.

The Council will have to accept that the expectations will have to be amended to reflect a sharper focus on
priorities and less of a dependency on support services. In reaching agreements as to the specification for and
means of providing support, CSS managers and service managers will need to:
 work closely to understand the implications of wider organisational transformation on CSS services,
 adopt a risk based approach to identify priorities for future support,
 assess, and take account of the additional risks that will arise as CSS resources are reduced.



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5. How we will achieve this

2015/16

The SPA has been considering a number of business cases put forward by Carillion/CBRE which outline how
savings could be made against the single property budget. These include the following:

 Office rationalisation
 Investment portfolio
 Estates operational review
 Borough Care estate review
 Business rates review
 Energy and Low Carbon, Investment Grade Audit
 Community assets
 Depots, plant and equipment

Together with a more efficient and effective management and delivery of property related services it is
anticipated that these reviews and the actions that follow will lead to savings of around £1m during 2015/16.

2016/17

The additional £2m reduction in the indicative budget for 2016/17 is, as mentioned earlier, predicated and
dependent on a reduction in demand for CSS services flowing from the implementation of new delivery models
across the Council and with partners. At this stage, therefore, it is not possible to specifically identify how the
reduction would be effected. Suffice to say there would be:
 a further drive with the SPA to achieve further reductions in property related costs (and increases in
income),
 maximising efficiencies on non-staffing costs as the new CSS model really becomes embedded and the
functions become more integrated,
 a continued streamlining of policies and procedures,
 the automation and streamlining of back office business processes,
 Exploring the feasibility of different service delivery models, and
 Considering opportunities for additional income generation as a means of reducing net spending.

Given that the vast majority of the budget relates to employee costs (of the current net budget of £21.5m
around £18m is for staffing) it will be necessary to reduce the number of posts (currently around 570 FTEs)
during 2016/17 to achieve the budget reduction indicated.

In that regard, the fact that the majority of posts within CSS are generic in nature means that staffing resources
can be ‘flexed’ to reflect changing priorities and levels of demand. Further flexibility is built in by having a
number of posts filled on a temporary / fixed term basis; this will enable posts to be taken out of the structure
in future years while minimising the impact on permanent employees who wish to remain working in CSS and
develop the services and themselves.

In addition, CSS functions have identified a number of key projects which will support and enable further
streamlining and efficiencies. These include:

 Digital Mailroom – including scanning all incoming post for electronic desktop delivery; adopting a
hybrid mail solution for outgoing post; streamlining and reducing printing across the Council; providing
more effective document storage solutions
 Review and streamlining of all business support processes to maximise efficiencies including limiting
choice of stationery and equipment to achieve best value
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 Financial processing – streamlining purchase to pay financial transactions and processes to remove
duplication, optimise use of financial systems to develop improved financial reporting tools and
techniques and self-sufficiency
 Work closely with the Stockport, Trafford and Rochdale (STaR) procurement unit to optimise the
Council’s leverage and purchasing power
 Review and rationalise the Council’s ICT infrastructure to simplify and standardise processes
 Support and underpin the Council’s ‘digital by design’ agenda to enable the development of effective
technological solutions
 Provide streamlined and efficient HR and workforce development support with an increased focus on
quality advice, guidance and effective self-service systems (iTrent)
 Improved access to and analysis of research and intelligence to inform future service design
 Effective programme management of the IIS programme to ensure delivery of Council-wide
transformation and reductions


Detail are set out in:

- Appendix 1 – Activity and Impact Schedule
- Appendix 4 – Project milestones


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6. Impact on current service model

A significant element of the reduction in property costs will be achieved by rationalising the number of
locations occupied by council employees. This will obviously involve relocation and some minor short term
disruption could be suffered. The Council has been undertaking such a programme of rationalisation for some
time now and we are well versed in making such changes with minimal impact on service provision.

As indicated above, it is not possible at this point to identify or quantify the potential impact in 2016/17 as this
will be dependent on service transformation in other areas across the Council. Ideally, the demand for certain
CSS services will reduce or be eliminated and CSS will need to work closely with front line services to align and
sequence reductions given the integral nature of many CSS support services within front line service delivery
and associated processes and to enable service continuity where appropriate.

To the extent that this does not occur, there will need to be a further review and prioritisation of CSS activities
which may lead to the cessation of certain types of support. Again, a risk based approach will be required to
assess and manage the implications of such reductions for front line services and other stakeholders.

Detail are set out in Appendix 1 – Activity and Impact Schedule



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7. Interdependencies

The success of this project in 2016/17 is almost entirely dependent on the outcomes of the Investing in
Stockport programme. The reconfiguration of Council services and the organisation itself will directly impact
the way in which CSS is able to further transform and reduce and is predicated on a lower demand for CSS
activities. As such, the relationship between the transformation and reductions through the wider IIS
programme and CSS is a key interdependency.

CSS provides the lead in working with the SPA and STaR to enable the achievement of savings in the single
property budget and to identify and leverage procurement savings for the Council. As such, the success and
achievement of savings and efficiencies within these entities will be key for CSS.

The drive to be more ‘digital by design’ will also be important. We need to make our business processes as slick
as possible, automating as much as we can, reducing duplication and resource intensive interventions, and
getting the best out of existing technology. It is likely, however, that we will need to invest relatively significant
amounts on new technologies and associated support to really move the digital agenda along.

In addition to providing support to Council services, CSS generates a significant amount of income from trading
with schools and, to a lesser extent, some other external bodies. As such, the continued demand for CSS
services and any changes within those bodies may have further implications for CSS and the amount of income
it is able to generate to offset further reductions.


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8. Stakeholders

The new delivery model for CSS was only introduced after a very comprehensive consultation exercise involving
key stakeholders. This engagement will continue and all will be formally consulted with once firm proposals
emerge in relation to 2016/17.

In the meantime, those service areas, employees and partners impacted upon by proposed changes to the
Council’s estate and office accommodation arrangements will be fully consulted as moves are being considered
and planned.

Feedback from the previous consultations and discussions with stakeholders will continue to be important as
the CSS model is developed; for example:

• building a better relationship and greater understanding by CSS providers of the services delivered by
outward focussed teams
• guidance and advice from CSS providers has to be clear, consistent, timely and accurate
• need to reduce duplication and maximise economies of scale where appropriate
• need to communicate more clearly the support service roles and responsibilities
• flexibility of staff by developing valued and appropriate competencies and skills to enable us to use the
workforce to its fullest potential
• detailed workflow analysis to identify and drive out inefficiencies and duplication
• better use of technology to support services to become more streamlined and effective
• better commissioning and contract management

And:

• to work proactively with customers to listen and understand the business needs and develop services to
meet these
• the workforce will be flexible and have the appropriate skills and knowledge to perform the tasks
required to support the outcomes of the Council
• the policies, processes and procedures are streamlined and developed collaboratively and jointly owned
across the organisation
• the providers of the corporate and support services will be accountable and responsible to their
customers

This Business Case cannot be achieved alone and will require the support of a wide range of stakeholders. The
Management Team are working with a range of stakeholders to shape and progress this proposal. These
include:

 Customers of CSS across the Council – managers and particularly other IIS project leads
 Elected members
 External customers – including schools and associated bodies
 Strategic partners – including Carillion/CBRE (SPA), STaR
 CSS employees
 Trade unions





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9. Consultation and Engagement

For the most part the consultation exercises will be internally focussed involving the stakeholders identified
above.

Services occupying buildings to be included in the property rationalisation programme will be consulted and
involved in the design of new accommodation arrangements and the timing and logistics of the moves. Where
these directly impact on members of the public, we will consult as appropriate.

As indicated above and given the integral and reciprocal nature of CSS support to services, users of CSS services
will be heavily involved in determining the ways in which CSS costs could be reduced through changes in
demand and on-going prioritisation of work and CSS can in turn help to enable services to transform and
reduce.

Any changes to staffing structures / numbers will be the subject of formal consultation with employees and
trade unions at the appropriate juncture


A Consultation Plan is attached at Appendix 2


APPENDICES
1. Activity and Impact
2. Consultation Plan
3. EIA
4. Project Milestones

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APPENDIX 1
ACTIVITY AND IMPACT SCHEDULE
Year Activity and Potential Impact
2014/15
The new service delivery model will be fully implemented during 2014/15
In consultation with service users there will be a prioritisation exercise to ensure that key activities are preserved /
enhanced while those in lower priority areas can be reduced
The SPA is working on business cases to identify how savings in the single property budget (SPB) can be achieved
2015/16
Savings of £1m will be achieved in the SPB through building rationalisation; it is expected that this will have little or no
adverse effect on service provision
CSS will be providing additional support to services as they implement their Investing in Stockport propositions
Preparations will be made for reducing the cost of CSS in 2016/17, identifying the reductions in ongoing
requirements for CSS that will result from changes across the Council
2016/17
A £2m budget reduction will be achieved through a combination of further property savings, process improvements,
and reducing a number of posts that are filled on a temporary basis
The impact on services and the Council as a whole will very much depend on the extent to which demand for CSS
services can be reduced and/or changes to priorities agreed that will enable CSS resources to be reduced
Without a significant reduction in demand the reduction of CSS resources will increase the levels of risk borne by and
across the Council
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APPENDIX 2
CONSULTATION PLAN

Please indicate if you need to
consult internally and/ or
externally
Internal and with targeted stakeholders
Details of who you intend to
consult and whether there will be
a geographical focus
o Customers of CSS across the Council – managers and
particularly other IIS project leads
o Elected members
o External customers – including schools and associated
bodies
o Strategic partners – including Carillion/CBRE (SPA), STaR
o CSS employees
o Trade unions.


What you intend to ask them or
the aim of the consultation
o Developing new service delivery models in line with
changes to customer services
o Obtain feedback on proposed changes
o Assess the impact of proposals on internal and external
customers

What methods of consultation
will be used
Meetings; online/email; face-to-face
The team that will be carrying
out the consultation
CSS Management team
Period of consultation

Between September - December 2015
What form the feedback will take Meetings; online/emails; face-to-face



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APPENDIX 3
EQUALITY IMPACT ASSESSMENT

Title:
Corporate and Support Services
Date:
Stage: consultation/ draft/ final
(delete as applicable)
Lead Officer: Andrea Stewart

Stage 1: Do you need to complete an Equality Impact Assessment (EIA)?
Not all policies will require an EIA: these key questions will help you to decide
whether you need to conduct an EIA (see guidance notes at the end of this form).

Yes, an EIA is required. This is will involve service redesign. Significant changes to staffing
structures will require 45 days consultation.

The EIA continues to be required as the further redesign of CSS will involve changes to
services which will impact on staff and could impact upon residents. Direct impact on
residents is expected to be limited with the possible exception of any changes as part of
property rationalisation arrangements, changes made to external communications and the
approach to wider public consultation. Indirect impact may be possible as employees
affected by the CSS Review provide support to front line services and the models of this
support are likely to change.
This project will consider the following services and functions:
 Business Support
 Estate and Asset Management
 Finance
 Information and Communication
 Legal and Democratic Governance
 People and Organisational Development
 Policy, Performance and Reform

This EIA will reflect the varied nature of these services and consider potential impacts on
staff and residents.
This EIA will be updated as the project develops and thereafter during the process to
transfer to a new model. It will be regularly reviewed by the CSS Leadership Team and will
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inform any considerations for changing the proposals during this period. This EIA will only
include the service areas as identified above. This EIA will not cover any subsequent
restructures or specific changes to services which may occur outside of the scope of this
phase of this project.


Stage 2: What do you know?
An EIA should be based upon robust evidence. This stage will guide you through
potential sources of information and how to interpret it. Understanding the current
context is a key stage in all policy making and planning (see guidance notes at the
end of this form).

Update and insert workforce statistics and information from previous CSS Review


Stage 2a: Further Data and Consultation
If you feel that the data and past consultation feedback you have is not sufficient to
properly consider the impact before a decision is made then you may wish to
supplement your evidence base with more data or further consultation. This should
be proportionate to the scale of the decision and will depend on the gaps in your
current understanding (see guidance notes at the end of this form).

To be developed as future plans emerge


Stage 3: Results and Measures
As a result of what you have learned in Stage 2 what will you do to ensure that no
group is unfairly and unlawfully impacted upon as a result of the proposed
change(s)? (see guidance notes at the end of this form)

To be developed - Include age, gender, socio-economic, pregnancy and maternity, disability
etc.


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Stage 4: Decision Stage
Once your plan/policy is fully developed it will need to go through the correct scrutiny
and approval channels: the EIA should be included as part of this (see guidance
notes at the end of this form).




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APPENDIX 4

Potential milestones
Project Milestone Project Target
Date
SPA milestones to achieve property related savings 2015/16
Progress and implement CSS projects identified at section 5 Sept 2014-
March 2016
Work with IIS project leads to identify and align further CSS transformation and reduction Sept 2014-
March 2016
Develop outline business case for further CSS redesign Apr-Sept 2015
Consultation on redesign proposals Sept-Dec 2015
Finalise redesign proposals Jan-Mar 2016
Implementation of redesign Mar 2016