Thursday, September 12, 2013

space
of
their
Create the perfect
bedrooms for your kids
Holiday decor
Mix up your look with these
holiday decorating tips, page 2
Upgrade interior lighting
for a brighter winter, page 5
Brighten up
your home
A Post Register
advertising supplement
By Casey Archibald
carchibald@postregister.com
W
ith the fall and winter
holidays fast ap-
proaching, it’s time
to venture up into the attic and
dust of the old boxes full of
seasonal decorations.
Michelle Rushton, owner of
Design and Home Decor Out-
let, and Jannet Steffen, owner
of Crackleberry Boutique have
dozens of tips and tricks to re-
use old decor and bring in the
new for this holiday season.
Design and Home Decor
Outlet has been in business for
about seven years. Te store
is chock-full of hand-picked
mirrors, ceramic fgurines,
faux foral arrangements, vases,
mantel pieces, wall-hangings
and more.
In addition, the outlet offers
in-store or on-site consulting
as well as decorating services
for customers. This includes
both holiday and everyday
decor. Rushton said she started
the store because she has al-
ways had a passion for making
things beautiful.
“Your environment has such
an impact on you as a person
whether it is your own home
or a business where you work.
[Decor] is all about creating a
positive environment for people
to live and work in, and creating
positive, good surroundings.”
Crackleberry Boutique
is a store that specializes in
high-quality home decor for ev-
eryday decorating as well as sea-
sonal. Floral arrangements and
home decor advice is also avail-
able. Stefen said she purchased
the store in 2005 and has been
running it ever since. Te shop
recently moved three streets east
from their old location.
“I love having a creative
outlet,” said Stefen, “I worked
full time for a long time and
purchasing Crackleberry kind
of just happened. I truly enjoy
it, and that is the very best part
about [owning the boutique.]”
Both Rushton and Stefen said
there are certain times of the
year that are the most appro-
priate for decorating for the
winter holidays. Every year, the
stores rotate through Halloween,
Tanksgiving, and Christmas
decor during the fall and winter
months.
Halloween
Mid-September is a great
time to start getting out fall and
Halloween decorations.
“I think Halloween is proba-
bly one of the most fun holidays
for people to decorate for,” said
Stefen. “Between the frst of
September and the 15th is when
people usually start to set their
places up for fall and Halloween.
If you don’t have a lot of holiday
stuf to put up, then October is
plenty soon.
Stefen explained that Hal-
loween decor doesn’t have to be
creepy to keep with the spirit
of the holiday. She said most
of the Halloween decor sold at
Crackleberry is “cutesy rather
than creepy.”
According to Stefen, jack-o-
lantern, crow and owl decora-
tions are very popular this year.
She also said do-it-yourself
projects can be adjusted to be
more seasonal.
“So many things can be done
with wood pallet. I have seen peo-
ple cut them into the shape of a
pumpkin so the wood is standing
straight up and down. People are
so darn creative these days,” said
Stefen.
Some of Stefen’s most popular
Halloween pieces that are sold
in her store are wooden letters
that read things like S-P-O-O-
K-Y or G-H-O-S-T. Each letter is
decorated in something diferent.
Mummies, bats, broomsticks and
pumpkins are just a few of the
things featured on the letters. She
said if you are creative enough,
it could be a great DIY project as
well.
For many years during the
holidays, Rushton said she dec-
orates a tree for every holiday of
the season in her own home. She
starts with what she calls her “har-
vest tree” and puts it up sometime
before Halloween and uses a color
palette based on shades of red,
orange and yellow.
“Te reason I started doing
trees in the fall is because it
started getting dark earlier in
the evening, and the light that I
could produce with a tree helped
alleviate that sinking feeling that
summer is gone. With a tree, you
can bring a little bit of that light
back into the space.”
Rushton explained besides
providing extra light, bringing a
tree into her home so early in the
holiday season helped bring her
family together in the evenings.
“During Halloween I could
put a few ornaments or dec-
orations relating to that, with
witches, ghosts or jack-o-lan-
terns,” said Rushton. “Ten
when Halloween is over, I take
those of and replace them with
more Tanksgiving-style orna-
ments and decor.”
Rushton said generally, the
jack-o-lanterns, bats and witches
should come down the day afer
Halloween.
“The transition between
Halloween decorating and fall
or Thanksgiving decorating
can be made very easy because
they have similar color pal-
ettes. You can use some of the
same pieces, just tweak them a
little,” said Rushton.
2 • Thursday, Sept. 12, 2013 Home Improvement Post Register
Deck
halls
t
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Ring in the holiday season with these decorating tips
Stock photo
Give Christmas ornaments a new look with glitter, ribbon or paint.
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Tanksgiving
Rushton suggested the frst
day of November as the perfect
time to start decorating for fall
and Tanksgiving.
Stefen said some of the most
popular Tanksgiving trends
for this year include dark
woods, candles and foliage with
a standard fall color-palette. She
also explained that even though
many people are straying from
the traditional decor, pilgrims
are still a standard.
“For things like pilgrim and
nativity sets, it’s best to just
splurge on one nice set and keep
it forever or until it breaks. Tose
things will always be a mainstay
for the holidays,” said Stefen.
Christmas
Stefen said most people tend
to start decorating for Christmas
soon afer Tanksgiving.
Rushton said one of the best
parts about the Christmas season
these days is that colors aren’t as
important as they used to be. Te
traditional green, red and white
color palette isn’t as standard as it
once was.
“Every year, there are diferent
color trends for Christmas,” said
Stefen. “Tis year a mix of green
and turquoise is a really popular
choice.”
She said one way to keep
Christmas decor from clashing
with everyday decor is to match
the Christmas decorations to the
room rather than the other way
around — and it doesn’t have to
be expensive.
“Use things you already have,”
said Rushton. “You can pick out
some wrapping paper and use
it to pull out certain colors that
are in the room. Use it to wrap a
photo or some art that is hanging
on the wall and top it of with
some cute ribbon or a bow. Ten
hang it back up.”
Rushton explained that there
are things that people do every
year to decorate for Christmas
that just say “Christmas” regard-
less of their color.
“Stockings are a great example
of this. You can make stockings
out of the colors that normally
make up the decor of the room.
Stockings say ‘Christmas’ no
matter what color they are,” said
Rushton.
Some of Rushton’s other
suggestions included wrapping
empty boxes in paper that match-
es the decor of the room, flling
decorative bowls with glass balls,
corset-wrapping candles with
ribbon, decorating pine garland
with the right colors to match
the room and putting beaded
garlands around everyday decor.
“Basically, you just need to add
a little more bling during Christ-
mastime,” said Rushton.
Rushton said her store dec-
orates two or three Christmas
trees every year for the Festival
of Trees in Idaho Falls. She said
there is no limit to the creativity
that can go into decorating a tree.
Stefen suggested using spray
paint or foral paint to change the
color of foral picks, ornaments,
pine cones or other tree decor to
get a Christmas tree to match the
room it’s in. She added that trans-
parent ornaments can be flled
with colored sand, or splashed
with paint on the inside.
Refurbishing old ornaments is
something that both decorators
suggested as a cost-ef cient way
to create a great look for a Christ-
mas tree.
“A lot of times your orna-
ments may get really old and
nasty-looking. You can recreate
those old ornaments into new
things in a variety of ways, espe-
cially with the glass balls,” said
Rushton.
Rushton suggested using hot
glue to attach little squares or
little petals onto ornaments or
wrapping them in colored yarn.
Other ideas included spray paint-
ing them, using glitter paint to
add a little sparkle or doing some
kind of bow or ribbon-wrap.
“Really anything can be an or-
nament on a tree, it doesn’t have
to be meant to be a Christmas
ornament,” said Rushton, “Get
creative.”
Rushton said a great way to
see if the colors on a tree coor-
dinate well with the other colors
in the room is to see if it passes
the squint test. Tis technique
involves squinting at the object
in question until everything blurs
together.
Generally, people use the
squint test to see if the lights on
their tree are evenly spaced, but
Rushton explained that it can
also be used to see if the colors
on the tree are spread evenly, and
to make sure they are refected in
the room’s color palette. Hanging
like ornaments in odd numbers
can also help trees pass the test.
“You can use the squint test for
anything,” Rushton said.
Stefen suggested stringing
icicle lights on a tree in an up
and down motion rather than
wrapping straight strands around
the tree in circles.
“With icicle lights you can pull
them down and push them up
as you need to,” said Stefen, “If
you go around and around with
a strand of lights you can never
get those lines straight and even.
Icicle lights are so much easier to
maneuver.”
Matching Christmas decora-
tions to everyday decor is not the
only way to create an amazing
space for this season.
“Copper and metallic colors
tend to match well with almost
any color you might have in
the room. You can use metallic
decorations on the tree to pick
up on the colors of the decor in
the room. You can keep all your
regular ornaments even if they
don’t match perfectly and just use
copper-colored tinsel or some-
thing that can work in with the
other colors.”
Stefen said a kind of country
vintage look has been popular for
Christmas trees and other decor
in the past few years. To achieve
this look, she said some people
use burlap, lace and ornaments
wrapped in twine.
Packing in the ornaments
is not necessarily a bad thing,
according to Stefen.
“We tend to fnd that [trees]
look good even when you pack
[decor] in there,” said Stefen,
“We usually sell things right
of our Christmas trees and
they start of jam-packed full of
ornaments. By the end of the
season we think it looks like it’s
been picked apart, but people
still tell us they look amazing. It
just depends on your style, the
amount of time you have and
your budget.”
Budget isn’t the only issue that
people face when it comes to dec-
orating for Christmas. In a small
home or apartment, it can be
challenging or look too crowded
if traditional Christmas decor is
implemented.
“If you don’t have the room or
budget for a big tree, try creat-
ing a little Christmas vignette
instead,” Rushton said. “Start
by hanging one of those beau-
tiful, lit or decorated wreaths
on an empty wall. Put a little
table underneath, cover it with
a pretty tablecloth and top it of
with a bunch of lit candles. Even
though it isn’t a traditional tree,
you still have a place for packages
underneath the table. Tis way,
you can create a Christmas look
and apply it to a wall area, instead
of taking up a lot of room with a
full-fedged tree.”
For homes without a mantle,
Stefen suggested tying stockings
to a banister with some nice
ribbon, or hanging up a piece of
wood with hooks on it to hang
stockings from.
“At our store we sell stock-
ing hangers that say ‘And the
stockings were hung…’ above
the hooks on a wood panel,” said
Stefen.
Rushton said she is looking
forward to this season so her
clients and customers can take
part in the trends that are new
this year. She said even though
styles change every year, the
color palettes are always beau-
tiful because they are derived
from nature.
“We are so lucky in this area
because we have four distinct
seasons,” said Rushton. “Our dec-
orating here is based on what is
going on outside seasonally. Our
color palette outside changes four
beautiful times every year. And
as those changes happen outside,
that’s what people are trying to
do — make what is outside their
home gel with what is on the
inside.”
www.postregister.com Home Improvement Thursday, Sept. 12, 2013 • 3
A Christmas tree with a red and white
theme on display at Crackleberry
Boutique.
Submitted photo
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Improve your home improvements
by being wattsmart.
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By Eryn Shay Johnson
For the Post Register
Winter months bring a num-
ber of concerns, but something
often overlooked is the home.
This winter, fight back with
a few tips from Rocknak’s
Hardware.
“The biggest thing we see in
the winter time is people com-
ing in for help fixing broken
pipes,” Brian Rocknak said.
Pipes may be the biggest is-
sues when the snow falls, but
preparation in advance can
easily prevent a broken line.
One easy step in homes is to
insulate lines with foam tub-
ing. Exterior walls that house
pipelines are the best to tar-
get on the path of prevention,
these lines are most often the
ones that break.
Easy to access, most pipes
are hidden behind walls, a
length of tubing with some
duct tape will prevent the lines
from the freeze and thaw that
cause the line to break.
RVs and trailers that will sit
can afford to push antifreeze
through the pipelines. In the
yard professionally blowing
out the sprinklers will save
digging up the yard to fix a
broken line.
In other parts of the home,
heat escaping and cold enter-
ing is a main concern.
“Use weather striping to seal
doors and gaps. In other areas
spray foam works well,” Rock-
nak said. “There is also spray
foam with bug repellent.”
Spray foam has been de-
signed to prevent bugs from
entering through small cre-
vasses, specially formulated
mixtures also discourage mice
and vermin from entering
homes.
“A fall spray is good for home
defense,” Rocknak said.
Whether it is the foam spray to
keep heat in and bugs out or a
bug repellent something should
be done to keep spiders, insects
and mice out of homes.
Heat slinks in through win-
dows as well. As a line of de-
fense caulking windows or
installing an insulating lay-
er of plastic on the inside of
the window works wonders.
Drafts can enter through light
switches and outlets, insulat-
ing these areas will prevent a
cool breeze. These steps are
easy to do and will save money
as the temperature drops.
Speaking of temperature
there are a few ways to save
money in home.
Purchasing a programma-
ble thermostat will discourage
the dial turning and save some
green. Termostats can be pro-
grammed to heat the house at
certain times of day and con-
serve energy when one is away.
“Also, check your furnace in
the fall,” Rocknak added. “Be
sure to change the filter if it
needs to be changed.”
Furnace filters should be
changed regularly; fiberglass
filters should be changed once
a month. Pleated filters last a
little longer.
“Fall is a good time to start
thinking about next spring,”
Rocknak said. In terms of lawn
care laying down Lawn Weed
and Feed will ensure a better
looking lawn during spring
and summer months.
The hardware store also sees
a lot of individuals purchasing
heat tape to lay on roofs to pre-
vent snow and ice build up on
eaves and valleys.
“Just make sure you take the
time to do the work,” Rocknak
added. “We all have such busy
lives that we forget about it.
We tend to procrastinate, and
then we start to see broken
pipes.”
A few hours taken to pre-
vent home invasion by bugs or
to give the pipelines a warm
sweater can save money in the
long run.
4 • Thursday, Sept. 12, 2013 Home Improvement Post Register
Get ready for winter
Winterize your home to
avoid costly repairs later
Adding
caulking to
windows
helps keep
heat in and
cold out of
the home.
Stock photo
(BPT) — With the average
American family doing more
than 400 loads of laundry each
year, it’s no wonder that the
laundry room has become one
of the most popular remodel-
ing projects in the house.-
Often out of sight and out
of mind, most laundry rooms
are designed like closets rath-
er than efficient utility rooms.
But according to Decorator
Jenny Komenda, who blogs at
The Little Green Notebook,
with just a few inexpensive
changes, you can brighten
your clothes and your mood
by transforming your dark
and dingy laundry room into
a bright, functional (and even
enjoyable) place.
Check out these tips on how
to create more efficient and
enjoyable laundry rooms:
• Dealing with a dark, cave-
like laundry room is a chore in
and of itself. By taking off the
doors on a few of your upper
cabinets, you’ll open up the
space and create a place to
store baskets. Assign baskets
for every member of the house,
which makes sorting a breeze.
• Why not decoupage or
paint the insides of your cabi-
nets for a fun pop of color? It’s
a guaranteed smile each and
every time you reach for your
detergent. Also don’t ignore
the door. Adhere some cork
panels on the inside of the cab-
inet doors and create a space
to pin all those stain removal
tips.
• Don’t like the cabinets,
floors and countertops in your
laundry room? Every surface
can be painted or resurfaced.
Update your laundry room
with paint and a concrete over-
lay for less than $30 in materi-
als. Say goodbye to the outdat-
ed linoleum, brick pavers and
old, dark cabinets.
• A rolling laundry butler
can be your best friend, doing
triple duty with a hanging bar,
a rolling basket and a drying
rack. It’s the perfect choice for
smaller laundry rooms that
haven’t been updated in a few
decades.
• Don’t neglect your laundry
room walls. Hanging interest-
ing art and mirrors will elevate
your room and make it feel less
utilitarian and a little homier.
Suddenly those 400 loads of
laundry most of us will do this
year might actually be enjoy-
able.
• A folding station makes
all the difference. Use a slab
of stone or a simple piece of
painted medium-density fiber-
board (MDF) on top of wash-
er/dryer units to create a fold-
ing station that also prevent
socks from slipping in between
the appliances.
Six tips to liven up
your laundry room
TIME IS RUNNING OUT! TIME IS RUNNING OUT!
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MON. - SAT. 10-7 º 80h0AY 11-5
3130 N. Yellowstone Hwy.
Idaho Falls, ID 208.523.5476
AMISH FURNITURE
GOING FAST!
HOWARD
MILLER
FLOOR
CLOCKS!
GOING OUT OF BUSINESS
EVERYTHING MUST GO!
GOING OUT OF BUSINESS
EVERYTHING MUST GO!
OLD IDAHO FALLS WINCO BUILDING OLD IDAHO FALLS WINCO BUILDING
*Discounts are off original and regular
prices which may or may not have resulted
in prior sales. ALL SALE ARE FINAL. All
merchandise sold “as-is”. First come, first
to save. Quantities are limited. Prior sales
excluded. Not responsible for Typographical
errors. Pictures are for illustration purposes
only. See showroom for further details. We
accept cash Visa, Mastercard, American Ex-
press, Discover and approved checks. GOB
License applied for.
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www.postregister.com Home Improvement Thursday, Sept. 12, 2013 • 5
By Casey Archibald
carchibald@postregister.com
A
s the days get shorter
and darker during the
wintertime, so do a lot of
tempers and moods.
But winter doesn’t have to be
gloomy — adding a little extra
light into your home can make
a signifcant diference when
it comes to the atmosphere of
your rooms.
Ginger Joslin, manager of
Home Lighting Center in Ida-
ho Falls, said some light bulbs
are even designed to help with
year-round or seasonal depres-
sion. Several customers that
come into the store, specifcal-
ly during the wintertime, are
on doctors’ orders to purchase
daytime or happy light bulbs
for their home in an efort to
improve their mood and bring
some sunshine into their home
— even if it is artifcial.
Tese special bulbs come
in a variety of diferent color
temperatures, which determine
their likeness to the sun.
Joslin said that surprising-
ly, the more the bulbs have a
bluish hue, the closer the color
temperature is to the sun. She
said many times people think
they want daylight bulbs and
then decide against it when they
see the bluish hue. Unless it is a
doctor’s prescription or advice,
Joslin suggests getting a bright-
er bulb for those who don’t like
the bluish hue of the daylight or
happy bulbs.
“Happy light bulbs are usually
used in little table lamps or foor
lamps,” said Desiree Smith, as-
sistant manager at Home Light-
ing Center, “Te bulbs in most
light fxtures can be replaced
with a happy light.”
Light bulbs are not the only
aspects of home lighting that
can make people happier in the
wintertime. Smith said that up-
grading light fxtures in a home
is an easy way to change the en-
tire look of a space.
“When you change the light
fxtures, you get faster gratifca-
tion in redoing your room than
you do when you take on a proj-
ect that involves totally remod-
eling,” said Smith. “Painting and
lighting, I would say, are the eas-
iest modifcations to make that
take the least amount of time
and efort.”
Joslin explained that pur-
chasing new fixtures is a quick
way to update a home and
make it look newer than it ac-
tually is. She added that kitch-
ens and bathrooms are usually
the most expensive rooms to
upgrade in a home, but that
they also have the most poten-
tial to increase its resale value.
“Based on the light you
choose, it can transform your
space from something that looks
1970s to something that looks
like it’s from 2013,” said Joslin.
Several types of home light-
ing fxtures are trending in 2013,
according to Joslin and Smith.
Joslin said crystal chande-
liers are in right now, and that
it is becoming more common
for people to hang them in
bedrooms, young girls’ rooms
and even in bathrooms over a
tub.
“A lot of people can’t [hang
a full size chandelier in their
bedroom] because their ceil-
ings are too low,” said Joslin.
“If that’s the case, you can
hang it over the bed or put in
a mini chandelier which would
still be cute. The ones that are
most popular for bedrooms
and bathrooms are usually
miniature, crystal and very
feminine.”
Smith said adding a chande-
lier to a bedroom or bathroom
space can provide more light
than a ceiling light could do
by itself. She also added that it
can add more character to the
room or space.
For a living or dining area of
the house, bronze chandeliers
or fixtures are really popular,
said Smith.
Joslin said a large chandelier
is an essential piece of decor
for homes with large entry-
ways.
If you really want to bright-
en a space, Joslin suggests
installing fluorescent lights,
especially in rooms where vis-
ibility is highly important like
in kitchens and bathrooms.
“The best lights ever are
fluorescents when it comes
to brightness and efficiency,”
said Joslin. “Although they are
not always considered deco-
rative, they can be. They are
the best-functioning light ever
made. That’s why most people
have at least one fluorescent
in their kitchen. They give, by
far, the most amount of light
with the least amount of watts
used.”
For those who don’t like
the appearance of fluorescent
ceiling lights in the kitchen,
Joslin suggested under-cabinet
lighting. This type of lighting
involves fluorescent lights that
are hidden underneath all the
cabinets in the kitchen and can
be turned on and off individ-
ually.
“In the wintertime, you are
generally going into the kitch-
en when it’s darker and you
can’t rely on window light,”
said Joslin. “If you have under
cabinet lighting it can light up
the specific surface that you’re
using, which is ideal. It’s all
about layers of lighting.”
Smith described layered
lighting as the perfect way to
light up a kitchen from the
ceiling all the way down to the
floor.
The technique can include
installing lights like regular
ceiling fixtures, canned light-
ing in the ceilings that act
similar to spotlights, ambient
lighting near the tops of the
walls that shine upward, un-
der-cabinet lights, pendant
lights over bar areas and long
strands of lights under the toe-
kicks throughout the room.
Joslin said the benefit to lay-
ered lighting is that it can light
up a room in a more even, nat-
ural way. It can light up corners
that are usually dark and each
layer can be turned on individ-
ually if there is ever a need for
less light in the room. She said
that many of these layers that
are great in a kitchen can also
work well in other portions of
a home.
Smith suggested putting up
light sconces to help illuminate
hallways and other areas of the
house.
Joslin added that they can
also work well in stairways. An-
other suggestion she has is to
illuminate stairs by installing
lights lower in the wall next to
the staircase that light up each
step all the way to the top.
Joslin and Smith said they
are looking forward to the
lights that will be on display
at Home Lighting Center soon
for the holidays.
“We will have snowflake
lights, lights that look like
snow is falling, vintage Christ-
mas lights, modern styles of
lights, light nets for bushes and
so many different colors,” said
Smith.
Whether it’s bright or happy
bulbs, an upgrade in light fix-
tures, layered lighting or holi-
day light decor, Joslin said ad-
justing home lighting during
the winter can change the en-
tire mood and look of a room,
especially with the upcoming
dark, winter days.
Let there be
Brighten gloomy winter days with a home lighting upgrade
Casey Archibald/carchibald@postregister.com
Chandeliers are in style now and can add extra light to a space according to Gin-
ger Joslin at the Home Lighting Center.
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8 • Thursday, Sept. 12, 2013 Home Improvement Post Register
Tip two: Let your child help
with the process.
The sisters form Funk n’
Hardee Designs said they
speak with each child before
they design their room. Funk
said this is something parents
can also do to include their
children if they are designing
on their own.
“Yes, parents have their
budget, but there are always
things that can be done to in-
clude the child in the process
of decorating,” said Hardy.
“For example, it doesn’t cost
any more to purchase aqua
paint, verses a pink-colored
paint.”
Hardy also suggested allow-
ing children to do their own
art.
“You can put it in a frame
and hang it on a wall,” Har-
dy said. “It makes them feel
good when they see it and it is
better than any art that money
could buy.”
Putting up photos of family,
a child’s feet or hands, or a
child doing their favorite sport
are some other suggestions
the sisters came up with to fill
the walls and still include the
children in the process.
“Getting photos printed on
canvas at a place like Sam’s
Club or Costco can make for
a classy, but cost-efficient
way to make the room more
personal,” said Hardy.
Tip three: Paint and
refurbish.
“Paint is magic,” said Hardy.
“If you are on a tight budget
some paint on the walls or
painted furniture can make all
the difference. If you are in an
apartment or renting, painting
furniture can really add some
personality to the room.”
Funk said linens and ac-
cessories are the easiest and
quickest things to change if
the home is being rented.
Sheets, lamps, drapes, accent
rugs and bedding can make a
big difference.
“These are things that you
can really use to show a child’s
personality because of the
varieties in color, shape or
pattern. You can always add
things that aren’t permanent,”
said Funk.
Funk mentioned a cost-ef-
ficient way to acquire great
quality paint. She said most
paint or hardware stores have
a collection of “oops” paint
that was not mixed to be the
proper color. She added that
inquiring customers can get
a gallon of “oops” paint for as
little as $5.
Hardy suggested painting
old pieces of furniture that are
around the house, or pieces
that can be purchased at yard
sales, thrift shops or on web-
sites like Craigslist.
“Children love to have little
chairs in their rooms. They
can be painted, or covered
with a slip cover that matches
the design of the rest of the
room,” Hardy said.
Funk said that new knobs
in old furniture that has been
painted can make the pieces
look fresh and new.
“The crazy thing about
nowadays is you don’t even
have to have the same knobs
on the same piece of furniture.
You can mix and match,” said
Funk.
Hardy said there are even
ways to refurbish pieces that
are broken without completely
rebuilding them.
“If you have an old dresser
that has a broken or missing
drawer, put a piece of wood
in its place to create a bottom
and put a basket in it,” Hardy
said.
Tip four: Let your child’s
personality show through
the decor in their room.
Sometimes when children
are sharing a room, the topic of
decor can be a highly debated
subject.
Te design sisters suggest
helping children fnd a compro-
mise in the decor.
“Start with one color that
they both like, then have them
each select their own color,”
said Funk. “Ten pop those
colors back and forth across
the room or shared space. Tat
way everything goes together,
but they have their area that
represents their own color and
personality and passions.”
Hardy added that allowing
each child to help select their
own bedding can help as well.
“You can also put up bulletin
boards in each child’s space.
Tat way, they can put up their
own stuf that defnes their
personality, without putting
pinholes or tape marks on the
walls,” said Hardy.
Hardy also said that children
— little boys especially — love
to have a little space to put their
trophies and other memorabilia
from sports. In a shared room,
small shelves can be put up in
each child’s area to help them
Kid rooms
Photos by Casey Archibald/carchibald@postregister.com
The Klaussen boys chose cars and airplanes for themes in their bedrooms. On
the cover of this section is the car room and the airplane room is pictured above.
The rooms are connected by a loft, at left, that the boys share as a game room.
The home is located in American Falls.
Previous page: The Funk girls have an elegant playroom complete with play
kitchenette and dining table. The chairs are full-size chairs with the legs cut off
to bring them down to the girls’ size. The home is located in American Falls.
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In the Community to Serve
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feel like they have a space of
their own.
Sometimes, children agree
on the design and color of their
room with no debate at all.
Funk said on one occasion she
and her sister received a call
from four girls who wanted
help decorating their shared
room.
When Funk answered her
phone, one of the girls asked,
“Are you the ladies who paint?”
followed by another question
— “Do you do zebra?”
Hardy said the family didn’t
have much money to pay for
the design, but the sisters spent
the day helping the girls any-
way. Tey painted zebra print
all over the walls.
“Te girls already had the
room pretty well-designed
themselves. Tey agreed on
just about everything. Tey
had it drawn out exactly how
they wanted it. It was the most
priceless little job we have ever
done,” said Hardy.
Even though Funk empha-
sized the importance of allow-
ing children to express them-
selves in their space through
its design, she said sometimes
parents have to say no, especial-
ly if the child’s request involves
painting. In those cases, it is the
parent and the child that must
fnd a compromise and many
times that can be done with
removable items in the room.
She explained that during one
of their projects, the little girl
wanted a white horse painted
on her wall, but her parents
weren’t too keen on the idea.
When her mom lef for a few
minutes and she turned to the
designers and said, “Paint the
white horse—quick.”
Tip five: Organization
is key.
“If kids know there are places
where they can put things, they
will generally put their things in
those places,” said Funk. “Tis
can really help in reducing clut-
ter. It’s when you don’t create
that spot, that there is chaos in
the room.”
Funk also suggested purchas-
ing baskets and shelves to help
keep things organized.
“Shelving can be painted in
all diferent colors and become
a part of the decor in the room.
Baskets can be lined with fun
fabric or spray painted to match
the room,” said Funk.
Hardy trunks are another
good way to keep the clutter
of the foor. She also suggested
using an over-the-door shoe
organizer to keep and organize
small toys or pairs of socks.
She said utilizing closet space
efciently is another great way
to organize.
“Children don’t need those
tall closets that are meant for
adult clothing,” said Hardy.
“You can bring the rod that
their clothes hang on down
lower, and then put shelving
up above to store things. Tat
way, not only do you have a
great way to eliminate clutter,
but they can reach their clothes
themselves.”
Both Hardy and Funk said
one of their passions is working
with children. Trough their
professional lives, they said they
have been able to create lasting
friendships and bonds with the
children they work with. Hardy
said she believes parents can
build a stronger connection
with their children by working
on a design together.
“Tere are two little girls that
are sisters and we still keep in
touch with them. Tey loved
their rooms so much they
named their Barbie dolls Denise
and Shelley,” said Hardy, “To
this day, they call our business
‘Pumpkin Party,’ instead of
‘Funk n’ Hardee.’”
www.postregister.com Home Improvement Thursday, Sept. 12, 2013 • 9
Kid rooms
m
.
Photos by Casey Ar-
chibald/carchibald@
postregister.com
All photos this
page: The Funk
girls bedrooms
reflect each of their
personalities.
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10 • Thursday, Sept. 12, 2013 Home Improvement Post Register
By Eryn Shay Johnson
For the Post Register
Most will be dreaming of a
white Christmas this year, but to
ensure a green spring start tak-
ing steps before the snow falls.
Winterizing a garden and
yard may seem more like a chore
but will be well worth it when
the snow starts to melt and fresh
greens start popping out of the
ground.
“First thing is to divide and
recognize what is in your yard,”
said John Crook Owner of Town
and Country Gardens. “Tender
plants need to go dormant to
survive the colder months.”
Hybrid tea roses are some
of the most tender and most
stubborn plants and are ofen
casualties of the winter months.
Tere are steps to take to combat
the causes of winter damage and
winter kill.
Plants sufer from diferent
factors such as wind, tempera-
ture, snow cover (or lack there-
of), humidity and sun. Tese are
some precautions to take to see
returning green in spring.
Eastern Idaho isn’t known for
its wind, but the natives are all too
familiar with the gusts. To shield
from the huf and puf of Mother
Nature, tender plants should be
placed in locations protected from
southwest winds. Be sure to water
thoroughly in the late fall when
the plants start to lose their sum-
mer clothing. A heavy water will
ensure that the plant will remain
well hydrated afer the ground
freezes. Exposed plants sufer the
most during the wind, but in win-
ter simply wrapping them in bur-
lap or providing a windscreen will
have a dramatic afect on survival.
We may not think the sun
could be a factor in winter, but
for plants the UV rays can be
harmful. Te heat of the sun, re-
fected of of snow or structures
can increase transpiration and
moisture loss. Sun is especially
dangerous to young trees with
thin bark.
“It is not just cold weath-
er,” Crook said, “it is the rapid
changes in temperature. Wrap-
ping trees in burlap will help, it
won’t keep the tree warmer, but
it will keep the temperature con-
sistent.”
Consistent temperature plays
a huge role in the next danger
plants face afer fall — freeze
and thaw.
Trees and plants are dam-
aged from the alternate freez-
ing and thawing of the ground.
To prevent this avoid planting
in boggy areas. Mulch the soil
and plants to maintain an even
soil temperature. Painting latex
whitewash on trunks of trees
can protect them from the sun
as well as the freeze and thaw.
“Ice and snow damage is
more of a concern with drifing
and snow shoveling,” explained
Crook.
Te harshest punishment
plants endure comes from snow
sliding from roofops. Te ex-
cessive snow can cause plants to
break limbs and branches.
Human error is also a dam-
aging factor when it comes to ice
and snow, salt used to melt ice
on sidewalks is harmful to plants
and grass, using a plant friendly
option sparingly will beneft the
aesthetics come spring.
“Just remember to do it,”
Crook added. “Most of us forget
to take care of our plants and
yards. When the weather is nice
we feel like it’s too soon, but it
turns bad quickly.”
Crook says the best month
to start preparing for winter is
November. Water heavily before
the frst frost and again if there is
an early thaw in January. For the
last mow of the season cut grass
as short as the mower is able,
this prevents a dead grass build
up that can only be removed
with power raking.
For gardens with roses or
tender stubborn plants take pre-
caution by mulching and trim-
ming early, stop feeding them
now and then water heavily be-
fore the winter hits.
“Once the winter hits, we just
have to wait it out … really wait
and see,” said Crook. “When the
snow clears prune out the dead,
start feeding them well, and if
they didn’t survive it’s time to re-
place them.”
Gardens need care in winter too
Submitted photo
Insulating a rose bush with mulch and a collar can help it survive winter months.
(BPT) — Whether you are
buying, selling or simply remod-
eling, you are looking to invest in
updates that will increase the val-
ue and appeal of your home. It’s
natural to want it all, but before
you over-personalize or break
the bank, there are many simple,
budget-friendly changes that can
increase the value of your home
without the risk.
• Little luxuries in the bath-
room: Replace your current
shower head with a rain show-
er. Completely budget-friendly
and easy to install — it takes
less than fve minutes — this
showerhead can make a huge
diference in an everyday rou-
tine — giving a spa-like experi-
ence with multiple high-perfor-
mance spray settings.
• Don’t forget about the out-
side: Every home needs curb
appeal. If you can’t aford major
landscaping, focus on the en-
trance to the home. Again, updat-
ing with paint and hardware on
the front door will be a welcom-
ing touch, while a couple of really
great potted plants at the entry-
way add to that focal point.
• It’s in the details: Consider
adding small details to rooms
that will elevate the style. Fram-
ing out windows, or adding
baseboards, molding or wain-
scoting to a space will leave it
feeling a bit more polished.
Give your home
a quick refresh
with these tips
Joe Haan
3387 S. Holmes
Idaho Falls, ID 83404
Phone: (208) 522-6450
Mike Silver
2275 W. Broadway, Ste A
Idaho Falls, ID 83402
Phone: (208) 529-3635
Chani Trench
1271 East 17th St.
Idaho Falls, ID 83404
Phone: (208) 528-7258
Brent L Esplin
90 South 1st West
Rexburg, ID 83440
Phone: (208) 356-0772
Brenda Haan
3387 S. Holmes
Idaho Falls, ID 83404
Phone: (208) 522-6450
Zaren Adams
444 Ronglyn
Idaho Falls, ID 83401
Phone: (208) 529-6620
Jim Stenbeck
1498 Midway Ave Ste 1
Ammon, ID 83406
Phone: (208) 522-6538
Justin Tawzer
291 West Main Street
Rigby, ID 83442
Phone: (208) 745-6428
Corbin S. Snedaker
2539 Channing Way, Ste 200
Idaho Falls, ID 83404
Phone: (208) 552-2509
Kevin King
2077 E. 17th Street, Ste 200
Idaho Falls, ID 83406
Phone: (208) 524-5296
Brian W Haney
3417 Merlin Dr.
Idaho Falls, ID 83404
Phone: (208) 542-0491
Oral Behunin
761 South Woodruff
Idaho Falls, ID 83401
Phone: (208) 524-1303
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MAKE YOUR FINANCIAL
FUTURE A PRIORITY.
www.edwardjones.com Member SIPC
Unlike other chores that pile up in the driveway, clutter
the garage or run wild in the front yard, your financial
situation is a little less obvious. That’s why it’s so important
to take advantage of our complimentary financial review
at least once a year.
We will discuss the different strategies available to help
put your finances in line with both your short- and long-
term goals.
To schedule your complimentary financial review, call
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By Amy Lorentzen
Te Associated Press
Sharing a meal or relaxing on a
deck, patio or balcony can be the
highlight of a summer day. And
when the season changes, proper
care can make your outdoor fur-
niture last for summers to come.
Whether you have a pricey patio
set or something more modest,
experts recommend some simple
steps for upkeep and storage.
Ofen, outdoor furniture “is a
bit of an investment, so it makes
sense to put efort into protecting
and maintaining what you have
in your yard,” says Matt Blashaw,
a licensed contractor and host of
DIY Network’s “Yard Crashers.”
LOOK FOR COVER
Ideally, it’s best to store any type
of patio furniture — metal, plas-
tic or wood — indoors during
harsh weather. If that’s not possi-
ble, Blashaw recommends weath-
er-proof covers, or at least some
simple poly/vinyl tarps secured
with straps or weighted down.
“Tere are furniture covers of
just about every shape and size
available,” he says, adding that the
newest ones are waterproof and
UV-treated for excellent protec-
tion.
Measure your pieces before you
buy covers to ensure the right ft.
You can also ask for manufactur-
er guidelines that may help you
choose the correct style.
Don’t forget fre pits and
chimeneas. Tere are elasticized
covers made for them, too, and
it’s important to keep water
from rusting their metal burn-
ers and grates.
As for acrylic cushions and
fabrics — even ones made for
outdoor use — store them in-
side. If you just don’t have the
space, Blashaw recommends
putting them in air-tight bags.
CAREFUL CLEANING
Before you store patio furni-
ture, make sure it’s free of dirt
and debris.
“Who wants to spend the frst
warm days of spring on fur-
niture cleanup duty anyway?”
Blashaw says.
Many experts recommend
regular cleaning of outdoor fur-
niture, but it doesn’t have to take
a lot of time or efort.
Lowe’s Home Improvement
spokeswoman Colleen Maiu-
ra tells customers to check the
manufacturer’s directions before
using any cleaning products. For
most materials, however, you’ll
just need soap and water, she says.
Consider using a pressure washer
on a low setting (1,200 to 1,350
pounds per square inch) to make
the job go even more quickly.
“Monthly cleaning and main-
tenance can help the furniture
maintain a good appearance and
make your investment last lon-
ger,” she says.
For acrylic cushions, Maiura
recommends spot cleaning with
a sponge, mild soap and water.
Make sure the cushions are com-
pletely dry before storing them.
While many outdoor cushions
are mildew-resistant, you can
use a solution of 1 cup bleach,
2 cups detergent and 1 gallon of
water to clean. Spray it on, allow
it to soak for 30 minutes, then
scrub with a sponge or rag.
Fabric pieces such as ham-
mocks and cloth chairs can
be machine-washed on gen-
tle. Stretch them back over the
frame for the right ft, and to
make sure the fabric is dry be-
fore storing indoors.
MUST-DO MAINTENANCE
Some additional maintenance
can keep your set functional and
looking fabulous.
For wood, you may need to
oil or varnish it, depending on
the type. For wicker, you may
have to wax if it’s not water-re-
sistant. Some metal frames re-
quire paint touch-ups, but most
are made to be rust-resistant or
rust-free. If your set is not, con-
sider using paste wax or naval
jelly for protection. Some rust-
ed metals can be professionally
powder-coated, making them
look new again.
Check your manufacturer’s
directions or website for details
on what maintenance your out-
door furniture requires. You can
also fnd tutorials at sites such as
YouTube.com.
WEAR OUT THE
WARRANTY
Blashaw says one of the biggest
mistakes homeowners make
with outdoor furniture is throw-
ing it out instead of making sim-
ple repairs with parts covered
under warranty.
“Keep the receipt, and if the fur-
niture does not hold up to the reg-
ular ‘wear and tear’ promise with-
in the warranty period, contact
the manufacturer and get yourself
a brand new set,” he says. “Many
homeowners throw the warranty
card away and, in turn, throw big
money in the trash.”
RESEARCH THE
RIGHT STYLE
If you’re in the market for a
new patio set, consider what
maintenance it will require. Do
you have time to paint wrought
iron, wax wicker or oil teak?
Inspect the furniture closely
to make sure there aren’t big
gaps in joints that would al-
low water to warp or rust the
pieces, and that the hardware
is capped to keep out moisture.
Try out the cushions to see if
they fit snugly and are com-
fortable.
According to Consumer Re-
ports, you should check whether
the seat height feels right for the
table, making sure that armrests
aren’t too high to pull chairs
close, and that there’s plenty of
leg room without feet getting
caught up in the table base.
Blashaw notes that maintain-
ing a budget-friendly patio set
properly can save you from hav-
ing to buy an expensive, weath-
er-resistant one.
“Tis will make taking a seat
that much sweeter,” he says.
www.postregister.com Home Improvement Thursday, Sept. 12, 2013 • 11
Simple maintenance can make patio sets last longer
AP photo
Whether you’re able to afford a pricey patio set or if you’re on a budget, you’ll
want to keep your outdoor furniture looking great for a long time with some
simple tips for upkeep and storage.
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12 • Thursday, Sept. 12, 2013 Home Improvement Post Register
By Eryn Shay Johnson
For the Post Register
Winter is coming.
Bringing with it the ice,
snow and other temperature
altering variables that ride the
coat tails of September into
October. But there are a few
ways to combat the cold.
One way, rapidly growing
in popularity, is an Infrared
zone heater.
“The idea, the intended
purpose, of the Infrared zone
heater is to put it in a room
you spend most of your time
in,” explained LeRoy Jones,
owner of Jones Sew and Vac in
Idaho Falls and Pocatello. “In
these rooms you can turn the
thermostat down — though
not off. You can save a lot of
money by doing that.”
Jones says he sees the zone
heaters sell year round but that
the stores definitely see a surge
in sales around the end of Sep-
tember.
“A lot of our customers use
these in basements that don’t
heat very well, or additions of
homes; stuff like that. These
zone heaters are built very
well and the safety is much
better. The ones we sell look
like furniture and can be used
as furniture, they are very easy
to build into a room’s decor,”
Jones said.
The zone heaters Jones
carries are designed with
safety in mind; there are no
exposed heating elements
or hot parts. Many of these
machines are made with light
bulbs or a tubing system, but
Jones’ favorite is a solid ele-
ment he says can last the life
of the machine.
When it comes to benefits a
zone heater can save hundreds.
“Natural gas is fairly cheap
right now,” Jones said. “In
homes like this someone us-
ing a zone heater can save be-
tween $50 and $200 off their
heating bill. In rural areas
where propane is used we’ve
seen some customers by two
or three and heat their whole
house instead of using pro-
pane. They have saved quite a
bit.”
Jones feels that another
reason why the heaters are so
popular is the aesthetic look.
“Space heaters are ugly,
these aren’t,” he said. “These
are safer too; most people are
not comfortable with letting a
space heater run if they are not
in the room.”
One of Jones’ employees,
Julie L. Johnson owns two of
the devices and loves them
both.
“It’s effective heating,” she
explained. “You’re only heat-
ing the area you are in. My
favorite part is saving energy
because you only use it when
you’re there and it heats quick-
ly.”
Most of the zone heaters
can heat a 1,000 cubic foot
room, but there are a few key
factors that play into how well
the heat is dispersed. Large
entry ways, high ceilings and
the number of windows can all
play a role in the effective heat-
ing.
“Healthy heat — that’s what
they call it,” Johnson said.
For those in older homes
the zone heaters can be a great
way to heat the room and save
money.
“They make for a warmer
house,” Jones said. “That is the
biggest reason to own one.”
Infrared zone
heaters, on
display at
Jones Sew
and Vac in
Idaho Falls,
can be used
to heat your
home more
efficiently.
Krysten
Bullock/
kbullock@
postregister.
com
Zone heaters ofer
efcient way to warm
homes in winter
“Our mission is to make a positive
difference in the lives of our employees
and our clients. We serve them by
being honest in all our dealings, to
always do the right thing, while
providing consistent quality.”
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