www.postregister.com Eastern Idaho Business Sunday, Oct.

13, 2013 • 9
By Casey Archibald
carchibald@postregister.com
Q
ueenie Linderman lives
to nurture. Whether it is
her daughter, the people
who come to her bar and grill
for food or drink, or hundreds
of needy individuals in Africa,
nurturing is an aspect that de-
fnes her more than most.
Just over a year ago, Linder-
man opened her third bar and
grill in town, and it has kept her
incredibly busy. Even though a lot
of people had their doubts about
her new location just of of exit
116 in Idaho Falls, Linderman de-
cided to take her chances. One16
Sports Bar and Grill has become
a successful business long be-
fore Linderman expected it to. In
fact, she said there will be a lot of
changes in the next few months to
improve it even further.
Linderman said her daughter
recently got her driver’s license
and though they have a wonder-
ful relationship, she understands
her daughter’s need to branch out.
“She is turning into a beau-
tiful young woman and I know
I have done my job so far,” said
Linderman. “Now that she is
cutting those ties I need an out-
let to put my love and my nur-
turing because that is who I am.”
Even though Linderman ex-
presses her
nurturi ng
side when
she talks
with the
customers
that come
into One16,
s e v e r a l
months ago
she knew
she needed
something
more. With
p e r f e c t
timing, she
received an
unexpect-
ed mes-
sage from
a friend on
Facebook,
Gerard Dailey, who was very in-
volved in some charity work in
Africa. He gave her some infor-
mation and she took of with it.
“Te next day [afer I got the
message], it was all over,” said
Linderman. “I knew I had al-
ways wanted to do this.”
Linderman only received
Dailey’s message several months
ago, but since then she has
helped more than 20 children
get of the streets and into
school, started a Facebook page
called Hopeful Hearts of Afri-
ca, where people can donate to
the cause, sent
school sup-
plies and food
to the children
in need, helped
with the ren-
ovation of
school rooms,
started plans
to build a new
orphanage and
began the de-
velopment of
a foundation
dedicated to
the cause.
Te foun-
dation will be
called Joseph
Simone Faith
in Education
Foundat i on,
which uses the frst name of
Dailey’s son and the frst and
middle names of Linderman’s
daughter.
Currently, Linderman is
working on two main projects in
Africa. She works with a young
husband and father by the name
of Julius, who is the project
manager for the Kigezi Orphans
home in Kabale, Uganda. She
also works with a man by the
name of Father Juma with the
Uyeeda Uyeeda street kids pro-
gram in Nairobi, Kenya.
“A lot of people criticize me
because they say there are a lot
of children in the United States
who need help as well,” said
Linderman. “I have no answer
to that other than God didn’t
send me there. He sent me to
Africa to help those people; it is
where I am supposed to be.”
Linderman is going to visit
Africa in July to see the work
she has done in person and to
work on her projects hands-on.
She will also get to visit the three
schoolrooms that have been
named afer her.
“Everybody tells me there are
just too many [people that need
help], and that I can’t change
everything. I don’t believe that,
I believe it just takes one,” said
Linderman.
With so many children that
need help in Africa and a limit-
ed amount of funding, Linder-
man and her fellow volunteers
have worked to fnd innovative
ways to provide them with ed-
ucation. One example of this
efort is the use of projectors to
display video lessons for many
of the children to see at once.
Linderman said her back-
ground is something that drives
her to help these children that
are in need.
“I lef home at 13 years old…
at frst I was homeless,” said Lind-
erman. “I know what it feels like
to go without food. One time I
went for four days without eat-
ing anything. It’s been many years
ago, I don’t dwell on it, but I know
damn well that it’s instilled in me.
You never forget something like
that. It has everything to do with
my desire to work with these pro-
grams. I have been lucky, some-
how with no education I have
owned four businesses, I have
educated myself, I have had to be
very tenacious. I didn’t want to be
a victim.”
Despite her unique ability to
educate herself and fnd success
in business and in life, Linder-
man said she understands the
importance of education to an
area that really needs it.
“It’s not a charity to me,” she
said. “It is an investment in all
of our futures. Tose people ar-
en’t foreign lands anymore, they
are our next door neighbors and
they have to compete with the
rest of the world to survive and
everyone is so far ahead of them.
We have to try to give them
some kind of education, because
as everyone knows, education is
the key to everything.”
Linderman said she is going
to dedicate the rest of her life
to helping people in Africa. She
said she has not only found her
passion, but also an outlet for
her desire to nurture.
Nurturing spirit
Linderman spreads her love through family, business and volunteer work
Queenie Linderman
Continued from page 3
It is also important to boost
a child’s self-esteem, according
to Potter. And she makes it a
point to use positive reinforce-
ment with all the children who
enter Little People’s Academy.
Potter carefully selects
employees who work at the
academy so they not only get
along well with children, but
they have a passion for teach-
ing them as well. Currently,
there are 17 employees who do
anything from caring for new-
borns to taking sixth graders
on educational field trips.
Besides helping children
with their daycare and edu-
cation, Potter goes above and
beyond when it comes to help-
ing the families who are part of
Little People’s Academy.
SuzAnn Lund, Potters
daughter, said there have been
many Christmases when her
mother gave Christmas pres-
ents and trees to some of the
families who couldn’t afford it.
Lund said one family that
had two children involved in
the program went through a
very trying time when their
home exploded and they were
left with no belongings.
Potter took action and start-
ed a drive to collect clothes,
furniture and household items
to help the family.
Overall, Potter said she tries
to influence Idaho Falls by
helping create happy and pro-
ductive families.
“If [parents] are happy when
they leave for work they can go
and have a good, productive
day’s work without having to
worry about their kids,” said
Potter. “We also have an open
door policy they can call any-
time and walk in anytime to
check on their kids.”
Potter lives right next door to
the academy and arrives early
every morning to open, and of-
ten leaves late at night to close.
Lund said her mother out-
works everyone else at the of-
fice.
“She has more energy than
people a third her age,” said
Lund. “I just see the influence
she has had on so many fam-
ilies in this community from
the time the daycare was little
until now. She has such a good
reputation in this town. There
isn’t a more generous person
in this world. If it was possible,
she would offer free daycare to
every child in Idaho Falls.”
Potter
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