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DATA SECURITY & THE CLOUD
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THE FUTURE OF THE CLOUD
STARTS WITH CANADA
Robert Hart sits with Apple co-founder Steve Wozniak to talk
about the future of technology. Will your company be left behind?
Featuring
BIG DATA
Keeping your company’s
data safe and accessible
DATA-SAFE ECOSYSTEM
Intellectual property and
your information in Canada
ARE YOU PREPARED?
The importance of cloud
back-up and data recovery
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Canada’s cloud caution: Losing out on economic benefits
T
o put it bluntly, Canada
has been slow to embrace
cloud computing. This has
been largely due to secur-
ity concerns primarily around pri-
vacy and data sovereignty. Are we
losing competitive economic ad-
vantage as a result?
Security and privacy considera-
tions represent a global caution to
cloud adoption. The Cloud Security
Alliance (CSA) leads and contrib-
utes internationally to commun-
ities and governments,establishing
security principles, best practices
and frameworks that help secure
the cloud ecosystem. The CSA Can-
adian Chapter has been formed to
address Canada’s unique security
and privacy considerations,leading
to the realization of innovation and
economic benefits.
EU in the cloud
The September 2012 European Com-
mission Report on Unleashing the
Potential of Cloud Computing in Eur-
ope highlighted the significant eco-
nomic business case for cloud com-
puting. They anticipate an overall
positive cumulative impact on GDP
of €957 billion and 3.8 million jobs
by 2020.
The EU also recognized that secur-
ity and privacy considerations are a
major concern,addressing these risks
with the creation of activities such as
European Union Agency for Informa-
tion (ENISA) and Network Security,
whose many guides help foster ap-
propriate secured cloud usage.
Europe has initiated a funding
program to stimulate adoption of
cloud computing under the Euro-
Cloud umbrella. The program’s goal
is to establish cloud computing as an
economic advantage for the region.
United States in the cloud
In the United States, Cloud First was
initiated in 2010 from the White
House CIOs of ce to save money,im-
prove agility, innovation, and time-
to-market.A major consideration was
the optimization of IT resources con-
sumed by the U.S.government.
The policy has touted $5 billion
in savings per year (7 percent of IT
costs), not to mention significantly
lower energy consumption. Savings
continue to rise, enabling more in-
novation and trust in the cloud eco-
system. The Federal Risk and Au-
thorization Management Program
(FedRAMP) was created as a means
to expedite qualification of cloud
suppliers.Although it has had chal-
lenges regarding the speed and com-
plexity of obtaining accreditation,
it is still considered the leading ex-
ample of such a government pro-
gram. The 25-point plan included
under Cloud First identified several
security considerations. The Nation-
al Institute of Standards and Tech-
nology (NIST) is addressing them by
maturing cloud security practices,
which are largely based on the CSA
models,guides,and matrices.
Canada in the cloud
Outside of Canada, cloud adoption
has continued to accelerate; cost
savings are now secondary to innov-
ation, openness, and interoperabil-
ity of the cloud.
In Canada, security is generally
perceived as the largest inhibitor to
cloud adoption. Other concerns re-
late to the USA PATRIOT Act and data
sovereignty considerations.
Canadian federal government and
several of Canada’s provinces adopt-
ed strict policies prohibiting export
of personally identifiable informa-
tion (PII) outside of Canadian bor-
ders.This reflects Canada’s relative-
ly strong respect for citizen privacy.
Canada has tremendous oppor-
tunities. The privacy instruments
developed in Canada by Ontario’s In-
formation and Privacy Commission-
er Dr.Ann Cavoukian, and the Of ce
of the Privacy Commissioner of Can-
ada,are extremely well respected and
used extensively internationally.
Looking ahead
The Canadian ICT (Information
Communication Technology) in-
dustry is more risk adverse than
its U.S. counterparts. As technol-
ogy evolves, frameworks, tools, and
solutions for security and privacy
concerns become available — many
of which are developed and ofered
right here in Canada. In reality, the
cloud ecosystem now ofers secure,
cost-efective solutions that can
directly and indirectly impact the
Canadian economy.
“In reality, the
cloud ecosystem
now ofers secure,
cost-efective
solutions that can
directly and
indirectly impact the
Canadian economy.”
STEVEN WOODWARD,
MEMBER & VP, POLICY & STANDARDS,
CSA CANADA
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SECOND EDITION, AUGUST 2014
Publisher: Richard Campbell,
Michael Goldsmith
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Managing Director: Joshua Nagel
Production Manager: Laura Shaw
Lead Designer: Matthew Senra
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Contributors: Patrick Bassett,
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Joe Rosengarten, Steven Woodward,
Ben Young
Send all inquiries to
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Distributed within:
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CLOUD RECOVERY IN
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Keeping cloud data in Canada is as simple as it sounds
There’s no question the ap-
petite for cloud in the Can-
adian market is strong and
growing stronger, despite a
bit of a slow start. In fact, a
recent report from IT World
Canada found that 54 per-
cent of businesses surveyed
planned to invest in cloud
computing projects this year.
However, many Canadian organiza-
tions are reluctant to move IT oper-
ations to the cloud,despite its cost ef-
ficiency,scalability and agility — de-
spite their number one concern being
the privacy and security of their data.
Even before cloud computing
took of, Canadian businesses have
tended to want their data to stay in
Canada. First the USA PATRIOT Act,
and then last year’s Snowden rev-
elations have made Canadian fears
over losing control over their data
greater than ever. In fact, research
from Peer 1 Hosting revealed that a
full one-third of Canadian business-
es planned to move data outside the
U.S. this year.
But do Canadian businesses have
to choose between two extremes
using cloud services that comprom-
ise on data privacy and security, or
avoiding the cloud altogether? The
short answer is no. In fact, secure
Canadian-based clouds can keep data
entirely within Canadian borders.
The three components of a
secure Canadian cloud
When thinking about where to
store information while retain-
ing data residency, some Can-
adian businesses only think about
the geographic location of servers
where data is stored.Yet many busi-
nesses — with good reason — aren’t
satisfied to hear their data is stored
in a Canadian data centre. They al-
so want to be sure data doesn’t pass
through any networks in any coun-
try, including the U.S., where it
might be subject to unwarranted
surveillance or seizure.
A Canadian cloud that offers
true data residency can’t rely just
on data centres sitting inside Can-
adian borders — it must be con-
nected by networks that are en-
tirely within Canada. Further-
more, the disaster recovery zones
where data is relocated in the
event of a server outage must also
be located in Canada.
The three requirements for a se-
cure Canadian cloud are therefore
pretty simple: physical storage of
data in Canada, networks inside
Canadian borders, and disaster re-
covery points local to Canada.
Canadians want choice
Data privacy and residency aren’t
always deal-breakers for every Can-
adian business, but it’s import-
ant that Canadian customers have
choice when it comes to the cloud.
Canadians shouldn’t have to miss
out on the cloud’s benefits simply
because some providers can’t guar-
antee that data will remain with-
in Canada. Fortunately, the rapidly
growing Canadian cloud market is
creating alternatives that keep data
local,safe and secure.
BEN YOUNG
editorial@mediaplanet.com
How you can keep your
company’s data safe and accessible
D
igital data is critical
to business.Just im-
agine what would
happen if you lost
access to customer
records or emails.
Organizations are also gathering
more data now than ever before.This
‘big data’ is a rich source of competi-
tive advantage, but many still deal
with more fundamental concerns:
dealing with growth afordably, as-
suring constant access, and driving
up productivity.
Exponential growth
Traditionally, businesses relied on
structured databases that grew at
predictable rates. Now, organiza-
tions see spikes in unstructured data
like audio,video,and photographs.
Ninety percent of the data stored
worldwide is less than two years
old, explains Corey Dyer, Vice
President Storage Sales at HP Can-
ada. Yet, despite this exponential
increase, organizations are still
using physical storage devices that
were designed 15 or 20 years ago.
These old designs are simply un-
able to keep up.
“Businesses are likely to be be-
hind the times if they don’t take
a hard look at the systems that
they’re using to store, serve, and
protect their information,” says
Dyer. “That’s why it’s important
for companies to understand what
they’re doing with their data, and
how it’s stored.”
Technologies like thin storage,de-
duplication, and other storage ef -
ciency features are critical to bridge
the gap between capacity and cost.
Keep your data protected
Not modernizing storage or using
the right protection technologies
could put a business in serious fi-
nancial danger. “Storage is the one
aspect of the corporate data centre
that is persistent,” says Dyer.“All the
other pieces move from point A to
point B.So without the right storage,
human error or a major event could
have a drastic impact on the busi-
nesses survival.”
Research indicates that, in most
enterprises, one minute of down-
time could cost as much as $5,600.
Despite this risk, most companies
are using traditional dual-control-
ler storage with limited resiliency
and haven’t done a major refresh of
their backup infrastructure in over
five years. “They are likely to face
major issues when they do a recov-
ery and get back up and running,”
says Dyer.
Technologies like multi-control-
ler scale-out design, replication
and federation, as well as snap-
shots and disk-based backup, are
all modern innovations that cus-
tomers should be integrating into
their datacenter plans.
Turbo-charge application
performance
Many companies that use virtual
machines fail to realize that storage
performance is the most important
link to maximize ROI from server
virtualization.
“One of the biggest innovations
in data storage is the utilization of
flash technology,” says Dyer.“People
now expect the speed of access that
they get from their smartphone or
tablet in their business applications,
and flash technology allows that to
happen.” At the same time,the right
flash storage can allow companies
to reduce power consumption and
store data more ef ciently, which
keeps costs down and frees up re-
sources for critical projects.
All-flash storage has reached
something of an inflection point.
Everybody wants more speed but
nobody wants to compromise on re-
liability or scale, and organizations
are not willing to pay a premium.
Second generation all-flash arrays
from mainstream storage vendors
are stepping up to the plate.
“Businesses now have the op-
tion to purchase high performance
storage with robust tier-1 features
and guaranteed resiliency, and it
now costs the same as the spin-
ning hard disk you were purchas-
ing,” says Dyer.
JOE ROSENGARTEN
editorial@mediaplanet.com
Corey Dyer
VP STORAGE SALES,
HP CANADA
“Businesses are likely to be behind the
times if they don’t take a hard look at the
systems that they’re using to store, serve,
and protect their information.”
Ben Young
GENERAL COUNSEL,
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F. Scott Fitzgerald once
remarked, both in a short
essay titled My Lost City,
and then again in the finest
hour of HBO’s The Wire,
that “there are no second
acts in American lives.” But,
are there second acts in
Canadian lives?
Since the inception of the Can-
adian Cloud Council in 2011, I have
to admit,we have taken a rather cyn-
ical approach to our country’s place
as a innovator on the global stage
— and rightfully so. This is a coun-
try that still does not have a national
cloud policy in place nor a telecom-
munications sector willing to em-
brace open source technologies, or
at least sell them to Canadian con-
sumers. And, far too many lacklus-
ter “CIO” nerds just not willing to
put their jobs on the line to drive for-
ward any type of material change.
Canadian legislation
We do, however, have a digital strat-
egy that is decidedly “anti-digital”
(the Canadian Anti-Spam Legisla-
tion is absurd), governments hell-
bent on building the biggest “private
clouds” on Planet Earth, and a slew
of incredibly fast growing start-up
companies who build their business
with United States giants like Goo-
gle and Amazon because they don’t
have access to Canadian resident,
on demand,API driven public cloud.
So, many Canadian companies are
innovating.Just not in Canada.
Of course, this was all incredibly
good news for the big boys in the IT
Cartel, but really bad news for the
Canadian economy. Until recently.
When things started changing.
Shopify and Hootsuite, two of the
largest software companies in Can-
ada, were recently valuated at a $1
billion a pop. Salesforce announced
their plans to establish Canadian
data center operations and offer
Canadians (and others I imagine)
non U.S.-resident “data safe” cloud
services.At last glance,at least three
companies have gone to market
with Canadian-hosted, open source
public cloud infrastructure. And,
well I hate to brag,a truly world class
technology conference called Inter-
zone was announced by yours truly.
One, where many tech titans like
Steve Wozniak, the CEO’s of Citrix
and NetApp, and CTO’s of Twitter
and GoDaddy will speak in Canada
publically for the very first time.
Canada’s world-class
ecosystem for data
Why is all this happening despite our
government’s best eforts to the con-
trary? Because we have world-class
data center ecosystem here.A ridicu-
lously vibrant start-up software eco-
system with M&A opportunities at
every turn. An oil and gas industry
that is one of the biggest micro-econ-
omies in the world.And some of the
smartest and innovative minds on
the planet. And, well, who the hell
would not want to build their com-
pany in Vancouver or Toronto — two
of the greatest cities on the planet?
So,Canadians,let’s prove Fitzgerald
wrong and Jay-Z right. “Moral victor-
ies is for minor league cultures,” he
once said.Minor league? Marc Benio-
f, who’s already acquired two major
Canadian software companies doesn’t
think so. Neither does the co-found-
er of Apple who you can read about
below. We are done with the moral
tongue-wagging, endless post-punk
cynicism and claims of dumbfounded
moral victories. We have arrived on
the global stage — the major leagues,
baby.And,you only live twice.
RH Internal IT departments
are widely seen as being
more maintainers than
innovators. Should IT
departments emphasize
innovation over maintenance
and make ‘maintenance’ the
business of service providers?
Steve Wozniak This is a tough
question for me. Innovation and
maintenance are both important. It
is important to find a good balance.
Disruption is the word of the day for
those who don’t adapt to new trends.
A healthy company will have de-
velopment and adaptation and in-
novation as key elements to a long
term (five year) planning cycle, but
the key sources of revenues and prof-
its should be protected in the mean-
time. Innovation should be intro-
duced in stages to avoid the “New
Coke” problem. Great care should be
exercised in introducing new ways
of doing business.Imagine a product
that gets totally replaced with a new
one. The creators of the ‘new’ prod-
ucts (or methodology) want to be im-
portant. The higher up in the com-
pany they are, they want credit for
the change.But I say that you should
keep existing profit sources running
and supported to the max and ofer
new products to your employees as
options that will gradually become
the standard. Of course you can find
many examples where total instan-
taneous switchovers work and are
ef cient.Just show caution.
AM Will human beings still be
at the top of the evolutionary
food chain in 2050?
SW I felt my entire life that computer
technology could do amazing things
with speed, compared to humans,
but that they would never equal the
human mind. Imagine a chess prob-
lem.A computer can’t solve the prob-
lem by trying every solution.It needs
some clever thinking to devise a
solution. I never felt that computers
would be able to program themselves
in this sense. I disdained the idea of
the [technological] Singularity where
computers could process as much
information as the human brain by
[2050]. But then I changed my mind.
When things progress along expo-
nential curves, you never see much
change until you hit the knee of the
curve. I saw many examples in real
life where computers were working
as smartly as humans do. Maybe the
human brain is not so much intui-
tion as it is access to huge amounts of
data,and that’s what you have on the
internet.You used to ask a smart per-
son a dif cult question, but now you
ask someone whose name starts with
“Go” — and it’s not God.We didn’t cre-
ate the internet as a brain replace-
ment,but to a large extent that’s how
it turned out,by accident.
As I started saying that it was go-
ing to happen, I realized that there
were dire outcomes for the human
species once computers were 10
times as smart. Companies without
slow humans, only these sentient
computers, would outperform com-
panies with slow humans. Even art
would flourish. We’d be left as the
family dog.We build this equipment
to do things for us and it may wind
up taking care of us.There wouldn’t
be a battle.We just can’t turn it of.
Because of this negative thinking,
I rethought what I was saying. I am
now unconvinced that computers
will be sentient (conscious) in 20-50
years. The advances that make this
possible largely depend on Moore’s
Law and I believe that Moore’s Law
is at or near its endpoint. We store
1’s and 0’s with a little as 8 electrons
now.You can’t go much further.
As to the evolutionary food chain
we have already started to see the
impact. We have kiosks in many
places,along with things like phone
support trees.These are all examples
of human workers being replaced by
machines. You can draw your own
conclusions as to what the future
will bring.
PC Customers are notori-
ously bad at describing
what they would like before
they’ve seen it. How should
companies read the tea
leaves of customer behaviour
to envision genuinely innova-
tive products and services?
SW Written into this question
is an answer that the companies
should be,or include,some custom-
ers of the products and services. A
heavy user is in the market to begin
with and can accurately feel what
products or services or, more like-
ly, changes are good. It is helpful to
make such a personal assessment
with working models of the final
product.Without that you really are
reading tea leaves. Your head and
your spreadsheets can find benefits
but they aren’t the important ones
that guide emotional decisions as
to what is good and what is bad and
how much value to assign.
The problem is that there is usual-
ly no single typical customer.This is
totally the case if the product or ser-
WOZ SPEAKS OUT ON THE SILVER LININGS
BYLINE
editorial@mediaplanet.com
ALL PROLOGUE
ROBERT HART
CEO, CANADIAN CLOUD COUNCIL
editorial@mediaplanet.com
Robert Hart
CEO, CANADIAN
CLOUD
COUNCIL &
INTERZONE
CTO, AURO
Adam
Messinger
CTO,
TWITTER INC.
Peter Coffee
VP, STRATEGIC
RESEARCH,
SALESFORCE
editorial@mediaplanet.com
vice is entirely new.Market research
is usually done in a way that tries to
assess the value to others.The goal is
to create products that others would
want.That is not nearly as accurate
as creating products that you your-
self want. Internal groups can cre-
ate working models and can dem-
onstrate what the benefits are, but
they often want recognition for do-
ing something worthwhile. For ex-
ample, engineers might be able to
show an example where a change
improves the response time of part
of a solution by a factor of 10:1. The
developers tend to overlook the total
picture.This improvement may only
apply to 1/100 of the total delay, and
therefore be nearly meaningless.
What is needed is a very object-
ive group internal to the company
whose job is to find the best solution
for the users and to overcome any
biases. It may sound unusual and
contradictory,but one way is to have
the researcher[s] who have little ex-
perience with the exact solution
methodologies but who fit the role
of typical users. When you are used
to the existing solutions you de-
velop a framework of knowing how
certain things are done and it acts as
blinders to new diferent ways that
really are improvements in the eyes
of unattached customers.
Sorry if this answer sounds vague.
Every example for every company
is unique and should be treated as
its own. The best answer should be
found and not a general formula ap-
plied to all new products. The key
is in finding employees and execu-
tives and managers with the per-
sonality to think this way. High in-
tegrity is a key.
Steve Wozniak, co-founder of Apple,
answers questions from some of the biggest names
in the cloud about the industry’s direction.
PAST, PRESENT, AND FUTURE
Apple Computer co-founder and philanthropist Steve Wozniak pauses while
speaking at the Bay Area Discovery Museum’s Discovery Forum February 1,
2010 in San Francisco, California.
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WOZ WITH AN APPLE 1 BOARD
Steve Wozniak, known as ‘Woz’, is an
electronics engineer and computer
programmer who co-founded Apple
Computer with Steve Jobs and
Ronald Wayne.
PHOTO: WOZ.ORG
“Disruption is the word of
the day for those who don’t
adapt to new trends.”
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editorial@mediaplanet.com
It’s in the cloud
W
as anyone really surprised
when Edward Snowden
revealed last year that
the United States National Security
Agency collects massive amounts of
customer data from cloud service pro-
viders and sells it to the highest bid-
der?  I mean, isn’t this what they do
for a living?  For those of you not fam-
iliar with their business model,I sug-
gest watching Matt Damon explain
why he “shouldn’t work for the NSA”
in his very first film Good Will Hunting. 
He should have won the Oscar.
At any rate, perception is reality,
and it must be harder and harder for
U.S.-based public cloud companies to
convince Canadian customers that
the economics of U.S. cloud suppos-
edly outweigh the need to be cautious
with their customer data. Heck, the
biggest Software as a Service (SaaS)
and Platform as a Service (PaaS) com-
pany in the world,Salesforce,recent-
ly announced their plans to establish
Canadian data center operations. So,
maybe we aren’t as small of a market
as we think we are. Or, maybe, just
maybe,they are on to something big-
ger than just selling Canadian resi-
dent cloud services to Canadians.
Intellectual property
in Canada
Businesses (rightfully so) view their
data as intellectual property. So how
many Canadian CIOs are going to sign
of on the potential fire sale of their
company’s core asset?  Hey, we were
already a risk-adverse bunch before
Snowden bought a one-way ticket to
Russia and every Canadian CEO start-
ed asking questions about cloud com-
puting and where their company’s
data is hosted.  Ironically, the cloud
conversation finally started at the
top level of every Canadian company,
even if it was for all the wrong reasons.
And really, why should the Can-
adian CEO be the person most in-
vested in the whole cloud comput-
ing discussion? Well,for starters,the
cloud dramatically improves and
accelerates the way companies de-
velop, monetize and commercialize
innovation, engage with their cus-
tomers, and diferentiate against
their competition. Tech startups
with a fantastic idea can strive to
become the next Mark Zuckberg ac-
quisition overnight and access the
necessary infrastructure to sup-
port that growth with a click of the
mouse. Although, that scale comes
with a tradeof, and it hasn’t been
good for the Canadian enterprise.
“Traditionally, any business in
Canada who wants to control their
data and have access to an enter-
prise cloud has to build it from the
ground up. It is complex, expen-
sive, time consuming, and challen-
ging to operate and maintain,” said
Matthew McKinney, Chief Strategy
Of cer at Auro. “More importantly,
because of the apparent non-exist-
ence of true enterprise public clouds
in Canada, many Canadian enter-
prises have been forced to choose
traditional infrastructure to en-
sure protection of their data, while
competitors South of the border eat
our lunch with immediate access
to highly scalable, on-demand, and
elastic cloud services.”
Back to Edward Snowden
So,then,Edward Snowden may have
shed light on a program that has
been accused of possibly “killing the
U.S. Internet Industry” (it won’t),
but I suggest we leverage Edward’s
clean conscience as an opportunity
to finally start building a viable Can-
adian cloud ecosystem.  One that
can compete with the Amazons of
the world,not just because it is built
across Canadian data centers, but
one that can compete globally on its
own uniqueness and merit.
There is an incredible software
ecosystem brewing in Canada, and
wouldn’t it be fantastic for the Can-
adian economy if companies like
Hootsuite, OpenText and Shopi-
fy actually built their businesses
using Canadian cloud infrastruc-
ture? Or, if more big U.S. Internet
companies followed Salesforce in-
to Canada to ofer Canadian hosted
“data safe zones” to their custom-
ers? This is not something that will
fragment the global internet, but
rather diversify its core network
operations outside of the United
States,and make it harder for pesky
three-letter acronym agencies to
gain access to customer data. This
would be a good thing for everyone,
not just Canadians.
“Salesforce is on to something
here “ says Chris Moore, former CIO
at the City of Edmonton. “Canada is
one of the most stable countries and
economies in the world, known for
our peace keeping international-
ly — it is the best place in the world
for the world’s data, not just Can-
adian data. If anyone in the world is
concerned about the USA PATRIOT
Act,then consider moving your data
from the U.S.to Canada.”
So, Ryan Holmes or Tony Clem-
ent, if you’re listening, give me a
shout. Canadian innovators and in-
vestors have been busy over the last
year and there are finally enterprise
class Canadian resident public cloud
services available to Canadian busi-
nesses. What we need is a big Can-
adian software company or govern-
mental agency to actually use them
and shout their story from their
rooftops of our country’s incredibly
awesome data centers. There is a
jet leaving Moscow at this very mo-
ment. Edward Snowden is falling
asleep in the back. Let’s not get stuck
on the tarmac.
THE NEXT JET TO LEAVE MOSCOW
ROBERT HART
editorial@mediaplanet.com
The three faces of cloud computing
Cloud computing and stor-
age have become so wide-
ly adopted and are so poorly
understood that, in certain
executive boardrooms across
the country, the phrase “it’s
in the cloud” has become a
sort of joking shorthand for “I
don’t know.” This is a shame,
because it’s a simple concept
that is transforming the way
companies do business.
Most people are familiar with the
idea of cloud storage. Remote ser-
vices like Dropbox let you save files
from one computer and recover them
later from another.Cloud computing
works under a similar principal,only
instead of data being stored remotely,
computer programs are executed re-
motely.This is not an old idea.As Les-
lie K.Lambert of GuruCul Solutions,a
security company with a large pres-
ence in the cloud computing space,
puts it: “cloud computing has been
with us for many many years.It’s on-
ly the name that is new.”
Beyond stratus and cumulus
Clouds come in three basic flavours:
private, public, and hybrid.A private
cloud is basically a large datacenter
with hundreds of computers chug-
ging away on customized code to
meet the specific needs of one com-
pany.When a salesperson requests a
quote on their cellphone, that quote
is generated by the cloud. When the
CEO types half a memo on his of ce
computer and then finishes it on his
tablet at home, it’s the cloud that
bridges that gap. “In a sense,” says
Lambert, “a private cloud is a very
close extension of your company
intranet.” The primary advantages
are security and control.
Public cloud services,on the other
hand, are provided by large general-
ized organizations, usually over the
public internet.They are more cost-
efective than private clouds,but less
customizable and less secure. They
do, however, provide one power-
ful operational advantage. “Pub-
lic clouds help companies size up
and size down very quickly in synch
with their need,” says Lambert. Say
a business needs a certain amount
of computing power for most of the
year, but then needs double or triple
that during occasional burst periods,
such as a Christmastime rush.With
a public cloud service they are never
paying for more computer power
than they use.
The best of both worlds
The hybrid cloud model is simply
a combination of private and pub-
lic clouds. Increasingly companies
are turning to hybrid clouds in or-
der to realize the separate advan-
tages of each model. For example, a
company might use a private sub-
cloud to store and process sensitive
client information, but simultan-
eously use a dynamic public sub-
cloud to scale processing power up
and down as needed.
The technology may be advanced,
but the concept behind it — essen-
tially the outsourcing or insourcing
of computation — is a simple one that
anyone in today’s connected society
can benefit from understanding.
Leslie K. Lambert
CHIEF SECURITY &
STRATEGY OFFICER,
GURUCUL SOLUTIONS, LLC
FROM RUSSIA WITH LOVE
Pictured is Sheremetyevo airport
in Moscow, Russia. It was here
that Snowden was confined to
while applying for asylum-status in
various nations around the world.
NEWS
A SPONSORED FEATURE BY MEDIAPLANET
6 · CLOUDCOMPUTINGINFO.CA
W
hen disaster strikes,
data recovery is essen-
tial to a business’ surviv-
al. Whether it is a one-person oper-
ation or a multinational behemoth,
every company lives and dies by the
ability to access backup data quick-
ly and efectively. With businesses
increasingly opting to adopt cloud
computing solutions, new alterna-
tives in data recovery are taking
centre stage.
For some businesses, the process
of data backup for recovery is as sim-
ple as saving important data to an
external hard drive. For larger com-
panies,data recovery can be more in-
volved, requiring of-site locations,
complex disaster recovery plans
(DRP) and significant outlays.
Affordable alternatives
The unfortunate reality is that DRPs
are a huge expense for many com-
panies; the cost of renting space,
equipment, technicians, and other
overheads is substantial, making
the provision of data backup overly
burdensome for some. Consequent-
ly, many businesses do not have ad-
equate data recovery plans in place.
According to Eran Farajun, Execu-
tive Vice President of Asigra, a To-
ronto-based company specializing
in cloud backup and recovery, the
advent of Data Recovery as a Service
(DRaaS) through cloud computing
ofers an afordable, dependable al-
ternative for many companies.
“With cloud backup you’re pay-
ing at a marginal rate,” says Farajun.
“Sure, there’s a data centre with
computers, staf, and infrastructure
— but you’re only paying for the ser-
vices that you need. There is a huge
economic benefit there.”
Multiple benefits
The benefits of cloud backup aren’t
just economic — DRaaS contracts of-
fer easily customized, scalable solu-
tions that can grow in lockstep with
a company’s needs. Cloud backup
strategies also provide faster recov-
ery times than traditional methods
such as magnetic tape recovery.“The
time to value for the right workload
is much shorter in the cloud. When
you need to recover data, and you’re
using old processes, your team and
customers can’t wait weeks for data
to be recovered.The pace of business
is measured today not in weeks and
months,but in minutes and hours.”
And it is that unrelenting pace
that makes early adoption of new,
more ef cient technologies all the
more important. “In the next three
to five years the majority of business
data will be moved to the cloud.It’s a
strategic first-mover advantage that
enables you to focus and spend less
time on back of ce processes. The
businesses that do that will have a
huge head start,” says Eran.
Note of caution
However, while early adopters will
have an advantage, there is a note of
caution.While Cloud Application Pro-
viders ofer space to house immense
amounts of corporate data, they do
not necessarily ofer secure backup
and recovery solutions that meet the
specific service level requirements
for each enterprise. “Unfortunate-
ly there is a misperception out there
that moving corporate data to the
cloud shifts responsibility onto those
companies, but that’s not the case,”
says Eran.“If you’re moving your data
you still need to make sure that it’s
safe. If you’re working with a cloud
backup provider make sure that they
can also backup and protect the data
in cloud-based applications like Goo-
gle apps,Of ce 365 and other applica-
tions that an enterprise might use.”
There is a growing interest
within organizations to ex-
plore what cloud services
have to offer as there can
be considerable economic
advantages to doing so.
In Canada, both public sector and
private sector organizations must
comply with Canadian privacy
laws. The federal and provincial
laws enforce some factors for or-
ganizations using cloud services —
especially if the services are hosted
in another jurisdiction. Depending
on the cloud service provider used,
the laws of foreign jurisdictions
may also be applicable.
Who is responsible?
Canadian privacy law mandates that
an organization collecting person-
al information is responsible for it.
For example,The Personal Informa-
tion Protection and Electronic Docu-
ments Act (PIPEDA) principle 4.1.3
stipulates that an organization may
engage third party vendors to pro-
cess data on its behalf,but the organ-
ization will remain responsible for
such personal information.
With some exceptions, generally
an organization can use foreign cloud
vendors. In PIPEDA case #313, the
federal Privacy Commissioner ad-
dressed a case in which CIBC sought
to outsource processing of its Visa
cards using a U.S. supplier.The Com-
missioner found that PIPEDA does
not prohibit use of foreign vendors,
but Canadian organizations must
have adequate provisions in place to
ensure a similar level of protection.
While much focus has been placed
on the USA PATRIOT Act,most coun-
tries, including Canada, have laws
that can require a cloud vendor to
disclose customer data in the case of
a governmental investigation.
Comparable legal risk
In the Visa case, the Commissioner
noted that personal information held
by a foreign third party vendor will be
subject to the laws of that country and
no contractual provision can over-
ride those laws. The Commissioner
found that there is a comparable legal
risk that the personal information of
Canadians held by an organization
and its vendor (whether Canadian
or United States) can be obtained by
government agencies lawfully in the
applicable country. Where an organ-
ization plans to use a foreign vendor,
the Commissioner found that the or-
ganization must notify its customers
that the information may be available
to government agencies under a law-
ful order made in that country.
A CLOUD ON THE HORIZON: DISASTER
RECOVERY AND CLOUD BACKUP STRATEGIES
How privacy laws in Canada afect the cloud
When something’s
missing, everything’s
wrong.
When it comes to recovering your data,
there’s no such thing as a minor detail.
Good thing there’s Asigra. Our award-winning recovery solution
lets you recover now from anywhere. Every byte. Any device. All
the time. How can we make such a promise? Because we’ve
been leading the recovery revolution for more than 25 years—
with more than a million installations worldwide.
Find out more today at recoveryiseverything.com.
Before you make the wrong step.
© 2014 Asigra Inc. Asigra, the Asigra logo, Asigra Cloud Backup, Recovery is Everything®, Recovery License Model and Recovery
Tracker are registered trademarks of Asigra Inc. All other brand and product names are trademarks of their respective owners.
Eran Farajun
EXECUTIVE VP,
ASIGRA
PATRICK BISSETT
editorial@mediaplanet.com
MARTIN P.J. KRATZ,
BENNETT JONES LLP
editorial@mediaplanet.com
Distributed computing (includ-
ing cloud,big data or other multi-
device use) can have a net posi-
tive impact on a business. How-
ever, as with any other invest-
ment of time, talent or cash, or-
ganizations must approach cloud
functions with care — to achieve
their goals and avoid harm along
the way.
There are five basic steps busi-
nesses can take to protect their in-
formation in the cloud and ensure
data remains private:
■ Know Thy Data (Assets)
■ Know Thy Team (People)
■ Know Thy Systems (Process)
■ Know Thy Stuf (Technology)
■ Know Thy Consequences
Before an organization jumps
headfirst into the cloud, it is mis-
sion critical to understand what
steps to take and what types of con-
sequences a business may incur
when faced with a privacy breach.
FAST FACTS
The five commandments
of the cloud
Michelle Finneran Dennedy
VP & CHIEF PRIVACY OFFICER,
MCAFEE; AUTHOR, THE PRIVACY
ENGINEER’S MANIFESTO
FOR MICHELLE’S IN-DEPTH VIEW
ON EACH PLEASE STEP VISIT
CLOUDCOMPUTINGINFO.CA
MICHELLE FINNERAN DENNEDY
editorial@mediaplanet.com
FOR MORE ON DATA SOVEREIGNTY FROM MARTIN KRATZ GO TO CLOUDCOMPUTINGINFO.CA