User Training 3.

0 - Script
Release 6.0.RC2
OpenERP
2011-05-22
Contents
1 Introduction exercises 4
1.1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
1.2 How to launch OpenERP server(s) and client(s)? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
1.3 How to get a new database? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
1.4 Exercises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
List View and Search . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Form view, tooltips and drill downs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Advanced Navigation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
Hierarchy view, wizards, actions and prints . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Right menu bar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Calendar and graph view, workflows and processes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
Simplified and Extended Views . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
GTK client . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
2 Case introduction : the NotSoTinyCompany 10
2.1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
2.2 History and market position . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
2.3 Company organisation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
2.4 NotSoTiny Products . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
2.5 The OpenERP Project . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
3 Database and Users setup 12
3.1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
3.2 Concepts and flows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
3.3 Exercises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Database setup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Users setup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
4 Purchases 14
4.1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
4.2 Concepts and flows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
4.3 Exercises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
Products data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
Partners data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
Stock inventory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
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Purchase order . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
5 CRM and sales 17
5.1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
5.2 Concepts and flows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
5.3 Exercises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
Customers data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
Product data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
Stock Inventory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
Basic sales flow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
CRM Flow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
CRM Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Addons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
6 Pricelists 22
6.1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
6.2 Concepts and flows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
6.3 Modules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
6.4 Exercises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
Consumer Pricelists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
Retailer Pricelist . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
Margin Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
7 Accounting 24
7.1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
7.2 Concepts and flows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
7.3 Modules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
7.4 Exercises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
Fiscal Year/Periods and Accounts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
Journals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
Invoices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
Invoices payment and reconciliation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
Reports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
Closing a financial year . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
Accounting Addons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34
8 Human Resources Management 35
8.1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
8.2 Concepts and flows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
8.3 Modules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
8.4 Exercises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
Modules, groups and roles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
Employees . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
Expenses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
Holidays . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
Timesheet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
9 Project Management 40
9.1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
9.2 Concepts and flows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
9.3 Modules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
9.4 Exercises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
Modules and groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
Projects and analytic accounts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
Tasks Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42
Addons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43
10 Stock Management 43
10.1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43
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10.2 Concepts and flows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43
10.3 Modules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
10.4 Exercises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
Stock locations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
Stock inventories . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
Minimum stock rules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45
Addons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46
11 Production Management 47
11.1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
11.2 Concepts and flows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
11.3 Modules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
11.4 Exercises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
BoMs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
Phantom BoM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48
Commercial BoM / Set . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49
Workcenter & Routing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49
Addons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49
12 Documents Management System 50
12.1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50
12.2 Concepts and flows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50
12.3 Modules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50
12.4 Exercises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50
Configure the DMS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50
Add files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51
Virtual printed files and dynamic repository . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51
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1 Introduction exercises
1.1 Introduction
The introduction exercises have been created to help you discover OpenERP in a really easy way. Their main
objective is to present the different applications, the menus, the view types, the shortcuts, the various field types,
the wizards, the actions, etc.
In no case, the purpose of the introduction exercises is to make you understand all the flows and concepts
used by OpenERP. We just want you to discover how to use our ERP!
1.2 How to launch OpenERP server(s) and client(s)?
Note:
• Explain the server(s)-client(s) structure. Draw the structure on a white board or display the adequate slide
if you have it.
OpenERP is running with a classic server(s)/client(s) structure :
• OpenERP server : it’s the main server gathering all the data.
• Web OpenERP server : this server is only required if you want to use the Web client.
• GTK client : it has to be installed on your machine as any software. It’s faster to encode data.
• Web client : this client is more user-friendly and dynamic. It just requires a Web browser.
To launch the server(s) and your favorite client on the virtual machine:
• OpenERP server : click the button on your desktop.
• Web OpenERP server : idem. (Only if you use the web client.)
• GTK client : idem.
• Web client : open your web browser and type localhost:8080.
Note:
During this training, all the exercises will be done with the Web client.
1.3 How to get a new database?
If the trainees receive a virtual machine with a demo database, skip this step and to not confuse them by explaining
how to install a database. You’ll do it further...
To do the following exercises, use the OpenERP_demo_database provided with the virtual machine.
If the trainer cannot give you an updated virtual machine and you’ve installed OpenERP on your system, please
follow these instructions in order to quickly a new database:
• On the connexion page of your Web client : Databases > New database. Please respect the following settings
while configuring the new database:
– Type the new database name
– Check Load Demonstration Data (this is checked by default)
– Default language : English (US)
– Type the administrator password (e.g. admin) and confirm it, then click OK
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– Click Start Configuration
• In the Configuration Wizard
– Configure your interface: Extended
– Confirm the Company Information (by clicking Next)
– Install the following applications:
*
Customer Relationship Management
*
Sales Management
– While configuring your database through the wizards, select:
– Accounting : select Generic Chart of Accounts, in Sale Tax (%), type 21 and press the Tab key. The Purchase
Tax (%) will automatically be updated.
– Click Configure 4 times to finish the configuration.
1.4 Exercises
Note:
• Before starting the exercises, introduce/show/explain the main menus and views :
– Menus : web menu, top menu + applications menu + Sales application menu + shortcuts line + right
menu (actions, prints...).
– Views : list + form + calendar + graph.
– Search bar : search fields and button + group by + customized search criteria.
– Fields : fields (blue & white), drop-down lists, m2o, o2m, m2m ...
List View and Search
• List view: display in a unique list all the elements (e.g. all the customers).
• Search menu : on the top of each list view are provided fields and tools to search and/or group the list
elements
– Search buttons: at the top left; they allow to quickly select some elements. You can use several
buttons at the same time.
– Search fields: at the top right; typically, they can be text fields, calendars, drop-down lists, etc.
– “My ...” buttons: set between the search fields, they filter the list to only display the elements “be-
longing” to the user.
– Group by buttons: in the middle; these buttons change the display of the list in order to group
elements according to your needs.
– Customized search criteria: at the bottom left; they can be completely customized and combined to
search on any information of the list elements.
– Filter Management: at the bottom right; customized filters can be loaded or saved for further use.
– Print : print the displayed data, or print a report according to the screen selected.
Exercise 1 - List View
1. In the Customers list view, sort the partners by inverse alphabetical order.
2. In the Addresses list view, sort the partners by Country and see how many partners there are in China.
3. Go to the Products list view and sort products by “Status” to discover which are items “in develop-
ment”.
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Exercise 2 - Basic Search
1. In the Customers list view, which customer(s) do you find when you filter the list according to these
criteria:
• Name : “as”,
• Country : “Taiwan”.
2. Open the Sales Orders list and find out how many sales orders are Quotations.
3. Still in the Sales Orders list, display your own quotations.
4. Show all the Sales Orders.
Exercise 3 - Group by
1. Display the Customers list according to these criteria:
• Name : “ma”,
• Group by salesman.
2. In the Addresses list view, group the addresses by Partner then by Type. Look at the order of the fields.
3. In the same list, clear the filter and group the addresses by country then by partner.
Exercise 4 - Advanced search
1. In the Customers list view, which customer(s) do you get when you filter with these (advanced) criteria:
• City : “Paris” OR “Mons” (use the operator “is equal to”).
2. Open the Products list view and filter with these (advanced) criteria:
• To sell,
• Cost price is greater than 300.
Exercise 5 - Filter Management
1. In the Addresses list view, suppose you would often like to see your contacts by Partner and by Country.
Filter to the correct data, then save the filter so that it can be easily reused. You can save it as a shortcut (it
will be added to the shortcut menu) or as a filter.
Exercise 6 - Extended Filters
1. In the Product list view, add the stock location Shelf 1. Look how the Real and Virtual stock figures
change.
2. In the Product list view, add the stock location Shelf 2. Look how the Real and Virtual stock figures
change.
Form view, tooltips and drill downs
• Form view : view with information about a specific element (e.g. a partner).
• Tooltip : question mark can be visible at the right of some field names. Hover your mouse on the name to
display a short text informing you about its utility
• Drill down : OpenERP allows you to open from a form view a list/form view in order to select/create
another element.
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Exercise 1 - Form view (part 1)
1. Find the partner “Maxtor” and open its form.
2. What is the partner’s ZIP code?
Exercise 2 - Form view (part 2)
1. Find the partner “Elec Import”.
2. Who is its dedicated salesman?
3. Which pricelist is linked to this partner?
4. What is the partner’s account receivable?
5. Open the country list and select “Australia”.
6. In Categories in the partner form, double-click the Supplier / Components Supplier category to find
out what happens.
Exercise 3 - Tooltips
1. Filter the partners list to find the partner “BalmerInc S.A.”.
2. In the partner form, consult the tooltip about the “customer” and “supplier” checkboxes.
3. Define the partner as a supplier.
Exercise 4 - Products information
1. In the Products list view, find the product with reference “ HDD1 ”.
2. What is the cost price of this product? Look at the costing method.
Exercise 5 - Update product information
1. In the Products list view, find the product “Basic PC”.
2. In this Products form, create a new category Basic PC with the parent category Computer Stuff that
you assign to the product.
Advanced Navigation
Note:
• Before starting the following points, introduce/show/explain the main :
– Default value
– F1 and F2
– Duplication
• Default value : Any value in a field can be set as the default value, either for all users, or only for yourself,
simply by right-clicking it. Some default values may be automatically set according to the value of another
field, i.e. ZIP and City.
• Tab key : If the value of a field depends on a list of elements, you can quickly select one of them by entering
a part of its name in the field and then using the “Tab” key (e.g. the list of Countries).
• F1 key : if the value of a field depends on a list of elements, you can quickly create a new one by clicking
into the field and pressing the “F1” key. A new form view will open.
• F2 key : if the value of a field depends on a list of elements, you can quickly open this list by clicking into
the field and pressing the “F2” key. The list will open.
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• Back & Forward buttons : in form view, use the back/forward arrows to display the form view of the
previous/next element.
• Duplication : when you are in form view, you can duplicate an element by clicking the “Duplicate” button,
or by pressing Ctrl + Shift + D. This will create a similar element.
Exercise 1 - List/form view in a form view and default values
1. Find the partner form for Agrolait and open it.
2. Change the view from the Partner Contacts to list view.
3. How many Partner Contacts belong to this partner? What are the names of the different contacts?
4. What is the city of the delivery address?
5. For this delivery address, update the postal code to 1200 and the city to “Brussels”.
6. Then Define “Brussels” as default value associated to 1200.
7. What happens when you enter “fra” in the country field and then use the “Tab” key?
8. Try again by entering “bel”. Why is it different (from “fra”)?
Exercise 2 - Advanced options
1. In the “Medium PC” Product form view, create a new product category using “F1”.
2. In the Product Manager field, select any of the users.
3. Without going back to the List view, find the product before and after “Medium PC”?
4. Duplicate the “Medium PC” product.
5. Change the name of this new (duplicated) product to Large PC and the reference to PCL, then save it.
Hierarchy view, wizards, actions and prints
• Hierarchy view : display a list of elements (such as product or partner categories) according to their par-
ent/children structure.
Right menu bar
This is the small grey bar with a black arrow at the right. It is hidden by default in the Web client. This menu
groups a couple of elements:
• Wizard : start a wizard to print a report that requires parameters.
• Action : according to the element type, action(s) can be launched both in list and form view.
• Prints : according to the element type, related prints can be launched.
Exercise 1 - Hierarchy views and wizards
1. Display the Products by category.
2. From the hierarchy view, display the list of products belonging to the “PC” category.
3. Open the PC2 form and print the Stock Level Forecast.
Exercise 2 - Prints
1. Print all the Customer Addresses.
2. Print product labels for product HDD_GEN.
3. In the Product list view, print the list of products.
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Calendar and graph view, workflows and processes
Note:
• Explain how to work in calendar view
• Explain the difference between a workflow and a process. Show how the Process view works.
• Calendar view : the Calendar view button displays a calendar which can include all the elements with a
date (e.g. invoice, a meeting, a phone call, etc). To open the calendar, you have to open a list/form view of
an element linked to a calendar view.
• Workflow : most elements such as sales orders or invoices, used in processes (sales, purchases, invoicing
...), can be qualified with different “states”, i.e. “draft”, “opened”, “pending”, “cancelled”, “done”, etc. A
workflow is a technical definition.
• Process : the main advantage of using an ERP is the connection between the various business processes
that exist in a company. For instance, invoicing can be automaticaly triggered when a sales order has been
completed.
Exercise 1 - Consult sales order information
1. Display the list of sales orders.
2. Open all the sales orders in Calendar view.
3. From the web client, drag and drop one of the sales orders to change its date.
4. From the web client, display the graph view and show all the sales orders of Agrolait.
Exercise 2 - Create a sales order
1. From the sales orders list, create a new quotation.
2. In the Customer field of the sales order, select Agrolait.
3. Order 2 PC2 products and change the Description to “Our basic PC”. Add the text “There will be no
delivery on Wednesday”. Save.
4. Compute taxes.
5. Confirm and print the order.
Exercise 3 - Workflows
1. Find how to display the Sales workflow in both GTK and web client.
Simplified and Extended Views
Note:
• Explain what Simplified and Extended views are. Show the difference with e.g. the Products screen.
• Simplified and extended views : OpenERP allows users to work with simple or complete views. Indeed,
some businesses do not need all the information proposed by OpenERP to run their activities. The list of
actions available for the different elements can also change according to the type of view. Switching from
one view to another is easy: in the top right toolbar, click the “Edit Preferences” button and then select the
required view type.
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Exercise 1 - Partner form view
1. Open the Distrib PC partner form in simplified view. Does it belong to any categories?
2. Then switch to extended view and open the same Partner form. Now associate the Customer / Con-
sumers category to it.
Exercise 2 - Product form view
1. Open the Keyboard product form both in simplified and extended view in order to compare the fol-
lowing tabs:
• Information,
• Procurements and Locations.
Exercise 3 - Action
1. Open the Mouse product form and check which of the following links are available in both simplified
and extended view:
• Minimum Stock Rules,
• Product Sales,
• Stock by Location.
GTK client
• Shortcuts : a lot of keyboard shortcuts (ctrl+s, ctrl+n, etc.) are available to navigate faster in the GTK
client. To discover all of them, go to menu/help/keyboard shortcuts.
• Date field : the date can be quickly set by clicking into the field and typing “+1d”, “+1w”, “+1m”... to add
1 day, 1 week, 1 month to the current date. For more information, refer to the tooltip of this field.
Change to Extended view.
Exercise 1 - Setting a date field and using shortcut
1. In the History tab of a Partner form, add a phone call:
• Name = “ Followup phone call ”
• Phone = “0032(0) 81/81.01.23”
• Duration = 0.25
• Date = “ today +1 month and +1 day”
Exercise 2 - Log in/out
1. In the File menu (menu on the top), connect as “demo” user (user : “demo”, password : “demo”).
2. While you are logged as “demo” user, press “ctrl+o” to connect as “admin” user (user : “admin”,
password : “admin”).
2 Case introduction : the NotSoTinyCompany
2.1 Introduction
OpenERP is a powerful application, having lots of different features in hundreds of functional areas. The best
way to learn OpenERP is to practice a real situation. This chapter presents a learning exercise, based on a simple
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example, to gradually make you discover the basic functions of OpenERP.
The goal of this tutorial/exercise is a unified presentation of the main features of the software, without considering
the various details and parameters.
2.2 History and market position
NotSoTiny is a company located in Belgium, with a dedicated factory manufacturing wooden bookshelves. The
company was created in 1978 by Fabien Dupont and Luc Lecoq.
• Fabien Dupont, the current managing director, has a technical background, and is behind the most famous
innovations of the company.
• Luc Lecoq, the vice-president, has a more commercial and financial background.
NotSoTiny employs 80 persons, and occupies a leading position in the industry. A strategic market positioning
has permitted a clear distinction from NotSoTiny’s competition:
• A relatively small range of products, but with a high quality, focused mainly on two models of cabinets.
• An engineering and design office that proposes analysis projects tailored for individual and enterprise cus-
tomers.
2.3 Company organisation
The various departments of NotSoTiny company are:
• A Commercial department composed of 1 sales manager and 3 salesmen. It works with 2 types of cus-
tomers: direct consumers and retailers.
• A Research and Development (R&D) department with 1 project manager and 3 prototype developers.
They have two main responsibilities:
– develop products on the request of large customers,
– develop new products.
• A Production department responsible for manufacturing cupboards as well as efficient maintenance of
Bills of Material (BoM) and manufacturing routes.
• An IT department which will be responsible for the administration of OpenERP once it will have been
integrated.
• An Accounting and Financial department which is in charge of the Financial Management. It must also
control the budgets of R&D projects and the invoicing processes of the various activities of the company.
2.4 NotSoTiny Products
The main product of the company is a Picaso bookshelf declined in two different models :
• a bookshelf having a width of 1 meter,
• a bookshelf having a width of 2 meters.
A “Picaso” bookshelf is composed of
• 3 external support panels (2 small ones on the sides and one large on the backside),
• 4 sections putting together the components,
• 3 racks,
• 12 metal blocks (4 per rack).
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2.5 The OpenERP Project
As NotSoTiny had a fast growth these past 5 years, it is now in a situation where all the processes are complex
and require a lot of efforts from the employees: dual encoding, error in processes, several non-integrated software
pieces...
NotSoTiny organized an internal group to manage the ERP project and selection. After having spent three months
to evaluate different ERP softwares, they decided to go for OpenERP, which seems to be far more advanced than
all others competitors.
In order to limit the risk of doing a big integration project at once, they contacted you to build a functional
prototype based on their data. You will have 5 days to build a clean configuration of OpenERP and organize
company processes.
After a first meeting with the project managers, you agreed to build the following prototype in 5 days, incremen-
tally constructing it through workshops with key company employees:
• Base System Installation and Configuration
• Sales Management
• Purchases management
• Human Resources management
• Accounting management
• Project management
• Warehouse management
• Manufacturing management
• Knowledge management
3 Database and Users setup
3.1 Introduction
OpenERP databases management proposes now users to smoothly and fastly create, drop, backup or restore
databases.
Thanks to the creation wizard, it is possible to select the appropriate functionalities amongst various and useful
applications. Then, it will still be possible to restart this wizard or to add news modules in order to complete the
functionalities.
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3.2 Concepts and flows
Note:
• To show and explain :
– differences between the User/Partner/Employee concepts.
• User : a physical person who is given access to the company’s system, i.e. a person who is able to log on to
OpenERP.
• Group : pre-defined entity allowing to assign specific access rights to the system users. For instance, the
user has to belong to the HR Manager group in order to view Holidays requests of all users.
3.3 Exercises
Database setup
Note:
• To show and explain :
– Database Management Interface
– All the steps to configure the database (through Wizards)
– Explain how you can restart the Configuration Wizards
– Toolbar Menu in the GTK client to create a database (File / Databases).
– INSIST ON creating a database without demo data
Exercise 1 - Install a working OpenERP by respecting these steps:
• Open your web client to create a new database.
– Do not select demonstration data and use English as default language.
– Give a name to the database and
• Start the configuration
• Select the extended interface.
• Configure your company :
– NotSoTiny Company - Union Street, 512 - 1000 Brussels - Belgium,
– Currency : euro,
– Load your logo if possible.
• Install the following generic modules:
– Customer Relationship Management,
– Warehouse Management,
– Purchase Management,
– Sales Management,
– Accounting & Finance.
• Select the generic chart of accounts and set 21% sales and purchase taxes, then click on configure.
• Click on configure or next for the next steps :
– CRM application
– purchase system,
– sales management,
– accounting,
– sales order logistics
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Users setup
Note:
• To show and explain
– User and Groups form views.
– How to create a new group / change access rights.
NotSoTiny also provides us with the list of users :
Name Login Password Groups
Fabien Dupont fabien fabien All features, except administration of the ERP
Luc Lecoq luc luc Accounting, Sales and Product / Partner Manager
Eric Dubois eric eric Sales, Manufacturing Product / Partner Manager
Thomas Lebrun thomas thomas Sales, Accounting and Product / Partner Manager
Exercise 1 - Create users and their access rights
In the Administration menu, define the different users according to the above table.
Luc Lecoq, the Sales and Financial Director, wants to have a sales dashboard that appears automatically when he
logs into the system.
Exercise 2 - Assign a sales dashboard to Luc’s login
Set up a sales manager dashboard to Luc. This dashboard must appear when he logs in.
Fabien wants to define strict rules on how to keep and maintain the customer database. No-one should be able to
delete a partner in the database except him.
Exercise 3 - Modify security rules
Create a new group “Partner deleletion” that gives the right to delete a partner and assign this newly created
group to Fabien. Remove this right from the Partner Manager group. Then log in as Thomas, create a new
partner “David Bathen” and try to delete it.
4 Purchases
4.1 Introduction
Purchase management enables you to track your suppliers’ price quotations and convert them into Purchase Orders
as you require. Open ERP has several methods of monitoring invoices and tracking the receipt of ordered goods.
You can handle partial deliveries in Open ERP, so you can keep track of items that are still to be delivered on your
orders.
Open ERP’s replenishment management rules enable the system to generate draft purchase orders automatically,
or you can configure it to run a lean process driven entirely by current production needs.
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4.2 Concepts and flows
Note:
• To show and explain :
– Display the process in the client to explain all its steps.
Main concepts for the Purchases application :
• Partner : represents an entity that you do business with (e.g. a prospect,a customer, a supplier, or even an
employee of the company).
• Product : a product means a raw material, a stockable product, a consumable or a service.
Purchases process :
4.3 Exercises
Products data
Note:
• To show and explain
– Form view of units of measure (UoM) with these examples : meter, centimeter and box of 10 units.
– Form view of a product including the different tabs.
– Explain how to create and duplicate a product
Before testing how to sell or purchase products, Luc (Sales Manager) asks whether OpenERP can manage the
products and product categories. He first gives us a list of the different categories:
• Other Products
– Raw material
– Misc.
Exercise 1 - Product Categories
Create the tree structure of the product categories using the data provided.
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NotSoTiny has not exported its product data yet. You will therefore have to encode the following list of products
with their main characteristics:
Name Code Type Procur Supply
UoM
Sale
Cost
Supplier Categ. Tax
Wood
2mm
WOOD002 Product Stock Buy Meter n/a 5C Wood
y Wood
Pecker
Raw
Material
21%
purch.
Exercise 2 – Create products
Enter the products defined above in the NotSoTiny database.
Partners data
Note:
• To show and explain
– CSV import/export mechanisms.
– Partner form view + address book.
To set up the suppliers address book, you received from NotSoTiny a sample of its business data in 2 CSV (Comma
Separated Values) files:
• Categories of suppliers
Suppliers
Suppliers \ Wood Suppliers
Suppliers \ Misc. Suppliers
• List of suppliers
Name,Contact Name,City,Country,Category,Supplier,Customer
Wood y Wood Pecker,Roger Pecker,Kainuu,Finland,Wood Suppliers,1,0
Vicking Direct,,Brussels,Belgium,Misc. Suppliers,1,0
Exercise 1 - Import Partners
In a suppliers list view, import the CSV files : suppliers.csv.
Stock inventory
Note:
• To show and explain :
– Periodical Inventory form view.
Some products are in stock and NotSoTiny would like you to enter these quantities in the database.
Code Stock
WOOD002 120 Meters
Exercise 1 - Create initial stock inventory
In the Warehouse menu, create the initial stock inventory and confirm it. Once the inventory is confirmed,
you should see the real stock of each product on the product form.
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Purchase order
Note:
• To show and explain
– Request for Quotation form view with the simplified view.
Exercise 1 - Create a purchase order
Test the system by performing the following operations:
• Create a Request for Quotation with :
– Supplier : Wood y Wood Pecker
– Products : 120 meters of wood (WOOD002).
• Convert the request into a purchase order
• In your incoming shipments, receive the goods sent by the supplier.
• In Accounting management, confirm the invoice and print it.
Exercise 2 - Check the stock levels
Check the stock level of all the products in the inventory analysis (warehouse management) and the products
list view.
5 CRM and sales
5.1 Introduction
The OpenERP Sales application allows salesmen to efficiently manage all their activities : leads, opportunities,
quotation and sales orders, phone calls, meetings, claims, campaigns or address book.
From the first contact to the sales order fulfilment, they can easily track all the sales flows and concentrate on their
deals thanks to various reminders, specific rules, requests escalating, mailing...
5.2 Concepts and flows
Note:
Script
• To show and explain
– After detailing all the concepts, present the Sales application flow
– Detail the Sales application menu.
Main concepts for the Sales application :
• Lead : represents a potential customer or a possible future business/sales opportunity.
• Opportunity : is created from a lead which needs to be followed up.
• Quotation : an estimate of costs submitted to a prospective client.
• Case : generic term that refers to a discussion with a partner about a specific subject.
• Section : allows to classify the cases in different groups (e.g. leads, opportunities ...)
• Category : used to differentiate the cases in a section (e.g. for the leads section, there can be different
categories : (from) website, (from) partner ...)
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• Stage : allows to follow the evolution of a case.
• Status : allows to characterize the state of any object in OpenERP (case, sale order, etc.) : draft, open,
pending, (escalate), close, cancelled.
• Rule : enables to automatically trigger actions depending on criteria you define for each case.
• Segmentation : allows to classify a group of partners according to some pre-defined criteria.
Sales process :
5.3 Exercises
Customers data
Note:
• To show and explain
– Partner form view.
Fabien also provides information about the main customers in different .CSV files :
• Categories of customers
Customer
Customer \ Consumers
Customer \ Retailers
• List of customers
Name,Contact Name,City,Country,Category,Supplier,Customer
The Shelve House,Henry Chard,Paris,France,Retailers,0,1
ZeroOne Inc.,Geoff,Brussels,Belgium,Consumers,0,1
Exercise 1 - Define categories of partners
In Sales application, define manually the categories hierarchy using Customers as parent of the hierar-
chy.
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Exercise 2 - Import Customers
In a customers view list, import the CSV file provided by NotSoTiny (customers.csv).
Product data
Before testing how to sell or purchase products, Luc (Sales Manager) asks whether OpenERP can manage the
products and product categories. He first gives us a list of the different categories:
• Marketable Products
– Services
– Shelves
Exercise 1 - Product Categories
Create the tree structure of the product categories using the data provided.
NotSoTiny has not exported its product data yet. You will therefore have to encode the following list of products
with their main characteristics:
Name Code Type Procur Supply
UoM
Sale
Cost
Supplier Categ. Tax
Shelf
100cm
SHE100 Product Stock Produce PCE 130C 50C / Shelves 21%
sales
Shelf
200cm
SHE200 Product Order Produce PCE 210C 80C / Shelves 21%
sales
Kitchen
Design
Project
PROJ Service Order Produce Hour 90C 20C / Services 21%
sales
Exercise 2 – Create products
Enter the products defined above in the NotSoTiny database
Stock Inventory
Some products are in stock and NotSoTiny would like you to enter these quantities in the database.
Code Stock
SHE100 50 Units
SHE200 20 Units
Exercise 1 - Create initial stock inventory
In the Warehouse menu, create the initial stock inventory and confirm it. Once the inventory is confirmed,
you should see the real stock of each product on the product form.
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Basic sales flow
Note:
• To explain
– Show and detail the sales process in the Web client.
Exercise 1 - Test the system
Test the system by performing the following operations:
• Create a Quotation with :
– Customer : ZeroOne Inc.
– Products : 1 Cooking Design Project, 3 Shelves 100cm
• Convert the quotation into a sales order
• Deliver the shelves to the customer
• Generate the draft invoice
• Confirm the invoice and print it
Exercise 2 - Check stock level
Check the stock level of the SHE100 product.
CRM Flow
The company is exhibiting at “House & Design” in Paris and meets lots of prospects during this event. In order to
allow salesmen to encode new prospects in the system, it first needs to define a campaign to classify them.
Exercise 1 – Create a new Case Category
Create a new campaign to classify prospects : open a new Case Category called “House & Design”.
At the end of each day, salesmen have to enter all information gathered as new leads (prospects). They will then
be able to contact them one by one to check if it can lead to a business opportunity.
Lead Subject Lead
Source
Prospect
Name
Prospect
Email
Lead Details
Brico House &
Design
Pierre
Durand
p.durand@
brico.be
Interest for cupboards but in larger quan-
tities (100 units/month)
Dubois SPRL House &
Design
Marc
Dubois
m.dubois@
dubois.be
SPRL Dubois would like to sell our book-
shelves but they have no storage location,
so it would be exclusively on order.
Consumer House &
Design
Lucie
Vonck
lucie.vonck@
gmail.com
Mrs Vonck is looking for a kitchen
project. Prepare a quotation
Exercise 2 – Add Leads
Thomas, a salesman, encodes the information gathered about the prospects in the system.
Because the prospect Dubois SPRL looks promising, Thomas creates a new Partner entry from the lead form.
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Exercise 3 – Convert the lead to a partner
Convert the prospect into a partner, and fill in the address of the new partner
Marc Dubois Liberty avenue, 56 1000 Brussels Belgium
Then he converts the lead into an opportunity and sets Luc, the sales manager who handles most interesting cases,
as responsible of the lead. On the business opportunity he should provide more information such as the estimated
income.
Exercise 4 – Convert the partner to an opportunity
Thomas converts the prospect to an opportunity and indicates that the estimated income would be 5.000C
and a success rate of 20%.
Thomas contacts the prospect and convinces him to meet Luc in order to discuss about a potential quotation.
Exercise 5 – Schedule a meeting
Thomas plans a meeting for Luc. This meeting is organized in a week with the customer and is related to
the case “Marc Dubois”.
A few days later, the client calls and Eric answers the phone. The customer asks that the salesman brings a product
catalog the next time he comes to see him.
Exercise 6 – Register a phone call
In an inbound phone call form, Eric encodes a summary and links it to Partner Dubois SPRL.
To prepare the meeting with the Partner “Dubois SPRL”, Luc opens the partner form to get the history of all events
related to this Partner.
Exercise 7 – Check partner history
Luc opens the Dubois SPRL Partner form and consults the history.
During the meeting, the Director of Dubois SPRL finally asks for a quotation that will include a small Design
Project (kitchen cupboards) and a bookshelf. Luc generates the quotation related to the business opportunity and
closes the business lead (prospect).
Exercise 8 – Create a quotation from an opportunity
Luc meets the customer to discuss the opportunity and finally sends him a quotation. The quotation includes
a Kitchen Design Project.
CRM Management
Luc, the Sales Manager, would like to check the quality of his sales team.
Exercise 1 – Delay to close an opportunity
Amongst the various reports available within the Sales module, find the one that provides the average time
taken to respond to a request from a customer (i.e. delay to close an opportunity).
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The company has different policies for managing non-qualified leads and real opportunities. Leads are kept in
a pool of unassigned prospects when they are created. Then several salesmen handle the leads and assign them
periodically. This is different for opportunities as they have to be assigned to Luc. He then decides whether he
wants to assign the case to someone else or handle it himself.
Exercise 2- Automatic assignment of opportunities
Create an automated rule to assign opportunities to Luc as they are created.
Addons
Exercise 1 - Profiling
Install the profiling module (crm_profiling) and configure it. Create a questionnaire and
add questions to it. Then go on a partner form and use the defined questionnaire.
• Name : Base Questionnaire
• Description : First Questionnaire
• Question : “Activity sector ?” with answers “HR, Telecom, IT”
• Question : “Number of employees ?” with answers “1 to 50, 51 to 100, More than 100”
Exercise 2 - Claims
Configure the Sales menu and add the “Claims” functionality. Configure claims and create a
new one.
• Name : “Damaged products”
• Partner : “Dubois SPRL”
• Category : Value Claims
• Open the claim
6 Pricelists
6.1 Introduction
Pricelists allow to manage promotions, customers special prices, segmentations of customer contracts made with
customers or suppliers, etc.
It enables to either set fixed prices or to work by rules to auto-compute prices according to the cost, the date, the
currency, the category of product, etc.
6.2 Concepts and flows
• pricelists : determine the purchase and selling prices.
• version :
• pricelist rule :
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6.3 Modules
product_margin Add a reporting menu to products that computes sales, purchases, margins and other inter-
esting indicators based on invoices. The wizard to launch the report has several options to
help you get the data you need.
6.4 Exercises
Consumer Pricelists
Note:
• To show and explain
– Pricelist/version/rule form views.
National consumers are segmented into 2 types: One shot customers and returning customers. The price policy is
to give returning customers a 10% discount on Stockable products, and a 15% discount on Services. Marketing
also wants all prices to end with 0.99C decimals.
Exercise 1 – Define the Customer Pricelist
Create a new specific pricelist “National returning customers”.
ZeroOne is a returning customer and is entitled to the defined pricelist.
Exercise 2 – Assign a pricelist to a partner
Assign the pricelist to ZeroOne and create an order to test it.
Because NotSoTiny also does business with foreign clients, Fabien asks to create new pricelists in various cur-
rencies. Before elaborating them, you should define an intermediate pricelist to charge each transaction with 5C
exchange fees.
Exercise 3 – Exchange fees
Define a pricelist ‘exchange fees’ in EUR, based on the Public Pricelist.
Exercise 4 – Exchange fees and USD currency
Set up a pricelist in USD based on the ‘exchange fees’ pricelist. Then create a new sales order and select the
USD pricelist in order to test it.
Fabien also asks to create a new pricelist for Switzerland where all the transactions are rounded at 0.05 cents.
Exercise 5 – Switzerland pricelist
Define a new pricelist “Swiss clients” in CHF based the ‘exchange fees’ pricelist and don’t forget that all the
transactions are rounded at 0.05 cents in this country. Create a new sales order and select the CHF pricelist
in order to test it.
The raw material purchase prices change very quickly, so their sale prices have to be defined according to an added
percentage. In a pricelist rule, add 10% to the purchase cost and set the margin to 50C to ensure that the margin
will bear the sale fees.
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Exercise 6 – Pricelist using margin
Define a pricelist by setting the percentage and the minimal margin. Create a new sales order and select the
USD pricelist in order to test it.
Retailer Pricelist
On the shelves market, prices of raw material (wood) change frequently. As a result, it is very difficult for
NotSoTiny to control its margin and have prices that automatically adapt to the market.
For retailers as the margin is smaller, the sale price will be determined based on the cost of the product. To
calculate the retail price, the standard cost of the product is raised by 10% with a minimum margin of 10C to be
sure that it will bear the sale fees.
Exercise 1 – Define the Retailer Pricelist
Define the retailer pricelist and then create an order to test it.
Margin Control
Luc, the Sales Manager, wants to consult margin statistics.
Exercise 1 – Consult Margin Statistics
Install the appropriate module (product_margin) and extract the related margin statistics.
7 Accounting
7.1 Introduction
Note:
• To show and explain :
– Configuration Wizard
– General accounting flow and concepts
– Difference between accounting module and account_voucher (or Invoicing in the Configuration
wizard) (easy entry, no need to be an accountant)
– Show the difference between Simplified and Extended view.
The Accounting & Finance modules enable you not only to manage your operations clearly but also to use efficient
tools for financial analysis based on real-time data. You can configure your accounting structure from A to Z,
define automated recurring actions, payment and budget follow-up. Keep your accounting up to date, whether
you are an accountant or a manager. OpenERP now also makes it easy to keep track of your accounting moves by
providing flexible data entry for people who do not have an accounting background. Drive your strategic enterprise
decisions with the analytic (or cost) accounting modules. Dynamic accounting dashboards give you direct access
to key information. You can work with one or multiple analytic plans. As all tools are integrated, you have full
control of your company.
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7.2 Concepts and flows
Note:
• To show and explain :
– General accounting concepts: financial year / periods, chart of accounts, journals, reconciliation,
payment
– Explain Tax codes and taxes, what they are used for and how they are linked.
– Explain that you can also generate chart of accounts / taxes from templates or create predefined
chart of accounts from the Configuration Wizard. Also explain the Reconfigure shortcut to restart
the Configuration Wizard.
Main concepts of the Finance & Accounting application:
• Partner: for OpenERP, a partner is any physical or moral person you do business with. Partners may have
various addresses and contact persons. Example: supplier, customer, employee, prospect.
• Fiscal Year/Period: in OpenERP, the fiscal period determines in which financial year entries will be posted,
and not the date of the entry. You can define monthly or three-monthly periods.
• Ledger: a ledger keeps accounting entries by accounts. It contains financial information from journals
(debits and credits), and shows the current balances by account.
• Account: an account is part of the ledger, and every debit and credit transaction is stored in it.
• Journal: a journal is used to record transactions from one account to another in chronological order. A
journal groups entries by nature, i.e. purchase, sales, ...
• Tax Codes: with tax codes you can define the structure of your VAT declaration (by creating the cases
(numeric / alphanumeric) that need to be filled in your VAT return.
• Taxes: configure taxes to be able to post with VAT and to do a VAT return. Tax codes are linked to your
Taxes, so it’s better to define them first.
• Fiscal Mappings: fiscal positions allow you to make a mapping from e.g. national taxes to intracommunal
or external taxes, or to map your accounts according to these criteria. You can link fiscal mappings to your
customers and suppliers to ensure automatic and easy VAT conversion.
• Reconciliation: reconciliation links entries in an account that cancel each other out – they are reconciled with
each other (sum of credits = sum of debits). This is generally applied to payments against corresponding
invoices.
• Invoice: an invoice is always created (manually or automatically) in Draft status. Such an invoice has no
impact on accounting at all. When you validate a draft invoice, the status changes to Open, which means
that the accounting entries are generated. When entries are reconciled (i.e. through bank statement), the
invoice gets the Paid status.
• Credit Note: a credit note is a document that enables you to cancel an invoice or part of an invoice.
Invoice process:
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Reconciliation process:
7.3 Modules
account_analytic_default This module allows you to define default analytic accounts according to various criteria,
such as product, partner, user, company and date.
account_analytic_plans This module allows you to combine several analytic plans according to distribution models
(according to percentages).
account_budget Module to manage budgets.
account_cancel This module allows you to cancel entries and invoices.
account_coda This module allows you to import bank statements from CODA files.
account_followup This module allows you to manage reminders. You can create reminders on multiple levels.
account_invoice_layout This module allows you to improve your invoice layout: order the lines of your invoice,
add titles, subtitles, draw lines, add pagebreaks and define your own invoice texts.
account_payment This module allows you to process payments through payment orders.
account_reporting Define your own balance sheet report.
account_voucher Use this module to follow up your accounting in an easy way, even if you are not an
accountant.
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7.4 Exercises
Fiscal Year/Periods and Accounts
Note:
• Explain the link from Financial Years / Periods to the check in Journals where you can have the system
check whether the date of the entry is in the selected financial period.
• Explain the definition of an account, with internal types, account types (also with respect to reporting and
financial year closing)
Note:
The current fiscal year and the current financial periods are usually defined through the Configuration Wizard.
A financial period in OpenERP determines in which financial year entries will be posted, and not the date of
the entry. Define financial years through Accounting –> Configuration –> Financial Accounting –> Periods –>
Fiscal Years / Periods. To create a new financial year, all you need to do is enter a code (e.g. the year), a fiscal year
(the name, which may be the year as well) and starting and ending date of the financial year. In a multi-company
environment you will also have to specify the company. Once you have created the financial year, press the Create
Monthly Periods or Create 3 Months Periods button to define periods by month or by quarter.
Note:
Note that if you have a quarterly VAT return, you should use 3 months periods.
Tip:
To make sorting easier, you could define your periods by starting with the code of the period, a slash and then the
year. Example: Period Code = 01/2010, Period Name = 2010 January
We recommend you to always create an Opening Period with the same starting and ending date (the first day of
your financial year). This period will contain the opening balances and opening customer / supplier entries thus
allowing you to print an account balance at the start of each financial year. One of the advantages of working with
periods is that each period can be individually closed. Use this feature to close a period after a VAT return, to
avoid posting or modifying entries in previous periods.
Tip:
You can have OpenERP check whether the date of the entry should be in the dates of the financial period in the
journals. In the corresponding journals, check the Check Date not in the Period box to prevent you from posting
entries in the wrong period.
Exercise 1 - Create Fiscal Year / Period
Create the next fiscal year and its associated monthly periods (from 01/01/YYYY to 31/12/YYYY). Create
an opening period with dates 01/01/YYYY.
Exercise 2 - Create an account
Create account 201000 Sales of Services with the account type Income and internal type Regular. Link it to
the corresponding parent. Set the default 21% tax.
28
Journals
Note:
• Explain how to define / use journals.
• Explain Entry controls per account type / account.
For each journal, you can define a specific sequence number. When defining sequence numbers, you can include
variables:
• Entry Sequence provides the automatic numbering of entries and allows you to display journals in the order
the moves were created (Account Journal type). Use Bank Statement type for your abstracts of account.
Note:
Suppose you have 2 purchase journals: one for cost invoices and another one for material invoices. Then Open-
ERP allows you to define two different sequences for these journals.
Exercise 1 - Create 3 Journals: Purchase, Sales, Bank
Create the journals specified in the table below. Associate the correct journal view and entry sequence. Add
a default debit and credit account for the journal.
+========+=====================+============+================================+ |
Code | Journal Name | Type | Default Debit/Credit Account | +========+=====================+============+================================+
| MPUR | My Purchase Journal | Purchase | / | | MSAL | My Sales
Journal | Sale | / | | MBANK | My Bank Journal | Cash | 110503 |
+========+=====================+============+================================+
Invoices
Note:
• Explain the manual creation of invoices.
• Explain the new Invoicing module regarding Vouchers (for non accountants)
• Explain how to refund an invoice (completely or partially) and how to create manual refunds.
We should differ between the Invoicing module (for people who are not accountant) and Accounting. The Invoic-
ing module includes Vouchers instead of invoices, which offers you an easier way of encoding. It is meant to be
used by people who are not accountants.
In OpenERP, there are 2 types of invoices:
• Customer invoices - Sales invoices are meant to be printed and sent to the customer, and have a legal
meaning.
• Supplier invoices - Purchase invoices are usually not printed/sent because they are usually generated by
the supplier. Through purchase invoices, you can book the correct moves in your accounting journals, and
double-check your incoming bank statement.
OpenERP can automatically generate invoices from purchase or sales orders (according to the settings). You can
also create invoices manually (sales / purchase). Most of the time, the system will generate draft invoices that
will have to be validated. By default, a manual validation step is required before an invoice will actually create
accounting moves.
OpenERP will generate invoices in several cases:
• from Purchase or Sales Orders,
29
• from Receipt or Dispatch of goods,
• from Work Carried out (timesheet lines, from which you can re-invoice, see Human Resources),
• from Tasks (see Project Management),
• from fee charges or other rechargeable expenses (see Project Management).
OpenERP also has two kinds of refunds: Customer refund and Supplier refund. A refund is a credit note. You can
manually create credit notes or you can refund an existing invoice (completely or partially).
Exercise 1 - Create a sales invoice through the Invoicing module Sales Receipt
This exercise concerns the creation of manual invoices through Sales Receipts.
Create the Customer invoice according to the example below. Also create all missing data, such as customer.
Use the default payment term.
Tip:
You can create a new partner and other basic data directly from the invoice.
30
OpenERP SA
40, Chaussée de Namur
1367 Grand-Rosière - Belgium
Phone:
Mail:
Contact : Administrator - Page: 1
Agrolait
69 rue de Chimay
5478 Wavre
Belgium

Invoice SAJ/2010/001

Document Invoice Date Partner Ref.
11/09/2010

Description Taxes Quantity Unit Price Disc.(%) Price
[PC3] Medium PC TAX 21.0% 1.00 PCE 900.00 0.00 900.00 €
Net Total: 900.00 €
Taxes: 189.00 €
Total: 1089.00 €

Tax Base Amount
TAX 21.0% 900.00 € 189.00 €




31
Exercise 2 - Create a purchase invoice through Supplier Invoice
This exercise concerns the creation of manual invoices like if you were an accountant. Use the Supplier
Invoices screen. Create the Supplier invoice according to the example below. Also create all missing data,
such as supplier etc. Use the default payment term. Select Fiscal mapping “Normal Taxes”.
Bedimo Inc. | compta@bedimo.be/
Rue Sainte-Henriette, 8030 Morlanwe, Bel!ium | "# $3% &0' () %30 *+, | -a. $3% &0' () %(+ *+, |
I/0 1 3)0-28%+3)2-*3 | IB3/ 1 B4%% 002) 2%%* ,()+ | 04B3B4BB
I / 5 6 I 7 4
Invoice # : 91101031
Invoice Date : 09/07/10
SPRL Tiny
Chaussée de a!u" #0
13$7 Ra!i%ies
Item /o 8e9cription :t; <nit "rice 3mount
RC0991 &R'100 ( )oo*she%ves + +9,3- -.,7
/019-1 P&L&T 2 Rea" 3ane% 10 ++ ++0
Tota% +7.,7
Due Date : 0./0./+010 Ta4es +1,005 -.,-3
T,6& : )7 0#77,#7+,701 0rand
=otal
33+.%3
=#an> ?ou @
32
Exercise 3 - Print the Purchase and Sales journals
When you have manually created the invoices, print the journals concerned to look at the account moves that
have been generated.
Invoices payment and reconciliation
Note:
• Explain payments by bank statements (complete, partial payments, advances)
• Explain reconciliation (manual / automatic)
• Explain vendor / customer payments (for non accountants) and automatic creation of advance
OpenERP allows you to reconcile matching invoices and bank statements, in order to verify that customer/supplier
invoices have been paid (partially, fully or not at all).
When an invoice has been reconciled with a corresponding bank statement, it is marked as paid.
There are several ways to reconcile/pay an invoice in OpenERP:
• use automatic reconciliation mechanisms based on open invoices, credit notes and bank statements;
• use manual reconciliation based on open invoices, credit notes and bank statements;
• manually mark an invoice as Paid and create the balancing accounting move(s) in one operation
An automatic reconciliation system is able to analyze the moves that are relevant for a given partner (supplier
or customer). Automatic Reconciliation will try to combine several moves and invoices / credit notes to find
balancing amounts between the invoices and the bank statements.
Note:
The number of partial amounts that can be combined to find a balance point can be chosen as the power of the
automatic reconciliation, i.e. if you select a power of 3, OpenERP will try to match 3 different moves at the same
time. Example: payment to be reconciled against 2 invoices and 1 credit note (power 3).
Exercise 1 - Pay and reconcile invoices in 4 different ways
1. Add a bank statement manually with amount(s) matching the pending invoice lines using the “Import
Invoices” shortcut
2. Add a bank statement manually with amount(s) that do not exactly match the pending invoice lines
and let the system attempt to reconcile them automatically (allowing a possible automatic write-off).
3. Use the explicit Pay Invoice feature to generate the appropriate account moves and mark the invoice
as paid.
4. Use the Vendor Payment feature to easily create a payment.
Reports
Note:
• Explain the various ways to start a report (from the menu, from accounts, through Print button, ...)
• Explain the Configuration tab of Companies to add Reserve / Profit & Loss account
In OpenERP, a given Chart of Accounts is associated with a set of predefined reports and legal statements. This
allows to generate reports and legal statements according to the accounting rules in your country.
33
Exercise 1 - Check the various reports available in the generic ledger
The Generic Ledger includes a set of predefined legal statements and reports. Print the following re-
ports/statement:
• Trial Balance
• General Ledger
• Partner Balance
• Partner Ledger
• Aged Partner Balance
• Profit & Loss
• Balance Sheet
Tip:
Localisation for Belgium: Check the various reports available in the Belgian PCMN
The Belgian Chart of Accounts (PCMN) includes a set of predefined legal statements and reports. The Belgian
localisation module will add:
• Periodical VAT declaration
• Partner VAT Intra
• Annual listing of VAT-subjected customers
Closing a financial year
Note:
• Review account types and their importance for annual closing.
• Review Opening/Closing period.
• Explain the difference between Close a period, Close a Fiscal Year and Generate Opening Entries
How to automatically generate opening entries
Before generating opening entries, check that:
• Account types have been defined correctly;
• Every general account is linked to the required account type;
• You have created the next fiscal year with an opening period;
• You have created an opening journal from the Situation type which has Centralised Counterpart checked.
Add a default Debit and Credit account (usually a Benefits / Loss account).
Note:
When you define a new Situation journal, Centralised Counterpart will automatically be selected.
Start the Generate Opening Entries wizard.
Set the financial year you want to close and the new financial year in which you want to create the opening entries.
Specify the opening journal and the opening period in which the entries need to be posted. The description will
be used for the entries.
In real life you should click Create to start the wizard. For the exercise we will not do this. OpenERP will create
a miscellaneous entry.
34
Tip:
You can generate opening entries as many times as you want, because OpenERP will at each run overwrite the
previous opening entries and adapt them to the current situation. So you cannot forget to transfer entries that
have been made after opening entries have been generated.
How to close a financial year
To close a financial year, use the menu Accounting –> Periodical Processing –> End of Period –> Close a Fiscal
Year. A form opens asking you for the financial year you want to close.
When the year is closed you can no longer create or modify any financial transactions in that year. So you should
always make a backup of the database before closing the fiscal year. Closing a year is not obligatory and you could
easily do that sometime in the following year when your accounts are finally sent to the statutory authorities, and
no further modifications are permitted.
It is also possible to close an accounting period. You could for example close a monthly period when a tax
declaration has been made. When a period is closed you cannot modify any of the entries in that period. To
close an accounting period use the menu Accounting –> Configuration –> Periodical Processing –> End of Year
Treatments –> Close a Period.
Accounting Addons
Note:
• Explain the extra modules
Use the demo data to check the following accounting modules.
Exercise 1 - Create Payment Order
Install the account_payment module.
Exercise 2 - Create Follow-ups
Install the account_followup module.
Exercise 3 - Create Budgets
Install the account_budget module.
Exercise 4 - Financial Analysis
Install the different modules enabling to analyze the financial status of the company : account_report,
account_reporting.
Exercise 5 - Customize invoices
Install the account_invoice_layout module. This module allows you to configure separators, subto-
tals and so on for your sales invoices.
35
Exercise 6 - CODA
Install the account_coda module. This module allows you to import CODA bank statements.
8 Human Resources Management
8.1 Introduction
In OpenERP, the Human Resources Management tools provide functionalities such as:
• management of staff and the holiday calendar,
• management of employment contracts,
• management of holiday and sickness breaks,
• managing claims processes,
• management of staff performance,
• management of skills and competencies.
8.2 Concepts and flows
Main concepts for the Human Resources application :
• Employee : physical people who have a work contract [fixed and indeterminate time periods, independent
and freelance service contracts] with the company.
• User : physical person who’s given access to the company’s system.
Employee process :
Expenses process :
Timesheet process :
36
8.3 Modules
hr This module allows to manage :
• Employees and hierarchies
• Work hours sheets
• Attendances and sign in/out system
hr_attendance This module aims to manage employee’s attendances.
hr_expense This module aims to manage employee’s expenses :
• Draft expense
• Confirmation of the sheet by the employee
• Validation by his manager
• Validation by the accountant and invoice creation
• Payment of the invoice to the employee
This module also use the analytic accounting and is compatible with the invoice on
timesheet module so that you will be able to automatically re-invoice your customer’s
expenses if your work by project.
hr_holidays This module allows you to manage holidays and holidays requests. For each employee,
you can also define a number of available holidays per holiday status.
hr_timesheet This module implements a timesheet system. Each employee can encode and track their
time spent on the different projects. A project is an analytic account and the time spent on
a project generate costs on the analytic account.
hr_timesheet_sheet This module helps you easily encode and validate timesheet and attendances within the
same view. The upper part of the view is for attendances and track (sign in/sign out)
events. The lower part is for timesheet.
37
8.4 Exercises
Modules, groups and roles
Note:
Script
• To show and explain
– Before starting the exercises, detail the Human Resources application menu.
Fabien assumed the role of HR manager and took care of leave requests, expense reports, etc. With the rapid
growth of the company, he has no more time to handle this, and in addition, centralizing this data becomes
necessary. To manage these points via OpenERP, the following features are required :
• Expenses management for salesmen
• Leave Request management
• Sign in/Sign out for employees (attendances)
• Timesheets (task-based)
Exercise 1 - Configure HR Management
Install HR modules required : Holidays / Leave Management (hr_holidays), Expenses (hr_expense),
Timesheets (hr_timesheet, hr_timesheet_sheet) and Attendances (hr_attendance).
The installation of these HR modules will add different HR groups: HR Manager and HR Users. New roles will
also be created to validate : holiday requests, timesheets, etc.
For now, only Fabien will be assigned to all groups. Other employees will only be considered as users.
Exercise 2 - Adding Groups
Update users definition following information provided.
Employees
Note:
Script
• To show and explain
– Employee form view
Fabien provides a list containing all professional and personal information over all employees :
38
Employee Related User Home Address Work
Phone
Work Email
Fabien Dupont Fabien Dupont Blvd Kennedy, 13
- 5000 Namur
081/75.75.01 fabien@notsotiny.com
Luc Lecoq Luc Lecoq Rue de l’Impasse,
3 - 1000 Bruxelles
081/75.75.02 luc@notsotiny.com
Thomas Lebrun Thomas Lebrun Rue de la Place, 11
- 5000 Namur
081/75.75.03 thomas@notsotiny.com
Eric Dubois Eric Dubois Route de Binche,
27 - 7000 Mons
/ eric@notsotiny.com
Exercise 3 - Create partner and employee records
Create the list of employees defined above and verify their hierarchical structure.
Expenses
Note:
Script
• To show and explain
– Expenses sheet form view
Returning from the Paris show “House & Design”, Thomas gives a copy of their expense receipts to Fabien to
be reimbursed. Using OpenERP, Fabien requests him to enter their expenses in the system, bringing together the
various expenses and their corresponding evidence (sales receipt or invoice).
So Thomas has to encode his monthly expenses :
Date Description Qty Unit Price
14/07 Restaurants 3 days 1 225.00C
13/07 Fuel Namur-Paris 650 0.29C
14/07 Hotel nights 2 125.00C
25/07 Errands for meeting 1 75.00C
Exercise 1 - Enter expenses
As Thomas, enter the expenses and confirm the expenses report so that Fabien can validate it.
Holidays
Note:
Script
• To show and explain
– New holidays request form view
– Holidays mechanism : OpenERP also counts week-end as potential holidays.
With the holiday management module, employees can enter their leave requests in advance, rather than having to
ask Fabien.
To enter holiday requests, we first need to define the type (or status) of holidays :
39
• Statutory holidays
• Overtime compensation
• Leave without pay
• Parental leave
Exercise 1 - Create Holiday Status
Create the appropriate holiday statuses using the list defined above.
By holiday status, Fabien must define the number of days an employee is entitled to:
• Workers (as Eric) are entitled to 20 statutory holidays
• Employees and managers (like Thomas, Fabien and Luc) are entitled to 20 statutory days, plus 12 days of
overtime compensation because they work 40 hours/week
Exercise 2 - Allocate employee holidays
Allocate all employee holidays as defined above.
Thomas is planning to make a city trip to Rome with friends from August 23 to 27, and he would like to use
compensation days for this. There is also his honeymoon when he leaves with his wife for Mexico from September
6th to September 17th (using statutory holidays).
Exercise 3 - Enter holidays requests
Log as Thomas and enter the corresponding holidays requests. Then log in as Fabien to validate them.
Timesheet
Note:
Script
• To show and explain :
– Introduce the analysis account form view.
– Timesheet form view.
– After encoding the timesheets, ask the participants to check the analytic accounts.
In order to monitor project processes in the company, Fabien decides to use the Timesheet module.
First, we must assign appropriate products and an analytical journal to human resources records. Fabien decides
to take 2 products for key positions in society:
Code Name Type Proc. Supp. Meth. Category UoM Price Cost
EMPL Employee Service Order Produce Others products Hour 75.00 30.00
WORK Worker Service Order Produce Others products Hour / 20.00
Exercise 1 - Setup HR products
Setup HR products (the “employee product can be sold, but not the “Worker” product). Then assign the
analytical journal “Timesheet Journal” and the right products to the corresponding employees (Eric is a
worker).
Fabien also provides the structure of analytical accounts that allow employees to encode their timesheets:
40
• Internal
– Administrative
– Holidays
• Sales & Marketing
• Project Management
– Pre-sales
– Development
Exercise 2 - Create Analytical Accounts
Create the analytical accounts structure defined above.
Then Thomas enters his work schedule as follows:
• Creating prospects and phone contacts: 4:00
• Administration (holiday requests, expense): 30 min
• Kitchen project for Mrs. Vonck (Demo, negotiation): 3:30
Exercise 3 - Entering a timesheet
Enter Thomas’ timesheet simulating arrival and departure for the day. Do not confirm the timesheet as this
is usually done at the end of the week.
9 Project Management
9.1 Introduction
OpenERP’s project management tools handle projects related to Services or Support, Production or Development
– it is a universal module for all enterprise needs. These tools allow for an operational project management to
organise the activities into tasks and plan the work you need to get the tasks completed.
The system handles an efficient allocation of resources, short and long term project planning, scheduling and
automatic email communication to get your partners informed on the project’s progress status. Gantt diagrams
give you graphical representations of your project plans.
9.2 Concepts and flows
• Project : in OpenERP, project is represented by a set of tasks for completion. They have a tree structure that
can be divided into phases and sub-phases.
9.3 Modules
project Project management module that tracks multi-level projects, tasks, works done on tasks,
etc. It is able to render planning, order tasks, ...
project_timesheet This module lets you transfer the entries under tasks defined for Project Management to
the Timesheet line entries for particular date and particular user with the effect of creating,
editing and deleting either ways.
41
account_analytic_
analysis
Modify account analytic view to show important data for project manager of services com-
panies. Add menu to show relevant information for each manager.
9.4 Exercises
Modules and groups
NotSoTiny operates 2 kinds of projects:
• Research projects and internal development
• Custom shelf design projects for customers
For the 2 types of projects they want to manage the tasks of different users. They need to assign tasks, make
plannings, delegate work and monitor project progress.
Exercise 1 - Install the required modules
Install modules which allow to manage financial and operational projects : project,
project_timesheet, project_long_term and account_analytic_analysis.
Exercise 2 - Manage the groups
These modules generate two new groups: ‘Project Manager’ and ‘Project User’. Add Fabien, Luc and
Thomas to the 2 groups while Eric will only be in the ‘Project User’ group.
Projects and analytic accounts
Note:
• To show and explain
– Before starting the exercises, explain all the Project application menu.
– Then present the project form view.
NotSoTiny is growing, mainly thanks to its 2 flagship products, but also trying to diversify by working on a new
project: a desk nicknamed COLOSS for its durability. The COLOSS project, created under a generic “R&D”
parent project, is divided as follow:
• Design
• Quality Assurance (QA)
The head of the COLOSS project is Luc, who oversees the R&D department and wants to be informed on projects
progress.
The second project type includes custom design projects for customers. NotSoTiny has signed an order with Lucie
Vonck for a new project that will be called “Lucie Vonck”. This one, created under a generic “Customer Projects”
parent project, will include :
• Requirements Analysis
• Project Realization
• Submission of Draft
The head of the “Lucie Vonck” project is Thomas, who will handle the entire project. For the “Lucie Vonck”
account, Fabien precises that the sales pricelist should be the “Public Pricelist” and the reinvoicing cost should be
100% as this is a customer project.
42
Exercise 1 - Create Projects & Project Phases
Create the projects as described : put “COLOSS” project under a global “R&D Projects” and project “Lucie
Vonck” under “Customer Projects”. Don’t forget to set the 5 phases under the appropriate projects and the
projects managers.
Tasks Management
Note:
• To show and explain
– The task form view.
– Tasks classification with sequence, importance and dateline criteria.
For the COLOSS project, Luc provides the following tasks:
Project Phases Task Summary Assigned to Planned time (h) Sequence
Design Check draft blueprint with designers Luc 4.00 10
Design Verify technical specs Eric 4.00 11
Design Assembly Eric 2.00 12
QA Quality tests Luc 2.00 10
Thomas provides the following tasks for the Lucie Vonck project:
Project Phases Task Summary Assigned to Planned time (h) Sequence
Analysis Customer meeting Thomas 4,00 10
Analysis Specifications writing Thomas 6,00 11
Realization Assembly Thomas 6,00 10
Submission Installation at customer Thomas 8,00 10
Submission End of project validation Thomas 2,00 10
Exercise 1 - Create tasks
Create the list of tasks as defined above.
Exercise 2 - Gantt Chart
For each project, check the Gantt chart to see the scheduling of project phases.
Thomas began the research project for the kitchen of Mrs. Vonck. He has been working on Requirement Analysis,
and took less time than expected, 3 hours in total. He began writing the technical specifications, and has already
worked 2 hours on this task. However, he would like to delegate the Assembly task to Eric.
Exercise 3 - Working with tasks and delegation
Enter Thomas’ task works and then delegate the Assembly task to Eric. As Eric, verify that the task was
correctly delegated.
Exercise 4 - Verify synchronization of task work and timesheet
Open Eric/Thomas timesheets to verify that task works were directly encoded as new timesheet lines.
43
Exercise 5 - Re-invoice work
Invoice the work tasks done to the customer.
Addons
Exercise 1 - Project analysis
Log in as Thomas and display the different dashboards available.
10 Stock Management
10.1 Introduction
Note:
Script
• To show and explain
– Emphasize on the double-entries stock management system and give some examples.
Open ERP’s stock management is very simple, flexible and complete. It is based on the concept of double entry.
The system can be described by Lavoisier’s maxim “nothing lost, everything changed” or, better, “everything
moved”. In OpenERP you don’t talk about disappearance, consumption or loss of products: instead you speak
only of stock moves from one place to another.
The Stock Management tools provide all operations needed to manage stock:
• define warehouses and structure them around locations,
• manage inventory rotation and stock levels,
• execute packing orders generated by the system,
• calculate theoretical stock levels and automate stock valuation,
• create rules for automatic stock replenishment,
• ...
10.2 Concepts and flows
• Stockable product : Product which can be used in stock management and its replenishment is more or less
automated as defined by the rules established in the system
• Consumable : Product that can be received, delivered and produced but whose stock level isn’t managed by
the system. Open ERP assumes that there are sufficient levels in stock at all time.
• Service : Corresponds to a service which cannot be managed by stock operations.
• Real stock : Quantity of products physically present in the warehouse.
• Virtual stock : Quantity of products that can actually be sold. It’s calculated this way: real stock – outgoing
products + incoming products.
• Physical locations : Defines where your stock is physically stored and represents the warehouses and their
hierarchical structure.
44
• Partner locations : Represents the customer and supplier stocks.
• Virtual locations : Represents counterparts for various operations : 1) procurement [when you don’t yet
know the source: supplier/production], 2) production [receipt of raw material and sending finished prod-
ucts], 3) inventory [to correct stock levels].
• View locations : Represents an organizational node for the hierarchical structure. It cannot be involved in
stock moves.
• Warehouse: A warehouse represents places of physical stock. It always contains an input location, a stock
location and an output location for sold products.
10.3 Modules
stock OpenERP Stock Management module can manage multi-warehouses, multiple and struc-
tured stock locations.
10.4 Exercises
Stock locations
Note:
• To show and explain
– Detail the Warehouse application menu.
– Present the location form view.
NotSoTiny has a single point of sale, connected to a single warehouse, which is organized as follows:
-> NotSoTiny
-> Output
-> Stock
-> Finished products
-> Components
So the storage area of the products is divided into 2 parts: one for finished products and one for components.
There is also an output zone for goods that are ready to be shipped to customers.
Exercise 1 - Create stock locations
According to the description above, set up the stock locations.
Stock inventories
As a reminder, NotSoTiny bookshelves are made of the following components:
• 3 panels for external structure (2 small on the sides and a large rear)
• 3 inner shelves
• 12 metal cleats (4 per shelf)
• 4 wood sections allowing the assembly of the elements (these are produced from wood lintels)
To create your prototype, you only need the necessary components to manufacture the ARM100 and ARM200
bookshelves. Costs are in EURO.
45
Code Description Supply Meth. UoM Cost Supp. Delay
PANA100 Rear panel SHE100 Buy PCE 10 5
PANA200 Rear panel SHE200 Buy PCE 13 5
PANLAT Side panel Buy PCE 5 5
ETA100 Shelf 100 Buy PCE 3 8
ETA200 Shelf 200 Buy PCE 4 8
PROFIL Assembly Section Produce PCE 2 /
LIN40 Wood Lintel 4m Buy Meter 8 10
TAQ000 Metal cleats Buy Box 1 20
Here is some additional information on these products:
• All products are stocked (i.e. stockable product, make to stock)
• All products belong to the Misc category
• The supplier for all products is Wood y Wood Pecker
• The metal cleats are stocked per unit but are bought in boxes of 20
Exercise 1 - Create the bookshelves components
Create the list of components provided above by creating new products. For the metal cleats, don’t forget to
create a new Unit of Measure.
Eric informs you that some of these products are still available in stock and should be taken into account in the
current level of stock. He gives you a list of the current inventory from his warehouse:
Code Stock
PROFIL 70
PANA100 15
ETA100 22
TAQ000 120
Exercise 2 - Set the correct stock level
To replenish the different products listed in the table above, create a new inventory. Then go to the product
datasheets to verify the level of real stock for these products.
Minimum stock rules
Note:
To automatically make stock replenishment proposals, you can use minimum stock rules. To do this use the menu
Warehouse →Automatic Procurements →Minimum Stock Rules. You can also access minimum stock rules from
the Product form, in the menu Purchases →Products.
The rule is the following: if the virtual stock for the given location is lower than the minimum stock indicated in
the rule, the system will automatically propose a procurement to increase the level of virtual stock to the maximum
level given in the rule.
It’s important to underline that the rule is based on virtual quantities and not just on real quantities. This way, it
takes into account the calculation of orders and receipts to come.
Once the rules have been properly configured the purchasing manager only needs to look at the list of orders for
confirmation with the supplier using the menu Purchases →Purchase Management →Requests for Quotation.
In a minimum stock rule, when you indicate a warehouse it suggests a stock location by default in that warehouse.
You can change that location.
All bookshelf components for SHE100 and SHE200 are maintained in stock, which means that it is necessary
to establish storage policies in order to manage the replenishment. These rules allow to automatically generate
purchase orders when necessary.
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Here is the stock policy defined for the NotSoTiny company:
Code Min Qty Max Qty
PANA100 10 20
PANA200 5 10
PANLAT 20 40
ETA100 30 60
ETA200 30 60
PROFIL 40 80
LIN40 10 20
TAQ000 200 500
Exercise 1 - Set minimum stock rules
Based on this table, create stock policies for all components of SHE100 and SHE200 products. Then test the
defined policies :
• Run the scheduler,
• Validate the purchase orders after precising the stock destination for them,
• Receive the products from your supplier.
Addons
Exercise 1 - Chained locations
Install the corresponding module (stock_location) and configure it. Define a new location which is
chained to “Input” location. Test your configuration by creating a purchase order and verify the internal
stock moves.
Exercise 2 - Traceability
Define pack lots on stock moves. Use the downstream/upstream traceability functionality.
Exercise 3 - Stock Valuation
Display the current stock value by locations. Optionally define input or output stock account on products or
inventory account on product categories.
Exercise 4 - Planning
Install the module stock_planning and configure it. Define the sale periods and then set the sales and
stock forecasts. Then configure the master procurement schedule.
Using a database containing demonstration data, configure the following functionalities :
Exercise 5 - Packaging
Define a packaging from the product form.
Exercise 6 - Import/Export
Install the module report_intrastat and configure it. Display reports available.
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11 Production Management
11.1 Introduction
The manufacturing module manages all the practices concerning manufacturing industries:
• multi-level BoM and routings,
• Just in Time,
• phantom BoMs,
• configurable products,
• workcenter operations,
• etc.
It supports several methods to automate productions or purchases propositions: MTS/MTO, Master Production
Schedule, Minimum Stock Rules.
11.2 Concepts and flows
Production
Order
list of operations that need to be carried out and the raw materials usage for each stage of
production.
Bill of Mate-
rial
a BoM is a list of raw materials used to make a finished product.
Make to Stock Customers are supplied from available stock. The company procures a set quantity of each
product when its stock is too low
Make to Order When a customer order is confirmed, the company then procures or manufactures the prod-
ucts for this order. This method won’t modify stock in the medium term because the com-
pany restocks with the exact amount that was ordered.
11.3 Modules
mrp allows you to cover planning, ordering, stocks and the manufacturing or assembly of prod-
ucts from raw materials and components. It handles consumption and production of prod-
ucts according to Bills of Material, and the necessary operations on machinery, tools or
human resources according to Routings.
11.4 Exercises
BoMs
Note:
• To show and explain
– Before starting the exercises, explain the Manufacturing application menu
– Bom form view.
In terms of production :
• SHE100 bookshelf being a best-seller, it is sold quite quickly and in large quantities. Therefore, NotSoTiny
decided to manufacture SHE100 in series in order to have sufficient stocks to meet customer demand.
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• SHE200 bookshelf, is less sold and in smaller quantities, so an important stock is not necessary. It will
be manufactured on demand according to confirmed orders, with a minimum stock in order to cope with
unexpected demand.
The assembly of a bookshelf is illustrated by the following picture:
Eric manages to extract a file describing the Bill of Materials (BoM) :
Article Component Quantity
SHE100 PANA100 1
PROFIL 4
PANLAT 2
ETA100 3
TAQ000 12
SHE200 PANA200 1
PROFIL 4
PANLAT 2
ETA200 3
TAQ000 12
PROFIL LIN40 0.25
Exercise 1 - Create BoMs
Define the BoMs for products SHE100 and SHE200, as well as for the “PROFIL” product. Test your BoMs
by simulating a sale of 5 SHE200 to ZeroOne and follow the process from production to customer delivery.
The production manager, Eric, would prefer not to start an intermediary production job for PROFIL component
for the SHE200. To satisfy Eric’s request, the BoM type of the “PROFIL” component should be changed to a
Phantom one.
Phantom BoM
Exercise 1 - Phantom BoM
Review the configuration of the “PROFIL” BoM. Then verify your configuration by simulating another sale.
Fabien wants to implement a new way of selling the SHE100, for do-it-yourself fans, as a bookshelf kit. It would
provide an opportunity for customers to purchase the components of the SHE100 and assemble them themselves at
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home. The idea is to sell a new product “100cm Bookshelf kit” which will include all components of the original
ARM100.
Commercial BoM / Set
Note:
• To show and explain
– The kit product has to be in MTO
Exercise 1 - Commercial BoM / Set
Configure the new product, ARM100KIT, and test your configuration by simulating a sales order for this
“ARM100KIT” product.
Workcenter & Routing
Exercise 1 - Workcenter
Create a new workcenter working full time and with the following parameters :
• Time for 1 cycle = 1
• Time before prod. = 0.3
• Time after prod. = 0.3
• Cost per hour = 5.00
• Cost per cycle = 20.00
Exercise 2 - Routing
Create a new routing :
• Name = “Subcontracting assembly”
• Production location = “Output”
• Create a new operation with number of hours = 5.00 and associated to the defined workcenter
Test the defined workcenter and routing by creating a production order and using the defined workcenter.
Addons
Exercise 1 - Just in Time
Install the corresponding module (mrp_jit) and configure it. Test your configuration by simulating a sales
order.
Exercise 2 - Subproduct
Install the corresponding module (mrp_subproduct). Add a subproduct to an existing BoM and then test
it by creating a sales order and triggering a manufacturing order.
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Exercise 3 - Repairs
Install the corresponding module (mrp_repair). Create a reparation.
12 Documents Management System
12.1 Introduction
OpenERP’s Knowledge Management is unique and totally innovative in its integrated approach. Its complete
integration and synchronization with the company’s management system solves most of the problems that are
encountered when you use independent document management systems. All documents produced by OpenERP
are automatically indexed and classified for maximum efficiency. There is an ultra-rapid access to documents,
which are directly available from the company management software. The user access rights are managed just the
same way as those that are available in the company management system.
12.2 Concepts and flows
FTP Standard network protocol used to copy a file from one host to another. It is built on a client-server
architecture.
12.3 Modules
document Allows to manage a complete document management system:
• FTP Interface
• User Authentication
• Document Indexation
12.4 Exercises
Configure the DMS
NotSoTiny requires a way to efficiently store, index and route all documents of the company. You decide to install
the Document Management System (DMS) of OpenERP to get a centralized document storage and processing
platform.
Exercise 1 - Install the DMS
Install and configure the DMS module (document).
First you will have to create the DMS structure using the FTP access. For that you should connect to the FTP
server of OpenERP and create the following structure:
• Documents
– Sales
– Projects
– Employees
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Exercise 2 - Connect to FTP Server
Connect to the FTP Server integrated in OpenERP and create the directories structure.
NotSoTiny decided to classify all documents into the related projects or related sales orders. The company needs
an automatically generated directory structure that reflects the current sales orders.
Exercise 3 - Configure DMS for sales orders
Configure the DMS so that you see automatically one directory per sales order in the “Sales” directory.
Now, employees can upload to the FTP each time they get a document related to a sales order. This way no
document gets lost on an employee’s personal computer or on unsorted shared drives, etc.
Add files
Exercise 1 - Attach a document to SO010
1. From the FTP access, add a document to the SO010 directory. Then verify, via the OpenERP interface,
that the document has been correctly attached to the SO010 sales order.
2. Do it the other way around and add a document to SO010 sales order using the OpenERP interface.
From the FTP access, check that the document has been correctly added.
To improve the efficiency of the DMS, you want to automatically put a .PDF file, which is the result of the sales
order’s print in each sales directory. It will enable you to efficiently store and make available the prints of the sales
orders.
Virtual printed files and dynamic repository
Exercise 1 - Virtual printed files
Configure the DMS to see a new self-generated file under each sales order directory.
It is also possible to define dynamic repositories which automatically add a repository once a new object is cre-
ated. For example, creating a new partner will automatically add a new repository under the general “Partners”
repository.
Exercise 2 - Dynamic repository
Define a dynamic repository for the “Partners”.
Exercise 3 - Full-text indexing
Upload a PDF file with text content and search for it using the search interface. Have a look at the automatic
full-text indexing functionality.