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Rivington Chase

Design and Access Statement
On behalf of Horwich Vision Ltd
December 2013
This Statement is provided in support of a hybrid planning application for the Rivington Chase redevelopment on the site of
the Former Horwich Locomotive Works site and should be read in conjunction with the associated environmental statement
and supporting planning statement. The site occupies around 76.6 hectares of land.
The redevelopment of the former works site provides the frst opportunity in over a century for the land to be accessed
and enjoyed by members of the public. The development will provide a signifcant enhancement of the built environment of
Horwich with a new sustainable community created with upto 1700 new homes, employment sites, and a network of public
open spaces and ecologically diverse habitats within it.
Horwich Vision Ltd are seeking to comprehensively regenerate the site, in line with the Bolton Metropolitan Borough Council’s
adopted Core Strategy as a sustainable mixed use development.
Introduction
Contents
Chapter No. Page No’s.
01. Introduction 1
02. Site Context and History 3-12
03. Planning Policy Context 13-16
04. Design Evolution 17-20
05. Masterplan Principles 21-24
06. Use and Amount of Development 25-30
07. Heritage Core and Chorley New Road Character Area 33-56
08. Northern Development Area 57-64
09. Moss Outlook 65-72
10. Southern Employment Area 73-80
11. Access Strategy 81-102
12. Conclusion and Summary 103-106
Appendix - Technical Summary Chapters
A. Open Space and Ecology i-xxii
B. Drainage Strategy xxiii-xxxii
C. Remediation Strategy xxxiii-xxxvi
D. Indicative Phasing xxxvii-xli
Rivington Chase Design and Access Statement 1
1.1 Overview
1.1.1 The hybrid application comprises the redevelopment and the mix
of housing and employment uses with associated open space
and highway works.
1.1.2 This statement provides an explanation of, and justifcation for, the
redevelopment proposals. The document is structured around a
number of key sections which have the following role and purpose:
• Site history and context - An assessment of the site’s history and
its immediate context
• Site analysis - An evaluation of the key features of the site,
including existing constraints and opportunities
• Planning policy context - An assessment of the planning policy
context
• Design evolution - Sets out the key stages of the design process
• Master-planning principles – Explains the design principles and
concepts that have been applied to particular aspects of the
proposal.
• Use and amount of development – Explains the quantity of land
uses and areas within the proposed development
• Development character areas – Specifc chapters that set out
the character, appearance and design principles associated with
areas of the site.
• Access Strategy - Explains the layout and character of individual
access points, streets, pedestrian and cycle routes throughout
the development.
• A subsequent technical summary appendix provides chapters
that focus on the open space and ecology strategies, hydrology
strategy, remediation strategy and the indicative approach to
phasing of the development.
1.0 Introduction
1.1.3 This statement should be read alongside, and in conjunction, with
the suite of documents included as part of this application. The
planning statement is particularly relevant. It provides a detailed
analysis of the rationale for the planning application, and explains
how the proposals for the site have evolved in line with key aspects
of planning policy.
1.1.4 Please note and treat all drawings, images and diagrams
within the design and access statement as purely
illustrative, providing a general overview of the applicants
approach to design and access matters.
2 Rivington Chase Design and Access Statement
2.0 Site Context and History
Rivington Chase Design and Access Statement
4 Rivington Chase Design and Access Statement
2.0 Site Context and History
2.1 Site History
2.1.1 The town of Horwich developed around the Loco Works in the
latter part of the 19th Century, and has been growing ever since.
The Town owes its existence to the Loco Works, and despite the
Works closing in 1983, it remains an important part of the Town’s
heritage and identity, with many local people retaining a strong
connection with it.
2.1.2 Physically however, the Works site has been closed to the public
for many years with high security fences between the Town and
the Works, and large scale industrial uses behind them. The
Rivington Chase project will radically change this relationship.
It will transform the site into an organic extension to the Town,
providing a sustainable community with a wide range of new
housing catering for an increased population, together with new
employment and community facilities.
1900 Historic Plan 2009 Aerial Image
1840 Historic Plan
Rivington Chase Design and Access Statement 5
2.2 Analysis of the Works Site
2.2.1 The construction of the Works in 1885 involved a major
earthmoving operation to create the plateau on which it stands,
approximately 1km long and 300m wide (plan above illustrates
extent of the original plateau). Other land to the west, adjacent to
Red Moss, accommodated ancillary uses such as railway lines,
a gas works and reservoir.
2.2.2 Over the next century or so, the plateau was extended by the
tipping of spoil materials from the Loco Works operations. More
recently, a large area of land to the west of the site was used for
the disposal of spoil materials, mostly arising from off-site railway
engineering operations (This area is shown in dark grey on the plan
opposite). This is now covered with self-seeded scrub woodland.
2.2.3 There are two smaller areas of land included within the regeneration
site:
• To the south is a low-lying area adjacent to the closed Red
Moss Landfll Site, mostly covered in scrub woodland which has
developed on a shallow layer of industrial spoil, together with a
small area of wetland.
• To the west an area of Gibb Farm is included, as an integral part
of the drainage and open space strategies.
2.0 Site Context and History
1840’s Plan Illustrating the Formation of Original Works Plateau
Plan illustrating the extents of the original Works plateau and areas of spoil
Key
Original Hillside Cut
Original area of fll to form Plateau
Face tipped spoil material during works operation
Spoil materials
Thirlmere Aqueduct
Red Moss
SSSI
Greater Manchester
Waste Authority Red
Moss Landfll Site
Gibb Farm
6 Rivington Chase Design and Access Statement
2.0 Site Context and History
2.3 Site Townscape Context
2.3.1 The site lies in an area characterised by a mix of land uses, on the
edge of Horwich. Immediate land uses are to the north, principally
residential, including to the north east high density terraced
housing developed originally to provide homes for those employed
at the works; there is more recent residential development to the
north west. To the east/south east is the Middlebrook retail and
leisure park, including the Reebok football stadium. This area
also contains a range of offce and industrial/warehouse uses. To
the immediate south is the Red Moss Site of Special Scientifc
Interest (SSSI), an extensive area of protected open land of high
ecological interest, which is also designated as a Site of Biological
Importance (SBI).
2.3.2 Beyond this, south of the Chorley/Bolton railway line is open
agricultural land, protected as green belt. The M61 is also a strong
physical feature in this location.
2.3.3 To the west of the site is a mix of residential development and
industrial uses. Horwich town centre is located to the north of the
site, approximately 200m to the north of Rivington House and is
accessed off Chorley New Road.
2.3.4 Over the following pages, greater detail is provided on the
surrounding residential context of the site in relation to density,
character and streetscape.
Horwich townscape landuse plan
Residential
Employment
Leisure
Education
Retail / Commercial
Red Moss SSSI
Rivington Chase Design and Access Statement 7
2.0 Site Context and History
2.4 High Density Terraced Housing
2.4.1 A series of short terraced streets run southwest-northeast though
the zone between the northern site boundary of the Loco Works
and Chorley New Road. These were constructed around the
same time that the Loco Works were developed and are named
after prominent engineers from the era (Stephenson, Brunel etc.).
2.4.2 The rows of two up, two down terraces are generally spaced twelve
metres apart, with minimal curtilage between the houses and the
street and small yards to the rear. With this grain of development
densities of around 82 units per hectare are achieved, however
there is minimal contribution to the character of the streetscene
through landscaping and the modern day streets have become
congested with car parking.
2.5 Medium Density Semi-detached Housing
2.5.1 This type of housing is typically found to the west and north of
the site, where the tighter knit town centre of Horwich expanded
during the post-war period to provide larger properties with
gardens for growing families. This type of residential area retains
the formal street network with houses fronting onto the street,
generally spaced twenty one metres apart and provision of
gardens eighteen metres in length.
2.5.2 The public/private boundary along the road is defned by street tree
planting with contemporary privet hedge planting gradually being
replaced by walls and fences, often where private drives have been
introduced within the curtilage. With this grain of development
densities of around 34 units per hectare are achieved.
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2.7 Low Density Detached Housing
2.7.1 This is of very similar character to the medium density detached
housing and also developed from the late twentieth century on
isolated brownfeld sites. The twenty metre offset is maintained
to the front of properties with rear gardens further reduced to
around eight metres length. Property sizes increase, enhancing
the dominance of the built form within the streetscene. With this
grain of development densities of around 16 units per hectare
are achieved.
2.0 Site Context and History
2.6 Medium Density Detached Housing
2.6.1 This type of housing has evolved in a more dispersed pattern as
the smaller industrial sites within Horwich have closed and been
subsequently redeveloped to meeting local housing need. Whilst
connecting into the existing street network, the developments
have a more organic form often clustered around cul-de-sacs in
groups of less than 20 houses.
2.6.2 This creates a more private development with the formal
streetscape abandoned in favour of a more gardenesque
treatment to the curtilage. The layout also responds more heavily
to the requirements of motor vehicles, with built form orientated
around the vehicle turning head and private driveways to each
property. Houses are generally spaced with a twenty metres
offset to the front, whilst rear gardens are reduced to around ten
metres, often reduced following introduction of conservatories.
With this grain of development densities of around 24 units per
hectare are achieved.
Rivington Chase Design and Access Statement 9
2.8 Ground Conditions, Remediation and Services
2.8.1 The existing ground conditions and other technical constraints
have exerted a powerful influence over the development
proposals, based on a thorough site investigation programme.
The main infuences are shown in the plan opposite.
2.8.2 The remediation strategy is based on a programme of demolition
and earthworks over the majority of the site. This involves the
demolition of all buildings outside the ‘Heritage Core’, and an
earthworks programme involving the movement of around
300,000m
3
of material. This will deliver the whole site in a suitable
condition for the long term development proposals, including
structural stability, removal of contamination risk, levels, drainage
and access.
2.9 Services
2.9.1 The Loco Works had a sophisticated and high capacity network
of services infrastructure, much of which remains today. Whilst
the new development will include the provision of new services
infrastructure throughout, there is signifcant capacity within the
local network to meet future needs.
2.9.2 In terms of key issues, surface water drainage is the most
signifcant, due to a range of factors including the adjacent Red
Moss SSSI, local watercourses and food risk, and the integration
of sustainable drainage principles into the masterplan.
2.9.3 These issues are dealt with in greater detail within the appendix
chapters of this document and within the specialist documents
of the environmental statement.
2.0 Site Context and History
Red Moss
SSSI & SBI
Former Greater
Manchester Waste
Authority Landfll Site
Gibb Farm
Site Constraints Plan
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2.10 Connectivity and Access
2.10.1 Historically, the Loco Works had very restricted connectivity with
its surroundings, which remains the case today. Road access
is restricted to two private, locations, off Chorley New Road, the
main Loco Works industrial estate access adjacent to Rivington
House, and an entrance to the Armstrong site adjacent to the
Fowler Industrial Estate. Two small private roads give access to
Gibb Farm in the west, and the landfll gas station in the south.
2.10.2 There are public footpaths along the south, south eastern, south
western and northern boundaries (refer to the adjacent plan). They
are generally unattractive routes and potentially unsafe.
2.10.3 The redevelopment of the site will transform this situation. It will
greatly improve connectivity between the new development and
the surrounding area, and create an extensive network of roads,
cycle routes and footpaths. The intention is to integrate the new
development closely with the existing town, and greatly improve
the local access network for the whole community, including
public transport, access to green open space, sustainability and
accessibility enhancements.
2.0 Site Context and History
Key
Existing public footpaths
Planning application boundary
Red Moss
SSSI
Greater Manchester
Waste Authority Red
Moss Landfll Site
Gibb Farm
Existing public footpaths plan
Rivington Chase Design and Access Statement 11
2.11 Open Space
2.11.1 Traditionally, the Loco Works has acted as a barrier between the
Town and an extensive area of open space to the south west.
This is made up of three main areas (refer to the plan opposite
for their locations):
• Red Moss SSSI
• The Former Greater Manchester Waste Authority Landfll Site.
• Gibb Farm
2.11.2 Although the Loco Works site has signifcant areas of open space
within it, mainly on the old railway sidings land to the west and the
steep slopes along the edge of the plateau, these have generally
been previously developed and are generally in an unstable,
derelict condition and make little contribution to local amenity.
2.12 Red Moss SSSI
2.12.1 The Red Moss SSSI is a valuable and protected wildlife habitat,
managed by the Lancashire Wildlife Trust on behalf of Bolton
Council. Both for reasons of safety and wildlife protection, human
access is discouraged, but cannot be entirely prevented. Litter
and fres are a recurrent problem.
2.13 Former Greater Manchester Waste Authority
Landfll Site
2.13.1 The Restored Landfll Site is developing well as an area of new
woodland. It is largely unmanaged and diffcult to access, and
is neither safe nor welcoming to the public. As a large area of
developing woodland, it is valuable as part of the local mosaic of
wildlife habitats, providing a complementary and supportive role
to the SSSI.
2.14 Gibb Farm
2.14.1 Part of Gibb Farm is included within the regeneration proposals. It
is presently in agricultural use, with modest amenity or ecological
value. The proposals include the creation of a new lake, together
with smaller waterbodies and wetland areas. These form part of
the sustainable drainage, open space and ecological strategies.
In addition, there will be areas of meadow, scrub and woodland,
managed primarily for their ecological value.
2.0 Site Context and History
Key
Gibb Farm
SSSI Boundary

Former Greater Manchester
Waste Authority Landfll Site
Existing area of open space
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2.15 Hydrology and Drainage
2.15.1 The whole of the site was originally on the lower slopes of a
hillside, sloping south westwards to Red Moss, which developed
on fat, poorly drained land in the valley bottom. As shown on the
plan opposite, a number of local watercourses ran down these
slopes. The junction between the sloping hillside and Red Moss
was marked by three of these watercourses, Middle Brook fowing
to the south east, and Nellie’s Clough fowing into Moss Brook
fowing to the north west, where it joins Pearl Brook on the edge
of the site.
2.15.2 The construction of the Works created a large, fat plateau some
13 metres above the valley bottom, and involved culverting the
three watercourses which crossed the site. A new piped surface
water drainage system was constructed, most of which led to a
purpose built reservoir in the lower part of the site. This will be
retained and upgraded, as part of the development, where it will
provide a valuable role as a drainage, amenity and ecological
resource.
2.15.3 Throughout the new development a new Sustainable Surface
Water Drainage System will be created. This will be focussed on
two major new features, a central waterbody acting as a collector
for the south eastern half of the development, and a new lake
which will serve the north, and provide food water storage for
the whole site.
2.0 Site Context and History
Existing site drainage plan
3.0 Planning Policy Context
Rivington Chase Design and Access Statement
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3.0 Planning Policy Context
3.1 The Bolton Core Strategy (2011)
3.1.1 The Core Strategy, adopted in March 2011, is the land use plan
for the Borough. It includes policies to guide development and
proposals for the use of land to ensure the needs of the Borough’s
population are met.
3.1.2 Policy P5 recognises that a high quality transport network is vital to
economic prosperity, and for local residents to be able to access
areas of employment and other community facilities. The policy
states that developments should take into account a range of
transport considerations including:
• Accessibility by different types of transport, prioritising pedestrians,
cyclists and public transport users over other motorised vehicle
users.
• The design of development to enable accessibility by public
transport.
• Freight movement for industrial and storage uses.
• Servicing arrangements.
• Parking, including parking for cycles and powered two-wheelers,
in accordance with the parking standards.
• The transport needs of people with disabilities.
• The requirement for a Transport Assessment and Travel Plan with
major trip generating developments’
3.1.3 Policy S1 states that the design of new developments should
take into account the need to reduce crime and fear of crime,
and promote road safety.
3.1.4 Policy CG2 states that developments will need to ensure that
they contribute to the delivery of sustainable development. It
confrms that for development which proposes to deliver 5 or more
residential units or 500m2 of non-residential foorspace this should
achieve a BREEAM rating of ‘Very Good’, incorporate renewable
or low carbon energy sources to reduce CO2 emissions and
achieve a 10% energy reduction and demonstrate the sustainable
management of surface water. The delivery of this policy is all
subject to suitability and viablility.
3.1.5 Policy CG3 requires that development proposals make an area
a pleasant place to work and live, by being locally distinctive and
sustainable, taking into account layout, density, height, massing,
architectural style, materials and landscaping.
3.1.6 Policy M1 confrms that the Horwich Loco Works is a strategic
site that will be developed for a sustainable mixed-use community
primarily for employment and housing.
3.1.7 Policy M2 sets out the following principles to guide proposals
for the site in order to ensure that the development delivered is
environmentally sustainable:
• It must ensure that additional traffc generated does not result in
serious inconvenience or danger on the public highway.
• It must provide transport links between Horwich town centre,
Middlebrook and the site.
• It must be well served by public transport, and make effective
provision for cycling and walking.
• It must maximise the potential for sustainable energy sources.
• Provision of open space will be required to meet the appropriate
council standards.
• The value of the adjoining Red Moss Site of Special Scientifc
Interest must be protected.
• Any new or expanded education services must be provided to
cater for the educational needs arising from the development.
• It should refect the historic importance of the Horwich Loco
Works.’
3.1.8 Policy M7 seeks to ensure that the scale and massing of new
development along the M61 corridor, respects the distinctive
landscape qualities and relates sympathetically to the surrounding
area.
Saved Policies of the Bolton UDP (2005)
3.1.9 The saved Unitary Development Plan (UPD) policies and the
adopted proposals map form part of the Local Plan, along with
the Core Strategy. The Council adopted the UDP in 2005. The
policies in the UDP expired in April 2008; however some of the
UDP policies are ‘saved’ and will remain in force until replaced
by new policies within the Local Plan. The Council has recently
submitted the Allocations Plan DPD for examination. However until
this is formally adopted the saved UDP Policies remain in force.
3.1.10 Saved UDP Policy O7 (Public Rights of Way) states that
development proposals affecting public rights of way will be
permitted, provided that they retain their integrity.
3.1.11 Policy A18 (The Road Network) establishes the Council’s
requirement to safeguard the Strategic Route Network along which
major traffc fows will be directed and will support the development
of public transport and improvements for cyclists in appropriate
locations on this network.
3.1.12 Policy A19 (Road Schemes / Improvements) allows development
that would not prejudice the construction of roads, road
improvement schemes and junction improvements that form part
of an integrated transport network.
Rivington Chase Design and Access Statement 15
3.0 Planning Policy Context
3.2 The National Planning Policy Framework (2012)
Requiring Good Design
3.2.1 Good design is a key aspect of sustainable development and
the framework requires planning decisions to aim to ensure that
developments:
• Will function well and add to the overall quality of the area, not
just for the short term but over the lifetime of the development;
• Establish a strong sense of place, using streetscapes and buildings
to create attractive and comfortable places to live, work and visit;
• Optimise the potential of the site to accommodate development,
create and sustain an appropriate mix of uses (including
incorporation of green and other public space as part of
developments) and support local facilities and transport networks;
• Respond to local character and history, and refect the identity
of local surroundings and materials, while not preventing or
discouraging appropriate innovation;
• Create safe and accessible environments where crime and
disorder, and the fear of crime, do not undermine quality of life or
community cohesion; and
• Are visually attractive as a result of good architecture and
appropriate landscaping.
3.2.2 Paragraph 64 states that development which fails to adhere to
the above design requirements should be refused.
3.2.3 Paragraph 66 requires applicants to work closely with those
directly affected by their proposals, and to aim to evolve designs to
take account of the views of the community. The Framework states
proposals that can demonstrate this in developing the design of
the new development, should be looked on more favourably.
3.3 Other Relevant Guidance
3.3.1 The Council has adopted a number of Supplementary Planning
Documents which are of relevance :
• Sustainable Design and Construction SPD;
• Accessibility and Transport Road Safety adopted SPD; and
3.3.2 Bolton MBC have also produced a number of technical guidance
notes which will be considered in the determination of this planning
application. Those considered most relevant are:
• Bolton MBC Planning Control Policy Note 1. Health, Well Being
and Quality of Life (February 2006); and
• Bolton MBC Planning Control Policy Note 2. Space Around
Dwellings (April 1992).
3.4 Horwich Loco Works Supplementary Planning
Document
3.4.1 The Horwich Loco Works Supplementary Planning Document
(SPD) was adopted by Bolton Council in March 2012. It provides
further details to the specifc Horwich Loco Works policies in the
Core Strategy, in particular Policies OA1, M1 and M2.
3.4.2 The SPD is not part of the Statutory Development Plan. However,
it forms part of the Local Development Framework and as such will
be an important consideration in determining planning applications
within the defned SPD area. The SPD was published to support
pre-application discussions and as a guide to be used throughout
the development control process. Paragraph 1.19 establishes the
3 principal purposes of the SPD as follows:
• To provide guidance for developers and applicants;
• To support swift and effective decision making by the council on
application proposals; and
• To assist in the delivery of a comprehensive and sustainable
development across the site as a whole.
3.4.3 The SPD provides a robust planning framework to inform potential
developers of land use, planning and transportation opportunities
and constraints on the site.
3.4.4 The Vision of the SPD is:
3.4.5 To secure the renaissance of the former Horwich Locomotive
Works strategic site as a high quality, sustainable and vibrant
mixed-use neighbourhood.’ To support this vision the following
objectives have been identifed in the SPD:
• To deliver a high quality, sustainable and comprehensive
development comprising around 1,600 dwellings and between
7.5 and 15 hectares of employment related uses together with
open space and supporting infrastructure and services;
• To create a vibrant, prosperous, environmentally sustainable
neighbourhood where people want to live and work, and which
refects the sites heritage; and
• To re-connect the strategic site with Horwich Town Centre,
Middlebrook and neighbouring areas and to deliver new
sustainable transport routes and linkages to support connectivity
with the rest of Horwich.
3.4.6 The SPD provides a description of the site and a number of
technical themes in relation to access and connectivity, ecology,
etc. It also sets out a number of guiding principles and policies
that the Council will use to assess planning proposals for the site.
The design principles provide guidance relating to areas such
as accessibility, heritage, urban design, public realm, housing,
employment uses, sustainability, etc.
3.4.7 One of the key policies relates to the requirement for comprehensive
development (Policy 10). The submitted proposals are wholly
compliant with this policy as a single planning application covering
the entirety of the SPD area is submitted.
16 Rivington Chase Design and Access Statement
4.0 Design Evolution
Rivington Chase Design and Access Statement
18 Rivington Chase Design and Access Statement
4.0 Design Evolution
4.1 Design Evolution
4.1.1 The frst exercise in preparing proposals for the comprehensive
regeneration of the Loco Works site was carried out by Bolton
Council in 2005. This led to the site being identifed by the Council
as a strategic mixed use development and one of three strategic
sites intended to meet the future development needs of Bolton.
The masterplan was based on contemporary ‘urban village’
principles, with relatively high density development.
4.1.2 Horwich Vision was set up to take the project forward. It is a
collaboration between Bluemantle, the owners of the largest part
of the Loco Works site, and Orbit Developments, developers of the
adjacent Middlebrook project, with the support and co-operation
of the Council.
4.1.3 Early analysis by Horwich Vision indicated that the quantum of
development shown in the original masterplan was undeliverable
when taking into account market demand and remediation issues.
4.1.4 Land use proposals were prepared on this basis, incorporating
1,600 new houses, 15 ha of employment land, and 13.7 ha of
open space, including road corridors. These proposals were
incorporated into the adopted Core Strategy in 2011, together
with supporting policies on access, environment, etc.
4.1.5 Following the formal adoption of the Core Strategy, work
commenced on the preparation of a Supplementary Planning
Document (SPD), with Horwich Vision working closely with the
Council. This was adopted by the Council in March 2012. It
followed closely the Land Use proposals and associated policies
set out in the Core Strategy, but was based on a greater level
of detail on the site and its future development (refer to the plan
opposite). Two issues which have had a signifcant bearing on
the development proposals are the Conservation Area status of
the main Works site, and land remediation.
Land use plan from the Horwich Loco Works 2012 Supplementary
Planning Document (SPD)
Rivington Chase Design and Access Statement 19
4.2 Heritage Core
4.2.1 Extensive work has been carried out in relation to the heritage
aspects of the site and its regeneration. This started with a
Conservation Area Management Plan prepared by the Council
in 2006, and culminated in an Options Appraisal of a proposed
‘Heritage Core’ carried out on behalf of English Heritage and
Bolton Council by Cass Associates in 2012.
4.2.2 Based on this work it has been agreed with English Heritage
and the Bolton Council that as part of the planning application,
a Heritage Core of four original buildings will be retained and
incorporated into the regeneration proposals for the site. These
provide the main entrance into the site from the existing Town,
with a strong ‘celebration’ of the Town’s heritage, and a ‘core’
serving the new development and other adjacent parts of Horwich.
Proposed uses remain fexible at this stage, with a wide range of
commercial, employment and community uses being considered
acceptable.
4.2.3 The application seeks permission for all other buildings within
the Conservation Area to be demolished inorder to achieve the
site’s regeneration. Detailed guidance on the layout and design
principles for new development is given in this Design and Access
Statement, refecting the infuence of the site’s heritage on its future
development. In essence, this involves the retention of a rectilinear
layout, with careful attention paid to the design of public space
and the form, layout and character of future housing development
within the Conservation Area.
4.2.4 Any new development has to meet contemporary requirements
in terms of layout, use, design and market demand. The 2012
Options Appraisal clearly demonstrated that the buildings within
the Heritage Core cannot be developed in the absence of a
substantial grant or subsidy.
4.0 Design Evolution
Plan showing the extent of the redline boundary, conservation area
boundary, and the proposed Heritage Core.
Heritage Core Conservation Area
20 Rivington Chase Design and Access Statement
4.3 Remediation Strategy
4.3.1 An intensive site investigation programme was carried out in 2011.
This identifed the underlying ground conditions throughout the
site, including the presence or likelihood of factors capable of
infuencing the future use of the site, such as contamination, poor
stability and abnormal ground conditions.
4.3.2 A remediation strategy has been developed in parallel to the
masterplan proposals. These are consistent with the provisions
of the SPD in terms of the amount and layout of development. A
small additional area of agricultural land at Gibb Farm adjacent to
the M61 motorway was included, to provide additional fexibility
for the earthworks and drainage design proposals, and to provide
additional green space, principally for ecological mitigation
purposes.
4.4 Community Engagement
4.4.1 The masterplan design has been developed over a long period
of time in close collaboration with a wide range of stakeholders,
consultation bodies and members of the public.
4.4.2 Over the course of the design process, the design team has
worked closely with Bolton Council holding regular meetings and
workshops to resolve issues and develop appropriate proposals
for the site.
4.4.3 The key stakeholders of English Heritage, the Environment Agency,
Natural England, Horwich Heritage and offcers at Bolton Council
together with a range of other bodies have been consulted
throughout the process in relation to specifc technical issues
associated with the site and the proposed development.
4.4.4 In addition to consultation with stakeholder bodies there have
been presentations to the town councils of Blackrod and Horwich
followed by an exhibition of the proposals to members of the
public held at Rivington House on the Former Loco Works site.
4.4.5 Further details of the consultation process can be seen in the
Statement of Community Involvement submitted as part of this
application.
4.0 Design Evolution
Remediation strategy diagram indicating likely land areas and volumes of
material
5.0 Masterplan Principles
Rivington Chase Design and Access Statement
22 Rivington Chase Design and Access Statement
5.0 Masterplan Principles
5.1 Overview
5.1.1 The purpose of this section of the document is to set out the
design principles that have been developed throughout the
evolution of the masterplanning process.
5.1.2 The indicative masterplan opposite demonstrates how the
particular character and setting of the former Loco Works has
exerted an infuence over the approach to new development. The
understanding of the character and context of the site provides
an essential backdrop for the masterplan.
5.1.3 The masterplan shows how the appropriate natural and historic
features of the site can be harnessed. The retained existing
buildings and natural features will contribute to a wider heritage
and green infrastructure network, to give a high quality framework
for new development. This includes not only the retained buildings,
open spaces and woodland areas, but also embraces road
corridors, water spaces and recreational facilities. These are all
essential components of a successful and sustainable place.
5.1.4 Linkages and integration is another strong theme running through
the masterplan. The value of a coherent and legible network of
movement routes within the site is demonstrated but, beyond this,
the way in which people will move between the new development
and Horwich has been considered and is highlighted.
Greater Manchester Red
Moss Landfll Site
Red Moss SSSI
Gibb Farm
Indicative illustrative masterplan
Rivington Chase Design and Access Statement 23
5.1.5 The masterplan for the site is a response to a number of key
aspirations and planning policy requirements for the development,
including:
• To create a form of development which refects the heritage of
the former loco works site.
• To give a balance between uses and activities to ensure that this
is a place which provides opportunities for living, working and
recreation.
• To integrate the new development with its surroundings on all
sides.
• To provide links to Horwich at Chorley New Road, Crown Lane
and to Middlebrook.
• To deliver new employment uses on land to the south of the site
and employment opportunities in the Heritage Core
• To defne the Heritage Core and heritage residential areas as a
focus for the development where housing, retail, commercial and
community uses will interact.
• To provide a robust and purposeful green infrastructure, which
builds on the natural assets of the site, protects the adjacent
ecological assets and successfully integrates drainage features.
• To give high quality frontage to movement corridors and open
space.
• To provide opportunities for different intensities of development
with higher density development within, and adjacent to, the
Heritage Core.
5.1.6 When taken together these aspirations represent an overarching
framework for new development, and give the essential context
for the detailed reserved matters applications that will follow.
5.1.7 In response to this framework the next chapter’s of the design and
access statement add detail, and explain the principles behind
the following key areas of the masterplan.
5.2 Use and amount of development
5.2.1 This chapter will contain a description of the type and extent of
development that includes residential areas, employment areas,
a mixed use Heritage Core and areas of open space.
5.3 The character, layout, scale and appearance of the
development in four distinct character areas
5.3.1 There will be four distinct character areas defned as; Heritage Core
and Chorley New Road Character Area, Northern Development
area, Moss Overlook and the Southern Employment area. Each
character area will be described in a separate chapter setting out
the masterplan approach, character and layout of each.
5.4 Access Strategy
5.4.1 This chapter will describe the primary vehicular access points
into the development alongside, public transport routes, an
internal network of pedestrian / cycle routes and linkages to the
surrounding residential areas, Middlebrook, train stations and
town centre of Horwich.
5.4.2 Each of the following appendix chapters provide a technical
summary of key issues and should be read in the context of the
the development masterplan and comprehensive environmental
statement. Taken together they will establish the broad principles
by which future detailed reserved matters applications may be
assessed.
5.5 Open space and ecology
5.5.1 This chapter will describe the layout and extent of open space
within the development with detail on the distribution and
character of recreation areas, the extents of habitat creation and
the protection of the adjacent SSSI and SBI.
5.6 Drainage Strategy
5.6.1 This chapter will provide a context of the existing hydrology of
the site, with proposals for a new development drainage strategy,
together with proposals for the improvement and mitigation of
existing site drainage issues and linkages to ecological issues.
5.7 Remediation Strategy
5.7.1 This chapter will explain the approach to remediation within the
site, including an overview of ground conditions, earthworks
design, and the approach to development within different areas
of the site.
5.8 Indicative Phasing Strategy
5.8.1 This chapter sets out two potential strategies to the phasing of
the development providing detail on the areas and direction of
construction.
5.0 Masterplan Principles
24 Rivington Chase Design and Access Statement
6.0 Use and Amount of
Development
Rivington Chase Design and Access Statement
26 Rivington Chase Design and Access Statement
6.0 Use and amount of development
6.1 Overview
6.1.1 The regeneration of the Horwich Loco Works site is being
proposed as a sustainable new community within Horwich,
comprising of up to 1,700 houses, a mixed use Heritage Core
and areas of predominantly offce and ‘high tech’ employment
land and open space.
6.1.2 As set out in the Horwich Loco Works Supplementary Planning
Document, the former Horwich Loco Works represents a major
opportunity for the Borough of Bolton to deliver housing and
employment targets over the course of the Core Strategy. It will
position Bolton as a major Greater Manchester hub for economic
prosperity, and will be a compelling place to live, work and relax.
New jobs are to be created, which will assist in narrowing the gap
between the most and least well off.
6.1.3 The land use plan shown opposite shows the mix and distribution
of land uses across the site. In terms of built development, there
are four main land uses:
• Residential use of varying types
• Mixed Use Heritage Core within Horwich Loco Works buildings
• Employment uses
• Residential / Local needs retail
6.1.4 The built development is predominantly located on previously
developed land with a large proportion of the residential land
situated on the former loco works area. The mixed use Heritage
Core, which is at the heart of the masterplan, is also located within
the former loco works site. A large area of residential development
is located to the north of the site, on land previously occupied
by rail sidings and infrastructure associated with the former loco
works. Further employment land is located to the south of the site
adjacent to the Middlebrook Retail and Leisure Park.
6.1.5 A signifcant element of the site comprises the existing areas of
open space that fank the development to the west that, with
further enhancement, will provide a valuable ecological and
amenity asset for the development. In addition to this, a network
of linked routes and public spaces will create further amenity value
and provide a key component of the landuse mix.
Rivington Chase Design and Access Statement 27
6.1.6 The schedule of development provided below sets the broad parameters for the distribution and amount of land uses proposed in different
areas of the site. The phasing of development is covered in chapter 15 of this statement.
6.1.7 The schedule of development provided below sets the broad parameters for the distribution and amount of land uses proposed in different
areas of the site:
6.2 Residential
6.2.1 Residential is the dominant land use within the development.
Overall there will be up to 1,700 new houses provided within an
area of 42.7 hectares of land. This connects with the existing
residential areas on the boundary of the site and defnes the
character of development adjacent to the Heritage Core at the
centre of the site.
6.2.2 The residential development covers two distinct areas. The frst
area lies on land to the north of the site bounding Pearl Brook to
the north and a large area of open space and Red Moss SSSI to
the south. The second area is located to the east of the site and
is largely over the former loco works. This area is bounded by
open space to the west and existing terraced streets to the east.
6.2.3 Due to the character of these different parts of the site, the scale
and density of development will vary. In the former built up loco
works area and around the Heritage Core, the densities will
be higher with development ranging from 30 to 80 houses per
hectare. In the areas to the north and west of the site, densities
will be lower with a range of houses from 15 to 40 per hectare.
6.0 Use and amount of development
Land Use (Gross) Area
Residential 41.65 ha
Residential / A1 Retail (up to 2,500m2) 1.05 ha
Mixed Use Heritage Core 3.36 ha
Employment 4.38 ha
Road corridors 5.77 ha
Strategic Open Space 20.36 ha
Total Site Area 76.57 ha
The accommodation schedule below sets out the proposed broad parameters for the number of residential units and broad maximum
development parameters for other uses within the site based on the land areas from the above schedule:
Land Use Use Class (Gross) Area / Units
Residential C3 Up to 1,700 units
Commercial / Employment *
1
B1 / B2 / D1 Comprising: Up to 17,520 m2
B1a (60%) Up to 10,512m2
B1b (30%) Up to 5,256m2
B1c/B2 (10%) Up to 1,752m2
D1 Up to 2,700m2
Heritage Core (Change of Use) *
2
Total 17,705 m2
- Retail A1 Up to 2,500 m2
- Hotel (max 100 bed) C1 3,655 m2
- Assembly and Leisure D2 Up to 2,500 m2
- Financial and professional services A2 Up to 2,500 m2
- Food and Drink A3, A4 & A5 Up to 2,500 m2
- Higher Education D1 1,000 m2
- Health Centre D1 750 m2
- Community D1 500 m2
- Craft Workshops Sui generis / B1 800 m2
- Markets Sui generis 1,000 m2
*¹ Total Commercial / Employment / D1 combined to not exceed 17,520m2
*
2
Heritage Core area includes existing B1 Offce Space at Rivington House which is excluded from the above fgures.
28 Rivington Chase Design and Access Statement
6.3.5 The development of layouts for this area of the site will be taken
forward through detailed design and condition controlled by Bolton
Council. In advance of this, the 2012 Options Appraisal document
has identifed a range of uses considered appropriate within the
Heritage Core. These include:
• Retail
• Hotel (max 100 bed)
• Assembly and Leisure
• Financial and professional services
• Food and Drink
• Higher Education
• Health Centre
• Community
• Craft Workshops
• Markets
6.3 Mixed use Heritage Core
6.3.1 The mixed use Heritage Core is a focal point for the development
with a primary entrance off Chorley New Road, and the retention
of a number of existing buildings around a new civic public space.
The Heritage Core is an area of 3.36 hectares that comprises of
four existing buildings and can accomodate sites for new buildings
and extensive areas of public realm.
6.3.2 The Heritage Core is located in the centre of the site and would be
surrounded by residential development on three sides. It is defned
by a primary entrance into the development at Rivington House
in the east, and is bounded by the existing Loco Works buildings
in the south-west and south-east. Details of these buildings are
provided in Chapter 7.
6.3.3 Development within the Heritage Core will consist of a range of
employment and community uses, integrated within the existing
fabric of the former loco works buildings.
6.3.4 The location of commercial uses at the heart of the site will enhance
the sustainable community aspirations of the development,
creating a vibrant core. The development in this area will need
to respond in a sensitive way to the existing buildings, creating
a framework of streets and public spaces that integrate with the
adjacent residential areas.
6.0 Use and amount of development
6.2.4 In turn this range of densities and character areas will result in
a variety of building types with larger 3, 4 and 5 bedroom family
houses provided in the lower density areas of the site, and smaller
2, 3 and 4 bedroom houses provided in the higher density areas
on the former built up loco works area.
6.2.5 The interaction of residential areas with the open space, green
infrastructure and movement network, is a key consideration.
Where appropriate, residential areas will overlook open space, to
create high value amenity spaces with a high degree of passive
surveillance over recreation spaces, movement corridors and
ecological zones.
Rivington Chase Design and Access Statement 29
6.4 Employment
6.4.1 The area of the site designed for employment and permission
is also sought for a limited amount of D1 foorspace of up to
2,700sqm. This area is located to the south of the development
and comprises 4.16 hectares of land. It is accessed to the south
from Aspinall Way and to the north from within the residential
development of the former Loco Works site. There are also two
small parcels of employment land adjacent to Rivington House but
outside the Heritage Core. These comprise 0.22 hectares in total.
6.4.2 The main area of employment land is bounded to the north-west
by a substantial ecological buffer to the Red Moss SSSI and to
the east by the Middlebrook development. To the north, the land
is bounded by existing woodland and to the south by the Middle
Brook stream corridor and wetland.
6.4.3 The employment land will comprise a range of employment and
D1 uses that will include:
• General offces
• Research and development facilities
• High technology industries
• Light and general industrial uses
• Private Clinic
• Creche
• Healthcare
6.4.4 The layout of development along the road corridor from Aspinall
Way will be an important consideration in defning the entrance into
the development from the south, and creating a suitable interface
with the open space and residential land to the north. As set out in
the Mixed Use Heritage Core above, the development of detailed
layouts for this area will taken forward at reserved matters stage.
6.5 Open Space
6.5.1 The site contains an extensive 20.4 hectare area of proposed
open space providing a valuable amenity and open space asset
for the development. The majority of open space is located in a
band running from north west to south east between the former
loco works site and the Red Moss SSSI. The land will largely
comprise a matrix of open meadow and amenity grasslands,
scrub woodland, water courses, wetlands and waterbodies.
6.5.2 In addition, a network of linked routes and spaces is proposed
throughout the developed areas of the site, providing pedestrian
and cycle connections between the town centre and the open
space to west.
6.5.3 Neighbourhood and local parks, including equipped play areas,
will be provided in each of the main housing areas, with a formal,
civic, public square created within the Mixed Use Heritage Core.
6.0 Use and amount of development
30 Rivington Chase Design and Access Statement
Rivington Chase Design and Access Statement 31
Overview
The following chapters set out further detail for each of the character areas
within Rivington Chase with each character area following the masterplan
principles set out in chapters 5 and 6 of this document.
The drawing opposite provides an overview of the character areas in the
context of the overall development site. Each chapter provides information
on the context, design principles and character of the area, in relation to
the land use associated with it.
Character Areas - Overview
7.0 Heritage Core and Chorley New
Road Character Area
Rivington Chase Design and Access Statement
34 Rivington Chase Design and Access Statement
7.0 Heritage Core and Chorley New Road Character Area
7.1 Location and context
7.1.1 The Heritage Core and the Chorley New Road area comprise 15
hectares of land within the Horwich Loco Works Conservation
Area boundary (marked on the adjacent plan).
7.1.2 The access road past Rivington House defnes the Heritage
Core boundary in the north and west. The South West boundary
is defned by building 10a whilst to the South East the area is
defned by building 6.
7.1.3 The wider residential area is defned by the existing terraced
streets to the east boundary, the edge of the conservation area
in the west and the site boundary with Middlebrook in the south.
7.1.4 A number of key characteristics are evident on the existing site
that have informed the scale, layout and form of development
within the area. These can be summarised as follows:
• The linearity and scale of the site and the existing buildings
• Historic access routes into the site, and the layout of the former
rail lines and works infrastructure.
• The materials and character of the existing buildings
Horwich Loco Works Plan from 1908 showing the conservation area boundary
Conservation area boundary
Heritage Core
Building 6
Building 10a
Rivington House
Entrance (inc.
war memorial)
Rivington Chase Design and Access Statement 35
7.3 Access + Historic Routes
7.3.1 The layout and distribution of access routes within the former
loco works can have an infuence on the design of the new
development.
• Evoking the arrangement of the former rail sidings will add to the
character of the development and reinforce the linear nature of
the site.
• The historic entrances will be redefned either as primary vehicular
entrances such as at Rivington House, or as a ‘Heritage Link’
pedestrian / cycleway entrance at Gooch Street.
• The Heritage Core buildings will be reinforced with areas of new
build such as residential development, and the creation of a new
civic public space designed to refect the character and heritage
of the site’s industrial past.
7.2 Scale + Linearity
7.2.1 The layout of the former loco works, and especially the linear
characteristics of the buildings within it, have had an infuence on
the form of the new development within this area.
• Strong road / public space corridors can be designed to refect
the ‘linear’ quality created by the existing buildings.
• Surface water attenuation infrastructure will add scale to the
development, refecting the length and continuity of the existing
loco buildings.
• The retention of the Heritage Core buildings will provide
an important foundation for the heritage character and the
surrounding urban grain.
• A higher density mix of development will defne the character of
the streets within the Heritage Core, and within the Chorley New
Road Area.
7.4 Materials + Heritage
7.4.1 The palette of materials used within the area will be important
in defning the character and reinforcing the wider urban design
principles put forward in this document.
• The materials and detailing will refect the features seen in the
existing loco works buildings.
• Where appropriate street frontages can be designed to refect
the scale of the existing buildings and spaces.
7.4.2 Additional heritage elements within the site, including the war
memorial (a listed monument), will be integrated within the
development with their settings enhanced alongside potential
interpretation material.
7.0 Heritage Core and Chorley New Road Character Area
36 Rivington Chase Design and Access Statement
7.5 SPD Design Principles
7.5.1 The SPD sets out a number of masterplan principles that provide
a framework for the approach to design within the Heritage Core
area of the development. These principles were set out and have
been developed as follows:
• Development design should include the use of vernacular
materials. Examples may include the use of red bricks, slate roofs
and traditional fenestration details.
• Development of the Heritage character area should refect the
historic layout of the ‘grid’ or linear character of the former loco
works buildings.
• The architectural style of all new buildings should be of a high
standard which refect the character of the locality.
• Development design should minimise opportunities for crime and
anti-social behaviour
7.5.2 In response to these principles and their further development, a
number of key design components form the basis of the character
area and they include:
• The Heritage Core
• Access and routes
• Chorley New Road Area
7.5.3 The following paragraphs set out the approach to the design of
each of these components adding further detail to the principles
described above, and informing the overall character of this part
of the development.
Heritage Core
Building 6
Building 10a
Heritage Link Central Route Rivington House
Entrance (inc.
war memorial)
7.0 Heritage Core and Chorley New Road Character Area
Rivington Chase Design and Access Statement 37
7.6 The Heritage Core
7.6.1 The Heritage Core forms a signifcant component of the overall
development. It sets the foundations for the interpretation of the
site’s industrial past, and sets the scene for a new mixed use
commercial and community core to the development.
• The design and layout of the Heritage Core will enhance the
development, with additional buildings that refect the scale and
mass of the previous industrial structures.
• A new civic public space will form the focal point of the Heritage
Core, providing a vibrant mix of uses that will be infuenced by
the future occupants of the surrounding buildings.
• The design and materials palette of both the public realm and
new buildings will be infuenced by the historic character of the
site, and by the historic materials and components that once
occupied the space.
7.7 Access and Routes
7.7.1 A hierarchy of routes has been designed to take infuence from
the former loco works site through its relationship to existing
buildings and through its overall form and scale. These routes
can be described as follows:
• Rivington House entrance - One of the primary entrances into the
development will be the historic loco works entrance retaining the
traditional link with the town of Horwich
• Central Route - A new north west - south east access route will
provide a major corridor through the development. The scale
and form of the street will evoke the linear quality of the existing
loco works.
• Heritage Link - A new pedestrian / cycle link will connect into
Gooch Street which is the location of a historic site access into
the works. The link route will provide residential access within the
site and links into the Heritage Core and open space to the south.
• Secondary and tertiary residential streets that form the core of
the smaller scale residential neighbourhoods connecting larger
access routes with areas of open space.
7.8 Chorley New Road Area
7.8.1 The urban grain and layout of the Chorley New Road residential
area will be infuenced by the scale and form of the former loco
works site. The density of development will be higher in this
area.
• There will be active street frontages, uniform elevations and
where appropriate, lengths of townhouses within the Heritage
Core refecting the linear form and scale of the adjacent existing
buildings.
• The palette of materials used will be refective of the local area
and of the historic materials used within the existing buildings.
• Layout, scale and massing, particularly in areas of the site closest
to the Heritage Core, will refect its character with a grid layout,
linear forms and simple,uncluttered architectural treatment.
7.0 Heritage Core and Chorley New Road Character Area
38 Rivington Chase Design and Access Statement
Existing Building 10A
Erecting Shop
Existing Building 6a & 6b
Existing Building 2
Stores
Potential new development
plot within Heritage core
Potential new development
plot within Heritage core
Public realm materials to the
Central Route carriageway
as it passes through Heritage
Core
Shared surface access to
adjacent residential unit
Landscape homezone
provides set back for
adjacent lower density
residential housing
Townhouses provide
formal frontage adjacent to
entrance core to Erecting
Shop
Townhouses provide formal
frontage to central route
Pubic square (potential
to incorporate parking
depending upon uses of
existing/proposed buildings)
Indicative
residential layout
Rivington House
Private parking
area for Rivington
House / Stores
Residential townhoues
with direct frontage
parking court at rear
Heritage Core, indicative sketch plan.
7.0 Heritage Core and Chorley New Road Character Area
Rivington Chase Design and Access Statement 39
7.10 Potential Uses
7.10.1 The fndings of the Heritage Building Options Appraisal (included
as part of the planning application) indicated the following uses
may be attracted to locate within the Heritage Core. In broad
terms these are: -
• Community/arts/cultural/leisure uses
• Commercial studio/offces/workshops/retail/catering uses
• Bespoke offce, training, education and conference uses.
7.10.2 The SPD also clarifes which uses are acceptable in this area.
7.10.3 At this early stage it will be important to maintain a high degree
of fexibility in considering precise uses of both existing and
proposed buildings. Hence a Change of Use is sought for the
retained buildings with a range of suitable uses.
7.11 Elevation Treatments & Interventions
7.11.1 The existing buildings have a reasonable potential for reuse. From
a design perspective, the large open internal spaces allow fexibility
for subdivision. There are also many examples of how the external
fabric can be modernised whilst still maintaining the scale and
presence of the building. The introduction of glazed entrances,
cladding and industrial detailing can revitalise the buildings whilst
retaining their monolithic quality.
7.11.2 There may also be potential to remove sections of the roof to
create open or semi enclosed internal spaces which can act as
cores to assist in internally subdividing the buildings.
7.11.3 New buildings within the core should be designed sympathetically
and could maintain principals of rhythmic repetition of elevations
and pitched gable ends.
Indicative proposed elevation along Rivington House access route Existing elevation along Rivington House access route
Potential uses and interpretation of the former works buildings
7.9 Heritage Core overview
7.9.1 The Heritage Core forms a distinct component of Rivington Chase
and sets the scene for a new mixed use core at the heart of the
development.
7.9.2 The indicative sketch plan opposite provides some insight into the
potential layout and character of the buildings and public open
spaces within the Heritage Core.
7.9.3 It is essential that the potential uses are viable and sustainable
complementing not only the adjacent housing but the wider
regeneration of the site including new employment development.
7.9.4 The following pages provide further details of the Heritage Core,
its potential uses, treatment of existing buildings, the character of
the public realm and the adjacent residential development that
will be created alongside it.
7.0 Heritage Core and Chorley New Road Character Area
40 Rivington Chase Design and Access Statement
7.12 Public Realm
7.12.1 The new public square and associated public realm should form
the focal point for the Heritage Core providing an open, fexible
series of public spaces that interpret the history and character
of the Rivington Chase site. Key characteristics could include:
• A combination of high quality surfaced streets and shared surface
zones aimed to slow traffc through the heritage core creating a
pedestrian priority zone.
• Flexible forecourts to the existing buildings with shared footpath/
parking and vehicular activity will increase fexibility of the existing
buildings, allowing new entrances to be created within the existing
elevations.
• There is also the potential to incorporate key historic elements
such as crane gantries or supporting pillars into the public realm
areas.
Public
Square
Integrated public realm within street corridors
Flexible civic spaces and public realm
Distinctive streetscapes
Heritage Core key plan
7.0 Heritage Core and Chorley New Road Character Area
Rivington Chase Design and Access Statement 41
7.12.2 Depending upon potential users, the public realm within the
Heritage Core has the potential to incorporate contemporary
design features contrasting dramatically with the existing brick
facades and industrial steel structures.
7.12.3 Pocket parks and squares could be incorporated between
buildings or ‘slices’ taken out of the existing buildings to create
open / semi enclosed access cores.
7.12.4 These could also have the potential to create high quality settings
for key historic elements such as the War Memorial, crane gantries
or supporting pillars.
7.13 Residential Development
7.13.1 Residential development in the immediate environs of the Heritage
Core is to have a uniformity of elevation more dense residential
designs with active frontages. Blocks could feature gable ends
at key corners and be urban in character. Heights may reduce
as the residential areas extend away from the core.
7.13.2 The distinctive characteristics, architectural rhythm, proportions
of windows and doors, and material of the existing loco works
buildings, will help inform the style and layout of the residential
development.
7.13.3 On street parking will be provided to create active street frontages
alongside further areas of shared surface parking to the rear of
public routes and spaces.
Civic and park spaces within the built development Architecture used to refect the heritage of the site Existing buildings infuencing the architectural form
7.13.1 The following pages provide details for each of the existing
buildings proposed to be retained within the Heritage Core.
7.13.2 The text and diagrams provide detailed information on potential
uses, and the design approach to conversion and sub-division,
that will be required in relation to the large scale industrial spaces
that currently exist.
7.0 Heritage Core and Chorley New Road Character Area
42 Rivington Chase Design and Access Statement
7.14 Former Stores Building (Building 2)
7.14.1 The building is in a high profle location at the main entrance to
the site and adjacent to the commercial and community ‘hub’ of
the proposed masterplan. Together with Rivington House it forms
a unifed composition, and the two buildings played an important
role in the former operation of the Works.
7.14.2 If possible, the original form and layout of the building should be
retained.
7.14.3 Historically there have been three goods entrances which served
the narrow gauge railway, one at each end of the south-west
facade, the other towards the right hand end of the south-east
facade. There was also a primary goods entry beneath the water
tower situated at the end of Rivington House.
7.14.4 Below are some examples of potential elevation treatments to
enable new openings to be formed to aid the internal subdivision
of the space.
Existing side elevation is 60m long and is
modulated following the internal 8.2m structural
grid. High cill heights to ground foor windows
inhibit internal / external interaction.
Potential new openings formed below existing
window locations to allow increased permeability
and internal subdivision.
Cills to ground foor windows lowered to allow
greater interaction with internal uses, coupled with
new openings allow will allow greater fexibility of
internal spaces.
New highly permeable openings formed within
existing modular elevation with generous openings
creating a link to the central atrium space from
which internal spaces could be accessed.
Former Stores building key plan and sketch section
Building 2
7.0 Heritage Core and Chorley New Road Character Area
Rivington Chase Design and Access Statement 43
7.15 Former Millwrights Shop (Building 6a)
7.15.1 Building 6a faces onto the proposed public square forming part
of the central core and therefore may attract commercial and
community uses.
7.15.2 The building has a internal area of approximately 1,450m2
7.15.3 If a single user took ownership of the entire building it would be
possible to avoid signifcant changes to the two long external
elevations, with main access being form the gable ends.
7.15.4 It is likely that multiple uses would require new access points,
below are some examples of potential elevation treatments:
Existing side elevation is 45m long (building 6a
only) and is modulated following the internal 5.5m
structural grid. High cill heights to ground foor
windows inhibit internal / external interaction.
Potential new openings formed below existing
window locations to allow increased permeability
and internal subdivision. Spandrel panels required
to windows if internal mezzanine is installed.
Cills to ground foor windows lowered to allow
greater interaction with internal uses, coupled with
new openings allow will allow greater fexibility of
internal spaces.
New highly permeable openings formed within
existing modular elevation to form new side
entrances, allowing potential internal subdivision of
spaces.
Former Millwrights Shop key plan and sketch sections
Building 6a
7.0 Heritage Core and Chorley New Road Character Area
44 Rivington Chase Design and Access Statement
7.16 Former Pattern Makers Shop (Building 6b)
7.16.1 Building 6b is physically adjoined to building 6a, however both
external elevation and internal spaces differ and the buildings are
internally subdivided. Unlike building 6a, 6b will be surrounded on
three sides by new housing and therefore, uses need to be more
compatible with the adjacent residential streets.
7.16.2 The building has an internal area of approximately 1,600m2 at
ground foor and 1,350m at frst foor.
7.16.3 Again large single users would be preferable, however, as the
building has an existing mezzanine a number of smaller, enclosed
spaces could be inserted to form ‘pods’ around a central
communal space.
7.16.4 On this basis the external elevational alternations may be relatively
minor. Below are some examples of potential elevation treatments:
Existing side elevation is 50m long (building
6b only) and has irregular bays in contrast to the
standardised bays elsewhere. High cill heights
to ground foor windows inhibit internal / external
interaction.
Potential new openings formed below existing
window locations to allow increased permeability.
Cills to ground foor windows lowered to allow
greater interaction with internal uses, coupled with
new openings allow will allow greater permeability.
New highly permeable openings formed within
existing modular elevation creating a link to the
central atrium space from which internal spaces
could be accessed.
Former Pattern Makers Shop key plan and sketch sections
Building 6b
7.0 Heritage Core and Chorley New Road Character Area
Rivington Chase Design and Access Statement 45
7.17 Northern Section of Former Erecting Shop
(Building 10)
7.17.1 Internally a 5m wide central aisle runs between columns with
symmetrical, 15m wide workshops to either side. Apart from a
small number of service doors, main access is from the gable
ends. New openings are therefore required to allow for fexible
internal subdivision. The adjacent sketch plan illustrates potential
new openings that will provide access to the heart of the
building creating strong links to the public square and adjacent
development.
7.17.2 The creation of internal ‘cores’ with either open or glazed roof
creates permeability and allows the building to become dual
aspect to the housing beyond. Below are some examples of
potential elevation treatments to enable new openings to be
formed to aid internal subdivision.
Existing side elevation is 163m long and is
modulated following the internal 4.4m structural
grid. High cill heights to ground foor windows
inhibit internal / external interaction.
Potential new openings formed below existing
window locations to allow increased permeability
and internal subdivision. Spandrel panels required
to windows if internal mezzanine is installed.
Single bay main access formed to central core
could allow large users to maintain individual ‘front
doors’. Spandrel panels required to windows if
internal mezzanine is installed.
Double bay main access formed creating link to
internal central atrium space and exposing internal
steel structure.
Building 10
7.0 Heritage Core and Chorley New Road Character Area
46 Rivington Chase Design and Access Statement
7.18 Access and routes
7.18.1 Over the following pages the key access points and routes within
the character area will be described in detail. These include the
primary movement corridors of the proposed north-west, south-
east Central Route, the Heritage Link that connects Gooch Street
to the strategic open space and the development of the existing
access past Rivington House.
7.19 Central Route
7.19.1 A new north west - south east access route will provide a major
corridor through the Rivington Chase development. The scale
and form of the street will evoke the linear quality of the existing
loco works site with residential development accessed directly
off the road, a linear attenuation feature, open space and avenue
tree planting.
7.19.2 There will be active frontages with direct access to the street and
alignment of the development to refect the linear form and scale
of the former works.
7.19.3 The palette of materials used will be refective of the local area
and of the materials used within the existing buildings.
7.19.4 Further details of the road corridor design and its relationship to
the wider infrastructure network are provided in the chapter 11
of this document.
Green Corridor with
SUDs Attenuation
Pedestrian frontage to
resiential development
Residential development with
frontage to the green corridor -
parking courts at rear
Residential
development with
active frontage
Private driveways Pedestrian Links
potentially continue
to the open space
beyond
Pedestrian Links
Central Route key plan
7.0 Heritage Core and Chorley New Road Character Area
Rivington Chase Design and Access Statement 47
7.19.5 The central route aims to act as a point of reference for navigation
within the site, its linear form refects the works linear layout and not
only provides a vehicular road but also a green corridor featuring
a SUDs attenuation feature.
7.19.6 The section below illustrates the scale of the street with residential
development providing direct access onto the central route.
7.19.7 The corridor is defned by a linear edge to the SUDs attenuation
feature and by a front wall or hedge to the plot boundary.
7.19.8 The street is further defned by avenue tree planting running along
the road corridor.
Typical section through Central Route
Large scale water bodies emphasise the linearity of the development
7.0 Heritage Core and Chorley New Road Character Area
48 Rivington Chase Design and Access Statement
7.20 Heritage Link
7.20.1 Historically this route existed as a main pedestrian thoroughfare
for workers to access between the works and the dining room,
cafe, cottage hospital and Chorley New Road.
7.20.2 This link will be re-established as a pedestrian and cycle
connection to connect the proposed development with Gooch
Street and Chorley New road beyond.
7.20.3 Within the development the link will widen into a green corridor
defning the edge of the heritage core to the South East whilst
providing a perpendicular route across the site linking with the
strategic open space beyond.
Existing Building 6B
Shared Surface
homezone within
Heritage core
Parking zones
Residential
development with
direct frontage to
green corridor
Residential
development with
active frontage to
central route
Residential development
with direct access to the
street frontage
Private Driveways
Tree Planting within plots
Green Corridor with tree
planting
Forecourt to existing
building
Gooch Street
Existing Terraced Houses
Former Loco Works Dining Rooms
(not part of this development)
Proposed Pedestrian/cycle
link formed accross Thirlmere
Aqueduct
Central Route
7.0 Heritage Core and Chorley New Road Character Area
Rivington Chase Design and Access Statement 49
7.20.4 The built form facing this corridor will have a frontage refective of
the height and the scale of the existing buildings both within the
Heritage Core and the adjacent terraced streets.
7.20.5 The section above illustrates the character of the street with direct
access to the residential development and a substantial linear
space linking the site entrance to the development.
7.20.6 The open space shown within the streetscape will be multifunctional
providing access, a linear park for residents and areas of on street
car parking.
7.20.7 The housing on the opposite side of the street will incorporate
walls or hedges to defne their boundaries and entrances.
7.0 Heritage Core and Chorley New Road Character Area
50 Rivington Chase Design and Access Statement
7.21 Rivington House Entrance
7.21.1 The Rivington House entrance was the traditional entrance into
the Loco Works from Horwich town centre. The signifcance of
this will be retained with a modifed route becoming the main
entrance into the new development containing provision for
vehicular, pedestrian and cycle users.
7.21.2 The key characteristics created by this entrance:
• Defne the character and setting of the new development
• Enhance the setting of the war memorial and frontage to Chorley
New Road.
7.21.3 Further details of the entrance route design and its relationship
to the wider infrastructure network are provided in chapter 11 of
this document.
Rivington House
Boulevard tree
planting
Proposed
reconfgured junction
to Chorley New Road
Water Tower
Stores Building
Proposed New
Building within
Heritage Core
Shared surface
zone
Proposed New
Building within
Heritage Core
Central Route
Building 10
Erecting Shop
Residential
development
with active street
frontage
Private driveways
War Memorial
SECTION LINE
The character and form of Rivington House
Indicative sketch of the Rivington House Entrance
7.0 Heritage Core and Chorley New Road Character Area
Rivington Chase Design and Access Statement 51
7.22 Phasing options of residential development
adjacent to Heritage Core - Rivington House
Entrance
7.22.1 During the early phases of development there is an option that
some existing industrial businesses are intended to remain in
operation within the former loco sheds.
7.22.2 On this basis consideration has been given to the future
phasing of the residential development adjacent the Heritage
Core.
7.23 Phased Development
• The existing industrial users remain in operation within the
former loco sheds.
• New housing is constructed within the early phase of
development
• Working zone / access roadway to existing building gables is
reduced to 21.5m
• Sacrifcial plot depth is formed between new development and
existing uses.
• 20m landscape buffer zone created on sacrifcial plot depth
including acoustic fencing/screen mounding as necessary
Early Phases - existing industry retained
Later Phases
7.24 Later Phases
• The existing industrial uses relocate. The later phases of the
site are remediated and buildings removed. Heritage Core
buildings retained.
• Sacrifcial landscape buffer zone removed
• A new roadway corridor is formed connecting Rivington House
entrance with the Heritage Core and development site beyond.
• Residential development occupies the former sacrifcial
landscape buffer.
7.0 Heritage Core and Chorley New Road Character Area
52 Rivington Chase Design and Access Statement
7.25 Chorley New Road Area
7.25.1 The information shown over the following pages is intended to
provide guidance on future reserved matters applications on the
residential development within the Conservation Area.
7.25.2 The layout, scale and massing will be designed to refect the
traditional character of the Former Loco Works, with a grid
layout of streets, linear forms and simple uncluttered architectural
treatment. Pastiche and superfcial imitation should be avoided.
7.25.3 Proposed elevation treatments will follow a robust and disciplined
approach. In particular, the proportions, fenestration, materials and
detailing close to the Heritage Core will aim to refect the site’s
heritage, albeit on a reduced scale compared with the original
buildings. Within these general principles a range of ‘stylistic’
approaches is appropriate, from contemporary to traditional.
7.25.4 Residential development will be relatively high density within the
area of the site close to Chorley New Road. The higher density
could also be appropriate for apartments and particular needs
such as a care homes and assisted living, where heights of up
to four storeys might be appropriate. Elsewhere, two and three
storeys are appropriate.
7.25.5 The development layout will provide good permeability along the
north-eastern boundary, creating pedestrian and cycleway links to
the existing terraced housing off Chorley New Road. The Thirlmere
Aqueduct runs close to this boundary and will have a signifcant
impact on the layout of new development.
7.25.6 The following pages describe a hierarchy of street types that will
inform the layout of the Chorley New Road Residential area and
help interpret the character of the Former Loco Works once the
existing buildings have been demolished.
Streets interpreting the character of the former works
Street corners emphasising the linearity of streets
Chorley New Road residential area within the conservation boundary
7.0 Heritage Core and Chorley New Road Character Area
Rivington Chase Design and Access Statement 53
7.26 Primary Streets - Central Route
7.26.1 As described earlier in this chapter, the scale and form of the
Central Route corridor is a key element of the development
that interprets the linearity and character of the former works.
This route is hierarchically the primary street type that links the
character of the Heritage Core with the rest of the Chorley New
Road Residential Area.
7.26.2 The interpretation of the former works character is defned on the
street by the following key elements:
• Formal tree planting that replicates the repetition of the former
works buildings with an avenue of trees planted along the length
of the route.
• Rectilinear attenuation structure that reinforces the linear character
of the street whilst providing a major drainage function for the
development.
• Linear open space created to allow the public to occupy the street
• A uniformity of architecture and plot boundaries that will strengthen
the character of the street and relate to the character and materials
of the former works buildings. Corners and gable ends should be
designed with dual aspect and strong frontages facing the street.
Public space and
attenuation
Uniform materials
and boundaries
Formal avenue tree
planting
Strong linear form with public realm access
Typical sketch plan of the primary central street
7.0 Heritage Core and Chorley New Road Character Area
54 Rivington Chase Design and Access Statement
7.27 Secondary residential streets
7.27.1 The secondary streets within the Chorley New Road area will
continue the design approach of the Central Route but at a
smaller scale.
7.27.2 The street layouts should be straight in nature with right angle
junctions reinforcing the grid layout of the former works. The use
of strong, uniform boundaries to residential plots together with
a uniformity of materials within the streets will further reinforce
the character of the residential area. The key elements within the
secondary streets will be as follows:
• Formal frontage proposed to key corridors and corners with dual
aspect frontages and a range of street facing garden spaces.
Uniformity of elevation and material treatment along street
frontages. Semi-detached / detached residential development.
• Private off street parking and some shared surface parking with
boundary treatments consistent with a uniform use of materials.
• Reduced radius corners to emphasis the grid layout of the
development and shared surface crossing points at the intersection
of streets to reduced traffc speeds and reinforce the public realm.
Shared surface
crossings
Uniform boundaries Feature gable
corners
Formal, uniform boundary treatments
Typical sketch plan of a secondary street
7.0 Heritage Core and Chorley New Road Character Area
Rivington Chase Design and Access Statement 55
7.28 Tertiary residential streets
7.28.1 A range of smaller scale, tertiary streets will form the fner grain of
the area. The character of these streets will refect the previously
established design approach of the larger streets, but on a smaller
scale incorporating home zones and pedestrian priority routes.
The street corridors will follow predominantly straight lines with
areas of direct frontage development and strong plot boundaries
that will emphasis the grid character of the area. The key elements
within the tertiary streets will be as follows:
• There should be a uniformity of elevations along street frontages
with a range of terrace, semi-detached and detached units.
• Buildings to feature gable ends at key corners.
• Shared surface road and pedestrian corridors should be used to
reinforce the scale of the street. Shared surface parking within
designated areas of the streets and spaces.
• Strong boundary treatments to individual plots should be used to
create a unifed street frontage.
• Parking courts with formal frontages.
Uniform boundaries
Shared surfacing
Range of house
types
Shared surface routes and uniform materials
Typical sketch plan of a tertiary street
7.0 Heritage Core and Chorley New Road Character Area
56 Rivington Chase Design and Access Statement
8.0 Northern Development Area
Rivington Chase Design and Access Statement
58 Rivington Chase Design and Access Statement
8.1 Location and context
8.1.1 The housing parcel within the area shown on the adjacent diagram
comprises 18.65 ha of land that slopes from the former Loco
Works plateau in the north east to the confuence of Nellie’s Clough
and Pearl Brook in the west. The northern boundary to the area
bounds Pearl Brook, existing residential areas and St Catherine’s
Church of England primary school. To the south the land overlooks
the proposed strategic open space for the development and the
Red Moss SSSI.
8.1.2 Within this area the approach to character, layout and scale of
development responds to the varying constraints and opportunities
that have been created by the historic use of the land and by its
geographical context.
8.0 Northern Development Area
Location Plan in the context of the wider development
Rivington Chase Design and Access Statement 59
8.2 Historic use, ground conditions and slopes
8.2.1 Historically the area was occupied by rail sidings that served the
Loco Works on the upper plateau of the site to the south and east.
In order to overcome the substantial level changes in the site, the
sidings were constructed on made ground running from west to
east traversing the natural slope of the land and connecting into
the main rail line to the west.
8.2.2 This area of made ground, created by the disposal of arisings
from railway engineering operations, has a major bearing on the
approach to development from an accessibility and construction
point of view. The remediation strategy for the development
is set out in appendix chapter C of this document and in the
supplementary documentation that forms part of the planning
application.
8.3 Water courses (Pearl Brook and Nellie’s Clough)
8.3.1 The water courses that fow adjacent to the north, west and south
boundaries of the area have an infuence over the location and
extent of development.
8.3.2 The low lying land and water courses to the south and west of the
area form part of the strategic open space for the development.
8.4 Services
8.4.1 A number of strategic services run through this area of the site
constraining the location and extent of development in certain
areas. The primary services constraint identifed at this stage is
the Nellie’s Clough culvert which runs south east to north west
through the area connecting into Pearl Brook.
8.5 Views and orientation
8.5.1 The west sloping character of the land creates a unique
opportunity within the development for housing to take advantage
of the views and orientation of the site. Housing in this area will
have far reaching views to the west with additional prominent
views to high ground and Rivington Pike in the north and east.
8.6 Informal character
8.6.1 The orientation and lie of the land in this area of the site lends itself
to an informal character, that can take advantage of the views
and develop a successful interface with the open space and
footpath network that surround it. The area is less constrained
by historic layouts and uses which enables an informal character
to be developed that directly contrasts with the formality of the
Former Loco Works buildings to the east.
8.7 Access to Horwich town centre, open space and
footpath network
8.7.1 A key infuence over the layout and form of development in this
area is the proximity of the strategic open space that lies to the
south and west. An important attribute will be the successful
interface and connection of the housing with the open space
enabling it to engage with, overlook and protect the main areas
of amenity and ecological space.
8.7.2 At its north, east and west boundaries, the land has direct footpath
links to Horwich town centre in the east and to Blackrod Station
in the west. The layout and form of development will need to
enhance this existing network to provide improved access to and
from each of these locations.
8.0 Northern Development Area
60 Rivington Chase Design and Access Statement
8.8 Masterplan principles
8.8.1 The location and characteristics of the existing site have a major
infuence over the principles associated with development in this
area. The physical constraints over development together with
the opportunities of the site’s topography, orientation and location
create an area of land that has three key attributes associated
with its development:
• 1. Informal character to take advantage of the views and slopes
within the development area
• 2. A range of development frontages that engage with the open
spaces and movement corridors within and adjacent to the
development
• 3. A comprehensive, sustainable, access and route network that
will permeate the development providing links to the adjacent
open space, town centre and Blackrod Station
Network Rail
Land
Strategic
Open Space
Horwich
Town Centre
8.0 Northern Development Area
Rivington Chase Design and Access Statement 61
8.9 Character
8.9.1 An informal development character will be created to exploit the
views and fully engage with the open space and route network
surrounding it. This approach will provide a contrast to the formality
of the Heritage Core and Heritage Residential Area to the east,
with an open development character incorporating fowing road
corridors and development frontages that engage with streets
and open spaces.
8.9.2 Development will be of a lower density to refect the informal
character, with open front and back garden spaces set back from
street frontages.
8.9.3 The development character will have a fner grain in the centre
where it will follow the main road corridor through the development.
Towards the south and west boundaries where development
overlooks the open space, the layout will be more open to create
a sensitive interface with the open space.
8.9.4 To the northern boundary the development interfaces with the
Pearl Brook corridor a proposed area of woodland and adjacent
housing.
8.9.5 A number of existing trees are located to the north boundary
which, where appropriate, will be incorporated into the housing
development that surrounds them.
8.10 Frontages
8.10.1 The development frontages to open space will be a major
characteristic of the area with housing overlooking the amenity
spaces to the south, directly overlooking street fronts and
engaging with the pedestrian and cycle network.
8.10.2 At these points housing will be set back from the street frontage
to provide a sensitive interface between development and open
space. This approach enables the development to exploit the
views to the west over the open space and Red Moss SSSI as
well as to provide a high level of passive surveillance, to open
spaces and movement corridors.
8.11 Access and Routes
8.11.1 A range of routes will be developed within the area to create a
highly permeable movement network with access to Horwich
town centre, Blackrod Station and to the strategic open space
and footpath network.
8.11.2 A number of characteristics will infuence the route network:
• Street frontages will be directly accessible for housing enabling
streets and footpath routes to engage with the surrounding
development.
• A hierarchy of road types will create a clear and legible mapping
of the area allowing residents and visitors to orientate themselves
within the development.
• A further layer of pedestrian routes will connect into the
surrounding footpath network and open spaces to link Horwich
into the development in the north east and west and to link the
wider areas of the development together.
8.0 Northern Development Area
Character area extents Key frontages to streets and open spaces Strategic road, pedestrian and cycle routes
62 Rivington Chase Design and Access Statement
8.12 Main Road Corridor
8.12.1 The primary road corridor through the area will have a major
infuence on the character and layout of the surrounding housing.
The road will provide a link from the entrance at Crown Lane to the
Heritage Core, with further connections through to the remaining
areas of the development and Middlebrook to the east.
8.12.2 The street corridor has been developed to enable housing to
directly engage with the street frontage with driveway access. On
street cycling enables the footpaths on either side of the road to
be kept to minimum widths, which in turn creates a better scale
of street, with strong garden boundaries working to enhance the
character of the street alongside avenue tree planting.
8.12.3 The tree planting will line the carriageway on both sides of the
street to create an informal character with a uniform frontage for
development. The continuity created by the scale and character
of the trees, will enable a range of development typologies to be
constructed along the length of the street, without detracting from
the character and identity of the area as a whole.
8.0 Northern Development Area
Indicative, primary road corridor section through the
residential area
Rivington Chase Design and Access Statement 63
8.13 Frontage development
8.13.1 Development overlooking open space will have direct access
from street frontages providing views, enhancing movement and
increasing passive surveillance of the space.
8.13.2 There will be a range of frontages within the area with the most
important facing the strategic open space on the south and
west boundaries. Along these edges the open space varies in
character and use with a variety of habitat types and amenity
uses associated with it.
8.13.3 The character of development along the key open space frontages
will be informal, with street frontages allowing access and
providing pedestrian and cycle routes along the edge.
8.13.4 Housing will be set back from the street front, with a strong use
of garden boundaries to create continuity within the streetscape.
8.13.5 Further street tree planting will be used where appropriate to
enhance the character of the surrounding open space. The housing
along these edges will be of a lower density and predominantly
detached in typology, to emphasise the informal character of the
area and provide a suitable interface to the adjacent open space.
8.0 Northern Development Area
Indicative section through
development facing onto public
open space
64 Rivington Chase Design and Access Statement
8.14 Typical Residential development
8.14.1 The informal character of the development in this area will be
refected in the typology and layout of housing used within the
individual development plots. A range of house types will be used
with predominantly detached houses arranged along streets that
connect into the wider movement network.
8.14.2 Densities will vary within the development area with lower, more
open grain of development to the edges where housing provides
an interface to the strategic open space of the development.
Towards the centre, and along key street frontages, the density
will increase to enhance the character and form of the streetscape.
8.14.3 A hierarchy of street types will create smaller scale character areas
within the wider area derived from the surrounding site context
and spaces. Some key characteristics of the housing within this
area will be as follows and as illustrated on the adjacent sketch:
• A range of building typologies with predominantly detached
houses
• Direct access to street frontages through driveway entrances
• Strong garden boundaries to enhance the streetscape
• Use of different characteristics to develop individual identities
throughout the development
• Street tree planting used where appropriate to enhance the
streetscape
8.0 Northern Development Area
Strategic
Open Space
Residential
development
overlooking public
space
Attenuation
water body
Shared surface street Pedestrian routes
to public space
Indicative sketch plan showing residential
development overlooking strategic open
space
Section line
9.0 Moss Overlook
Rivington Chase Design and Access Statement
66 Rivington Chase Design and Access Statement
9.1 Location and context
9.1.1 The housing area within Moss Overlook comprises over 10 ha of
land to the south west of the Heritage Core and Chorley New Road
Character Area. The land is bounded to the west by woodland
within the strategic open space.
9.1.2 The levels drop sharply at this point to a series of historic rail
embankments and open land that forms the boundary to the Red
Moss SSSI that lies further to the west. The land is crossed by a
number of key movement corridors with the primary road corridor
from Aspinall Way crossing the site in the south east, the Heritage
Link providing a major pedestrian and cycle route and a further
pedestrian link from the Heritage Core to the north.
9.1.3 There are a wide range of attributes that infuence the character
and layout of development which are derived from the historic
use of the site together with the form and orientation of the land.
Details of these attributes are provided on the following pages:
9.0 Moss Overlook
Location Plan in the context of the wider development
Rivington Chase Design and Access Statement 67
9.2 Historic use and ground conditions
9.2.1 This area of the site consists of made ground created as the
loco works plateau expanded towards the south and west. The
resultant ground conditions within this area have infuenced the
layout and type of development, leading towards a more informal
character with lower densities, and housing set back from the edge
of the development boundary. In addition, a number of historic
services and drainage lines cross the site, creating constraints for
development and residential densities.
9.3 Elevation and views
9.3.1 The location of the area, to the west of the Former Works plateau
and elevated above the Red Moss SSSI enables development to
exploit the views into the Chorley New Road Character area, the
strategic open space and to the wider views in the west.
9.3.2 This approach will be carefully balanced to partially screen long
range views into the site from the east with an overall effect of
improving the existing view of the Loco Works and its surrounding
industrial curtilage.
9.4 Proximity to the Heritage Core and open space
network
9.4.1 A major attribute of the area is its proximity to the Heritage Core in
the east and to the wider area of strategic open space to the west.
Connections to the Heritage Core will enable residents to access
the central hub of the development together with further links to
the centre of Horwich. Connections through the development
into the strategic open space provide a key link with routes to the
amenity and ecology spaces in the west.
9.5 Informal, lower density approach
9.5.1 The position of the land on the edge of the development leads to
a more informal, lower density character that creates a sensitive
interface with the adjacent ecological zones and open spaces.
This informal approach will also accentuate the contrast between
the more formal Chorley New Road Character Area development
in the east.
9.0 Moss Overlook
68 Rivington Chase Design and Access Statement
9.6 Masterplan principles
9.6.1 The physical attributes of the land in this area have had a direct
infuence over the design principles associated with it.
9.6.2 The ground conditions created by the historic use of the site, the
position and orientation of the land on the edge of the development
and the accessibility of the land to strategic open space result in
three main design principles for the area:
• Views and access to open space – the area is located to exploit
the views to the open space beyond and act as a key open space
interface for the development.
• Ecological buffer
• Character of development – the development will respond to the
underlying ground conditions and create a sensitive boundary to
the adjacent strategic open space
9.6.3 As a result of these characteristics the housing will have be lower
density with a more informal layout containing larger houses and
larger gardens.
Moss
Overlook
Strategic
Open Space
Horwich
Town Centre
9.0 Moss Overlook
Rivington Chase Design and Access Statement 69
9.7 Views and Access
9.7.1 The development area has a key role to play as a ‘soft interface’
into the strategic open space and the wider pedestrian and
cycle network. A number of key routes are provided within the
development area to incorporate movement and to connect into
the wider movement network.
9.7.2 The main pedestrian and cycle link is the Heritage Link which
connects through the heart of the development between Gooch
Street and the strategic open space. Further east - west links are
provided at the main access road corridor from Aspinall Street
and from the main entrance that passes the Heritage Core at the
north of the site.
9.7.3 In all cases pedestrian and road corridors will have development
fronting onto them providing overlooked, active spaces that are
fully integrated with the development.
9.9 Character
9.9.1 The informal character of the development area will directly
contrast to the formality of the adjacent Heritage Core and Chorley
New Road Character Area.
9.9.2 The development will have a lower density with a predominant use
of detached house types with defned front garden boundaries
and rear gardens.
9.9.3 As part of the reserved matters applications, individual character
areas will be created that respond to the physical characteristics of
the site with housing to the west exploiting the views and adjacent
woodland, smaller housing plots incorporating views to the open
space, and housing to the east contrasting with the formality of
the Chorley New Road Character Area.
9.7.4 The further attribute of the development area is its location on
higher ground, with views and proximity to the woodland and
open space to the west.
9.7.5 The development layouts and character will take a sensitive
approach to this location, with lower densities and set back rear
gardens to the open space and woodland, whilst exploiting the
views out over the Red Moss SSSI and beyond. The layout and
density of development further to the east, will be higher with a
fner grain following streets with views to the wider landscape
exploited along east – west movement corridors and breaks in
development.
9.8 Ecological buffer
9.8.1 The Red Moss SSSI and SBI are located to the western boundary
of the residential area and have a major infuence on the location
and layout of the development within the site. A key consideration
is for the development to have no detrimental impact on the
adjacent habitats with no harmful hydrological impact and a
substantial ecological buffer provided to protect them.
9.0 Moss Overlook
70 Rivington Chase Design and Access Statement
9.10 Typical Residential development
9.10.1 The layout, scale and massing of housing will reflect the
informal character of the area and its location on the edge of
the development site, adjacent to the strategic open space and
woodland.
9.10.2 Overall, development will be of a lower density with predominantly
detached house types set along a hierarchy of streets that connect
into the wider movement network. The design and layout of streets
will be informal in character, with the housing developed to relate
to the surrounding materials and vernacular of Horwich.
9.10.3 Strong front garden boundaries, street trees and driveway
access will be used to emphasise the character and form of the
streetscape. Some key characteristics of the housing within this
area will be as follows:
• A range of building typologies
• Direct access to street frontages through driveway entrances
• Strong garden boundaries to enhance the streetscape
• Use of different characteristics to develop individual identities
throughout the development
• Street tree planting
9.0 Moss Overlook
Rivington Chase Design and Access Statement 71
9.11 Heritage Link and Open Space interface
9.11.1 The Heritage Link provides an important open space interface
and corridor for the development, with a connection from the
Chorley New Road Character area in the east to the strategic
open space in the west.
9.11.2 The form and layout of development in this area will engage
with the Heritage Link route, providing direct access onto it with
a combination of pedestrian, cycle and low intensity vehicular
access.
9.11.3 Although informal in character, the housing along this route will
refect the heritage of the site and relate to the housing within the
Chorley New Road Character area, with a strong use of garden
boundaries.
9.11.4 Further to the west, the route descends down an existing cutting
from the development level to the woodland and open space
beyond. The character of the route will change along this transition
with a more formal, tree lined, street layout in the east passing
into woodland and glades further to the west.
9.11.5 The surfacing and design of the route itself will remain consistent
from the entrance off Gooch Street in the east, with a distinct
character that emphasises both the heritage of the Former Loco
Works and the development of the site as a new residential
9.0 Moss Overlook
Heritage
Link
Pedestrian / Cycle route
through existing cutting
Residential
street / square
Strategic open space
and woodland
Residential
development
overlooking
public space
Residential development joining the Heritage Link and strategic open
space to the south
72 Rivington Chase Design and Access Statement
9.0 Moss Overlook
community.
9.12 Small scale, low density development
9.12.1 The location of this housing parcel, on a former rail embankment,
adjacent to the former works reservoir and close to the habitats
and amenity of the strategic open space gives it a unique position
within the development.
9.12.2 The layout and massing of housing within the plot is sensitively
designed to exploit this position with low density, detached
housing arranged to face out onto the reservoir and provide a
‘soft interface’ with the adjacent open space and habitats.
9.12.3 Road frontage will provide access from the north and connect into
the wider pedestrian and cycle network through the open space.
The use of strong garden boundaries will be used to enhance the
character of the area and defne the boundary between private
gardens and the public spaces beyond.
Residential development
overlooking the public space
Public space adjacent to
the existing reservoir
Existing
reservoir and
building
Residential development overlooking the existing
reservoir complex
10.0 Southern Employment Area
Rivington Chase Design and Access Statement
74 Rivington Chase Design and Access Statement
10.1 Location and context
10.1.1 The employment land to the south east of the development
consists of 4.16 ha located on either side of the proposed primary
access into the site from Aspinall Way (Middlebrook). The existing
land is largely scrub woodland with boundaries constrained to the
east by the existing commercial development at Middlebrook, and
to the west by the former landfll site and Red Moss SSSI. The
land rises at the northern boundary making a steep transition to
the upper level of the Former Loco works plateau.
10.1.2 It forms an important gateway to the whole development from
Aspinall Way. The design, layout and massing of development
within this area will be particularly important in defning the quality
of the development that follows. There are a number of physical
attributes in and adjacent to the area that infuence the layout of
the development.
10.0 Southern Employment Area
Location Plan in the context of the wider development
Rivington Chase Design and Access Statement 75
10.2 Ground conditions and slopes
10.2.1 The land is in a low lying area of the site over a layer of peat,
with a water course, underground services, and wetland areas
within it. The Middlebrook water course fows through the centre
of the area before discharging into the wetland area in the south
east corner of the site (details of this can be found in the Flood
Risk Assessment). Further underground services cross the site
following Moss Brook water course and the northern boundary
to the area. The peat layer depth and ground bearing properties
have a major bearing on the approach taken to the development
of the site. This combined with the existing drainage conditions
create challenging conditions that infuence the layout and location
of both the development and the proposed road access from
Aspinall Way.
10.3 Ecological buffer
10.3.1 The Red Moss SSSI and SBI are located to the western boundary
of the employment land and have a major infuence on the location
and layout of the development within the site. A key consideration
is for the development to have no detrimental impact on the
adjacent habitats with no harmful hydrological impact and a
substantial ecological buffer provided to protect them.
10.4 Strategic location (in relation to Middlebrook)
10.4.1 The employment land is strategically located to work with the
adjacent Middlebrook development with uses that can compliment
and enhance the Middlebrook offer. The provision of a main
access road into the site at this location will enhance this position,
creating a gateway and allow access into the employment land
from the south-east, as well as from the residential development
to the north.
10.5 Low lying (visual impact perspective)
10.5.1 The location of the employment land in the low lying areas of
the site has the beneft of reducing the visual impact that larger
massing and building heights will produce. The development
land, located to the north-east of the former landfll site and south
of the upper plateau will be largely screened from view from the
wider landscape. This will be further enhanced by the provision of
new woodland buffer planting to the east and west boundaries.
10.0 Southern Employment Area
76 Rivington Chase Design and Access Statement
10.6 Masterplan principles
10.6.1 The entrance into the site from Aspinall Way provides an important
gateway into the development. The design and layout of the
buildings that line the access road will reinforce this position,
producing a high quality corridor from Middlebrook to the upper
residential areas of Rivington Chase. The approach to this area
follows two main principles derived from the physical attributes
of the site, and from the location of the land and the adjacent
land uses.
• Entrance, character and relationship to Middlebrook and
complimentary types of development.
• Environmental buffer to the SSSI.
Employment
Land
Strategic
Open Space
Horwich
Town Centre
10.0 Southern Employment Area
Rivington Chase Design and Access Statement 77
10.7 Character & access
10.7.1 The character of the employment / D1 area will play a key role in
establishing the setting for the wider development and its entrance
from the south. The character of the area will be defned by the
tree lined road corridor and water course that links into the site
from the entrance at Aspinall Way.
10.7.2 The layout and massing of built development will address the road
and watercourse with a fner grain of buildings of up to 4 storeys
lining the road frontage.
10.7.3 Larger scale development may be set back in the plot to the east
and west with main car parking and service areas potentially set
back behind buildings, away from the road frontage.
10.7.4 The employment / D1 plots are designed to allow for a wide range
of development types with a fexible approach tailored to the
changing needs of the commercial market in the future.
10.7.5 A number of important pedestrian and cycle routes cross the area
connecting into the wider movement network for the development.
A strategic pedestrian and cycle route follows the main access
road connecting into Middlebrook to the east. Further pedestrian
footpaths link into the site from the woodland and open space to
the north and south.
10.7.6 SUDs ponds and wetland planting will enhance the setting of the
development whilst providing additional drainage and attenuation
for the site.
10.8 Environmental buffer zones
10.8.1 A 30m wide woodland buffer will be located to the west of the
employment land, enhancing the matrix of habitats on the site,
and providing a further layer of protection for the Red Moss SSSI
and SBI. This area of land connects into the wider strategic open
space, linking with the existing woodland to the north and with
the scrub woodland on the former landfll site to the south.
10.8.2 The existing watercourse within the employment zone, land has
been sensitively integrated into the main movement corridor to
provide an improved area of habitat and an important setting for
the development.
10.0 Southern Employment Area
78 Rivington Chase Design and Access Statement
10.9 Main road corridor
10.9.1 The alignment of the road corridor and the development alongside
it have been carefully considered to provide a sensitive interface
with the existing watercourse, create flexible commercial
development plots and to provide an important setting and
entrance for the development.
10.9.2 A carriageway width of 7.3m with capacity for larger commercial
vehicles is set within avenue tree planting and a segregated 3m
wide pedestrian and cycle route that follows the line of Middle
Brook to Aspinall Way before linking into the wider movement
network.
10.9.3 Development will face the road, set behind tree planting and the
watercourse to create an informal but defned streetscape. Front
boundaries will be kept to a minimum to enhance the streetscape
with main service areas and car parking set back behind the
building frontage.
10.0 Southern Employment Area
Indicative section showing the acces road from Aspinall Way
into the employment land.
Rivington Chase Design and Access Statement 79
10.10 Environmental buffer zone
10.10.1 The ecological buffer zone to the west boundary of the employment
land forms part of a wider strategy of ecological enhancement
measures on the site. Details of the strategy are provided in the
ecology and open space chapter of this report.
10.10.2 The design and location of the buffer zone in relation to the
employment land plays an important role in protecting the adjacent
SSSI and SBI and in establishing the setting of the development
within the landscape. The design and detail of this proposal has
been the subject of pre-application discussion and consultation.
10.10.3 The woodland planting, together with the low lying land that the
development occupies will minimise the impact of the larger scale
and massing of buildings.
10.10.4 Over time the woodland buffer will develop to form a cohesive
network that connects into the existing woodland to the north
and into the developing woodland on the former landfll site in
the south.
10.10.5 The adjacent section shows details of the relationship and levels
between the woodland buffer zone and the adjacent development
land.
10.10.6 Further screening and buffer woodland planting is provided to
the east boundary of the development. This area will follow the
principles established above and will further enhance the setting
and integration of the development within the wider structural
landscape.
10.10.7 The enhancement of the existing watercourse and the landscape
corridor that it occupies is intrinsically related to the design
approach taken for the road corridor and overall setting of the
development. The section provided earlier in the chapter sets
out the principles associated with the corridor demonstrating the
sensitive approach taken to enhancing the habitat of the water
course and connecting it into the wider matrix of habitats.
10.0 Southern Employment Area
80 Rivington Chase Design and Access Statement
10.11 Typical development
10.11.1 The scale, massing and layout of development will be defned by
the setting of the main access road from Aspinall Way. A fner grain
of commercial buildings will be aligned to create a frontage onto
the road, with car parking set behind the buildings to enhance
the defnition of the streetscape.
10.11.2 Larger scale commercial units will be located behind smaller
scale development that faces the road corridor. This allows for a
fexible approach to be taken to the individual plot layouts within
the wider, structural landscape framework.
10.11.3 Additional structural planting will be provided within individual
plots, to further enhance the setting of the development and the
relationship to adjacent development and landscape corridors.
10.11.4 A minimum number of access points will provide access into
the plots, reducing the impact on the watercourse corridor and
retaining continuity to the streetscape frontage.
10.11.5 Drainage for the development is provided in large part by an
attenuation layer set below the individual development plots with
additional drainage provided by a SUDs pond and wetland that
connects into the existing water course. Further details of the
drainage strategy are provided within the hydrology chapter.
10.0 Southern Employment Area
Indicative
employment
development
Car parking and
service yards set
behind development
Road link to
Aspinall Way
Water course
corridor
Sketch plan showing employment development in the south of the site
11.0 Access
Rivington Chase Design and Access Statement
82 Rivington Chase Design and Access Statement
Existing roads network context plan
C
h
o
rle
y
N
e
w
R
o
a
d
D
e
H
a
villa
n
d
W
a
y
Horwich Town Centre
Red Moss SSSI
Former Horwich Loco Works
Middlebrook Business,
Retail & Leisure Park
M
6
1

M
o
t
o
r
w
a
y Horwich Parkway Station
Blackrod Station
North
A
s
p
in
a
ll
W
a
y
C
ro
w
n
L
a
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e
11.0 Access Strategy
Rivington Chase Design and Access Statement 83
11.1 Overview
11.1.1 The site is well located to the primary road network. The A635
Chorley New Road runs immediately to the north east of the
site. Chorley New Road links Horwich to Bolton to the east and
Chorley to the north west. The A6027 De Havilland Way runs to
the south east of the site and links Chorley New Road with the
strategic road network at junction 6 of the M61 and to the A6.
The A6 Blackrod Bypass runs close to the southwestern portion
of the site.
11.2 Strategic Approach
11.2.1 The strategic approach to accessing the Loco Works site, has
been to provide a series of accesses, which link to the primary
roads in the area and use these roads for the purpose that they
currently provide to distribute traffc across the wider area. The
increases in traffc fows on these roads and on the approaches
to these roads are likely to necessitate improvements to key
junctions. In this regard the junction between Chorley New Road
and De-Havilland Way (known as the Beehive Roundabout) is a
particularly important location.
11.2.2 A strategic decision was taken early in the design process to
discourage through traffc. The reasons for this are because, frstly
it is not necessary in Highways terms and secondly because of
the extent of the site that would be sterilised and the impact it
would have on the heritage core.
11.2.3 Technical analysis has also shown it would not be possible to
provide junctions of suffcient capacity at the site accesses or on
key approaches to the primary road network, to accommodate
signifcantly higher fows of traffc than those generated internally
on the site.
11.2.4 In this context the driving factor to road corridor design
within the site is to serve the site itself and not to
accommodate through traffc. Manual for Streets is therefore
the starting point for design considerations not the Design Manual
for Roads and Bridges. Bolton MBC’s own design guidance is out
of date in this context although the Council’s draft SPD document
“Accessibility, Transport and Road Safety” acknowledges the
importance of the Manual for Streets approach in future highway
provision within the Borough.
11.2.5 Other strategic access and transport considerations to the design
and layout of the site have been;
• Horwich Parkway and Blackrod Railway stations
• Bus provision at Middlebrook and on Chorley New Road
• Employment, services, retail and leisure in Horwich town centre
• Employment, services, retail and leisure in Middlebrook


Figure 1 Potential New Bus Service Route
M61 Junction 6
roundabout
Spirit of Sport
roundabout
De Havilland Way / Mansell
Way traffic signals
Loco Works Access
Chorley New Road /
Mason Street traffic signals
Chorley New Road /
Crown Lane junction
De Havilland Way /
A6 roundabout
Horwich Loco
Works Site
A6 Blackrod Bypass / Station
Road (Crown Lane) traffic signals
Lostock Lane / Cranfield
Road traffic signals
Armstrong's Access onto
Chorley New Road
Aspinall Way / Burnden
Way roundabout
De Havilland Way /
New Road roundabout
Chorley
Crown Lane
Vale Avenue
Lee Lane
Winter Hey Lane
Longworth Road
Pennine Road
Lever Park Avenue
Victoria Road
Chorley New
Road Claypool Road
Dedicated bus
link through to
Mansell Way
Burnden Way
Link to Horwich
Parkway
Weekday survey
location
Weekday & weekend
survey location
KEY
Possible bus route strategy (refer to text overleaf)
11.0 Access Strategy
84 Rivington Chase Design and Access Statement
1 2
3
4
5
Proposed road corridor
- Vehicles and on road
cycling
Existing buildings retained
Proposed road corridor -
bus and cycle access
Strategic open space and
landscape
Proposed combined
pedestrian / cycle path
Existing and proposed
waterbodies
Existing footpath
retained
Existing
watercourses
Proposed footpath
Development area
Planning application
boundary
11.0 Access Strategy
Rivington Chase Design and Access Statement 85
11.3 Overview
11.3.1 The access strategy for the site has been developed from the
strategic principles, and follows closely the high level work which
informed the Core Strategy and SPD.
11.3.2 This section of the report should be read in conjunction with
the Access and Movement Parameters Plan, and the illustrative
access plan shown opposite.
11.4 Roads - Private Vehicles
11.4.1 There will be 4 private vehicular access points into the site as
referenced below on the plan opposite.
• 1. Rivington House Access (Existing Loco Works Industrial
Estate access to Chorley New Road) – priority or signal
controlled junction.
• 2. Existing Armstrong access to Chorley New Road – priority or
signal controlled junction.
• 3. New access to Aspinall Way at Middlebrook – traffc signals,
this is important for the owners Orbit/Emerson Group who want
the fow of traffc into Middlebrook controlled at times when
traffc queues build up on Burnden Way.
• 4. New access to Crown Lane – priority junction.
11.4.2 All four locations were directly specifed in the SPD. The primary
function of the two accesses to Chorley New Road and the Crown
Lane access will be to serve light vehicles associated with the
residential development and Heritage Core with some use by
buses. They will also provide a high quality pedestrian and cycle
access.
11.4.3 The access to Aspinall Way would also serve the employment
land and as such its use by heavy goods vehicles has also been
a consideration in its design.
11.5 Public Transport Provision
11.5.1 There is an inherently high level of accessibility by bus in the
location of the former Loco Works site. Middlebrook is served by
a number of bus services and there is a high frequency service
on Chorley New Road.
11.5.2 Future bus access to the Loco Works site is likely to include
the diversion of a number of these existing services through the
site. Further enhancements to existing services will be agreed in
consultation with the Council and operators.
11.5.3 A possible bus route strategy is shown at the start of this chapter.
11.5.4 To assist in the provision of these bus services a ffth access point
would be provided into the site from an extension of Mansell Way
in Middlebrook (No. 5 on the plan opposite). This would be a
public transport, walking and cycling link and is likely to include
a form of positive control such as a barrier or bollards to control
vehicular use.
11.5.5 Horwich Parkway and Blackrod Stations both have frequent
services to Manchester, Bolton, Chorley and Preston. Wider
connections are available at these stations particularly in
Manchester and Preston. Horwich Parkway has a large park and
ride facility although it is envisaged the main modes of access to
the station would be by walking, cycling and bus.
11.5.6 There is likely to be some enhancement to services on this line
when it is electrifed. Work on electrifcation is due to start next
year and will take two or three years to complete.
11.6 Pedestrian and Cycle access
11.6.1 The development will be as permeable as possible for movement
by walking and cycling. Key links within the site connecting the
Heritage Core, employment areas, strategic open space, Horwich
town centre, Middlebrook, Parklands, Crown Lane and the two
railway stations will form part of a comprehensive pedestrian and
cycle network.
11.6.2 In line with Manual for Streets the movement corridors within
the site would be designed to accommodate vehicles, cyclists
and pedestrians with as little segregation as possible. Further
details on the hierarchy of streets that will be created within the
development are illustrated on the following pages.
11.6.3 A traditional segregation between vehicles and pedestrians
will be provided for the majority of road corridors with cycling
accomodated within the carriageway.
11.6.4 There would also be dedicated facilities for cyclists on the route
to Aspinall Way in Middlebrook.
11.6.5 Further off-road cycle and pedestrian links will be provided within
the strategic open space to connect into specifc areas of the
development.
11.6.6 Externally to the site there is also the opportunity to provide a
pedestrian / cycle route to the town centre utilising an existing
bridge under Chorley New Road although the land required for
this is outside the developers control.
11.0 Access Strategy
86 Rivington Chase Design and Access Statement
11.7 Rivington House Access
11.7.1 The form of this junction (number 1 on the plan opposite) would
be much as there today serving the existing Loco Works site. The
carriageway would be narrowed and footways provided on both
sides of the road. Cyclists would use the carriageway and there
is likely to be some use by buses.
11.7.2 The junction itself could either be priority controlled as it is now
or traffc signal controlled. Traffc signals would provide better
pedestrian crossing facilities but would introduce delay to
through traffc including the primary bus service between Bolton
and Horwich. A priority junction would not provide the same
level of pedestrian crossing provision although there are existing
crossing facilities on Chorley New Road. There would also be the
opportunity to provide a traffc free link in to the town centre as
referenced above.
11.7.3 The existing cycle lanes on Chorley New Road in this location
would be maintained.
1
2
4
3
1. Rivington House Access 2. Second access to Chorley New Road
3. New access to Aspinall Way at Middlebrook 4. New north west access to Crown Lane
11.0 Access Strategy
Rivington Chase Design and Access Statement 87
11.9 North West Access
11.9.1 This would be a new access (number 3 on the plan opposite)
constructed on land to the northeast of the M61 embankment.
A dedicated lane for right turning traffc into the site would be
provided on Crown Lane and the junction would be priority
controlled.
11.9.2 Footways would be provided on both sides of the road. Cyclists
would use the carriageway and there is likely to be some use by
buses.
11.9.3 Pedestrians and cyclists would use this junction to access
Blackrod station and Horwich Town Centre.
11.10 Aspinall Way Access
11.10.1 This access (number 4 on the plan opposite) would be located
to the east of the Futura Park access on Aspinall Way. A
number of forms of this junction have been considered including
a roundabout which would be consistent with many existing
junctions within Middlebrook.
11.10.2 It has however been determined that a traffc signal junction would
be the most appropriate form for this access. A signalled junction
would provide better pedestrian crossing facilities and allow traffc
fows from the Loco Works site to be managed.
11.10.3 The road into the Loco Works site from this access would
accommodate all forms of traffc including heavy goods vehicles.
As such the carriageway would be wider at 7.3m and there would
be segregated cycle facilities on the section of the road leading to
Aspinall Way. These would link into the existing shared segregated
cycle facilities on the Aspinall Way footways.
11.10.4 Notwithstanding this, the road design would still follow many
of the principles of Manual for Streets including the provision of
levels of forward visibility commensurate with traffc speeds of no
more than 30 mph.
11.10.5 There is a level difference between Middlebrook and Loco
Works site and one of the requirements of this access road is to
accommodate this level change. As such a section of the road
would be at a gradient of about 1:14.
11.8 The Armstrongs Access
11.8.1 The form of this junction (number 2 on the plan opposite)
would be much as there today serving the existing Armstrongs
Environmental site. The carriageway would be designed in line
with the sections provided on the following pages with footways
provided on both sides of the road. Cyclists would use the
carriageway and it is likely to be used by buses in the future.
11.8.2 The junction itself could either be priority controlled as it is now
or traffc signal controlled. Traffc signals would provide better
pedestrian crossing facilities but would introduce new delay to
through traffc including the primary bus service between Bolton
and Horwich. There are existing crossing facilities on Chorley
New Road.
11.0 Access Strategy
88 Rivington Chase Design and Access Statement
Rivington Chase Design and Access Statement 89
11.11 Hierarchy of Streets
11.11.1 A comprehensive road network will connect the four main access
points identifed in the preceding pages to the core residential and
employment areas. The adjacent diagram sets out the primary
route network within the development. In addition to this, a wider
hierarchy of secondary, tertiary and pedestrian / cycle routes
provide a movement network throughout the development.
11.11.2 As set out in the strategic approach described above the access
strategy follows the principles sets out in Manual For Streets (MfS)
to create a network of interconnected streets that provide linkages
to the wider setting of Horwich and the surrounding countryside
and a high degree of permeability throughout the development
area and its strategic open space.
11.11.3 Three of the areas where MfS deviates signifcantly from vehicular
based highway design are carriageway width, provision for cyclists
and vehicular frontage access.
11.11.4 In terms of carriageway width, MfS shows that at a width of 5.9m
a carriageway can accommodate a two way fow of large vehicles.
On the main movement corridors within the site a carriageway
width of 6.4m is proposed which will clearly accommodate large
vehicles albeit at a reduced width from a typical “road” width of
7.3m. The exception to this is the Aspinall Way access which will
be 7.3m wide as it serves the employment areas.
11.11.5 In terms of cycling sections 6.4 of MfS provides guidance and is
based on accommodating cyclists on the carriageway rather than
on adjacent cycle tracks. This is the approach adopted across
the site. There are a number of other key cycle links which are
detailed towards the end of the report.
11.11.6 In terms of frontage access section 7.9 of MfS recommends that
frontage access is provided on roads that carry less than 10,000
vehicles per day (vpd). Previous thinking recommended the limit
for road with frontage access was 3,000 vpd. It is very unlikely that
any of the internal roads in the site would carry fows in excess
of 10,000vpd.
11.11.7 The following pages set out the principles associated with a
number of key primary routes through the development together
with descriptions of the design principles for secondary and tertiary
streets alongside the approach to a range of ‘off-road’ pedestrian
and cycle routes.
2
3
4
1
6
5
1. Central Route
2. Rivington House Entrance
3. North West Route
4. Aspinall Way, Southern Access Route
5. Mansell Way Link (Bus, pedestrian and cycle link only)
6. Existing Armstrongs Access Route
11.0 Access Strategy
90 Rivington Chase Design and Access Statement
11.12 Central Route
11.12.1 The central north-east, south-west route will provide a key access
corridor through the development. The scale of the street will
evoke the linear quality of the existing loco works site.
11.12.2 MfS describes the inter-relationship of ‘place’ and ‘movement’
functions along streets; along the Central Route the ‘place’
function is given a higher priority than ‘movement’, with the
intention that the corridor will become a key amenity space
within the development. A 10m wide amenity zone including a
linear SUDs attenuation feature and avenue tree planting provide
greenery and accentuate the linear character of the street. Closer
to the Heritage Core a mix of hard landscape materials and change
in levels within the streetscape could reinforce the priority for
pedestrian movement and complement the setting of retained
historic buildings.
11.12.3 The residential development along side the road will have active
frontages with direct pedestrian access from the street reinforcing
the desire to create a walkable neighbourhood. Vehicular access
can be provided through parking courts to the rear.
11.12.4 Within the corridor, cyclists will share the road with other users.
11.0 Access Strategy
Rivington Chase Design and Access Statement 91
11.13 Rivington House Entrance
11.13.1 The former main Loco works entrance will act as the main vehicular
entrance for the proposed development from Chorley New road.
Upon entering the development the road will pass Rivington
House, entering both the Heritage Core and the residential areas
to the north west.
11.13.2 The road corridor includes pedestrian footpaths and verges with
avenue tree planting alongside each side of the carriageway,
providing a green streetscape character and framing views into
the Heritage Core.
11.13.3 On-road cycling is proposed, in line with guidance from MfS that
states that cyclists should generally be accommodated on the
carriageway, with no need for dedicated cycle lanes on the street.
11.13.4 As the route enters the residential development, residential units
are proposed with active street frontages and private driveways
accessed from the road. These residential units will also front
directly onto the Heritage Core.
11.13.5 Where existing buildings are retained the verge has been omitted
from the road corridor to provide a 4m wide public realm frontage
to the buildings.
11.0 Access Strategy
92 Rivington Chase Design and Access Statement
11.14 North West Route
11.14.1 This route provides a new link into the development from Crown
Lane to the north-west.
11.14.2 Research described within MfS shows that increased visibility
and unneccesarily wide roads encourage higher vehicle speeds.
The Crown Lane route would gently curve with a 6.4m wide road
width maintained in order to minimise speeds and reinforce the
residential nature of the route.
11.14.3 The road corridor would pass through an informal, lower density
part of the development and features 2m wide footpaths and 2.5m
wide verges to both sides of the carriageway. Avenue trees will
reinforce the informal character of the road and provide a green
aspect to residential properties and the road corridor.
11.14.4 On road cycling routes are continued from the Rivington House
entrance along the entirety of this route. These can connect
into more informal off road cycle provision running within the
greenspace corridor adjacent Red Moss.
11.0 Access Strategy
Rivington Chase Design and Access Statement 93
11.15 Aspinall Way, southern access route
11.15.1 The southern access route provides a new link to the south east
onto Aspinall Way. The route would pass through the Southern
Employment Area and has been carefully considered to provide
a sensitive interface with the existing watercourse.
11.15.2 A carriageway width of 7.3m from Aspinall Way to the Central
Route provides capacity for larger commercial vehicles and is set
against avenue tree planting and a separate 3m wide pedestrian
and cycle route. This off road route provides opportunities to
explore the Middlebrook corridor or connect into more informal
off road cycle provision running within the greenspace corridor
adjacent Red Moss.
11.15.3 Commercial development will face the road, set behind the
tree planting and watercourse creating an informal but defned
streetscape. Front boundaries will be kept to a minimum to
enhance the streetscape with car parking set back behind the
building frontage.
11.15.4 The route rises up an embankment from the lower employment
area up onto the residential plateau. Here residential units are
proposed with active street frontages with private driveways
accessed from the road.
11.0 Access Strategy
94 Rivington Chase Design and Access Statement
11.16 Mansell Way link (Bus, Pedestrian & Cycle Link)
11.16.1 The Mansell Way link provides an extension of Mansell Way for
use by public transport, walking and cycling and as indicated
previously may include a control point at the boundary of the site.
11.16.2 Within the site itself the road will have residential development
fronting onto the carriageway, providing active street frontage.
The corridor features 2m wide footpaths and 2.5m wide verges
with avenue tree planting. There is also the potential for additional
tree planting within front gardens of housing plots.
11.16.3 Along the route there will be a transition for cyclists from the
off road cycle provision on Mansell Way to the on road cycling
proposed along the Central Route.
Potential control method
11.0 Access Strategy
Rivington Chase Design and Access Statement 95
11.17 The Armstrong Access Route
11.17.1 Historically this entrance acted as a secondary entrance to the
Loco Works. The route is proposed to provide a key entrance to
the residential development area and links with both the Cental
Route, Mansell Way link and Southern access road forming a key
hub within the development.
11.17.2 The existing road corridor width is maintained, with 2m wide
footpaths and 2.5m wide verges to both sides of the carriageway,
providing room for avenue tree planting that reinforces the ‘place’
function of the street as the entrance to the development.
11.17.3 Residential development will front directly onto this route providing
active frontage and access to private driveways and reinforcing
the desire for a walkable neighbourhood.
11.17.4 On road cycling is proposed along this road, connecting into the
existing on road route along Chorley New Road and proposed
on road Central Route.
11.0 Access Strategy
96 Rivington Chase Design and Access Statement
11.18 Secondary Streets
11.18.1 The secondary streets will continue the design approach of the
main routes as illustrated previously.
11.18.2 Within the Chorley New Road Character Area the street layouts
should be straight in nature with right angle junctions reinforcing
the grid layout of the former works. Elsewhere the form of the
secondary residential streets will take a more organic approach,
creating a contrast to the linear grid layout.
11.18.3 The use of contrasting boundary treatments between the
Conservation Area and elsewhere will further enhance this
contrast. The Chorley New Road Character Area, set within the
Conservation Area should have strong, uniform boundaries with
a uniformity of materials within the streets. Elsewhere a more
informal appoach should be employed with a combination of
hedges, planting and trees deliniating the boundary to plots.
11.18.4 The key elements within the secondary streets will be as follows:
• Semi-detached / detached residential development
• Formal frontage proposed to key corners with dual aspect
frontages and a range of street facing garden spaces.
• Private off street parking and some shared surface parking
• Shared surface crossings points at the intersection of streets to
reduced traffc speeds and reinforce the public realm.
11.0 Access Strategy
Rivington Chase Design and Access Statement 97
11.19 Tertiary Streets
11.19.1 A range of smaller scale, tertiary streets will form part of the
residential areas. The character of these streets will refect the
previously established design approach of the larger streets but
on a smaller scale with areas of home zones and pedestrian
priority routes.
11.19.2 Within the Conservation Area the street corridors will again
predominantly follow a linear form with areas of direct frontage
development and strong plot boundaries that will emphasise the
grid character of this residential area.
11.19.3 The key elements within the tertiary streets will be as follows:
• Shared surface road and pedestrian corridors should be used to
reinforce the scale of the street.
• Shared surface parking within designated areas of the streets
and parking courts.
• Buildings to feature gable ends at key corners
• Residential development may take the form of terrace, semi-
detached and detached units along these streets.
11.0 Access Strategy
98 Rivington Chase Design and Access Statement
11.20 Existing Footpath Network
11.20.1 The existing footpath network runs predominantly adjacent to the
site boundaries and location of the majority of routes will remain
unaltered.
• 1. From the north the footpath runs from the junction of Vale
Avenue and Mason Street west adjacent to Pearl Brook towards
the M61 motorway crossing the north west corner of the site
before skirting the motorway embankment, before passing under
the motorway.
• 2. Runs east from this point towards the former Loco Works.
Running adjacent to Gibb Farm the footpath continues around
the Red Moss SSSI at the base of the slope of the works plateau
and continues towards Aspinall Way.
• 3. There are a number of footpaths that converge at the east
corner of the site. This route runs south west adjacent to the
boundary between the site and Middlebrook before joining with
the route described above that links to Aspinall Way.
Existing Footpaths
11
1
2
2
2
3
3
11.0 Access Strategy
Rivington Chase Design and Access Statement 99
11.21 Proposed Footpath and Cycleway Network
11.21.1 The proposed footpath network retains the majority of the existing
network, with some minor diversions at the location of the new
Aspinall Way access road. The routes are described in further
detail below.
11.21.2 In addition to the footpaths and cycle ways provided on or
adjacent to the main vehicular corridors, new ‘off road’ footpath
and cycleway links are to be provided at the locations shown
on the adjacent diagram. These additional links will enhance
permeability from the existing town and surrounding residential
streets providing links through the proposed development to the
areas of strategic open space and wider areas :
• 1. Improvements to the north west - south east footpath &
cycleway that runs perpendicular to the existing terraced streets
providing a link between the development and Horwich Town
Centre.
• 2. Footpath & cycleway link from Gooch Street running South
West onto the central route.
• 3. Continuation of the Gooch Street footpath & cycle link,
connecting the town and proposed development with the Red
Moss SSSI beyond.
• 4. Diversion of the existing footpath to create a new north west
- south east footpath and cycleway linking the existing footpath
network with the reservoir, proposed residential zone and the new
southern access route linking with Aspinall Way.
• 5. Potential northern footpath and cycle link connecting Chorley
New Road with the proposed Crown Lane route.
• 6. North west - south east footpaths linking the existing footpath
running adjacent to Pearl Brook with the proposed residential
development and proposed SuDs attenuation feature.
• 7. North east - south west footpath linking the Heritage Core
and Rivington House Access with the pocket of residential
development adjacent to the existing reservoir. The footpath also
forms a connection with the footpaths described above.
1
2
3
4
5
6
6
6
7
Proposed road corridor -
on road cycling
Existing buildings retained
Proposed road corridor -
bus and cycle access only
Strategic open space and
landscape
Proposed combined
pedestrian / cycle path
Existing and proposed
waterbodies
Existing footpath
retained
Existing
watercourses
Proposed footpath
Development area
Planning
application
boundary
11.0 Access Strategy
Existing footpaths to be
diverted.
100 Rivington Chase Design and Access Statement
1
A
A
A
A
B
C
C
B
2
2
2
2
1. Primary off road pedestrian and cycle route
2. Secondary off road pedestrian and cycle route
A. Primary off road pedestrian route
B. Secondary off road pedestrian route
C. Existing off road pedestrian route
11.22 Existing & Proposed off Road Pedestrian and
Cycle Network
11.22.1 Within the ‘off road’ pedestrian and cycle network a hierarchy of
routes exist with a combination of formal and informal pathways,
defned by different widths and surface treatments.
11.22.2 The hierarchy of routes graduate from the existing hard surfaced
streets within the town, to separate pedestrian / cycle corridors
and informal routes integrated within the strategic open space
within the development.
11.0 Access Strategy
Rivington Chase Design and Access Statement 101
Pedestrian route Cycleway and footpath corridor
3m Wide Hard Surfaced Corridor 2m Wide Gravel Surfaced Route
Typical example of existing footpath
11.0 Access Strategy
102 Rivington Chase Design and Access Statement
12.0 Summary and Conclusion
Rivington Chase Design and Access Statement
104 Rivington Chase Design and Access Statement
Rivington Chase Design and Access Statement 105
12.0 Summary and Conclusion
The proposed re-development of the Former Horwich Loco Works aims
to create a sustainable new extension to Horwich containing, residential,
community and employment land uses centred on a Heritage Core and
extensive open space. The re-development of the former industrial site will
enhance the character and setting of the town creating a positive change
within the surrounding community and having a benefcial effect on the
wider environment.

1. Understanding the heritage and distinctive qualities of
the site
This document demonstrates a thorough understanding of the site to
be developed and its historic context. The existing topography, physical
constraints, ecological qualities and historic development of the site have
been understood and utilised to design a clear framework for development
which in turn will allow the creation of a distinctive, unique extension to
the town of Horwich.
2. Relate to the surrounding context
A detailed site analysis has been undertaken to understand the context
of the surrounding streets and urban grain. The analysis has looked at
the street patterns, the character of individual neighbourhoods and the
cross section of densities within the residential areas of the town. The
understanding gained from this analysis has allowed a framework of
masterplan principles to be developed that will create relationships with the
surrounding areas and defne the character of individual neighbourhoods
within the development site.
3. A design evolved over time
The design development of the site has evolved over a number of years
and follows an extensive range of consultations and collaborations between
key stakeholders, Bolton Metropolitan Council, the local town councils and
the residents of the surrounding communities.
At the centre of the design process, the principles of the Urban Design
Compendium, together with numerous other documents and contemporary
best practice thinking have been used to illustrate the approach to
residential design and place making.
Manual for Streets has played a central role in the development of a design
that promotes the use of sustainable transport over the private car. The
masterplan contains of a hierarchy of multi-modal streets that incorporate
residential access, vehiclular, pedestrian and cycling routes within them.
This approach, combined with the character of the site, enables distinctive,
active places to be set within a robust development framework.
4. Identifying with the site and its context
Since the proposals are based on an understanding of the surrounding
context and history of the site, the new design will be unique to the
area providing a distinctive extension to Horwich. The development will
be set within a high quality framework of open space and residential
neighbourhoods connecting with the surrounding streets through an
network of footpaths, cycle routes and landscape corridors.
5. Defned character areas
The character of individual parts of the site will be distinct. This key principle
of the masterplan will create a framework of residential neighbourhoods,
open spaces and streets based on a range of contextual, ecological
and heritage settings. This approach, combined with the understanding
of the site’s context will create a distinctive and connected approach to
development and the surrounding residential neighbourhoods of Horwich.
6. Enhancing the location and visual impact of the site
The design has been based on a defned set of urban design principles
using best practice thinking and a strong relationship to the site’s landscape
and historic context. The massing and scale of development has been
designed to enhance the existing site, replacing large areas of former
industrial land, and create a sustainable, new community that identifes
with the history and character of Horwich.
Overall the design will regenerate the area providing new focal points
for Horwich with access to the wider landscape and open spaces,
enhanced habitat development and a renewed interpretation of the historic,
former works site. The design proposals create a robust framework
for development, defned by a series of unique character areas and an
extensive network of open spaces and routes that will deliver an enriching
environment for new residents and the existing community alike.
106 Rivington Chase Design and Access Statement
Open Space and Ecology
Rivington Chase Design and Access Statement
Appendix A - Technical Summary
ii Rivington Chase Design and Access Statement
Open Space overview
The majority of the 20.36 hectares of open space lies in a band between
the residential development and Red Moss SSSI to the south and west,
with other pockets created within the Heritage Core, along road corridors
and on the north east boundary. The drawing opposite sets out the location
of the open space together with the three zones identifed below.
The proposals for the strategic open space can be divided into three
distinct zones:
Appendix A - Open Space & Ecology
Zone 1: Civic amenity space within the Heritage Core
• A civic zone around the Heritage Core will provide a predominantly hard
landscape ‘town square’ environment at the heart of the development.
This space is envisaged to provide for a broad range of uses from every
day recreation and social activities to a one off event.
• Details of this space and the surrounding public realm links are provided
in chapter 7 of the document.
Zone 2: Amenity open space within the development
• An amenity zone of 5.7 hectares is shown adjacent to the proposed
attenuation lake, existing reservoir and following the heritage link to
the east. The area close to the attenuation lake will be the main focus
for a parkland landscape within the development and will consist of a
grassland, water bodies and groups of tree planting. The area will be
overlooked by the adjacent residential properties to create a safe and
vibrant amenity space.
• The further recreation and amenity space to the east is dispersed within
the remaining open space of the development. This will take the form
of pedestrian and cycle routes with interconnecting spaces immersed
within the ecological habitats described below.
• Children’s play spaces are provided within the development with two
LEAP spaces and one NEAP space. One of the LEAP’s and the NEAP
have been combined in the new amenity space to reinforce the space
as a recreational focus for the development. The second LEAP space
is located close to the Brindley Street area of the site and will beneft
the existing adjoining community.
• Further details of these areas are provided in the following pages
alongside information contained within chapters 8 and 9.
Zone 3: Habitat areas with limited public access
• A substantial area (12.36 hectares) of the open space within the
development is zoned for habitat development and includes a number
of important buffer zones and improvements to the existing ecology of
the site. The design and detail of these proposals have been subject
to pre-application discussion and consultation. Public access would
be restricted to footpaths and cycle routes as described above.
• Details illustrating the character of these routes are provided in chapters
8, 9 and the access strategy chapter 11.
• The development of habitat buffer zones of wetland and woodland
within these areas will create a barrier for access from the site into the
SSSI and SBI designated areas.
Rivington Chase Design and Access Statement iii
Appendix A - Open Space & Ecology
Heritage Core to include
amenity space and public
realm
Amenity open space
Habitat areas (some limited
access provided with
footways and cycleways)
Proposed play equipped
area
Existing and proposed
attenuation waterbodies
Existing watercourse
Existing buildings to be
retained
Development area
Illustrative access roads
within landuse zones
Planning application
boundary
iv Rivington Chase Design and Access Statement
Ecology overview
Proposals for habitat creation and management of retained areas of existing
habitat are proposed with the following objectives in mind:
• To protect and provide a buffer to habitats within Red Moss SSSI;
• To retain and enhance the ecological value of habitats within the site
which lie within Red Moss SBI;
• To mitigate the loss of predominately willow woodland that will be lost
on the north and west side of the site;
• Provide a series of new habitats which, although not seeking to
replicate that of lowland raised mire present on the SSSI will provide
additional value in the form of additional habitat for key mossland fauna,
in particular, reptiles, water vole and birds which also use the mixture
of fen, scrub and marshy grassland often present in the hinterlands
of lowland mosses;
• Retain and enhance boundary planting adjoining adjacent development
where possible, for ecological and amenity value.
• To remove and manage any invasive weeds within the site utilising a
weed control management plan.
With the above objectives in mind, habitat creation and management
proposals are made for the following areas of the site:
• Fields southwest and northeast of Gibb Farm;
• Slopes leading down to Red Moss SSSI from the south west edge of
the existing Loco Works site;
• Areas within the site immediately to the north of the former Greater
Manchester Waste Authority landfll site;
• Habitat adjacent to Middlebrook which lies to the south east of the site;
• Boundary areas of landscape and arboricultural value.
These have been divided into a number of areas as shown on the adjacent
plan and described in detail on the following pages.
Appendix A - Open Space & Ecology
Rivington Chase Design and Access Statement v
Existing
reservoir
Attenuation
waterbody
(proposed)
Existing
watercourse
Riparian corridor
(managed as
watervole habitat)
Existing woodland
(alien invasive species
to be eradicated)
Proposed broadleaved
woodland
Marsh / scrub
mix
Indicative
areas of tree
clearance
Proposed tree lined
road corridor
Proposed greenway
(Off-road pedestrian /
cycle route)
Proposed marshy
grassland shrub
mosaic
Amenity / Wildfower
/ recreation landscape
Proposed biomass
willow (5 year
rotation)
Existing trees - to be
retained where possible
Trees subject to TPO
- to be retained where
possible
Appendix A - Open Space & Ecology
vi Rivington Chase Design and Access Statement
Proposed mature broad leaved woodland & biomass
willow
Area 1 Proposed Mature Broadleaved Woodland
• A mixture of planted downy birch and grey willow refecting woodland
habitat typically found on mossland edges. To be allowed to mature,
then managed via thinning and selected felling to promote stand
maturity and colonisation of successionals; in particular pedunculate
oak, rowan, alder and holly. This area can become contiguous with
native planting already present on the embankments of the M61.
Area 2 Biomass Willow
• Densely grown willow managed as short rotation coppice on a fve
year cycle.
Area 1 - Proposed woodland
Area 2 - Proposed short rotation coppice
Habitat section locations (refer to page opposite)
Area 2
Area 1
Area 1
Area 1
Key:
Appendix A - Open Space & Ecology
Rivington Chase Design and Access Statement vii
Indicative landscape section: year 25
Indicative landscape section: year 01
yr 01
yr 25
Appendix A - Open Space & Ecology
viii Rivington Chase Design and Access Statement
Marshy grassland scrub mosaic
Existing improved grassland to be stripped and reseeded with a marshy
grassland mix E.g. British Seed Houses (BSH) RE3 Floodplain / Water
Meadow mix.
Elements of scrub, marginal vegetation and ruderal vegetation should also
be included. Ruderals and marginal vegetation will colonise naturally, small
clumps of alder buckthorn could be planted and other scrub (birch and
willow) will colonise naturally.
The grassland will need to be managed either via periodic grazing or cutting
to maintain a grassland scrub mosaic.
Proposed marshy grassland /
scrub / wetland edge
Habitat section locations (refer to page opposite)
Key:
Appendix A - Open Space & Ecology
Rivington Chase Design and Access Statement ix
Indicative landscape section: year 01
Indicative landscape section: year 25
yr 01
yr 25
Appendix A - Open Space & Ecology
x Rivington Chase Design and Access Statement
Amenity and recreation area
The main purpose of this area will be to provide for informal recreation.
However the area should also include the following elements:
• The balancing pond should form a waterbody which is not a single
expanse of water, but rather divided by islands, reed bed etc. This will
encourage key species such as water vole and grass snake and deter
undesirable species such as black-headed gull and Canada geese;
• Within amenity areas areas species-rich wildfower grassland can also
be provided at the margins. BSH RE2 Lowland Meadow mix would
be suitable;
• Some tree planting consisting of a mixture of alder buckthorn, grey
willow and birch should be planted along the southern boundary of
the lake to screen recreational areas from the SSSI.
Proposed amenity / wildfower
grassland / tree planting
Habitat section locations (refer to page opposite)
Key:
Appendix A - Open Space & Ecology
Rivington Chase Design and Access Statement xi
Indicative landscape section: year 25
Indicative landscape section: year 01
yr 01
yr 25
Appendix A - Open Space & Ecology
xii Rivington Chase Design and Access Statement
Marsh / Scrub Mosaic and Woodland slopes, mossland
edge and buffer strip
Area 05 - Marsh / Scrub Mosaic
To consist of an area of fen / mossland lag vegetation to be managed
as a wet hinterland to the mossland. To consist mainly of marsh / tall
herb (already present) and an element of scrub which receive regular
management to reduce scrub invasion onto the Moss.
Area 06 - Woodland slopes and mossland edge and buffer strip
Woodland slopes, which include areas within the Red Moss SBI would
receive management to enhance their wildlife value, both in terms of
their intrinsic value as woodland and as habitats which border the Moss.
Retention of tree cover is also a priority to maintain the stability of the
slopes. The following measures would be implemented:
• Japanese Knotweed would be eradicated and Himalayan balsam
controlled and eradicated if possible;
• Willow woodland habitat would be managed to create a varied
age structure, retaining mature examples where appropriate and
rotationally coppicing areas of younger growth. A long cycle of
7 - 10 years is proposed to enable habitat for a range of summer
warbler species, chiffchaff, willow warbler and blackcap to be
maintained;
• Where areas of existing heather are present these areas would be
opened up and the scrub controlled within them in order to promote
the expansion a heathland scrub mosaic;
• Where scrub encroachment onto peatland areas occurs this would
be cleared and treated to prevent regrowth to reduce invasion of
scrub onto the Mossland;
• The existing footpath would be retained and improved to provide all
weather access.
Existing managed woodland
Habitat section locations (refer to
page opposite)
Proposed marsh / scrub mosaic
Key:
Appendix A - Open Space & Ecology
Rivington Chase Design and Access Statement xiii
Indicative landscape section: year 01
Indicative landscape section: year 25
yr 01
yr 25
Appendix A - Open Space & Ecology
xiv Rivington Chase Design and Access Statement
Existing Watercourses
Sections of Middle Brook are known to provide habitat for water vole.
Measures proposed are:
• Selected clearance of bankside trees in order to maintain water in the
channel and encourage the growth of marginal vegetation;
• Selected vegetation removal to be undertaken on a rotational basis
to ensure a balance of vegetated margins and open water in order to
maintain optimum water-vole habitat. This is best undertaken in the
early spring months when water vole populations are at their lowest
but animals have come out of hibernation. All works would be subject
to a method statement setting out measures to avoid killing / injury
of water vole;
• Where necessary, ledges would be installed to allow movement of
animals through culverted sections during spate events.
Habitat development within Middlebrook
Habitat section locations (refer to page opposite)
Key:
Appendix A - Open Space & Ecology
Rivington Chase Design and Access Statement xv
Indicative landscape section
Appendix A - Open Space & Ecology
xvi Rivington Chase Design and Access Statement
Landscape trees present on the Northern / North-
western boundary
Opportunities to retain and enhance northern boundary vegetation (namely
tree groups G2,G9 and G13 in the arboricultural appraisal report) should be
explored as a means of retaining visual screening whilst providing habitat
linkages and urban greening adjacent to the existing developed edge.
Existing mature trees should be retained where possible and augmented
with additional native structure planting (planting within the Thirlmere
aqueduct easement zone will be subject to agreement with United Utilities).
Existing trees (present as G16 in the arboricultural report) can be enhanced
through thinning and restocking to provide a more coherent wooded edge
to the western site boundary. Native tree species should be used.
Existing woodland
Habitat section locations (refer to page opposite)
Key:
Appendix A - Open Space & Ecology
Rivington Chase Design and Access Statement xvii
Indicative landscape section
Appendix A - Open Space & Ecology
xviii Rivington Chase Design and Access Statement
Overview
Formal avenue streetscapes have been designed to provide a primary
landscape structure to the routes through the site. This will evolve to allow
the growth of large, mature, deciduous trees that will form a distinctive
character to the streetscape as illustrated on the drawings opposite.
Tree lined road corridors
Habitat section locations (refer to page opposite)
Key:
Appendix A - Open Space & Ecology
Rivington Chase Design and Access Statement xix
Indicative landscape section: year 01
Indicative landscape section: year 25
yr 01
yr 25
Appendix A - Open Space & Ecology
xx Rivington Chase Design and Access Statement
Landscape Management
The structural landscape components within Rivington Chase will come
under active management. The main component is the strategic open
space and woodland that follows the west boundary of the development
with smaller components along the north, south and eastern boundaries
of the site. Both fora and fauna will be subject to the pressures associated
with new public access.
An ongoing management regime will ensure that impacts associated
with public access are absorbed whilst the essential nature conservation
interests of the grasslands, wetlands, woodland and riparian habitats are
preserved.
The existing woodland on site and landscape is currently not subject to any
specifc management activity. As part of the site’s long term development
it’s quality will be secured and improved by the implementation of outline
details which are shown on the management plan opposite. The strategic
aims of this management plan are:
• To protect and enhance wildlife interests within the landscape including:
natural regeneration; removal alien invasive species, selective removal
of non-native species; creation of glades; strengthen wildlife corridors;
coppicing and pollarding; creation of wetlands and wildlife habitats.
• To provide and manage formal and informal recreation resources to
a high standard to meet the needs of future users of the strategic
landscape spaces including: increase habitat connectivity though
closure of unused tracks; development of clear public access routes
to maximise enjoyment of green space whilst minimising disturbance
impacts.
• To provide high quality interpretative facilities including: reference
to woodland in information packs for house buyers/purchasers;
interpretation of key physical and cultural features.
• To manage all woodland and scrub areas, to ensure the delivery of
recreation, natural and landscape aims including: avoiding overgrazing;
planting of native trees; monitoring regime.
The amenity park spaces, play areas and linear routes associated with the
strategic open space will be managed as amenity, public open spaces
with drainage and ecological functions integrated within them.
The landscape associated with the road corridors, such as grass verges,
will be maintained by the highways authority with the primary aim of
providing a setting for the transport routes and the development as a whole.
The amenity and parking areas associated with commercial development
will be managed privately for primarily amenity purposes.
Appendix A - Open Space & Ecology
Rivington Chase Design and Access Statement xxi
Protection and enhancement of
existing and proposed woodland
Management of formal and
informal recreation / habitat areas
Road corridors maintained as
part of the strategic network
Appendix A - Open Space & Ecology
xxii Rivington Chase Design and Access Statement
Drainage Strategy
Rivington Chase Design and Access Statement
Appendix B - Technical Summary
xxiv Rivington Chase Design and Access Statement
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Existing key site features plan
Appendix B - Drainage Strategy
Rivington Chase Design and Access Statement xxv
Overview
The key features of the site that infuence the existing drainage regime as
indicated in the drawing opposite are:
Zone 1, Buildings and infrastructure of the Former Horwich Loco Works
– this is essentially hard surfaced plateau and drains to the existing site
drainage systems which discharge to a reservoir located at a lower level
than the main works plateau;
Zone 2, The north western area – this is covered by low grade trees and
scrubland;
Zone 3, Lower area adjacent to Red Moss SSSI – this is covered by dense
vegetation and includes the slopes up to the Loco Works plateau;
Zone 4, Western area adjacent to Red Moss SSSI - this is currently low
lying felds;
Zone 5, South eastern fnger that comprises dense vegetation and trees.
Virtually the whole of the site has been disturbed in the past by earthworks,
tipping and building operations. The vegetation that is present has grown
up after these operations were completed.
The adjacent Red Moss SSSI comprises a wetland area that is waterlogged
for the whole year round. Lancashire Wildlife Trust and Greater Manchester
Ecology Unit indicate it is fed purely from rainfall.
Geology
The area is underlain by drift deposits of Glacial Till (Boulder Clay) overlying
Coal Measures. The Former Loco Works plateau has been formed by
excavating into the original ground slope and using the material to form
an embankment. This has subsequently been extended by tipping waste
over the edge of the embankment. Therefore signifcant areas of Made
Ground are also be present over the Glacial Till. The adjacent Red Moss
SSSI and the lower areas of the site are underlain by between 3m and 5m
Peat and/or Alluvium deposits.
The Glacial Till comprises a series of interbedded clays, silts and sands/
gravels. The sandy and gravelly layers are not likely to be continuous
for great distances. Perched groundwater is present within the granular
layers of the Glacial Till. It is also perched in the Made Ground. The
presence of discontinuous perched groundwater within granular lenses
in the Glacial Till means that there is unlikely to be hydraulic connectivity
between groundwater below the development site and Red Moss SSSI.
Further to this, data obtained from well records on the British Geological
Survey website indicate that the main groundwater table is present at
depth within the Coal Measures at around 85m to 86m AOD. Therefore
there is unlikely to be any connection between this groundwater and the
groundwater in Red Moss SSSI.
Appendix B - Drainage Strategy
xxvi Rivington Chase Design and Access Statement
Existing site drainage
The existing water courses, water bodies and key drainage infrastructure
in and around the site, are shown in the plan opposite.
The two main watercourses afjoining the site are Pearl Brook and Middle
Brook. Red Moss SSSI and the site form a watershed between these
two main water courses. Pearl Brook runs through the existing housing
development to the north west of the site. The main catchment for Pearl
Brook is an area of housing on the hillside to the north and north west of
the site.
Middle Brook is situated to the south of the site. The main catchment for
the brook is agricultural land, the M61 and the Middlebrook sports and
commercial development including the Reebok Stadium. The catchment
also includes former Greater Manchester Waste Authority landfll site.
Nellie’s Clough
Nellie’s Clough is a stream that runs from the hillside above the eastern
edge of the site. The catchment is a mixed area of agricultural land, golf
course and housing. Nellie’s Clough enters a culvert on the hillside to
the east of the site which then runs along the south eastern edge of the
site. This culvert has previously been believed to discharge into the water
course that runs along the south western edge of the Former Loco Works
(referred to in the environmental statement as Nellie’s Clough Surface
Channel). However there is no evidence on site that the culvert actually
fows into the channel.
Nellies Clough Surface Channel is a wide open ditch with standing water,
receiving local fows from the adjacent embankment and incidental rainfall.
It also receives some minor outfalls of surface drainage from the Former
Loco Works.
Surface water fow entering Nellies Clough Headwall (location 2 on the plan
opposite) is not linked with Nellies Clough Surface Channel. Flows into
the Headwall discharge to the adjacent large diameter sewer. Therefore
all signifcant fows which would have been conveyed via Nellies Clough
(Surface Channel) are now conveyed by a 900mm dia trunk sewer below
Red Moss SSSI. The sewer appears to extend as far as the confuence
with Pearl Brook. The channel is separate from Red Moss SSSI, although it
is joined by drains running from Red Moss SSSI. No signifcant fows were
observed within the surface channel on the day of a site visit undertaken on
01/08/13. (A more detailed constraints drawing illustrating Nellie’s Clough
headwall can be found within the food risk and drainage assessment
contained in the environmental statement).
The majority of the current surface water drainage from the Former Loco
Works plateau discharges to the existing reservoir and then into Nellie’s
Clough surface channel. The channel then continues in a westerly direction
and passes below a dismantled railway before joining Pearl Brook. The
existing site drainage joins Nellie’s Clough well downstream of the length
of the surface channel that could affect the moss.
A small area of the eastern side of the Former Loco Works drains to Middle
Brook. Perimeter surface water ditches around the former landfll site
also drain to Middle Brook. The Brook then continues in a south easterly
direction through the Middle Brook sports and commercial development.
It fows under two road crossings and then one railway bridge.
Overall the evidence via site inspections and associated drainage plans
indicate there is very little site drainage fowing into the watercourse
adjacent to Red Moss SSSI. Therefore current surface water fows from
the site will not have any real consequence in terms of impact on the Moss
and there will be insuffcient runoff into Nellie’s Clough Surface Channel to
cause fows to spill out of it into Red Moss.
Natural England (NE) has a good understanding of the hydrology of the
Red Moss SSSI and has indicated that some of the fows into the Moss
only become visible at high water levels.
NE has indicated that some water from Nellie’s Clough surface channel
does fow into the SSSI in a number of locations. The loations have been
indicated on a plan (opposite). NE believe the fow has damaged part
of the SSSI and has been working with the Lancashire Wildlife Trust to
manage the water within the SSSI to try and limit the impact. There is a
beneft to the water fow from Nellie’s Clough Surface Channel because
NE has anecdotally indicated that it keeps the southern end of the peat
moss wet. Where the channel has blocked up it has started to develop
lagg fen which helps to support the hydrology of the moss.
OS Site plan 1954
Appendix B - Drainage Strategy
Appendix B - Drainage Strategy
xxviii Rivington Chase Design and Access Statement
Hydrogeology
There are two key areas for potential groundwater fows:
• The Former Loco Works Plateau
• The area to the north west of the Former Loco Works site.
The section through the Loco Works Plateau shown above indicates that
groundwater fow is likely to be within the Made Ground along the boundary
with the less permeable Glacial Deposits. The likely fow of groundwater
from this area will be 9814m3/yr. Compared to rainfall on the moss SSSI
of 658,000m3/yr the contribution from groundwater below the Loco Works
area is negligible (1.5%).
The proposed development will have a minimal impact on the groundwater
regime and therefore the impact on the Red Moss SSSI will be negligible.
The diagram above shows groundwater contours for the north western
area. These indicate groundwater fow is to the south west (ie towards
Red Moss SSSI).
In reality, the continuity of groundwater beneath the site (particularly within
the shallow Glacial Deposits which vary signifcantly both laterally and
vertically in composition) is questionable and discrete lenses / pockets
of groundwater under sub-artesian pressures are likely to be dominant.
Groundwater levels below this part of the development are about 105m
AOD to 106m AOD as shown on the sketch section above. It is known
that attempts have been made to raise groundwater levels in the Red Moss
SSSI and they are expected to be close to ground levels (Mosslands of
Northwest 1 (Merseyside, Lancashire and Greater Manchester), State and
extent of surviving acid mossland habitats, Dr Paul Thomas and Martin
Walker, 2004). It may therefore be the case that groundwater levels in the
Moss are higher than those in the surrounding ground.
The likely fow of groundwater from this area towards the Moss will be
about 3595m3/yr. Compared to rainfall on the moss of 658,000m3/yr
the contribution from groundwater in the north western area is negligible
(0.5%). The proposed development will have a minimal impact on the
groundwater regime and therefore the impact on the Moss will be negligible.
Calculations have been produced as part of the submitted FRA to assess
the impact of dewatering for the attenuation pond excavation in the
north western area. These show that the excavation and any pumping
required will have minimal infuence on the groundwater levels below Red
Moss SSSI. If necessary the water pumped from the excavation can be
recharged to the ground via a trench excavated between the attenuation
pond and Red Moss SSSI.
Appendix B - Drainage Strategy
Rivington Chase Design and Access Statement xxix
Proposed development drainage strategy
The impact of the site drainage on downstream areas (including Red Moss
SSSI) will be minimised by the use of sustainable drainage methods that
will be designed to control the frequency, rate and volume of surface water
discharged from the site. The Sustainable Drainage Systems (SuDS) will
also be designed to remove any potential pollutants from the runoff.
The proposed outline SuDS strategy is set out in the adjacent diagram
and described as follows:
• Zone 1 - Heritage Core area of the Former Loco Works – retroft SuDS
where possible to give up to 50% reduction from current runoff from
this area for events up to 1 in 100 years. Provide treatment to remove
pollution from runoff where possible (eg using permeable paving in
parking areas).
• Zone 2 - Redeveloped area of Loco Works – new developments to be
provided with SuDS that reduce runoff by 50% from current rates for
events up to 1 in 100 years (requirement of BMBC). SuDS to provide
treatment to remove pollution in runoff to levels that will not have any
adverse impact on the adjacent Red Moss SSSI. (This is precautionary;
there is no evidence of connection between the development site and
Red Moss SSSI.)
• Zone 3 - Lower areas that are currently vegetated or felds – new
developments to be provided with SuDS that limit runoff to greenfeld
runoff rates for events up to 1 in 100 years. SuDS to provide treatment
to remove pollution in runoff to levels that will not have any adverse
impact on the adjacent Red Moss SSSI.
Surface water runoff is to be prevented from fowing into the surface water
channels adjacent to the Red Moss without being treated frst and the
majority of outfalls will be downstream of Red Moss SSSI.
Appendix B - Drainage Strategy
xxx Rivington Chase Design and Access Statement
Su mmar y of f l o od r i s k as s es s ment and h y dr o l og y
Ho r wi c h Lo c o Wor k s
V1. 0 DECEMBER 2010 © EPG LTD
Regional
Storage
location
Contributing
Catchments
Total
Contributing
Net
Catchment
area (m
2
)
Allowable
discharge
from
regional
location
(l/s)
Storage
provided
in
Regional
location
(m
3
)
Total
storage
required
(m
3
)
Addition
source
control
storage
require in
each site
(total for all
contributing
areas) (m
3
)
Total allowable
discharge from
development
sites into main
drainage
infrastructure
(l/s)
Proposed lake R9 to 13 85,680 206 10,000 3,712 0 206.2
Existing
reservoir
R1, R4, R7
and E1
65,080 185 2,040 2,651 611 142.2
Proposed
pond SE
E2 andE3 37,134 58 750 1858 1108 34.7
Proposed
canal
R2, R3, R5
and R6
102,581 292 1,700 4177 2,477 172.7
Proposed
pond NW
R14 and R15 42,930 61 750 2,675 1,925 17.0
The additional source control storage requirements in Table 1 can be readily provided by the
proposed use of permeable pavements or other solutions within each development area.
All SUDS features should be kept at as shallow a depth as possible and any open storage
features should have small rises in water levels during rainfall events. Within the regional
large storage features a rise of 1m is acceptable for the 1 in 100 year event. Where open
water features are located within residential areas the rise should be no more than 600mm.
Conceptual design for strategic SuDS infrastructure
The main SuDS ponds will be constructed when the other infrastructure is
constructed (roads, etc). These regional SUDS controls will also manage
construction run-off when the individual plots and sub catchments are
developed. Swales or individual bioretention systems will be provided
alongside the main distributor roads in the development, where it is
practical to do so.
SUDS whould also be incorporated in each individual development in
order to provide source control and a treatment train to effectively remove
pollution. The robust treatment train is essential to minimise the risk of
adverse impacts on the adjacent Red Moss SSSI. The following treatment
to remove pollution should be provided:
Roofs – 1 method of treatment
Car parking and smaller roads – 2 methods of treatment in series
Service yards or other uses in employment areas and main roads – 3
methods of treatment in series.
Preliminary calculations have been undertaken to estimate the required
attenuation storage volumes for the different development areas. These
are based on controlling runoff from a 1 in 100 year event (with 30%
allowance for climate change) to either the green feld runoff rate or 50%
betterment as discussed previously. The rainfall data is based on the
Wallingford Procedure.
These calculations are very conservative and the required volumes are
the maximum that are likely to be required. For example the calculations
assume all the runoff arrives instantly into the water bodies and take no
account of the time it takes for water to fow off the hard surfaces, along
swales, etc. Once these factors are taken account of in detailed design the
required volumes are likely to be smaller. The volumes of storage required
are summarised in the table below.
The additional source control storage requirements in the Table can be
readily provided by the proposed use of permeable pavements or other
solutions within each development area.
All SUDS features should be kept at as shallow a depth as possible and
any open storage features should have small rises in water levels during
rainfall events. Within the regional large storage features a rise of 1m is
acceptable for the 1 in 100 year event. Where open water features are
located within residential areas the rise should be no more than 600mm.
Appendix B - Drainage Strategy
Appendix B - Drainage Strategy
xxxii Rivington Chase Design and Access Statement
Remediation Strategy
Rivington Chase Design and Access Statement
Appendix C - Technical Summary
xxxiv Rivington Chase Design and Access Statement
Appendix C - Remediation Strategy
Site Development Proposals
The remediation and earthworks strategy for the site has evolved over
a number of years into the proposals put forward in this chapter, and in
those presented in the associated environmental statement.
In order to get to this postion a comprehensive array of technical surveys
and reviews have been undertaken, to enable the land use master plan
(described in Chapter 6) to be produced, that is both fnancially viable and
works in harmony with the inherent ground conditions of the site.
It was noted during the initial stages of the project that existing site
characteristics were incompatible with desired residential and employment
land densities. These issues were two fold;
The layout of the existing locomotive works estate was not considered
compatible with residential development if the majority of existing structures
were retained, and
The variation in existing site levels (particularly at the boundary between
the main locomotive works estate and adjacent land) was such that
development could not take place if left in their current condition.
An earth works strategy was developed to increase the developable area
of the site whilst simultaneously seeking to reduce the risks associated with
soil and groundwater contamination. Broadly, speaking this strategy entails
the completion of a cut / fll exercise in conjunction with the clearance of
existing works buildings (excluding the Heritage Core).
It is considered the majority of remedial works will be completed as part
of the bulk earth works main element of site remediation works. Further
details regarding the site redevelopment and proposed remedial earth
works are provided below.
Indicative remediation earthworks strategy diagram indicating land areas and indicative
volumes of material (refer to the environmental statement for further details and extents of
remediation zones)
Rivington Chase Design and Access Statement xxxv
Appendix C - Remediation Strategy
Earth Works Overview
As previously indicated, the site’s current confguration and characteristics
are considered to be incompatible with the requirements of the adopted
Core Strategy and specifcally the development sizes and densities. It
is considered the retention of all existing locomotive works structures,
coupled within topographic variations, are such that the development
could not be economically achieved if the site was to be left in its current
condition.
Following on from completion of the Phase 2 Site Investigation, a review of
results was undertaken, during which options were explored to assist with
the sites safe and economical redevelopment. This review culminated in the
production of an initial earth works strategy (shown above), within which a
development strategy was postulated. This strategy entailed the creation
of useable development platforms by way of a cut / fll exercise, whilst
simultaneously seeking to reduce risks posed by sources of contamination
and associated abnormal costs.
The initial model was refned by way of volumetric computer modelling
utilising information obtained during the course of site investigation works,
as well as topographical data for the site and a range of site levels.
These site levels, whist indicative, were developed based on the
philosophies of the initial earth works strategy to increase the developable
area of the site. In addition, completed cut and fll site levels were set
c0.5m lower than proposed fnished foor levels to assist developers
with drainage run / housing construction and the installation of clean soil
capping systems within garden and landscape plots.
The scope of these cut and fll works varies across the site. An indicative
cut / fll drawing indicating the areas of excavation and up fll has been
provided within ROC consulting remediation strategy.
Main Locomotive Works Estate & Extended Works Site
Site investigation works revealed the presence of limited made ground
deposits in the immediate vicinity of existing locomotive works buildings
(>2m) as well as contamination hot spots arising as a result of current and
historic industrial activity.
The properties of underlying boulder clay are such that the adoption of a
conventional foundation solution could be considered across a signifcant
portion of the site.
An initial cut / fll proposal was developed whereby existing made ground
materials across the locomotive works estate are excavated and used to
increase the thickness of capping across the adjacent extended works site.
Levels were advised with the intention of reducing the need for abnormal
foundations in new building construction across the main locomotive works
site (by exposing the underlying natural boulder clay / bedrock).
Excavated soils will be reused (subject to validation) across the extended
works site to increase capping thickness. The precise thickness of this
soil cap will be refned as each development phase is progressed to a
detailed design; however an overall aspiration for a 1m cap is envisaged.
Completion of the cut / fll works would be dependant on adequate
characterisation of site soils including the identifcation and treatment
of contamination hotsots as well as appropriate validation of excavation
material. A conceptual site cross section is provided above to further
illustrate the cut / fll proposals.
Main locomotive works earthworks philosophy
1. Reduce thickness of made ground beneath works buildings & associated abnormal costs
2. Use validated excavated spoil to increase capping thickness across extended works site
Main Locomotive Works Extended Works Site
xxxvi Rivington Chase Design and Access Statement
14.0 Remediation Strategy
Southern Employment Area
The proposed land use across this area of the site comprises employment
development as well as the construction of a site access road linking the
lower Middlebrook development site to upper works plateau.
The road, which is to be designed to adoptable standards, will cross the site
on or around the alignment indicated on the land use masterplan drawing,
rising up to the main locomotive works site by way of an embankment.
The road will cross the Aspinal Way registered landfll site as well as relic
peat deposits (up to 5m in thickness) before rising up to the existing works
plateau.
The cut / fll proposals will see the introduction of a capping layer across
the entire Southern Employment Area using materials won from earth
work excavations and demolition activities across the adjacent Locomotive
works estate. In addition, materials are to be imported to facilitate the
construction of the site access road including the embankment.
The access road is to be designed and constructed by way of the in situ
stabilisation of peat / poorly compact made ground deposits using cement
soil mixing techniques. The use of in situ treatment techniques is intended
to limit the need to excavate into the existing ground in this area. (owing
to the potential presence of Asbestos containing materials).
Similarly, by increasing levels it is hoped the existing capping thickness
across the tip (identifed as being c.0.3m) can be improved to assist with
the site’s safe development. It is anticipated development across the
Southern Employment Area will require a piled foundation solution (owning
to the poorly compact nature of underlying soils) and specifcally a driven
pile (to remove / reduce requirement to excavate into tip).
North West Previously Developed Land (PDL)
The cut / fll strategy for the North West PDL seeks to address levels
differences in the area adjacent to the existing works tip face such that a
useable development platform can be created that connects the locomotive
works estate to the lower portions of the site.
The proposed earth works will see the construction of a slope at a 1:25
even grade from the boundary with the extended works site to the north
and M61 motorway to the south. The slope will be constructed by way
of a conventional cut / fll earth works package with materials excavated
from the lower portion of the site moved to the upper extent and used to
increase site levels.
Material used for up fll will be subject to validation testing prior to excavation
and treated using Dynamic Compaction ground improvement techniques.
The approximate extent of cut / fll extent is shown in the environmental
statement.
The aspiration for cut and fll activity across this portion of the site is to
create a useable development platform linking the upper and lower portions
of the former locomotive works whilst seeking to reduce the need to adopt
abnormal foundations for new building development. The use of dynamic
compaction has been envisaged to improve the capacity of soils in areas
of both cut and fll to improve and assist with this aspiration. An indicative
site cross section is shown above to further illustrate the proposals.
Gibb Farm Land.
The use of the Gibb Farm land within the development master plan will be
for predominantly public open space, and to act as a green space buffer
between the site and adjacent Red Moss SSSI. In addition an attenuation
water body is proposed across the northern extent of the Gibb Farm estate
to assist with surface water attenuation across the residential development.
The proposed attenuation pond will comprise the excavation of clean
natural strata (as reported during the course of site investigation works).
Assuming an average pond depth of 1.5m it is anticipated the total volume
of material arising from excavations will be of the order of 30’000m3.
Subject to appropriate validation works it is envisaged this material can
be used as clean soil for use in gardens and residential areas.
The environmental statement should be referred to for all detailed technical
information in relation to the application.
North West PDL earthworks philosophy
1. Reduce thickness of made ground toward southern extent
2. Use validated excavated spoil to correct site levels and create development platform
Extended Works Site North West PDL
Indicative Phasing Strategy
Rivington Chase Design and Access Statement
Appendix D - Technical Summary
xxxviii Rivington Chase Design and Access Statement
Appendix D - Indicative Phasing Strategy
Overview
The Rivington Chase development will be delivered in three phases
over a period of 10-15 years. In developing the phasing strategy for the
development two phasing options have been created. There are a number
of factors that have been taken into account for this decision, including:
• The remediation process
• Land ownerships and current land uses within the development site
• The provision of community facilities and services at the appropriate
time.
• Housing land supply and housing need within Horwich
• Employment land supply within Horwich
• Financial Viability
The need to apply the principles of good design and accessibility through
each phase of the proposed development, has also had a signifcant
bearing on the phasing options that are put forward.
Option A
The principles associated with Option A of the phasing strategy shows that
development progresses from the south of the site. Firstly, the Armstrong’s
site will be de-commissioned and the access route from Aspinall way will
be created. Secondly, the Heritage Core will be developed alongside a
range of housing land and lastly the fnal areas of housing will be developed
together with the fnal access point onto Crown Lane. The following
paragraphs set out the detail of each phase:
Phase 1
During the frst stages of the development it will be important to create
new connections into the site to allow a variety of access points. In this frst
phase the Armstrong’s site will be de-commissioned to provide housing
land and a new access point from Chorley New Road. This will allow early
pedestrian and cycle links to be developed between Horwich, the new
residential areas and a series of new public open spaces.
A new road link from Aspinall Way will provide further connections to
Middlebrook with employment / D1 land released to form a gateway
entrance from the south. The initial phases of remediation and construction
works will also enable the structural landscape to be developed, providing
increased access for residents together with a developing diversity of
habitats within the existing woodland and open park spaces.
Overall, 20.68 hectares (gross) of land will be released as part of the phase
1 development.
Phase 2
During phase two, a further 10.72 hectares (gross) of residential land
will be released alongside the development of 4.48 hectares (gross) of
the Heritage Core and a small area of employment land that will form the
centre point of the site. The creation of the Heritage Core at this point will
strengthen the development’s character, provide an important draw for
the future phases and create further routes and connections into the site
and landscape spaces.
As the number of residential units increase the rising population will bring
an increased level of activity to the main areas of landscape and open
space. During this phase the scheme will respond to this by providing
an increasing level of amenity and access for the residents, alongside
an enhanced diversity of habitats and buffer protection to the Red Moss
SSSI and SBI.
Phase 3
The fnal phase of the development will see the remaining 20.33 hectares
(gross) of residential land developed alongside a new pedestrian and road
connection into Crown Lane which in turn will provide the full range of
movement connections to the surrounding road and footpath network.
During this phase, the structural landscape works will be completed. The
initial landscape phases will be reaching maturity, enhancing habitats and
providing an established framework of landscape and public spaces.
Rivington Chase Design and Access Statement xxxix
Appendix D - Indicative Phasing Strategy
Phase 1
Phase 2
Phase 3
Strategic Open Space &
Landscape (20.36 ha gross)
Indicative phasing plan option A
xl Rivington Chase Design and Access Statement
Option B
In terms of development order, Option B follows a reverse set of principles
to those established in Option A. Within this option, the site is developed
with the initial phases incorporating the Loco Works access road and the
access onto Crown Lane. Further phases include the construction of the
Aspinall Way access point which enables some of the existing industrial
uses of the site to be retained. The later phases progress along the Former
Loco Works site culminating with the decommissioning of the Armstrong’s
site and the creation of the fnal access point onto Chorley New Road.
Phase 1
The phase 1 development will see the creation of numerous access points
into the site. Residential access will be provided from an upgraded Loco
Works entrance together with a new access onto Crown Lane to the west.
A range of pedestrian and cycle links will provide access into the site and
to the adjacent open spaces.
Throughout Phase 1 an overall area of 20.73 hectares (gross) of residential
land will be released.
The addition of the new road from Aspinall Way will link into the Middlebrook
development, provide further employment / D1 land of 4.9 hectares (gross)
and provide a separate access for commercial traffc using the Loco Works
industrial estate.
Phase 2
The development of 4.08 hectares (gross) of the Heritage Core alongside
a small area of employment land will signify the start of Phase 2 with the
retained buildings and adjacent residential land of 13.61 hectares (gross)
providing a change of character and focal point for the development.
Additional road and pedestrian links will allow residents to access the
wider areas of public space. As the residential population increases the
extent of publicly accessible landscape space will be increased to provide
a range of amenity and play space. Alongside these spaces, the habitat
and ecological zones will be developed to enhance and protect the existing
habitats on site and the adjacent Red Moss SSSI and SBI.
Phase 3
During the fnal phase of the development the Armstrong’s site will be
decommissioned allowing the development of 12.89 hectares (gross) of
residential land alongside the fnal access point onto Chorley New Road
and the public transport and pedestrian link onto Mansell Way.
Additional enhancements to public spaces and the landscape setting of
the development will be implemented, which, alongside the initial phases of
the structural landscape will present a maturing setting for the development
as a whole.
Appendix D - Indicative Phasing Strategy
Rivington Chase Design and Access Statement xli
Phase 1
Phase 2
Phase 3
Strategic Open Space &
Landscape (20.36 ha gross)
Indicative phasing plan option B
Appendix D - Indicative Phasing Strategy