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Characteristics of the Rose Flower

By Rose Brown, eHow Contributor






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The rose has been dubbed "the Queen of Flowers."
For centuries, the rose flower has been synonymous with love, romance, beauty and
pleasure, as well as with healing, personal growth and spirituality. Few flowers can boast
such a broad assortment of meanings and purposes to such a variety of cultures
throughout the world. But the rose, also known as "the Queen of Flowers," is a truly
singular creation. This most beloved of blooms possesses several recognizable
characteristics that distinguish it from many other flowers.
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The Characteristics of Roses
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1. Family
o Roses are part of the Rosaceae family, which is composed of 3,000 different plant species,
including raspberry plants, strawberry plants and almond, cherry, apple and pear trees.
Species within this family share certain characteristics, including alternate, composite or
simple leaves; flowers with five segments, and many stamens.
Fragrance
o Roses are renowned for their heavenly fragrance. Different varieties of roses have different
scents; some are fruity, some are flowery; others are even reminiscent of tea. Roses
classified as old garden roses are generally more fragrant than modern roses, which are any
roses identified after 1872. Old garden roses include China roses, tea roses, moss roses,
Damask roses and bourbon roses.
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Shape
o The first roses, which were wild roses, were round in shape and had five petals. Today's
roses, some of which have hundreds of densely packed petals, are a result of breeding. All
roses, however, have retained the round shape of the first roses, no matter how many petals
they have. Roses are radially symmetrical---their petals are evenly distributed around their
centers.
Color
o Roses come in a kaleidoscopic assortment of colors, with more colors to choose from than
any other flower. From pure, simple white to boldly two-toned orange and red flowers, roses
are available in enough hues to suit virtually anyone's taste. Some rose colors are associated
with different sentiments; for example, red roses represent love and passion, while yellow
roses symbolize friendship.
Perennial
o Roses are perennial flowers. This means that, unlike annuals, they grow back year after
year. With proper care, rose plants can live extremely long lives---sometimes hundreds of
years. Roses thrive in well-drained soil where they can be exposed to optimal sunlight. In
cool climates, they do not bloom in the winter, and benefit from regular pruning.


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Characteristics of Lilies
By Nicole Crawford, eHow Contributor




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True lilies are bulbs that belong to the Lilium family.
The lily's showy flowers earn it the nickname "Queen" or "Grand Dame" of the garden. In fact, many flowers
that are commonly referred to as lilies, such as canna and calla lilies, do not actually belong to the lily family.
True lilies belong to the Lilium family, which is a part of the larger Liliacaeae family. Although specific
characteristics vary by species, most lilies have certain features that distinguish them from non-lily plants.
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The Characteristics of a Water Lily
The Parts of a Lily Flower
1. The Lily Bulb
o True lilies grow from bulbs rather than seed. Mike's Backyard Garden describes the lily bulb as resembling an
artichoke. The bulb has several compacted scales which develop into the lily's leaves. One way to differentiate
lily species is to look at the color of the bulb scales, which can be yellow, white or reddish-purple. At the base of
the scales is the basal plate, which produces scales, buds and roots. Before the plant develops roots and leaves,
the scales provide nourishment for the plant. Once the lily has emerged from the bulb, the stem roots feed the
plant, and the basal roots at the very bottom of the bulb provide support.
Physical Characteristics
o According to the Pacific Northwest Lily Society, lilies share a variety of physical characteristics. Flowers always
have three outer sepals and three petals, although these look very much the same and are usually called tepals.
Flowers also have six stamens, which are tipped with pollen-filled anthers. The color of the pollen is usually
yellow, orange or brown. It stains very easily, so always be cautious when transporting or handling lily flowers.
Lilies also tend to have long, thin leaves and unbranched stems.
o
Growing Requirements
o Once again, although growing requirements vary by cultivar, most lilies share many growing preferences. Most
lilies prefer well-drained soils with a pH between six and seven. Raised beds and sloped surfaces encourage
better drainage and are desirable for gardeners with heavy soil. Lilies also need to be planted deep in the soil
since they produce stem roots above the bulb; the exception to this requirement is the lilium candidum variety.
The Genus Lilium recommends covering the bulb with soil about two to four times its own height. Most
varieties also need at least six hours of sunlight each day.


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Characteristics of Flowers
By Neal Litherland, eHow Contributor




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Intro
flowers(Photo: BananaStock/BananaStock/Getty Images)
While many flowers are valued for their beauty, and there is a great variety from one flower to the next, there are
general characteristics that separate flowers from the rest of the plant kingdom.


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Blossom
flowers(Photo: BananaStock/BananaStock/Getty Images)
The most notable part of a flower is the blossom. The blossom is often a showy, colorful collection of petals that grows at the top of
a stem. Often the blossom emits a pleasant aroma unique to each type of flower. Blossoms are often the parts of flowers that people
are most concerned with due to their pleasing aspects.


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Reproduction
flowers(Photo: Ryan McVay/Photodisc/Getty Images)
Inside the blossom of a flower is the reproductive organs of the flower. The petals enclose a pistil, stamen or sometimes both. The
petals protect the reproductive parts from outside interferences. Some varieties of flower may fertilize themselves, but often they will
need the help of outside forces (commonly insects and birds) to pollinate or fertilize.


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Reproduction
flowers(Photo: Ryan McVay/Photodisc/Getty Images)
Inside the blossom of a flower is the reproductive organs of the flower. The petals enclose a pistil, stamen or sometimes both. The
petals protect the reproductive parts from outside interferences. Some varieties of flower may fertilize themselves, but often they will
need the help of outside forces (commonly insects and birds) to pollinate or fertilize.


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Stem
flowers(Photo: Hemera Technologies/AbleStock.com/Getty Images)
All flowers have a stem, no matter how small the flower. A stem is a stalk that attaches the blossom at one end to the roots at the
other end. Through the stem passes water and energy to keep the blossoms healthy, and to provide nutrients for the reproductive
process when it begins.


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Roots
flowers(Photo: Hemera Technologies/AbleStock.com/Getty Images)
All flowers, and all plants in general, have roots. The roots of the flower (or of the larger plant which the flower may grow from in
some cases) anchor it to the soil, as well as absorb water and nutrients from the earth. Like any other plant, the roots act as a
combination of a foundation and "mouth" to absorb needed nutrients.


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Rose
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
For other uses, see Rose (disambiguation).
Rose

Rosa rubiginosa
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Plantae
(unranked): Angiosperms
(unranked): Eudicots
(unranked): Rosids
Order: Rosales
Family: Rosaceae
Subfamily: Rosoideae
Genus: Rosa
L.
Species
See List of Rosa species
Synonyms
Hulthemia Dumort.
Hulthemosa Juz. (Hulthemia Rosa)
A rose is a woody perennial of the genus Rosa, within the family Rosaceae. There are over 100 species. They
form a group of plants that can be erect shrubs, climbing or trailing with stems that are often armed with
sharp prickles. Flowers vary in size and shape and are usually large and showy, in colours ranging from white
through yellows and reds. Most species are native to Asia, with smaller numbers native to Europe, North
America, and northwest Africa. Species, cultivars and hybrids are all widely grown for their beauty and often
are fragrant. Rose plants range in size from compact, miniature roses, to climbers that can reach 7 meters in
height. Different species hybridize easily, and this has been used in the development of the wide range
of garden roses