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STRUCTURED CURRICULUM LESSON PLAN

Day: 078 Subject: Mathematics Grade Level: 4

Correlations (SG,CAS,CFS): 6A3

ITBS/TAP: ISAT:
Perform arithmetic operations involving
integers, fractions, decimals, and percents

Unit Focus/Foci

Decimals

Instructional Focus/Foci

Reading, writing, and identifying decimals expressed through thousandths

Materials

Six-Group Activity: Decimals (place value)


Decimal mods
Overhead projector
Overhead transparencies
Students’ homework papers
Place value chart

Educational Strategies/Instructional Procedures

Warm-up Activity:

Teacher will tell students to pretend they each have $5.00 and want to purchase specific items.
Teacher will read an item and its price. Students will raise their left hands if they have enough
money, and their right hands if they do not. (Students will ignore sales tax for this exercise.)

Two magazines for $1.95 each (left hands)


Five notebooks for $1.10 each (right hands)
Two T-shirts for $2.50 each (left hands)
Four candy bars fo r $1.10 each (left hands)
Four erasable pens for $1.25 each (right hands)

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Lesson:

Have students trade homework decimals and answer each others questions. Students will grade
each other’s answers. Ask each pair to choose one of their decimals and “teach” information
about it to the class, using overhead projector.

Must write their decimal on the place value chart (previously prepared on a transparency by the
teacher), read it, point to each digit, and say its place and value.

They must explain how they know their answers are correct. (For example, “I know that I
multiply as I move to the left, or divide as I move to the right. I know a 3 in the tens place is
worth ten times the value of a 3 in the ones place, and that a 3 in the ones place is worth one-
tenth the value of a 3 in the tens place, etc. They must ask if the class has any questions about
anything they said, or did not say.

Teacher will then model different ways of reading a decimal. For example, the decimal 58.47
could be read at five eight point four seven, five-eight point forty-seven, or five-eight and forty-
seven hundredths. Student volunteers will practice reading some of the homework decimals in
these different ways.

Teacher will display the flats, rods, cubes, and tiles from the decimal mods kit and ask volunteers
to review their names and values. Teacher will then give each student a large cubical base ten
block and state that this figure is now worth one or 1.0. Ask them what this does for the value of
the other figures. (The flat is now worth one tenth, the rod worth one hundredth, the cube worth
one thousandth.

Ten Statements

Review the ten statements and have the students write yes if they heard it in today’s lesson and
no if they did not. If the answer is no say, The statement is true, but it was not heard in today’s
lesson.

1) A digit in the thousandths place is worth one-tenth the value of a digit in the hundredths
place. (yes)
2) A digit in the ones place is worth 100 times more than a digit in the hundredths pace. (yes)
3) A percent can be changed to a decimal. (no)
4) Twelve and eight tenths is greater than twelve and 79 hundredths because eight tenths equals
eighty hundreds. (no)
5) There are 1000 grams in a kilogram. (yes)

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6) Twenty dollars minus eighty-five cents is nineteen dollars and fifteen cents. (yes)
7) The first three decimal places are tenths, hundredths, and thousandths. (yes)
8) A decimeter is one tenth of a meter. (no)
9) A decameter is ten meters. (yes)
10) When reading a number, say “and” whenever you see a decimal point. (yes)

Free Choice Lesson

Have the students choose a lesson from the Free Choice Activity Sheet (one box per day).

Six Group Activity

Have a group of six students, two from each ability level, complete teacher directed activity
sheet Decimals (place value)

Math Workshop

Have the students work in the Math Workshop after completing their Free Choice Lesson.

Integration with Core Subject(s)

LA: Understanding explicit, factual information


Understanding the meaning of words in context
SC: Apply scientific method to solve problems
Analyze and interpret data
SS: Read and interpret maps, charts, tables, graphs, and cartoons
Sequence information, especially using timelines
Select appropriate information for intended purpose

Connection(s)

Enrichment:

Fine Arts:

Home: Find the total cost of groceries for the family for a week; then estimate the total cost for
the year (parent and student).

Remediation: See attached Six Group Activity Sheet Decimals: Place value

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Technology:

Assessment

Student performance on homework assignment.

Homework

Each student will write two original word problems relating to place value of decimals.

Teacher Notes

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Six Group Activity

Decimals: Place value

Materials:
15 (3 x 5) index cards
1 black marker
1 pencil
1 (9 ½ x 6 ½) envelope

Prepare these index cards using the black marker and the pencil to write the answers on the back.

1. 264.20 2. 54,912 3. 8,342.09 4. 37.045 5. 39.264


6. 391.40 7. 795.261 8. 471.003 9. 921.203 10. 926.15
11. 3.09 12. 1314.26 13. 596.263 14. 45.391 15. 376.02

1. For the first five numbers, what place is the 4 in?


2. For the second, five numbers ask: What place is the 1 in?
3. For the third set, write the place value for the three?

Answers:
1. ones
2. thousands
3. tens
4. hundredths
5. thousandths
6. ones
7. thousandths
8. ones
9. ones
10. tenths
11. ones
12. hundreds
13. thousandths
14. tenths
15. hundreds

Copy and use as a study board with the lesson

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M H T T T T H T O ⋅ T H T
I U H E H H U E N E U H
L N O N O O N N E N N O
L D U U U D S S T D U
I R S S S R H R S
O E A A A E S E A
N D N N N D D N
S D D D S T D
S S S H T
S H
S
9 4 8 0 1 3 7 . 6 2 5

A place value chart shows the value of each digit in a number, depending on its position in the
number. For example, the place value chart above shows that the 1 is in the hundreds place. The
value is 1 × 100 or 100. The 8 is in the ten-thousands place. Its value is 8 × 10,000 or 80,000.

Show the students examples of different numbers on the place value chart and ask the question:

What place is the number on the chart?


The 9 is in what place on the chart? (millions)
The 5 is in what place on the chart? (thousandths)
The 0 is in what place on the chart? (thousands)
The 8 is in what place on the chart? (ten thousands)

Tell the students that they are going to do an activity called “Place Value.” Say, “I am going to
lay a card on the table and I want you to write the value of the 4 with the first five cards.” When
the students complete the first five cards, give the students directions for the next set of five
cards which would be the value of the 1, the last set will be the value of the 3.

Lay a card on a flat surface and say “Write the value of this number,” give the students 3 to 4
seconds to write the answer. Turn the card over to reveal the answer and say: ”The answer
is……” Continue until you finish the cards.

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STRUCTURED CURRICULUM LESSON PLAN

Day: 079 Subject: Mathematics Grade Level: 4

Correlations (SG,CAS,CFS): 6B1

ITBS/TAP: ISAT:
Perform arithmetic operations involving
decimals

Unit Focus/Foci

Decimals

Instructional Focus/Foci

Place value

Materials

Six-Group Activity: Decimals (number line)


Decimal mods / overhead projector / overhead transparencies

Educational Strategies/Instructional Procedures

Warm-up Activity:

Write the following five sets of numbers on the chalkboard.


$2.80 $2.85
$0.025 $0.25
$2.50 $2.05
$10.440 $10.52
$315,000 $315.10

The students are to copy and compare using the symbols <, >, and = (“less than,” “greater than,”
and “equal to”). *Note: These symbols have been introduced previously. These symbols should
be visible on classroom teaching displays, and should be recorded in the student notebooks. If
there are students who have difficulty with the use of the symbols, six-group activity may be
used to reteach necessary skills.

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Have volunteers to share answers with the class. Class will discuss answers, while students
correct their papers.

Lesson:

The teacher will distribute decimal mods to class. The teacher will have sorted materials into
sets containing: one flat, ten rods, ten cubes, and ten tiles. (These materials may be used
individually or in pairs.) Allow five to seven minutes for students to explore and become
familiar with materials. As a volunteer to tell what he/she has noticed about the materials. You
should have responses like this, “ten of these will make or is equal to one of those,” etc.

The teacher will display one of each figure from the overhead or chalkboard, tell its name and
value.

Example: This is a cube. It equals one-hundredth or (0.01). This is a tile. A tile is equal to one
thousandth or (0.001). The students will draw pictures of each figure, write its name and value
in decimal notation.

Write a whole number such as 6,452, 279 on the chalkboard or over head transparency.

While pointing to each digit, ask what place it is in. Ask students what they are actually doing as
they move to the left (multiplying by ten); as they move to the right (dividing by ten).

Annex a four place decimal to this whole number (Ex. 23,532,598,135). Starting at the nine, ask
students to predict the name of the place that the eight is in. Remind them to use the decimal
mods and refer to their notes to help find the answer. Students should be able to state that this
1
place is one-tenth of one, and can be written 0.1 or . Continue discussion as to the place
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value of the 1, the 3, and the 5. Stress that they are continuing the pattern that they saw in the
whole number of dividing by ten each time they move one place to the right. Ask students why
there is no “oneth” place. (Answer: there isn’t a “oneth” place because the first decimal place is
one-tenth of one; therefore its place is the tenth place).

Returning to the number (23,532,698,135), ask for the value of each digit. Example: The two,
in the millions place has a value of two millions (2,000,000). The three in the thousandths place
has a value of three thousandths (or 3,000). The three thousandths place has a value of three
thousandths (or 0.003). The teacher should display both ways of writing the value of the digits.
*Note: Students should write this in their notes.

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Ten Statements

Review the ten statements and have the students write yes if they heard it in today’s lesson and
no if they did not. If the answer is no, say: The statement is true, but it was not heard in today’s
lesson.

1) The top number in a fraction is called the numerator. (no)


2) A tile in the decimal mods is worth 0.001. (yes)
3) Ten rods in the decimal mods kit equals one flat. (yes)
4) Some of the multiples of two are four, six, and eight. (no)
1
5) In the decimal mods kit, the value of a rod is of the value of a flat. (yes)
10
6) There is no “oneth” place in our number system. (yes)
7) The factors of eight are one, two, four, and eight. (no)
8) One tenth is the first decimal place to the right of the decimal point. (yes)
9) A five in the tenths place is worth ten times more than a five in the hundredths place. (yes)
10) A decimal can be converted into percent. (yes)

Free Choice Lesson

Have the students choose a lesson from the Free Choice Activity Sheet (one box per day).

Six Group Activity

Have a group of six students, two from each ability level, complete teacher directed activity
sheet Decimals (number line)

Math Workshop

Have the students work in the Math Workshop after completing their Free Choice Lesson.

Integration with Core Subject(s)

LA: Understanding explicit, factual information


Understanding the meaning of words in context
SC: Apply scientific method to solve problems
Analyze and interpret data
SS: Read and interpret maps, charts, tables, graphs, and cartoons
Sequence information, especially using timelines
Select appropriate information for intended purpose

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Connection(s)

Enrichment:

Fine Arts:

Home: Select 5 items from a mail-order catalog and calculate the total sales tax and any
shipping charges (parent and student).

Remediation: See attached Six Group Activity Sheet Decimals: Number line

Technology:

Assessment

Teacher observation of class participation

Homework

Students will find newspaper or magazine articles containing decimals, cut these out and tape or
paste them to notebook paper. If they cannot find articles, they may write five decimals of their
own. They will make up five questions about each decimal, which are similar to questions
discussed today, or which reflect questions they are interested in, or concepts they are still
confused by.

Teacher Notes

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Six Group Activity

Decimals: Number line (graphing decimals)

Materials:
7 (5 x 7) index cards
10 (3 x 5) index cards
Contact paper
7 black crayons or washable markers (fine line)
1 paper towel to be cut up into 6 pieces
1 pencil
1 (9 ½ x 6 ½) envelope

Prepare these 5x7 index cards. Copy the number line and tape it to the 5 x 7 index card. Cut the
contact paper the same size as the 5 x 7 card and cover the card with the contact paper.

0 .5 1 1.5 2 2.5 3 3.5 4 4.5 5

Prepare these 3x5 index cards using the black marker.


2; 1.3; 2.5; 4.8; 3.7; 0.75; 4.2; 5; 1.5; 2.2

The teacher will show the answers on their graph card. Xerox this study board to aide in
reteaching of this activity.

Graphing decimals

The number line below shows each whole number divided into ten equal parts, or tenths.

0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

From one number to the next number there are ten tenths.

Example:
0 1

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Bernadette’s eight and six tenths are recorded on the number line.

Carl did four and five tenths hours and it is recorded on the number line.

Say this to the students:

We are going to do an activity that requires you to plot numbers on the number line. I am going
to show you a card and I want you to use the crayon or marker to plot your answer. The teacher
will place an index card on a flat surface. Give the students 3 to 4 seconds to mask their answer.
The teacher should use the extra card to mark the correct answer to show the students. Before
you show the correct answer say, “The answer is……” do the remaining cards the same way.
Store the index cards and study board in the 9 ½ x 6 ½ envelope.

Tell the students that they are going to do an activity that calls for them to plot numbers on the
number line. Lay a card on the table and allow students to solve the problem. While revealing
the answer and say, ”The answer is……” Store the activity and study board in the 9 ½ x 6 ½
envelope.

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STRUCTURED CURRICULUM LESSON PLAN

Day: 80 Subject: Mathematics Grade Level: 4

Correlations (SG,CAS,CFS): 6B1

ITBS/TAP: ISAT:
Perform arithmetic operations involving
decimals

Unit Focus/Foci

Decimals

Instructional Focus/Foci

Comparing and ordering

Materials

Six-Group Activity: Decimals (comparing and ordering)


Overhead projector
Overhead transparencies

Educational Strategies/Instructional Procedures

Lesson:

Teacher will dictate a number such as 420.086. Students will write this number on their papers.
Teacher gives directions such as “Circle the digit in the hundreds place. Underline the digit in
the hundredths place. Put a box around the digit which is worth ten times as much as the eight,”
etc. Volunteers will come to the overhead projector to show how they followed each direction
and explain why.

Direct students to take notes. Teacher will stress the importance of writing decimals vertically
when comparing or ordering them, and that they can annex zeroes to the right of any decimal
without changing the value of that decimals. Annexing zeroes gives each decimal an equal
number of digits and makes it easier to see which one is greater or less than the other. For
example, if you are asked to compare 4.6 and 9.27, you may write these decimals the following
way.

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9.27
4.6

A student looking at the problem the way it was originally written may think the first fraction is
smaller because three is smaller than twenty-seven. However, when problems are written
vertically and zeroes are annexed to the right, it is easy to see that 40 hundredths is greater than
29 hundredths.

Students will complete five problems from part 1 and 5 problems from part 2 on p. 64. Students
may choose to work alone or with a partner.

Student volunteers will provide answers for problems they completed, and explain their methods
for comparing and ordering. Teacher will accept alternate methods if they are logical and if they
will work all the time.

Teacher will display 15.79 and 15.8 and ask whether the first one is greater than, equal to, or less
than the second one, and why.

Ten Statements

Review the ten statements and have the students write yes if they heard it in today’s lesson and
no if they did not. If the answer is no, say: The statement is true, but it was not heard in today’s
lesson.

1) When comparing two decimals that are written horizontally, it may be helpful to rewrite
them vertically. (yes)
2) You can annex as many zeroes as you want to the right of a decimal without changing the
value of that decimal. (yes)
3) Eight equals eight point zero equals eight point zero. (yes)
4) Four tenths is greater than thirty-nine hundredths. (yes)
5) To multiply two fractions, first multiply the numerators, then multiply the denominators.
(no)
6) After multiplying two decimals, make sure your product has the same number of decimal
points that you had in your factors. (no)
7) If you have a remainder after doing a division problem, you can sometimes express that
remainder as a decimal. (no)
8) Six is equal to six point zero. (yes)
9) Seven point ten is greater than seven point zero one. (yes)
10) Two point eight six is equal to two point eight six zero. (yes)

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Free Choice Lesson

Have the students choose a lesson from the Free Choice Activity Sheet (one box per day).

Six Group Activity

Have a group of six students, two from each ability level, complete teacher directed activity
sheet Decimals (comparing and ordering)

Math Workshop

Have the students work in the Math Workshop after completing their Free Choice Lesson.

Integration with Core Subject(s)

LA: Understanding explicit, factual information


Understanding the meaning of words in context
SC: Apply scientific me thod to solve problems
Analyze and interpret data
SS: Read and interpret maps, charts, tables, graphs, and cartoons
Sequence information, especially using timelines
Select appropriate information for intended purpose

Connection(s)

Enrichment: Have students find the frequencies of their five favorite radio stations (example -
107.5) and graph them in order of decreasing MHz/kHz.

Fine Arts:

Home: Compare the cost of different brands of one item in the supermarket to find the best buy
(parent-child).

Remediation: See attached Six Group Activity Sheet Decimals: Comparing and ordering

Technology:

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Assessment

Completed assignment, class participation

Homework

Students may select one worksheet (Reteaching, Practice, or Enrichment) to complete, after
teacher displays and explains directions for each. Or, teacher may assign the proper worksheet
to each student, depending on his or her informal observations of level of mastery.

Teacher Notes

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Six-Group Activity

Decimal (Comparing and ordering decimals)

Materials:
10 index cards (5 x 7)
1 black marker
1 pencil
1 envelope (9 ½” x 6 ½”)

Prepare the index cards using the black marker to write problems on the front of the cards and
use the pencil to write the answers on the back.

1. 450.17; 450.1; 450.09 6. 34.2; 39.02; 39.1


2. 58.83; 58.71; 55.84 7. 40.3; 41.2; 42.2
3. 39.09; 36.6; 32.91 8. 5.75; 15.75; 57.5
4. 27.08; 29.14; 29.32 9. 429.02; 429.39; 429.6
5. 1.15; 1.26; 0.94 10. 201.5; 201.6; 201.9

Answers:

1. 450.09; 450.1; 450.17


2. 55.84; 58.71; 58.83
3. 32.91; 36.6; 39.09
4. 27.08; 29.14; 29.32
5. 0.94; 1.15; 1.26
6. 34.2; 39.02; 39.1
7. 40.3; 41.2; 42.2
8. 5.75; 15.75; 57.5
9. 429.02; 429.39; 429.6
10. 201.5; 201.6; 201.9

Copy this study board and use it to reteach the concepts of comparing and ordering decimals.

Decimals (Comparing and ordering decimals)

Say: When comparing decimals, look from left to right.


Example: 3.068, 3.7, 3.084

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Look at the place value chart.

Ones . tenths hundredths Thousandths


3 . 0 6 8
3 . 7
3 . 0 8 4

First compare the whole numbers.

The ones value for each number is the same.

Next look at the tenths place.

0.7 > 0.0 so 3.7 is the greatest number.

Look at the hundredths place.

0.08 > 0.06 so 3.068 is the least number.

Tip: The further the numbers go back behind the decimal, the smaller it gets. .084 is in the same
place value space as .068 so compare the number, .084 is larger than .068.

Show the students 201.5 and 201.66. Have them look at the whole numbers first. 201 and 201
are the same. Now look at the first number behind the decimal points; they are 5 and 6. The
number 6 is larger than 5, so the number 201.66 is larger than 201.5.

Tell the students that you are going to show them some cards with sets of decimal numbers on
them and you want them to put the numbers in order from least to greatest. Allow students to
use the place value chart if they need it.

Lay a card on a flat surface and give the students up to one minute to write the numbers in order.
When you turn the card over to reveal the answer say: The answer is…… Continue with the
remaining index cards until finished. Call the next group and do the same activity. Store the
index cards and study board in the 9 ½” x 6 ½” envelope.

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STRUCTURED CURRICULUM LESSON PLAN

Day: 081 Subject: Mathematics Grade Level: 4

Correlations (SG,CAS,CFS): 6C1

ITBS/TAP: ISAT:
Perform arithmetic operations involving
decimals

Unit Focus/Foci

Decimals

Instructional Focus/Foci

Adding and subtracting decimals and describing and demonstrating understanding of the inverse
relationship between adding and subtracting

Materials

Six-Group Activity: Decimals (tenths)


Overhead projector
Overhead transparencies

Educational Strategies/Instructional Procedures

Warm-up Activity:

Ask the students to show thumbs up if they have enough money to purchase the item and thumbs
down if they do not have enough money to purchase the items.

Students have $100.00.

Do you have enough money to purchase? ↑thumbs up, ↓thumbs down

1. four bath robes that cost $29.00 each ___↓


2. A video game that cost $59.00 and 3 cartridges for $4.99 each ___ ↑
3. Six cassettes that cost $9.99 each and 4 games that cost $8.50 each ___↑

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Teacher may choose to do a couple of additional warm-up. Examples if needed.

Lesson:

Write sample problems on transparency and explain, step-by-step, how to write decimal
problems vertically, and line decimal points up in order to add or subtract. The sample problems
all deal with money, so this is a review of a previous lesson. If a group of students seems to still
be having problems with adding or subtracting money, the teacher can use the play money set
during the six-group activity.

Examples: In order to add, the problem $0.70 + $8.98 should be written as follows.

$0.70
×$8.98

In order to subtract, the problem must be written as $15 - $12.87


$15.00
−$12.87

Circulate giving help as needed. Students may work alone or with a partner. If partners get
stumped, they may also ask other student/partners for help. After sufficient time is allowed,
answers will be discussed as a whole class. Student volunteers may come to the chalkboard or
overhead transparency to teach problems in which they feel confident. The teacher may teach
any problems which stumped the entire class, or which no one in class attempted.

Teacher will demonstrate that addition and subtraction are inverse operations, meaning that one
can “undo” the other. For example, if you add 9.98 to 0.80, you get 10.78. If you subtract 0.80
from 10.78, you get 9.98. If you subtract 9.98 from 10.78, you get 0.80.

Students will summarize main points from the lesson in their math journals.

Ten Statements

Review the ten statements and have the students write yes if they heard it in today’s lesson and
no if they did not. If the answer is no, say: The statement is true, but it was not heard in today’s
lesson.

1) When problems involving addition or subtraction of decimals are written horizontally, it is


useful to rewrite them vertically. (yes)
2) You must line up the decimal points when writing a problem vertically before you add or
subtract. (yes)

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3) The largest decimal number is not necessarily the one with the most number of digits. (yes)
4) The larger number must go on top when writing a problem vertically that involves
subtraction of decimals. (yes)
5) When subtracting decimals, you may annex as many zeroes as necessary to the right of the
decimal number. (yes)
6) Seven point four and seven point four zero have the same value. (yes)
7) Perimeter means the distance around a figure. (no)
8) Area is expressed in square units. (no)
9) There are four quarts in a gallon. (no)
10) If you pay for an item that costs $8.08 with a ten dollar bill, your change will be $1.92. (yes)

Free Choice Lesson

Have the students choose a lesson from the Free Choice Activity Sheet (one box per day).

Six Group Activity

Have a group of six students, two from each ability level, complete teacher directed activity
sheet Decimals (tenths)

Math Workshop

Have the students work in the Math Workshop after completing their Free Choice Lesson.

Integration with Core Subject(s)

LA: Understanding explicit, factual information


Understanding the meaning of words in context
SC: Apply scientific method to solve problems
Analyze and interpret data
SS: Read and interpret maps, charts, tables, graphs, and cartoons
Sequence information, especially using timelines
Select appropriate information for intended purpose

Connection(s)

Enrichment: Students can make their own cross number puzzle involving addition or
subtraction of decimals.

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Fine Arts:

Home: Parents can teach students how to write checks/balance checkbooks.

Remediation: See attached Six Group Activity Sheet Decimals: Tenths

Technology:

Assessment

Completed assignment, class participation

Homework

Students will write five story problems of their own, involving decimals.

Teacher Notes

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Six Group Activity

Decimals: Tenths

Materials:
10 (3 x 5) index cards
1 black marker
1 pencil
1 (9 ½ x 6 ½) envelope

Prepare these index cards using the black marker and use the pencil to write the answers on the
back.

4 9 8 5 3 6 1 7 1 3
2 8 14 36 6
10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10

Answers: .4 2.9 .8 8.5 14.3 .6 .1 .7 36.1 6.3

Copy this study board and use it to reteach this lesson.

Decimals - tenths

Decimals are names for fractional numbers. Fractions can be written with a denominator of 10,
100, 1000, etc. A decimal can be used to name the number.

7 5 3
= .7 = .5 2 = 2.3
10 10 10

The dot in the decimal is called the decimal point. It is written to the right of the ones place.
The first place to the right of the decimal point is the tenths place.

3
or .3 is shaded.
10

2
1 or 1.2 is shaded.
10

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A decimal with the one digit to the right of the decimal point is read as “tenths.” When a
decimal names a mixed number, the decimal point separates the whole number and fractional
part and is read as “and.”

.5 = five tenths
3.5 = three and five tenths

Go over the study board with the students using this problem
7.8
Ask these questions:

What is the whole number? (7)


What separates the whole number from the fraction? (decimal point)
What place comes after the decimal point? (tenths)
8
How would you write 7.8 as a fraction? ( 7 )
10

Tell the students that they are going to do an activity the same as the problems in the study
board. Lay a card on the table and tell students to change the number to a decimal. As you reveal
the answer say: ”The answer is……” Store the activity cards and the study board in the 9 ½ by
6 ½ envelope.

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STRUCTURED CURRICULUM LESSON PLAN

Day: 082 Subject: Mathematics Grade Level: 4

Correlations (SG,CAS,CFS): 6B3, 4; 6C4; 6D1, 2

ITBS/TAP: ISAT:
Perform arithmetic operations involving
integers, fractions, decimals, and percents

Unit Focus/Foci

Decimals

Instructional Focus/Foci

Problem-solving

Materials

Six-Group Activity: Decimals (lining decimals up)


Overhead projector

Educational Strategies/Instructional Procedures

Warm-up Activity:

Present this problem on the chalkboard.

Find a decimal number that is equally greater than 1.7 and less than 7.1 (4.4). Show how you
arrived at the answer.

Lesson:

Model problem-solving techniques, such as:

1. Skim entire problem for the main idea.


2. Read problem carefully to find out what question you are being asked to answer.
3. What key words give hints about processes you will use? 4.

499
4. What numbers are given, and what do they represent?
5. Is there any missing information?
6. Is there too much information?
7. What answer seems reasonable (an estimate)?

Teacher will also warn about certain pitfalls, such as reading too fast and not seeing the words.
Students will then choose four more problems to solve, and write their strategies for solving.
Write-ups should include any “traps” they see which might fool someone, and their own methods
for avoiding these pitfalls.

Volunteers will then discuss each problem. Allow two or three students to “teach” each problem
to show various methods that could be used in arriving at the correct answer. Stress that even if
some students did not arrive at the correct answer, their thinking steps and problem-solving
methods are still valuable.

Ask students who do not answer correctly what they would change next time they are confronted
with a similar problem. Teacher will model good strategies for any problems that were not
attempted, or for which no students had a correct answer. Students will take notes in their math
notebooks.

Ten Statements

Review the ten statements and have the students write yes if they heard it in today’s lesson and
no if they did not. If the answer is no, say: The statement is true, but it was not heard in today’s
lesson.

1) The bottom number in a fraction is called a denominator. (no)


2) Presidential elections are held every four years. (yes)
3) The next Presidential election will be in the year 2000. (yes)
4) Fractions can be used to show part of a whole. (no)
5) When you know the size and number of equal parts, you can multiply the size by the number
of equal parts to find the total. (yes)
6) Fractions can be used to show part of a set. (no)
7) When you know the total and how many equal parts, you can divide the total by the number
of equal parts to find the size of each part. (yes)
8) When you know how much an item costs and how much change someone received, you can
add to find out what amount he/she gave in payment. (yes)

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9) When you know how much money is in someone’s savings account, and what that person’s
savings goal is, you can subtract to find out how much more he/she has to save. (yes)
10) When you know a business owner’s sales and expenses for a week, you can add the sales,
and subtract the expenses to find his or her profit. (yes)

Free Choice Lesson

Have the students choose a lesson from the Free Choice Activity Sheet (one box per day).

Six Group Activity

Have a group of six students, two from each ability level, complete teacher directed activity
sheet Decimals (lining up decimals)

Math Workshop

Have the students work in the Math Workshop after completing their Free Choice Lesson.

Integration with Core Subject(s)

LA: Understanding explicit, factual information


Understanding the meaning of words in context
SC: Apply scientific method to solve problems
Analyze and interpret data
SS: Read and interpret maps, charts, tables, graphs, and cartoons
Sequence information, especially using timelines
Select appropriate information for intended purpose

Connection(s)

Enrichment: Students can write a story problem in which the final answer is already given, and
their partners will have to work backwards to fill in missing numbers and their labels.

Fine Arts:

Home: Parents can help students study for test.

Remediation: See attached Six Group Activity Sheet:

501
Technology:

Assessment

Completed assignments, class participation

Homework

1. 2.60+3.2 2. 5.26+26.3 3. 9.61+3.1 4. 10.36+9.21 5. 11.03+12.1+2.3

6. Explain in writing step by step how to solve one of the five problems.

Teacher Notes

502
Six Group Activity

Decimals: Lining decimals up

Materials:
20 index cards (3 x 5)
1 black marker
1 pencil
1 envelope (9 ½ x 6 ½)

Prepare the following index cards using the black marker to write the problems on the front of
the cards. Use the pencil to write the answers on the back of the cards.

1) 59.2 + 322.1 + .2 2) 6.1 + .002 + .1 3) 7.21 + 3.2 + 5


4) 2.34 + 1.346 + .2 5) 9 + 23.2 + 3.1 6) 6.24 + 21.1 + .21
7) 9.23 + .23 + 10.211 8) 54.12 + 321.2 + .03
9) 7.1 + 9.3 + .02 10) 5.21 + .36 + 69

Answers:
59.2 6.1 7.21 2.34
1) 322.1 2) .002 3) 3.2 4) 1.346
+ .2 + .1 +5 + .2

9 6.24 9.23 54.12


2) 23.2 6) 21.1 7) .23 8) 321.2
+ 3.1 + .21 +10.211 + .03

7.1 5.21
9) 9.3 10) .36
+ .02 +69.

Next, prepare another set of cards using the answers (addition problems) above. Write these
using black marker. On the back of the cards, write the answers to these addition problems.

1. 381.5 2. 6.202
3. 15.41 4. 3.886
5. 35.3 6. 27.55
7. 19.671 8. 375.35
9. 16.42 10. 74.57

503
Have the students who are above or at grade level write and answer the problems.

Addition of decimals

Say: When adding decimals line the points up first and then write the numbers in the correct
order. Example: If a problem
has two sets of numbers (26.3 + .021), rewrite the problem vertically.

Step 1: Write the decimals.


Step 2: Write the numbers in the correct order.
26.3
+ .021

Step 3: Then you are ready to add.


26.3
+ .021
26.321

Step 4: In the answer, bring the decimal straight down. (26.321)

Explain how to solve addition of decimals problems using the study board as a guide. After you
explain how to do the problems, tell the students that they are going to do an activity called
lining up decimals. Explain that to line the decimals up and write the numbers in the correct
order. Say: Don’t write the answer because we want to work on ordering the numbers.

Say: I am going to lay a card down and I want you to write the problem vertically. Lay one
index card on a flat surface and give the students five or six seconds to write the answer. When
the time is up, turn the index card over and say: The answer is…… Go to the next card and
repeat the process.

Tell the students that they are going to do an activity called adding decimals.

Lay a card on a flat surface Turn the card over to reveal the answer and say: The answer is…
Go to the next card and repeat the process. Call the next group and do the same activity. Store
the index cards and study board in the 9 ½” x 6 ½” envelope.

504
STRUCTURED CURRICULUM LESSON PLAN

Day: 083 Subject: Mathematics Grade Level: 4

Correlations (SG,CAS,CFS): 6A3,6; 6B1,3,4; 6C1,4; 6D1,2

ITBS/TAP: ISAT:
Computation adding and subtracting decimals

Unit Focus/Foci

Decimals

Instructional Focus/Foci

Formal Assessment-place value, comparing, addition and subtraction

Materials

Number cubes 0-5 and 5-10


Overhead projector
Overhead transparencies

Educational Strategies/Instructional Procedures

Warm-up Activity:

See attached (Mathematics Assessment)

505
Mathematics Assessment

Add, subtract, multiply and divide:

1) 5.2 2) 7.81 3) 7.69 4) 5.43


-2.15 -3.20 +3.20 +4.83

5) 1.72 + 3.14 =

6) 5.29 - 3.24 =

7) 14.82 - 11.1 =

8) 4.5 + 6.5 =

9) John rode his bike 500 meters in 1 minute and 49.7 seconds. Tory rode 500 meters in two
minutes and 3.1 seconds. By how much did John beat Tory?
__________________________

10) 7.2 x 10 = 11) 63.4 ÷ 10 =

12) 26.1 x 100 = 13) 42.5 ÷ 10 =

14) 8.9 x 1000 = 15) 44.8 ÷ 100 =

506
Compare: Draw <, >, or = to make each statement true.

16) 0.3 ___ 0.4 17) 0.5 ___ 0.50

18) 0.947 ___ 8.32 19) 4.703 ____ 4.73

20) 7.99 ____ 8.0

21) Round 0.587 to the nearest hundredths.

22) Round 0.72 to the nearest tenth.

23) Round 0.1459 to the nearest thousandths.

24) Round 2.79 to the nearest tenth.

25) Round 5.368 to the nearest hundredths.

There is no Warm-up, remediation, or homework today. As a free choice activity, students may
choose one or more games to play when their tests are completed.

507
Ten Statements

Review the ten statements and have the students write yes if they heard it in today’s lesson and
no if they did not. If the answer is no, say: The statement is true, but it was not heard in today’s
lesson.

No Ten Statements today.

Free Choice Lesson

Have the students choose a lesson from the Free Choice Activity Sheet (one box per day).

Six Group Activity

Have a group of six students, two from each ability level, complete teacher directed activity
sheet No Six-Group Activity today.

Math Workshop

Have the students go into the Math Workshop after completing their Free Choice Lesson.

Integration with Core Subject(s)

LA: Understanding explicit, factual information


Understanding the meaning of words in context
SC: Apply scientific method to solve problems
Analyze and interpret data
SS: Read and interpret maps, charts, tables, graphs, and cartoons
Sequence information, especially using timelines
Select appropriate information for intended purpose

Connection(s)

Enrichment:

Fine Arts:

Home:

508
Remediation:

Technology:

Assessment

Homework

Teacher Notes

Answers to Assessment:

1. 3.05
2. 4.61
3. 10.89
4. 10.26
5. 4.86
6. 2.05
7. 3.72
8. 11
9. 46.6
10. 72
11. 6.34
12. 2610
13. 4.25
14. 8900
15. 0.448
16. <
17. <
18. <
19. >
20. <
21. 0.59
22. 8
23. 146
24. 2.80
25. 5.4

509
STRUCTURED CURRICULUM LESSON PLAN

Day: 84 Subject: Mathematics Grade Level: 005

Correlations (SG,CAS,CFS): 6C2; 7B1; 8D5

ITBS/TAP: ISAT:
Perform arithmetic operations involving Solve word problems requiring computation
decimals. Choose and apply problem with decimals.
solving strategies,

Unit Focus/Foci

Decimals

Instructional Focus/Foci

Estimating products of decimals

Materials

Six-Group Activity: Decimals (rounding)

Educational Strategies/Instructional Procedures

Warm-up Activity:

a). Round these decimals to the nearest whole number.

67.15 45.674

0.6214 15.749

b). Find the sum or difference

16.3 + 40.7 92.5 - 71.3

5.006 + 442.17 + 587.408

510
Lesson:

Vocabulary - Review
Approximate, product, factors, area in context. Have student fill in blanks.

The word _____________ is a signal to estimate an answer. You can round the ___________-in
a multiplication problem and multiply them to find the ______________. You can multiply the
length of a rectangular figure by its width to find its ______________. (approximate, factors,
product, area).

Area is the amount of space covered by a flat surface.

Example: You want to cover your bedroom floor with carpet. The length of your room is 12.3.
Its width is 9.8. Find the approximate area of your floor.

Step 1: First round each decimal to the nearest whole number. 12.3 = 12 (12.3 is about equal to
12) 9.8 = 10

Step 2: Multiply the new numbers. 12 x 10 = 120. Area is always expressed in square units, so
the final estimate is 180 square feet for the room area.

Example 2: The carpet costs $18.98 per square foot. About how much should your expect to
pay to carpet your room? ( This time use a compatible number instead of rounding to the nearest
whole number. $18.98 ≈ 20. 120 square feet times $20.00 equals about $2,400. You can
expect to pay about $2,400 to carpet your room.

Ask students whether it is good to estimate more or less than the exact amount in this situation
(answer: It’s better to over-estimate because it is better to save a little too much money than to
come up short).

Give the students a few more similar problems to work with you and a few to try independently.
Close by discussing answers to the problems done independently. Discuss in depth to make sure
they understand concepts and vocabulary.

511
Ten Statements

Review the ten statements and have the students write yes if they heard it in today’s lesson and
no if they did not. If the answer is no, say: The statement is true, but it was not heard in today’s
lesson.

1) The area of a rectangular - shaped figure can be found by multiplying the length of the figure
times it width. (yes)
2) Area is expressed in square units. (yes)
3) Area is the amount of space covered by a flat surface. (yes)
4) In a multiplication problem, the numbers to be multiplied are called factors. (yes)
5) The answer to a subtraction problem is called the difference. (no)
6) The answer to a multiplication problem is called the product. (yes)
7) You can round the factors of a multiplication problem to help you estimate the answer. (yes)
8) Rounding a decimal to the nearest whole number or using compatible numbers are two ways
to help you estimate. (yes)
9) The perimeter is the distance around a figure (no).
10) The surface area of a box is the sum of the area of all of the surfaces of the box. (no)

Free Choice Lesson

Have the students choose a lesson from the Free Choice Activity Sheet (one box per day).

Six Group Activity

Have a group of six students, two from each ability level, complete teacher directed activity
sheet Decimals (rounding)

Math Workshop

Have the students go into the Math Workshop after completing their Free Choice Lesson.

Integration with Core Subject(s)

LA: Understanding explicit, factual information


Understanding the meaning of words in context
SC: Apply scientific method to solve problems
Analyze and interpret data

512
SS: Read and interpret maps, charts, tables, graphs, and cartoons
Sequence information, especially using timelines
Select appropriate information for intended purpose

Connection(s)

Enrichment: Student can measure a one inch by one inch square and cut it out. Using this as a
pattern, they can cut 100 more. They choose three rectangular objects and predict their area.
Students can cover these objects with the square inches and count them to find the exact area.
They can also count the length and width, then multiply them to verify that this is another way to
find area. This activity also reinforces the reason for reason for measuring area in square units.

Fine Arts:
Home: Parents can assist students in measuring the area of a table to buy a table cloth of the
right size, etc.

Remediation: See attached Six Group Activity Sheet Decimals: Rounding

Technology:

Assessment

Participation, completed assignment

Homework

Have students write five problems of their own involving estimating products with decimals.

Teacher Notes

513
Six-Group Activity

Decimals (Rounding)

Materials:
10 index cards (3” x 5”)
1 black marker
1 pencil
1 envelope (9 ½” x 6 ½”)

Prepare the following index cards using the black marker to write the problems on the front of
the cards and use the pencil to write the answers on the back.

Nearest Whole Number Tenths Hundredths

9.82, 28.7, 49.5 .76, .145, .98 .877, .215, .449, 36.50

Answers: 10; 29; 50; .8; 1; .88; .22; .45; 37.

Copy this study board use this to reteach the lesson.

Rounding decimals

Say: Decimals are rounded the same way whole numbers are rounded. 8.625

8.625rounded to the nearest one is 9. Since the numeral to the right of the ones (6) is 5 or
greater, the ones number is rounded up.
8.625rounded to the nearest tenth is 8.6. Since the numeral to the right of the tenths (2) is less
than 5, the tenths number is rounded down.

8.625rounded to the nearest hundredth is 8.63. Since the numeral to the right of the hundredths
(5) is 5 or greater, the hundredths number is rounded up.

Review the steps for rounding decimals and use the study board for help. Show the numbers
31.17, .98, and 4.999. Ask the students some questions about these numbers.

Say: Round 31.17 to the nearest whole number. (31)


What number are you looking at for rounding this number? (1)
Is this number greater than or less than 5? (less than)

514
Ask the same questions about the other numbers.

Tell the students that they are going to do an activity the same as the one they just did.
Lay a card on the table and give the students time to write the answer. As you reveal the answer,
say, The answer is…… Store the index cards and study board in the 9 ½” by 6 ½” envelope.

515
STRUCTURED CURRICULUM LESSON PLAN

Day: 85 Subject: Mathematics Grade Level: 4

Correlations (SG,CAS,CFS): 6C2; 6D2

ITBS/TAP: ISAT:
Perform arithmetic operations involving
decimals.
Choose and apply problem-solving strategies
for problems involving decimals.

Unit Focus/Foci

Decimals

Instructional Focus/Foci

Multiplying decimals by powers of ten.

Materials

Six-Group Activity: Decimals (hundredths)


Calculators

Educational Strategies/Instructional Procedures

Warm-up Activity:

Have students mentally solve problems similar to mental math 1) (25 × 10) and
2) (12 × 10). Remind them if necessary, to start by writing the 25 (or 12). Next count the
zeroes in the power of ten and put the same number of zeroes to the right of the first number you
wrote. So 27 × 10 = 270, 27 × 100 = 2700, 27 × 1000 = 27000 etc.

Lesson:

In your lesson on multiplying whole numbers by powers of ten, (10,100, 1000, 10,000, 100,000
etc.), you learned to write as many zeroes to the right of one factor as you see in the factor that is
the power of ten.

516
When you multiply a decimal by a power of ten, move the decimal point to the right as many
times as you see zeroes in the power of ten.

Use your calculator.

Multiply
4.86 × 10 record your results
4.86 × 100 record your results
4.86 × 1000 record your results
4.86 × 10,000 record your results

Write your own rule for multiplying a decimal by a power of ten

Predict what 4,86 × 100,000,000 would be: 486,000,000

Verify your prediction by using your calculator.

Sometimes you have enough digits within your factor to move the decimal point. Example:
92.376 × 100 = 92.376. What must you do when you do not have enough digits in your number?
(If no one volunteers, ask them to refer to the record of results from step two above). Answer:
Move the decimal point as far as you can then write as many zeroes to the right of the number as
necessary to complete the move. Example: 92.376 × 10,000 = 9,237,600

Provide guided and independent practice from selected problems in your math book. Close by
discussing answers to problems assigned in Step 6. Stress the difference between having enough
digits to move the decimal point the required number of places and not having enough digits.
(More as far as you can then add as many zeroes as necessary to the right to complete the
move). Show how this differs from writing zeroes in whole numbers.

Example: 3,914 × 1000 = 3,914,000


39.14 × 1000 = 39,140

517
Ten Statements

Review the ten statements and have the students write yes if they heard it in today’s lesson and
no if they did not. If the answer is no, say: The statement is true, but it was not heard in today’s
lesson.

1) To multiply a whole number by a power of ten, write s many zeroes to the right of that whole
number as there are zeroes in the power of ten.
2) To multiply a decimal by a power of ten, move the decimal point to the right as many places
as there are zeroes in the power of ten.
3) To divide a decimal by a power of ten, move the decimal point to the left as many places as
there are zeros in the power of ten. (no - The statement is true, but it was not discussed
today).
4) To round a decimal, look at the digit to the right of the digit to be rounded. (no)
5) To multiply a decimal by a power of ten, when you don’t have enough digits to move the
decimal point, move as far as you can, then write as many zeroes as necessary ( to the right)
to complete the move.
6) To compare decimals, write them vertically and line up the decimal points. (No)
7) Power of ten are numbers like 10, 100, 1000, etc.
8) 4.17 × 10 = 41.7
9) 4.17 × 100 = 417
10) 4.17 × 1000 - 4,170

Free Choice Lesson

Have the students choose a lesson from the Free Choice Activity Sheet (one box per day).

Six Group Activity

Have a group of six students, two from each ability level, complete teacher directed activity
sheet Decimals (hundredths)

Math Workshop

Have the students work in the Math Workshop after completing their Free Choice Lesson.

Integration with Core Subject(s)

LA: Understanding explicit, factual information


Understanding the meaning of words in context

518
SC: Apply scientific method to solve problems
Analyze and interpret data
SS: Read and interpret maps, charts, tables, graphs, and cartoons
Sequence information, especially using timelines
Select appropriate information for intended purpose

Connection(s)

Enrichment: Tell students that scientist use powers of 10 to express huge numbers for example,
the distance Neptune is from the sun is 4.5 × 109 miles. This kind of number expression is called
scientific notation.

1). 109 (read “10 to the ninth power) means to multiply 10 × 10 × 10 × 10 × 10 × 10 × 10 × 10 ×


10) and that the product contains 9 zeroes. 1,000,000,000 ( read “one billion” elicit a
volunteer to read if possible)
2). Multiply 4.5 × one billion to find the distance from Neptune 4.500,000,000 - 4,500,000,000
have a volunteer read the answer (four billion, five hundred million miles).
3). Have student write a paragraph explaining why they think scientists use scientific notation.

Fine Arts:

Home:

Remediation: See attached Six Group Activity Sheet Decimals (hundredths)

Technology:

Assessment

Class participation, completed assignment.

Homework

Tell students to explain to parents/guardians how to multiply decimals by powers of ten, then
assign parents ten problems to solve. Parents sign a form that their children explained the
concept adequately. (your can prepare the form ahead of time).

Teacher Notes

519
Six-Group Activity

Decimals (Hundredths)

Materials:
10 index cards (3” x 5”)
1 black marker
1 pencil
1 envelope (9 ½” x 6 ½”)

Prepare the following index cards using the black marker to write the problems on the front of
the cards and use the pencil to write the answers on the back.

37 19 49 98 61
4 7 1
100 100 100 100 100

7 86 4 55 2
9 9
100 100 100 100 100

Answers: .37; 4.19; 7.49; .98; 1.61; .07; .86; 9.04; .55; 9.02

Copy this study board and use it to reteach this lesson.

Decimals-Hundredths

Say: The first place to the right of the decimal point is the tenths place. The second place is the
1
hundredths place. Each figure is divided into 100 equal parts. Each part is or .01 of the
100
area.

26
or .26 is shaded.
100

520
54
1 or 1.54 is shaded.
100

Say: A decimal with one digit to the right of the decimal point is read as “tenths.” A decimal
with two digits to the right of the decimal point is read as “hundredths.”
.65 = sixty-five hundredths
.03 = three hundredths
5.32= five and thirty-two hundredths

Review the study board with the students and use this problem to ask questions.
67
10
100

521
What is the whole number? (10)
What number is in the tenths place? (6)
What number is in the hundredths place? (7)
How would you rewrite this mixed number as a decimal? (10.67)

Tell the students that they are going to do an activity that changes fractions and mixed numbers
to decimals. Lay one card on the table and give students time to write the answer. As you reveal
the answer say: The answer is…… Store the activity and the study board in the 9 ½” by 6 ½”
envelope.

522
STRUCTURED CURRICULUM LESSON PLAN

Day: 086 Subject: Mathematics Grade Level: 4

Correlations (SG,CAS,CFS): 6A1,2,3; 6B3,4; 6C1,2,3

ITBS/TAP: ISAT:
Perform arithmetic operations involving
fractions, decimals and percents

Unit Focus/Foci

Decimals

Instructional Focus/Foci

Multiplying a decimal by a whole number

Materials

Six-Group Activity: Decimals (multiplying tenths)


Decimal Mods

Educational Strategies/Instructional Procedures

Warm-up Activity:

Put the following problem on the chalkboard. Tell students to round the factors to the nearest
whole number and then multiply. *Rounded numbers at side in parenthesis.

1. 8.3 = (8) 2. 7.4 = (7) 3. 5.866 = (6)


x 2.4 = (2) x 4.4 = (4) x 2.8 = (3)

4. 4.82 x 22.1 5. 6.3 x 5.5


(5) (22) (6) (6)

523
Guide the students through the first problem without the decimal. Then remind the students to
do the following: 1. Multiply as you would if you had two whole numbers. 2. Put the decimal
point in the answer as many places from the right as it is in the decimal factor. (Example: 2 x
21.4)

Example: 21.4
x 2
42.8

Place the decimal point in the answer one place from the right.

Have students write in math journal in their own words the rule for placing the decimal in the
product.

Lesson:

After having reviewed the rules for placement of decimals in the product, (see Warm Up) put
these problems on the chalkboard. Students are to solve and place the decimal point in each
product. (Be sure to explain that if there are not enough places, that they should add a zero or
zeroes to the right of the product to make the needed places to place the decimal. (Example:
0.943 x 10,000.)

Example: 0.943 x 10,000 = 0.9430

Guided Practice:
1. 0.0004 2. 0.031 3. 4.65
x 7 x 6 x 8

*Note: Five or greater is rounded up, (4) or lesser number are rounded down.

4. 0.0571 5. 4.85 6. 14.032


x 3 x 6 x 8

To provide additional practice see any text with multiplying a decimal by a whole number may
be used. “Roll a Harder Decimal” may also be used for reinforcement. (Consult Game Mat for
rules.)

524
Ten Statements

Review the ten statements and have the students write yes if they heard it in today’s lesson and
no if they did not. If the answer is no, say: The statement is true, but it was not heard in today’s
lesson.

1) One strategy used to place decimals in products is to multiply as you would whole numbers
and count the places in the factor to place the decimal. (yes)
2) If there are not enough places to place the decimal in the product, add zeroes to the right of
the product to make digits to place the decimals. (yes)
3) The rule for rounding is five or more is rounded up less, less than five is rounded down.
(yes)
4) When you round numbers you are rounding them to the nearest whole number. (yes)
5) Equivalents are numbers that have the same value. (no)
6) To find an equivalent decimal for a fraction, divide numerator by the denominator. (no)
7) Example number two shows how zeroes are added to provide needed digits in the product to
place the decimal point. (yes)
8) Mathematical reasoning is one of the objects of the Roll a Harder Decimal Game. (yes)
9) “Roll a Harder Decimal” is designed to be played by two persons. (no)
10) The quotient in a division problem is the answer. (no)

Free Choice Lesson

Have the students choose a lesson from the Free-Choice Activity sheet (one box per day).

Six Group Activity

Have a group of six students, two from each ability level, complete teacher-directed activity
lesson: Decimals (multiplying tenths)

Math Workshop

Have the students go into the Math Workshop after completing their Free Choice Lesson.

Integration with Core Subject(s)

LA: Understanding explicit, factual information


Understanding the meaning of words in context

525
SC: Apply scientific method to solve problems
Analyze and interpret data
SS: Read and interpret maps, charts, tables, graphs, and cartoons
Sequence information, especially using timelines
Select appropriate information for intended purpose

Connection(s)

Enrichment: Use any text available with the kinds of problems in this lesson.

Fine Arts:

Home: Have students find the cost of a burger and fries from fast food establishments, and
calculate the cost to buy a meal for themselves and five friends.

Remediation: See attached Six-Group Activity Lesson: Decimals (multiplying tenths)

Technology:

Assessment

70% on items in this lesson and class participation.

Homework

Round the problems then answer them.

6.5 8.2 567 9.2 5.9


+2.4 × 3.9 - 28 +3.7 × 4.8

Teacher Notes

Answer key for Warm-up Activity:

1. 2 x 8 = 16 2. 4 x 7 = 28 3. 3 x 6 = 18 4. 5 x 22 = 110 5. 6 x 6 = 36

Answer key for Guided Practice:

1. 0.0028 2. 0.186 3. 37.20 4. 0.1713


5. 29.1 6. 112.256

526
Six-Group Activity

Decimals (Multiplying tenths)

Materials:
5 index cards (5” x 7”)
1 black marker
1 pencil
1 envelope (9 ½” x 6 ½”)

Prepare the following index cards using the black marker to write the problems on the front of
the cards and use the pencil to write the answers on the back.

209 69.8 87 9.6 2.9


× .3 × 3 × .6 × .5 × .8

Answers:
2 2 09 6 2 9.8 4
87 9.6 3 7
2.9
× .3 × 3 × .6 × .5 × .8
62.7 209.4 52.2 4.80 2.32

Copy this study board and use it to reteach this lesson.

Multiplying tenths

Say: The number of decimal places in the product equals the sum of the number of decimal
places in the factors.

Step 1: Multiply
4.3
× .3
129

Step 2: Place the decimal point in the product so that the number of places in the product is the
sum of the number of places in the factors.
4.3 ← decimal place
× .3 ← decimal place
1.29 ← 2 decimal places

Use the study board as a guide to solving and asking questions about this problem.
5.2
× .5

527
How many numbers are to the right of the decimal points? (2)
What is the first step in solving this problem? (5 × 2)
What is the answer? (10)
What is the next step? (5 × 5 and add the 1 you carried)
What is the answer? (25 + 1 = 26)
What is the answer to the multiplication portion of the problem? (260)
Where does the decimal point go in the product? (2.60)

Tell the students that they are going to do an activity similar to the problem they just worked.
Tell them you want the problem multiplied and the decimal point written in the answer. Lay a
card on the table and give the students time to write the answer. As you reveal the answer say:
The answer is…… Store the activity and the study board in the 9 ½” x 6 ½” envelope.

528
STRUCTURED CURRICULUM LESSON PLAN

Day: 087 Subject: Mathematics Grade Level: 4

Correlations (SG,CAS,CFS): 6A3; 6C1,2

ITBS/TAP: ISAT:
Perform arithmetic operations involving
fractions, decimals and percents

Unit Focus/Foci

Decimals

Instructional Focus/Foci

Zeroes in the product

Materials

Six-Group Activity: Decimals (multiplying hundredths)


Decimal Mods

Educational Strategies/Instructional Procedures

Warm-up Activity:

Tell the students that to separate the whole numbers from the fraction, a point is placed between
them. This is known as a decimal point, and a number that has a decimal point is called a
decimal number. (Put example on the chalkboard or overhead.)

Example: 538.6 means 5 hundred, 3 tens, 8 ones and 6 tenths, and is read “five hundred thirty-
eight point six”.

Thousands Hundreds Tens Ones Tenths


5 3 8 6

Explain that sometimes a number has no whole numbers, just tenths. Example: 0.2 means no
ones and 2 tenths, and is read zero point two.

529
Now have the students take out a sheet of paper, and draw boxes for a decimal number like the
following.

Examples: 1.
·
The teacher will place the following boxes on the chalkboard.

1 4 6 9

2. The students are told to choose two of the numbers from those given to make a decimal
number with ones and tenths.

3. It is possible to make 12 different decimal numbers. How many can you find? Put them in
order from largest to smallest.

(Answer: The twelve possible numbers are 9.6, 9.4, 9.1, 6.9, 6.4, 6.1, 4.9, 4.6, 4.1, 1.9, 1.6, 1.4.)

Lesson:

On the overhead or on the chalkboard, put the following examples up and explain that when the
number 8.14 is multiplied by 10 and by 100 that the position of the decimal point differs in the
two answers.

8.14 8.14 Now ask the students to write the rule for multiplying by a
x 10 x 100 power of ten (10). Show example. Answer: Move the decimal
000 000 point to the right as many places as there are zeroes in the power
8140 0000 of ten (10). Example: 12.757 x 100 = 12.75.7 = 1,275.7.
81.40 81400
814.00

*If you do not have enough places to move the decimal point write zeroes to the right of the
number. 0.842 x 10.000 = 0.8420 = 8,420

Guided Practice: Complete these exercises by placing the decimal point in the product.

1. 3.61 x 10 = 36.1 (A) 2. 0.033 x 1000 = 0.33 (A)


3. 16.8 x 1,000 = 16.800 (A) 4. 419.60 x 100 = 41960. = 41,960 (A)

530
Now have the students complete the following activity on their own.

1. 0.03 x 1000 = 30 (A)


2. 68.7 x 10 = 687 (A)
3. 0.056 x 100 = 5.6 (A)
4. Jackie is buying collector baseball cards at $0.19 each. If he buys 1000 cards how much will
they cost? $190 (A)
5. 101 = 10
102 = 10 x 10 = 100
103 = 10 x 10 x 10 = 1,000
104 = 10 x 10 x 10 x 10 = 10,000
105 = 10 x 10 x 10 x 10 x 10 = 100,00

The above configuration is an example of power of 10 . (A)

Ten Statements

Review the ten statements and have the students write yes if they heard it in today’s lesson and
no if they did not. If the answer is no, say: The statement is true, but it was not heard in today’s
lesson.

1) To separate the whole numbers from the fraction a decimal point is placed between them.
(yes)
2) A number that has a decimal point is called a decimal number. (yes)
3) When solving decimal problems it is possible to have tenths and no whole numbers. (yes)
4) The largest fraction possible from these numbers 1 4 6 9 , 9.6. (yes)
5) The smallest fraction possible using the numbers in the boxes in statement number four is
1.4. (yes)
6) A liter is the basic unit of capacity in the metric system. (no)
7) The rule for multiplying by power of ten is to move the decimal point as many places to the
right as there are zeros in the power of ten. (yes)
8) The centiliter is a unit of measure in the metric system equal to 0.01 liter. (no)
9) When solving problems with decimals, if there are not enough places to move the decimal
point you should write zeros to the left of the number. (yes)
10) Quotient is the answer in a division problem. (no)

Free Choice Lesson

Have the students choose a lesson from the Free-Choice Activity sheet (one box per day).

Six Group Activity

Have a group of six students, two from each ability level, complete teacher-directed activity
sheet: Decimals (zeros in the product)

531
Math Workshop

Have the students go into the Math Workshop after completing their Free Choice Lesson.

Integration with Core Subject(s)

LA: Understanding explicit, factual information


Understanding the meaning of words in context
SC: Apply scientific method to solve problems
Analyze and interpret data
SS: Read and interpret maps, charts, tables, graphs, and cartoons
Sequence information, especially using timelines
Select appropriate information for intended purpose

Connection(s)

Enrichment: Have students write five true/false statements about the topic. Example: It is
possible to write decimals that have no whole numbers, just tenths. 0.2, zero ones and 2 tenths.
(true)

Fine Arts:

Home:

Remediation: See attached Six-Group Activity sheet

Technology:

Assessment

Class participation, 75% on activities from the lesson.

Homework

Write three problems with zero in the product.

Teacher Notes

532
Six Group Activity

Decimals: Multiplying hundredths

Materials:
3 (5 x 7) index cards
1 black marker
1 pencil
1 (9 ½ x 6 ½) envelope

Prepare these index cards using the black marker and use the pencil to write the answers on the
back.

47.89 93.64 47.93


× 3.6 ×1.87 × 8.5

Answers:
2
95 3.3 64
2 × 1.87 6
4 7 7.2 93
4 2 7.2 89
× ×
2
3.6 65548 8.5
1
28734 749120 213965
+ 14367 + 936400 +138344
172.404 175.1068 407.405

Copy this study board to help reteach the lesson.

Multiplying hundredths

Remember: The number of decimal places in the product equals the sum of the number of
decimal places in the factors.

Step 1: Multiply
1 1
3. 651
× 251
3651
+18255
7302
916401

533
Do a sample problem and use the study board to show the students the steps to solving a
multiplication of decimal problem.

Tell the students that they are going to do some problems like the sample one they just did. Lay
a card on the table. Give the students time to write the answer. As you reveal the answer say:
”The answer is……” Store the activity and study board in the 9 ½ by 6 ½ envelope.

534
STRUCTURED CURRICULUM LESSON PLAN

Day: 088 Subject: Mathematics Grade Level: 4

Correlations (SG,CAS,CFS): 6A1,2,3; 6B3,4; 6C1,2,3

ITBS/TAP: ISAT:
Perform arithmetic operations involving
fractions, decimals and percents

Unit Focus/Foci

Decimals

Instructional Focus/Foci

Multiplying decimals by a decimal

Materials

Six-Group Activity: Decimals (lining decimals up)


Decimal Mods

Educational Strategies/Instructional Procedures

Warm-up Activity:

Write the following problems with directions as written. Have students complete per directions.

1. 39.94 (round to nearest whole number)


2. 4.85 x 2 (round to nearest whole number and find the product)
3. 16.3 + 40.7 (find the sum)
4. 92.5 - 71.3 (find the difference)
5. 4.62 x 4 (find the product)
6. 23.6 x 3 (find the product)

Answer Key: 1. 40 2. 10 3. 57.0 4. 21.2 5. 18.48 6. 70.8

Allow about ten minutes to complete, then give answers if students were unable to solve. Give
explanations as needed.

535
Lesson:

Before getting into the lesson, remind the students that when area is measured it is measured in
square units.

To find the area, you multiply the length by the width.

Example: 2.5 yards x 4.5 yards = 11.25 yards . Explain that when you multiply a decimal by a
decimal, multiply as you would with whole numbers, then count the numbers behind the decimal
to determine where the decimal point should go in the product.

Example: 1.6 (1 place after the decimal point)


x 2.6 (1 place after the decimal point)
96
32
4.16 (2 places after the decimal point)

Remind students that sometimes it is necessary to place zeros along with digits in the factors in
the product in order to place the decimal point correctly. This is done when multiplying by
whole numbers and decimals as well as multiplying two decimals.

Example: .1 (1 place after the decimal)


x .2 (1 place after the decimal)
0.02 (need to add a zero in order to correctly place the decimal)

Have the students solve these problems to get practice with multiplying two decimals.

A. 825 (multiply as you would a whole number)


x 15
Ans.: 12375

B. Count the decimal places after the decimal point.


Ans. (2) 8.25 (places after the decimal point)
Ans. (1) x 1.5 (places after the decimal point)
Ans. (3) 12375 (total places after the decimal point)

C. Place the decimal point in the answer.


8.25
x 1.5
12375 (Ans. 12.375)

536
Instruct the students to write each product, placing the decimal point carefully.

1. 5.8 x 7.5 2. 9.8 x 5.25 3. 4.1 x 8.525 4. 1.2 x .2


5. 103.2 x 9.5 6. 49.3 x 5.2 7. 2.25 x 6.8 8. 8.7 x 0.0025

Answer key:

1. 43.50 2. 51.450 3. 34.9525 4. 0.24


5. 980.40 6. 256.36 7. 15.300 8. 0.02175

If the text is not available, any text with the kind of problems in this lesson may be used.

Ten Statements

Review the ten statements and have the students write yes if they heard it in today’s lesson and
no if they did not. If the answer is no, say: The statement is true, but it was not heard in today’s
lesson.

1) Area is measured in square units. (yes)


2) To find the area of a rectangle, you multiply the length by the width. (yes)
3) To determine where a decimal should be placed when multiplying a decimal by a decimal
multiply as with whole numbers, then add up the number of places after the decimal points in
the factors to determine where the decimal point should go in the product. (yes)
4) It is necessary to place zeros in the factors of the product to correctly place the decimal when
solving some problems. (yes)
5) (5.8 x 7.5 = 43.50) is an example of multiplying a decimal by a decimal. (yes)
6) The numbers in an addition problem are called addends. (no)
7) (39.94) ≈ 40 is an example of rounding to the nearest whole number. (yes)
8) You do not have to line up the decimal point in order to multiply. (no)
9) Count the decimal places after the decimal point. (yes)
10) Withdraw: to take money out of the bank. (no)

Free Choice Lesson

Have the students choose a lesson from the Free-Choice Activity sheet (one box per day).

537
Six Group Activity

Have a group of six students, two from each ability level, complete teacher-directed activity
sheet Decimals (lining decimals up)

Math Workshop

Have the students go into the Math Workshop after completing their Free Choice Lesson.

Integration with Core Subject(s)

LA: Understanding explicit, factual information


Understanding the meaning of words in context
SC: Apply scientific method to solve problems
Analyze and interpret data
SS: Read and interpret maps, charts, tables, graphs, and cartoons
Sequence information, especially using timelines
Select appropriate information for intended purpose

Connection(s)

Enrichment: Any problems like the ones shown in the lesson.

Fine Arts:

Home: Have students measure a window and a door in his/her home. Tell how many square
centimeters are in each. Tell what he or she did to determine how many centimeters were
needed.

Remediation: See attached Six-Group Activity sheet

Technology:

Assessment

75% successful completion of lesson and class participation.

538
Homework

Complete.

1. 2.5× 3.2
2. 4.6× .3
3. 5.26× .03
4. 95.2× .5
5. 62.2× 5.1

Teacher Notes

539
Six Group Activity

Decimals: Lining decimals up

Materials:
20 index cards (3 x 5)
1 black marker
1 pencil
1 envelope (9 ½ x 6 ½)

Prepare the following index cards using the black marker to write the problems on the front of
the cards. Use the pencil to write the answers on the back of the cards.

2) 59.2 + 322.1 + .2 2) 6.1 + .002 + .1 3) 7.21 + 3.2 + 5


5) 2.34 + 1.346 + .2 5) 9 + 23.2 + 3.1 6) 6.24 + 21.1 + .21
8) 9.23 + .23 + 10.211 8) 54.12 + 321.2 + .03
9) 7.1 + 9.3 + .02 10) 5.21 + .36 + 69

Answers:
59.2 6.1 7.21 2.34
322.1 .002 3.2 1.346
3) 2) 3) 4)
+ .2 + .1 +5 + .2
3815
. 6.202 15.41 3.886

9 6.24 9.23 54.12


23.2 21.1 .23 321.2
4) 6) 7) 8)
+ 3.1 + .21 +10.211 + .03
35.3 27.55 19.671 375.35

7.1 5.21
9.3 .36
9) 10)
+ .02 +69.
16.42 74.57

Next, prepare another set of cards using the answers (addition problems) above. Write these
using black marker. On the back of the cards, write the answers to these addition problems.

11. 381.5 12. 6.202


13. 15.41 14. 3.886
15. 35.3 16. 27.55
17. 19.671 18. 375.35
19. 16.42 20. 74.57

540
Have the students who are above or at grade level write and answer the problems.

Copy this study board and use it with the lesson. Store the index cards and the study board in the
9 ½” x 6 ½” envelope.

Addition of decimals

Say: When adding decimals line the points up first and then write the numbers in the correct
order. Example: If a problem
has two sets of numbers (26.3 + .021), rewrite the problem vertically.

Step 1: Write the decimals.


Step 2: Write the numbers in the correct order.
26.3
+ .021

Step 3: Then you are ready to add.


26.3
+ .021
26.321

In the answer, bring the decimal straight down.

Explain how to word addition of decimals problems using the study board as a guide. After you
explain how to do the problems, tell the students that they are going to do an activity called
lining up decimals. Explain that to line the decimals up and write the numbers in the correct
order. Say: Don’t write the answer because we want to work on ordering the numbers.

Say: I am going to lay a card down and I want you to write the problem vertically. Lay one
index card on a flat surface and give the students five or six seconds to write the answer. When
the time is up, turn the index card over and say: The answer is…… Go to the next card and
repeat the process.

Tell the students that they are going to do an activity called adding decimals.

Lay a card on a flat surface Turn the card over to reveal the answer and say: The answer is……

541
STRUCTURED CURRICULUM LESSON PLAN

Day: 089 Subject: Mathematics Grade Level: 4

Correlations (SG,CAS,CFS): 6A1,2,3; 6B3,4; 6C1,2,3

ITBS/TAP: ISAT:
Perform arithmetic operations involving
fractions, decimals and percents

Unit Focus/Foci

Decimals

Instructional Focus/Foci

Using Decimals: weight & volume

Materials

Six-Group Activity: Number line (graphing decimals)


Decimal Mods
Metric measure containers

Educational Strategies/Instructional Procedures

Warm-up Activity:

Put the following drawings on an overhead. Ask students to look at the drawings and shade in
the decimal amounts below each at their seats.

.4 + 0.6 .4 + 0.6 = ___ (10)

Ans. (shade 4 sections) Ans. (shade six sections) Ans. (color the whole drawing)

542
Lesson:

Define the following vocabulary words. These terms should be put into the math journals.

1. Weight - describes how heavy something is.


2. Gram & Kilogram - are metric units of weight.
3. Volume - another term to describe the number of cubic units it takes to fill an object.

1 kilogram is 1000 grams. ___ 1 kg. = 1000 g


1 gram is one thousandth of a kilogram. ___1 g = 0.001 g

The liter and milliliter are metric units of volume.

*The teacher may want to bring in a one and a two liter pop container for concrete examples.
Label the contents using metric measurement. Allow students to request metric amounts for
consumption.

1 liter is equal to 1000 milliliters. (1000 mL = 1 L)


1 milliliter is one thousandth of a liter. (1 mL = 0.001 L)

After the teacher has done a couple of examples allow the students to solve the following..

1. 4 g = ___ Kg (0.004) 2. 30 g = ___ Kg 3. 2 mL = ___ L (0.002)

4. 30 mL = ___ L 5. 0.02 L = ___ mL (20) 6. 8 Kg = ___ g (8000)

7. 800 g = ___ Kg (0.800) 8. 2.6 L = ___ mL (2600) 9. 0.625 L = ___ mL (625)

10. A man’s shoe weighs about 500 g. How many kilograms would two pairs of shoes weigh.
Show how you arrived at your answer, write it out. Answer: 2 kilograms = 2 Kg, 1 Kg =
1000 g) 1 shoe weighs 500 g. If one shoe weighs 500 grams, then 2 pairs of shoes = 4 x 500
g = 2000 grams.

543
Ten Statements

Review the ten statements and have the students write yes if they heard it in today’s lesson and
no if they did not. If the answer is no, say: The statement is true, but it was not heard in today’s
lesson.

1) Volume is a term used to describe the number of cubic units it takes to fill an object. (yes)
2) One milliliter is one thousandth of a liter. 0.001 L) (yes)
3) The drawings in the Warm Up show fractions as well as decimal amounts. (no)
4) Weight is a term used to tell how heavy something is. (yes)
5) One kilogram is equal to a thousand grams. (yes)
6) A man’s shoe weighs about 500 grams. (yes)
7) Mathematical reasoning is one of the objects of roll a harder decimal game. (no)
8) Kilogram is a unit of metric weight. (yes)
9) 30 grams is equal to 0.040 kilograms. (yes)
10) Equivalents are numbers that have the same value. (no)

Free Choice Lesson

Have the students choose a lesson from the Free-Choice Activity sheet (one box per day).

Six Group Activity

Have a group of six students, two from each ability level, complete teacher-directed activity
sheet: Number Line (graphing decimals)

Math Workshop

Have the students go into the Math Workshop after completing their Free Choice Lesson.

Integration with Core Subject(s)

LA: Understanding explicit, factual information


Understanding the meaning of words in context
SC: Apply scientific method to solve problems
Analyze and interpret data
SS: Read and interpret maps, charts, tables, graphs, and cartoons
Sequence information, especially using timelines
Select appropriate information for intended purpose

544
Connection(s)

Enrichment:

Fine Arts:

Home:

Remediation: See attached Six-Group Activity Lesson: Number line (graphing decimals)

Technology:

Assessment

Class participation at the 70% level, successful completion of classroom material

Homework

Write out the differences between weight and volume and give an example of each. Tell what
units are used for each.

Teacher Notes

545
Six Group Activity

Decimals: Number line (graphing decimals)

Materials:
7 (5 x 7) index cards
10 (3 x 5) index cards
Contact paper
7 black crayons or washable markers (fine line)
1 paper towel to be cut up into 6 pieces
1 pencil
1 (9 ½ x 6 ½) envelope

Prepare these 5x7 index cards. Copy the number line and tape it to the 5 x 7 index card. Cut the
contact paper the same size as the 5 x 7 card and cover the card with the contact paper.

0 .5 1 1.5 2 2.5 3 3.5 4 4.5 5

Prepare these 3x5 index cards using the black marker.


2, 1.3, 2.5, 4.8, 3.7, 0.75, 4.2, 5, 1.5, 2.2

The teacher will show the answers on their graph card. Copy this study board to aide in
reteaching of this activity.

Graphing decimals

The number line below shows each whole number divided into ten equal parts, or tenths.

0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

From one number to the next number there are ten tenths.

Example:
0 1

Bernadette’s eight and six tenths are recorded on the number line.

546
Carl did four and five tenths hours and it is recorded on the number line.

Say this to the students:

We are going to do an activity that requires you to plot numbers on the number line. I am going
to show you a card and I want you to use the crayon or marker to plot your answer. The teacher
will place an index card on a flat surface. Give the students 3 to 4 seconds to mask their answer.
The teacher should use the extra card to mark the correct answer to show the students. Before
you show the correct answer say, “The answer is……” do the remaining cards the same way.
Store the index cards and study board in the 9 ½ x 6 ½ envelope.

Tell the students that they are going to do an activity that calls for them to plot numbers on the
number line. Lay a card on the table and allow students to solve the problem. While revealing
the answer and say, ”The answer is……” Store the activity and study board in the 9 ½ x 6 ½
envelope.

547
STRUCTURED CURRICULUM LESSON PLAN

Day: 090 Subject: Mathematics Grade Level: 4

Correlations (SG,CAS,CFS): 6A1,2,3; 6B3,4; 6C1,2,3

ITBS/TAP: ISAT:
Perform arithmetic operations involving
fractions, decimals and percents

Unit Focus/Foci

Decimals

Instructional Focus/Foci

Formal Assessment-Unit test

Materials

Games
Resource kit

Educational Strategies/Instructional Procedures

Formal Assessment (See attached)

548
Formal Assessment

Students should come prepared with paper and pencils.

Find the value of the missing number.

1. 12 km = _____ m (Ans. 12000 m)


2. 8 m = _____ dm (Ans. 80 dm)
3. 6 cm = _____ m (Ans. 0.06 m)

Add or Subtract

4. 6.29 - 3.24 = _____ (Ans. 3.05)


5. 1.62 + 3.14 = _____ (Ans. 4.76)
6. 6.12 - 2.37 = _____ (Ans. 3.75)
7. 1.6 8. 6.06 9. 6.74
+ 1.52 - 2.21 - 2.42
3.12 (A) 3.85 (A) 4.32 (A)

Solve.

10. Jan walked 200 meters1 minute and 40.1 seconds. Joy walked 200 meters in 2 minutes and
1.1 second. By how much did Jan beat Joy? (21)

Draw <, >, or = to make each statement true.

11. 0.5 ___ 0.2 (Ans. >) 12. 0.76 ___ 0.8 (Ans. <)
13. 0.6 ___ 0.8 (Ans. <) 14. 0.6 ___ 0.49 (Ans. >)

Write each amount as a decimal.

15. 7 nickels = _____ (Ans. $0.35)


16. 9 dimes and 0 cents = _____ (Ans. $0.90)

Write in standard form.

17. 6 ones, 3 tenths, and 8 hundredths _____ (Ans. 6.38)


18. 9 ones, 4 tenths, and 6 hundredths _____ (Ans. 9.46)

549
Multiply.

19. 10 x 9.5 = _____ (Ans. 95) 20. 0.41 x 10 = _____ (Ans. 4.1)
21. 6.3 x 100 = _____ (Ans. 630) 22. 5.8 x 7.5 = _____ (Ans. 43.5)

23. Complete the register with the given figures.

Number Date Description of Transaction Payment Deposit Balance


201 2/2 Phone -$97.45 $0 $714 44
616 99
202 2/8 Gitanone clothes -$145.06 +$202.00 471 93
673 93
203 2/11 Electric -$49.05 $624.8
204 2/15 Repair -$107.00 $210.00 834 88 $727.88
Mortgage -$407.00 $320.88
Misc. -$90.00 $230.88

24. Estimate to find the exact answer.

0.7 x 0.6 = _____ (Ans. 0.42) 2.7 x 3.9 = _____ (Ans. 10.53)

25. What is the rule for multiplying by powers of 10?

Students may utilize the Game mats or Free Choice Lesson and go into the math workshop once
the assessment is completed.

Teacher may also choose to prepare an activity sheet.

550
Ten Statements

Review the ten statements and have the students write yes if they heard it in today’s lesson and
no if they did not. If the answer is no, say: The statement is true, but it was not heard in today’s
lesson.

No Ten Statements today

Free Choice Lesson

Have the students choose a lesson from the Free-Choice Activity sheet (one box per day).

Six Group Activity

No Six-Group Activity today.

Math Workshop

Have the students go into the Math Workshop after completing their Free Choice Lesson.

Integration with Core Subject(s)

LA: Understanding explicit, factual information


Understanding the meaning of words in context
SC: Apply scientific method to solve problems
Analyze and interpret data
SS: Read and interpret maps, charts, tables, graphs, and cartoons
Sequence information, especially using timelines
Select appropriate information for intended purpose

Connection(s)

Enrichment:

Fine Arts:

Home:

Remediation: See attached Six-Group Activity sheet

551
Technology:

Assessment

Homework

Teacher Notes

552