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Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
Friday • Aug. 15, 2014 • Vol XIII, Edition 311
Oyster Point Marina
95 Harbor Master Rd. #1
South San Francisco, CA
94080
Pillar Point Harbor
1 Johnson Pier
Half Moon Bay, CA
94019
It doesn’t get any fresher!
Just caught seafood for sale right at the
docks at Pillar Point Harbor.
Just South of Whipple Avenue
Phones Cameras Watches
Cars Hearing Aids Tools
TRANSITION OF POWER
WORLD PAGE 6
NEW COMMISH
FOR BASEBALL
SPORTS PAGE 11
NOTHING SAVING
‘EXPENDABLES 3’
WEEKEND JOURNAL PAGE 16
IRAQI PRIME MINISTER NOURI AL-MALIKI GIVES UP POST TO RIVAL
Open access
bill heading
to Assembly
By Samantha Weigel
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Legislation aimed at reopening
Martin’s Beach has traveled a
rocky path the last few months,
but it jumped another hurdle
Thursday after being taken out of
suspense and will now make its
way to the Assembly floor.
As coastal rights activists rose
against the wealthy property
owner closing the only access
road to the secluded crescent-
shaped beach just south of Half
Moon Bay, state Sen. Jerry Hill,
D-San Mateo, created Senate Bill
968 as a bargaining chip.
SB 968 would require billionaire
venture capitalist Vinod Khosla,
who purchased the property for
$32.5 million in 2008, to negoti-
ate with the State Lands
Commission, or SLC, to create
public access. The bill passed the
Legislation to reopen Martin’s Beach
passes committee, moves to floor vote
Jerry Hill Vinod Khosla
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
A Redwood City man’s rights
were not violated when a prosecu-
tor told jurors in his vehicular
manslaughter trial that he proved
himself guilty by not asking
about the welfare of the other car’s
occupants, the California Supreme
Court ruled
Thursday in a
split decision
that restores his
conviction in
the 2007 crash.
In a 4-3 rul-
ing, the court
overturned the
First District
Court of Appeal’s 2012 ruling that
reversed Richard Tom’s convic-
tion in the death of 8-year-old
Sydney Ng. The lower court found
that prosecutor Shin-Mee Chang
violated Tom’s right against self-
incrimination by arguing his
silence after the collision was
“substantive evidence of guilt.”
But the state Supreme Court dis-
agreed, arguing that Tom never
specifically invoked his Fifth
Amendment right to remain
silent.
Tom was sentenced to seven
years for the February 2007 crash
that killed Ng and seriously
injured her sister and mother. He
was about halfway through when
his conviction was overturned and
has been out on $300,000 bail
pending the Supreme Court deci-
sion.
Tom’s appellate attorney Marc
Zilversmit called the ruling “terri-
bly dangerous” because it doesn’t
clarify when a person has the right
not to speak with police.
“It’s not going to help prosecu-
Supreme Court restores fatal crash conviction
Redwood City man’s post-incident silence, and Fifth Amendment rights, at issue
Richard Tom
Wendy Shray will be displaying her handcrafted jewelry at Burlingame on the Avenue this weekend.
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Five of the nine men authorities
say smuggled $23 million worth
of marijuana from Mexico to
Pescadero pleaded no contest to
felony drug trafficking and
received a year in jail.
The plea deal came less than two
weeks after the nine defendants
were nabbed at Año Nuevo State
Park where two large vans came to
meet a panga boat carrying 5,148
pounds of marijuana.
Luis Farid Gonzalez, 20, Luis
Espinoza Mendoza, 28, Esteban
Flores Salazar, 39, Joan Sicairos,
19, and Mark Richard Teixeira, 38,
each opted to settle their case in
Drug smugglers take deal
in coastside pot boat case
By Angela Swartz
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Simple, affordable and high-
quality jewelry will be on display
at the Burlingame on the Avenue
annual festival that celebrates the
near completion of the $16 mil-
lion streetscape project.
The jewelry is created by San
Carlos artist Wendy Shray, who
runs her own company called
Wendy Shray Designs on the
online marketplace Etsy. She
describes her work as everyday
wear that’s inspired by the
Southwestern styles shown in
Sundance Catalog. These items
will be featured on the first day of
the two-day event on Burlingame
Avenue.
“What I love about it is there’s
so much beauty
in the materials
themselves, so
when I’m buy-
ing materials I
fall in love with
the materials,”
she said.
“There’s a lot of
satisfaction to
create some-
thing someone wears.”
Shray, a mom of two and 23-year
resident of San Carlos, left her
work in the pharmaceutical and
biotech industry 10 years ago to
take care of her children and took
up jewelry making at that time. As
a teen, she had done sewing and
has always been crafty.
Other handcrafted fashions
offered by Shray include yoga jew-
elry, such as her om or lotus
charms, minimalist jewelry, bat
mitzvah jewelry necklaces and
bridesmaid wear. A typical item
from Shray is sterling silver or 14
karat gold-filled material wire
wrapped with gemstones for
bracelets, anklets and necklaces
with matching earrings. She also
uses freshwater pearls, crystals,
glass beads, feathers, stone, bone
and leather.
“I started with making stuff for
myself and gifts for teachers,” she
said. “Just having a passion for
collecting the materials, so I real-
ized I needed to create something
from everything I collected.”
Shray, who is from New Mexico
herself, likes to include Southwest
Burlingame celebrates on the Avenue
Jewelry maker Wendy Shray among artists at renamed event
Wendy Shray
See AVENUE, Page 20
See BEACH, Page 19
See TOM, Page 20
See DRUGS, Page 20
California women call
police over cat’s furry fury
CHULA VISTA — Two San Diego
County women had to get help from
police after being trapped in a bedroom
by a family cat that a neighbor calls “a
ball of fury.”
Chula Vista police tell KGTV-TV a
woman and her adult daughter called
911 Tuesday to say they were stuck in
the bedroom because their cat “Cuppy”
was in a rage and wouldn’t let them
leave.
Police say such matters are usually
left to animal control, but officers
decided to help out on a quiet night.
They say eventually the cat walked out
on its own.
Neighbor Karen Yarger says the cat
has been a family pet for years but is
unpredictable.
A Portland, Oregon, family went
through a similar ordeal, when their cat
Lux attacked a baby and boxed his own-
ers in a bedroom.
Lake Tahoe man accused
of attempted murder
SOUTH LAKE TAHOE — A South
Lake Tahoe man accused of striking his
female roommate in the head with a rub-
ber mallet has been arrested for suspi-
cion of attempted murder.
South Lake Tahoe police say 47-year-
old Steven Post was booked into the
local jail where he was being held with-
out bail.
Sgt. Shannon Laney says a verbal
argument escalated Tuesday night
before Post grabbed a rubber mallet and
struck the woman several times in the
head and arm.
Laney says she was transported to
Barton Memorial Hospital and later
flown to Renown Medical Center in
Reno where her condition was not
known.
Lake Tahoe News reports Post was
arrested in 2010 and 2011 on charges
of battering the same woman but was
not convicted either time. Post told
police the two have lived together for
18 years, but were not romantically
involved.
Woman shot by police in San Jose
SAN JOSE — San Jose police say an
officer shot a woman after responding
to a report of someone with an Uzi
threatening to kill family members.
Officers were called to a home a little
after 10:30 a.m. Thursday. Police
spokesman Albert Morales says at
some point a woman emerged from the
residence, and an officer opened fire.
It was not immediately clear what
prompted the shooting. The woman’s
condition also was not known.
Specks returned from
space may be alien visitors
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. — There
may be itsy-bitsy aliens among us.
Scientists say seven microscopic
particles collected by NASA’s comet-
chasing spacecraft, Stardust, appear to
have originated outside our solar sys-
tem. If confirmed, this would be the
world’s first sampling of contemporary
interstellar dust.
“They are very precious particles,”
the team leader, physicist Andrew
Westphal of the University of
California, Berkeley, said in a state-
ment Thursday.
The dust collectors were exposed to
what is believed to be the interstellar
dust stream in the early 2000s and
returned to Earth in 2006. Since then,
dozens of scientists worldwide led by
Westphal have examined scans of the
collection panels to zero in on the par-
ticles. The team was assisted by
30,000 citizen-scientists, dubbed
Dusters, who reviewed more than 1
million images in search of elusive
tracks made by incoming particles.
The findings were published
Thursday in the journal Science.
Westphal said the suspected inter-
stellar particles are surprisingly
diverse. Some are fluffy like
snowflakes.
Afew particles splatted a little when
they hit the collection panels because
of their speed and the fact that some
ended up hitting the aluminum foils
between the softer aerogel tiles meant
to capture the grains. In fact, one par-
ticle believed to be following the flow
of interstellar wind was vaporized
because it was going so fast — an esti-
mated 10 miles per second.
FOR THE RECORD 2 Friday • Aug. 15, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
The San Mateo Daily Journal
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As a public service, the Daily Journal prints obituaries of approximately 200 words or less with a photo one time on the date of the family’s choosing.To submit obituaries, email
information along with a jpeg photo to news@smdailyjournal.com.Free obituaries are edited for style, clarity, length and grammar. If you would like to have an obituary printed
more than once, longer than 250 words or without editing, please submit an inquiry to our advertising department at ads@smdailyjournal.com.
Actress Natasha
Henstridge is 40.
This Day in History
Thought for the Day
1914
The Panama Canal officially opened
as the SS Ancon crossed the just-com-
pleted waterway between the Pacific
and Atlantic oceans.
“Forgiveness is the key
to action and freedom.”
— Hannah Arendt, American author and philosopher
Actor Ben Affleck
is 42.
Rock singer Joe
Jonas is 25.
Birthdays
REUTERS
Sean Tucker pilots his plane along with two members of the U.S.Navy Blue Angels in preparation for the 56th Annual Chicago
Air and Water Show.
Friday: Cloudy in the morning then
becoming sunny. Patchy fog in the morn-
ing. Highs in the upper 60s. South winds
5 to 15 mph.
Fri day ni ght: Partly cloudy in the
evening then becoming cloudy. Patchy
fog after midnight. Lows in the mid 50s.
South winds 5 to 10 mph.
Saturday: Cloudy in the morning then becoming sunny.
Patchy fog in the morning. Highs in the upper 60s.
Southwest winds 5 to 10 mph.
Saturday night: Mostly clear in the evening then becom-
ing cloudy. Patchy fog after midnight. Lows in the mid 50s.
West winds 5 to 10 mph.
Sunday: Cloudy in the morning then becoming partly
cloudy. Patchy fog. Highs in the upper 60s.
Local Weather Forecast
In other news ...
(Answers tomorrow)
PARCH ADMIT TRUANT PEWTER
Yesterday’s
Jumbles:
Answer: The Army base had a softball team and the
general was the — TEAM CAPTAIN
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
ACTFE
KIYLS
TARNTY
LUTDON
©2014 Tribune Content Agency, LLC
All Rights Reserved.
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Print answer here:
I n 1057, Macbeth, King of Scots, was killed in battle by
Malcolm, the eldest son of King Duncan, whom Macbeth
had slain.
I n 1483, the Sistine Chapel was consecrated by Pope
Sixtus IV.
I n 1812, the Battle of Fort Dearborn took place as
Potawatomi warriors attacked a U.S. military garrison of
about 100 people. (Most of the garrison was killed, while
the remainder were taken prisoner. )
I n 1935, humorist Will Rogers and aviator Wiley Post
were killed when their airplane crashed near Point Barrow
in the Alaska Territory.
I n 1939, the MGM musical “The Wizard of Oz” opened at
the Grauman’s Chinese Theater in Hollywood.
I n 1944, during World War II, Allied forces landed in
southern France in Operation Dragoon.
I n 1945, in a radio address, Japan’s Emperor Hirohito
announced that his country had accepted terms of surrender
for ending World War II.
I n 1947, India became independent after some 200 years
of British rule.
I n 1967, a 50-foot-tall sculpture by Pablo Picasso was
dedicated in Daley Plaza in Chicago by Mayor Richard J.
Daley.
I n 1969, the Woodstock Music and Art Fair opened in
upstate New York.
I n 1974, a gunman attempted to shoot South Korean
President Park Chung-hee during a speech; although Park
was unhurt, his wife, Yuk Young-soo, was struck and killed,
along with a teenage girl. (The gunman was later executed.)
I n 1989, F.W. de Klerk was sworn in as acting president of
South Africa, one day after P.W. Botha resigned as the result
of a power struggle within the National Party.
Actress Rose Marie is 91. Political activist Phyllis Schlafly
is 90. Actor Mike Connors is 89. Actress Lori Nelson is 81.
Civil rights activist Vernon Jordan is 79. Actor Jim Dale is
79. Actress Pat Priest is 78. Supreme Court Justice Stephen
Breyer is 76. U.S. Rep. Maxine Waters, D-Calif., is 76.
Musician Pete York (Spencer Davis Group) is 72. Author-jour-
nalist Linda Ellerbee is 70. Songwriter Jimmy Webb is 68.
Rock singer-musician Tom Johnston (The Doobie Brothers)
is 66. Actress Phyllis Smith is 65. Britain’s Princess Anne is
64. Actress Tess Harper is 64. Actor Larry Mathews is 59.
Actor Zeljko Ivanek is 57.
Lotto
The Daily Derby race winners are Lucky Star,No.
2, in first place; Big Ben, No. 4, in second place;
and Eureka, No. 7, in third place. The race time
was clocked at 1:42.69.
0 3 4
32 53 60 63 68 6
Mega number
Aug. 12 Mega Millions
8 37 39 40 52 24
Powerball
Aug. 13 Powerball
8 19 24 33 35
Fantasy Five
Daily three midday
4 0 6 5
Daily Four
7 3 6
Daily three evening
14 18 20 27 46 18
Mega number
Aug. 13 Super Lotto Plus
3
Friday • Aug. 15, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO
Suspi ci ous ci rcumstances. A resident
found blood on his front porch and was
unaware of how it got there on Adrian
Avenue before 6:52 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 9.
Suspi ci ous vehi cl e. A woman was seen
taking pictures of Genetech and when con-
fronted she fled on Grandview Drive before
11:14 a.m. Saturday, Aug. 9.
Burglary. Aradio and two TV’s were stolen
from a car on Baden Avenue before 12:13
a.m. Saturday, Aug. 9.
Traffic law. AMitsubishi Mirage was seen
racing another vehicle on South Airport
Boulevard before 9:21 p.m. Friday, Aug. 8.
Threat case. Aman received a threatening
text saying he would be “pop’d” by a gang-
member on Valverde Drive before 9:05 p.m.
Friday, Aug. 8.
Assault with a deadly weapon. Aman
with a handgun was threatening his upstairs
neighbors on County Club before 7:59 p.m.
Friday, Aug. 8.
HALF MOON BAY
Suspi ci ous ci rcumstance. A person’s
vehicle suffered approximately $3,000
worth of damage after it was vandalized on
the 800 block of Arnold before 5:34 p.m.
Sunday, Aug. 10.
Arre s t. Officers found and arrested a man
that failed sobriety tests because his broth-
er reported him for driving his three young
children back to the hotel after several
drinks at the 2900 block of South Cabrillo
before 10:12 p.m. Friday, Aug. 8.
SAN MATEO
Disturbance. Aman threatened employees
of El Nayarita Taqueria at the 600 block of
East Third Avenue before 2:56 p.m. Sunday,
Aug. 10.
Theft. Aburglary suspect took off in a gray
Impala at the 600 block of Concar Drive
before 6i:43 p.m. Sunday, Aug. 10.
Fraud. Aperson bought counterfeit concert
tickets on Craigslist at the 800 block of
North Delaware Street before 4:39 p.m.
Saturday, Aug. 9.
Police reports
A hot cup of steaming lager
A man was seen pouring a beer into a
travel coffee mug on the 1300 block of
Bayshore Boulevard in Burlingame
before 12:49 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 7.
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
San Mateo County Supervisor Dave Pine
will pay an $800 fine by the Fair Political
Practices Commission to settle claims he
did not file two pre-election campaign
finance statements in a timely manner.
The commission will vote Aug. 21 as
part of its consent calendar to accept Pine’s
stipulation that he did violate California’s
Political Reform Act.
The four violations arose during Pine’s
campaign for his first full term after serv-
ing the remainder of a term he won in a spe-
cial election. He failed to file statements
with the county Elections Office for the
period Jan. 1, 2012, through May 19,
2012, by the March 22, 2012, and May 24,
2012, deadlines. He also failed to file two
semi-annual campaign statements for the
period July 1, 2011, through June 30,
2012, which were due Jan. 31, 2012, and
July 31, 2012.
Pine’s committee filed
the statements after
being notified of a pend-
ing Franchise Tax Board
audit, according to the
FPPC stipulation.
The statements are dis-
closures of a committee
or candidate’s fundrais-
ing and expenditures.
Pine said the filings should have been
made on time and missing them was an
oversight.
“I will not miss a filing deadline in the
future,” he wrote in an email to the Daily
Journal.
Pine represents District One which
includes Burlingame, Hillsborough,
Millbrae, San Bruno and South San
Francisco east of El Camino Real. He
joined the board in May 2011 and was re-
elected in June 2012. His current term
expires in January 2017.
Supervisor fined $800 for
political reporting violations
Dave Pine
4
Friday • Aug. 15, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL/STATE
Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
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Norman Lloyd Persing
Norman Lloyd Persing, Burlingame resi-
dent for 50 years, died at his home Aug. 9,
2014.
He was 84 years old.
His parents Lloyd and
Marie Persing raised him
in rural Ceres, California.
Father of his three sons
Eric and his wife Lorey,
Krister and Thor and his
wife Danica, he also very
much loved his grandchil-
dren Jazmine, Soren and Sage.
Norm was a creative lover of life who grad-
uated from Fuller Theological Seminary in
Pasadena and San Jose State University. He
was beloved as a longtime music and choral
teacher at many California schools and as
minister of music at Saint Paul’s Episcopal
Church.
“Norm touched the lives of countless peo-
ple and was cherished as an all around charac-
ter in the Burlingame community.”
Funeral services will be 4 p.m. Sunday,
Aug. 17 at the First Presbyterian Church of
Burlingame, 1500 Easton Drive in
Burlingame. Condolence cards may be sent
via the church.
Any donations can be given to the “Home
and Hope” fund at First Presbyterian Church
of Burlingame.
Carole Kay Parry
Carole Kay Parry, nee Costello, born Nov.
9, 1942, died Aug. 12, 2014, peacefully in
South San Francisco after a brief illness.
She was a native San Franciscan and San
Mateo County resident for 48 years.
Carole was preceded in death by her hus-
band Darrell in 2001. She is survived by her
brother Jim Costello (Rita); her three sons
Dennis (Julie), Donald (Bobbi Lee) and David
(Holly); grandchildren Alyssa, Grayson,
Nicole, Darren, Kyle and Trevor as well as
many other family members and friends.
Carole retired after many years service from
Bank of America.
Family and friends are invited to attend the
memorial liturgy service 3 p.m. Saturday,
Aug. 16 at the Chapel of the Highlands, 194
Millwood Drive at El Camino Real in
Millbrae.
As a public service, the Daily Journal
prints obituaries of approximately 200 words
or less with a photo one time on the date of
the family’s choosing. To submit obituaries,
email information along with a jpeg photo to
news@smdailyjournal.com. Free obituaries
are edited for style, clarity, length and gram-
mar.
Obituaries
STATE
GOVERNMENT
• The state
L e g i s l a t u r e
Wednesday sent to
bills to the gover-
nor by state Se n.
Jerry Hi l l , D-San
Mat eo, that will prohibit the use of
antibiotics in farm animals as growth
enhancers and will establish hospital pro-
grams to ensure responsible use of antibi-
otics in humans.
Hill introduced the legislation because
the widespread use of antibiotics has
increased resistance to infections, accord-
ing to his office.
REGIONAL GOVERNMENT
• The San Mateo County Harbor
Di st ri ct ’s free wireless connectivity
service for the Pi l l ar Point Harbor i s
now live. The service, to be known as
“HarborFree, ” is an open but unsecured
public network.
The 24/7 wireless network spans the
area around the Harbormaster’s office,
parts of the Johnson Pier and the parking
lot, according to the district.
CITY GOVERNMENT
• The Burlingame Parks and
Recreat i on Commi s s i on has two
vacancies and is accepting applications.
The council is likely to appoint the
commissioners to the full three-year term.
The application deadline is Sept. 19.
Apply at
burlingame.org/index.aspx?page=3303.
If you have any questions, contact Ana
Si l va in the City Manager’s Offic e at
558-7204.
By Juliet Williams
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SACRAMENTO — The $7.5 billion water
package brokered by Gov. Jerry Brown and
legislative leaders signals a rare bipartisan
agreement on a thorny, politically divisive
issue that has bedeviled California governors
and lawmakers for decades.
To get sign-off from the dizzying array of
interests, Brown hunkered down with law-
makers from both parties behind closed doors
for the past few weeks, eventually giving
Republicans more of the funding for reser-
voirs and water storage they have long
sought.
The state’s crippling drought provided the
impetus to overcome longstanding divisions
and put a proposal before voters in November
that balances regional politics with the
state’s overall water needs. It is also a big win
for Brown as he campaigns for re-election.
The drought “hits home in literally almost
every district in California,” said Bill
Whalen, a research fellow at the Hoover
Institution at Stanford University, creating
urgency for a deal this year.
It also gives all parties a win to take home
as they campaign for
office this November.
“Imagine your lawmaker
coming home from
Sacramento,” he said.
“Your voters know that
there’s a drought, and they
ask, ‘What are you doing
about it in Sacramento?’
And you just shrug your
shoulders. How inept
would you look?”
Brown has repeatedly bragged this year that
unlike politically gridlocked Washington,
D.C., California politicians are tackling seri-
ous problems and forging compromises.
Wednesday’s nearly unanimous vote gave him
the proof.
With Democrats in control of both houses
of the Legislature, political compromise with
Republicans is rarely required. Wednesday’s
vote gave the minority party a rare shot at rel-
evance, but Brown said he wanted their sup-
port anyway, to help sell the plan to voters.
“The pitch now is you’ve got a unified
front,” said Assembly Speaker Toni Atkins,
D-San Diego. “You got Northern, Central,
South. You got Republicans. You got
Democrats ... and you got the governor.”
Water bond signals
historic compromise
Jerry Brown
5
Friday • Aug. 15, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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Bill would add ‘parent’ box to birth certificates
SACRAMENTO — The state Senate approved legislation
Thursday that would make California the latest state to mod-
ify birth certificates to accommodate same-sex couples who
become parents, but not before generating criticism from a
Republican lawmaker.
Under the bill, birth certificates in California will have
three check boxes for parents starting in January 2016:
mother, father and parent. Republican Sen. Jim Nielsen
voted against it, saying the change diminishes the tradi-
tional definition of parents.
“It removes the dignity of the term husband and wife,
mother and father,” said Nielsen, who represents a largely
agricultural region in Northern California. “No one can
argue this bill does not diminish the significance of those
terms in American society. I urge a ‘no’ vote. Stand up for
‘mother;’ stand up for ‘father.”’
In response, Democratic Sen. Mark Leno of San Francisco
said there is nothing offensive in the legislation and that it
seeks to treat all couples equally by including all three terms
as check-off boxes.
“There is no disrespect in using gender-neutral terms ... so
everyone feels included,” he said. “I support mothers and
fathers; we can do both.”
AB1951 by state Assemblyman Jimmy Gomez, D-Los
Angeles, passed on a 26-4 vote. It will return to the
Assembly for a final vote on technical amendments before
going to the governor.
Bill conforms sentencing for use of cocaine, crack
SACRAMENTO — Legislation intended to address racial
disparities in sentencing for cocaine offenses is close to
passing the Legislature.
The Assembly on Thursday approved SB1010 on a 49-14
vote, returning it to the Senate for a final vote on amend-
ments.
The current punishment for possession for sale of powder
cocaine is two to four years, while the same offense for
crack cocaine is punishable by three to five years. Bill sup-
porters say white drug users tend to snort cocaine while
black and Latino users tend to smoke crack.
The bill would make both punishable by two to four years,
ending what Assemblyman Steven Bradford of Gardena calls
“blatant racism.”
Officials weighing fix for Hetch Hetchy tunnel
SAN FRANCISCO — San Francisco is hiring outside con-
sultants to help it decide whether it should repair or entirely
replace an 89-year-old tunnel that is a vital part of the Hetch
Hetchy water system supplying 2.6 million Bay Area
homes and businesses.
The 19-mile-long Mountain Tunnel was left out of the San
Francisco Public Utilities Commission’s decade-long, $4.6
billion water-system overhaul. But San Francisco Public
Utilities Commission assistant general manager Steve
Ritchie said that more delay would increase the chances of a
“catastrophic” collapse of the tunnel, cutting water flow for
the region by 25 percent.
By Julie Watson
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN DIEGO — California home
sales declined in July compared to the
same time last year as buyers struggled
to find something they could afford in
the tight market, a research firm said
Thursday.
Statewide 39,608 new and resale
houses and condos sold in July — an
8.7 percent drop from July 2013,
CoreLogic DataQuick said.
The rate of rising year-over-year
prices also is no longer at double-digit
rates like last summer.
“The more spectacular annual price
gains of a year ago — over 20 percent
— seem far back in the rearview mirror
now,” said CoreLogic DataQuick ana-
lyst Andrew LePage. “Looking ahead,
such double-digit price jumps seem
unlikely unless there’s a burst of pent-
up demand, perhaps triggered by more
robust income growth, a loosening of
mortgage credit or a significant move
in interest rates.”
The sharpest drop in sales was in
Southern California.
About 20,000 new and resale hous-
es and condos sold last month in the
six-county Southern California
region, marking a 12.4 percent
decline from July 2013.
Atotal of about 8,474 new and resale
houses and condos sold last month In
the nine-county San Francisco Bay
Area. That’s down 9.3 percent from
July 2013 when 9,339 homes sold.
The numbers were based on transac-
tions that closed in escrow and were
reported by county recorder offices.
Cash deals have also fallen, indicat-
ing that fewer investors are snapping
up bargains.
The median price for homes
statewide in July was $392,000, an 8
percent increase from the same time a
year ago, CoreLogic DataQuick said.
California home sales
decline in tight market
DAILY JOURNAL FILE PHOTO
A total of about 8,474 new and resale houses and condos sold last month In the
nine-county San Francisco Bay Area.
By Ellen Knickermeyer
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO — Astatewide sur-
vey released Thursday ranks Fresno
and other Central Valley communities
as the most disadvantaged areas in
California when it comes to chal-
lenges ranging from polluted water to
joblessness.
The ranking by the California
Environmental Protection Agency ear-
marks those and other areas hardest-hit
by environmental, economic and
health problems for a greater share of
the more than $800 million in funds
from the state’s cap-and-trade pro-
gram. The program penalizes compa-
nies and other entities that emit the
most climate-changing carbon.
The agency assessed 19 criteria such
as percentage of people with asthma,
quality of drinking water and air,
prevalence of pesticide contamina-
tion, and nearness to toxic-waste
cleanup sites.
Fresno neighborhoods dominated
the ranking, with Bakersfield, Los
Angeles El Monte, San Bernardino and
Ontario also making the top 20.
“When people think of pollution”
and other environmental and economic
challenges, “they often think of inner-
city neighborhoods,” said Sam
Delson, a spokesman for the state
environmental agency. “What our data
has shown is that these challenges are
not limited to urban neighborhoods.”
The state’s cap-and-trade program
mandates that 25 percent of its pro-
ceeds go to the state’s most-disadvan-
taged communities.
Fresno tops list of most disadvantaged areas
Around the state
6
Friday • Aug. 15, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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PM al-Maliki
relinquishing
post to rival
By Sameer N. Yacoub
and Qassim Abdul-Zahra
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
BAGHDAD — Embattled Iraqi Prime
Minister Nouri al-Maliki announced late
Thursday that he was relinquishing his post
to his nominated replace-
ment, ending a political
deadlock that has plunged
the country into uncer-
tainty as it fights a Sunni
militant insurgency.
Standing alongside
senior members of his
party, including rival
Haider al-Abadi, al-
Maliki said he was step-
ping aside in favor of his “brother,” in order
to “facilitate the political process and gov-
ernment formation.”
Al-Maliki had been struggling for weeks
to stay on for a third four-year term as prime
minister amid an attempt by opponents to
push him out, accusing him of monopoliz-
ing power and pursuing a fiercely pro-Shiite
agenda that has alienated the Sunni minori-
t y. The United States, the U.N. and a broad
array of political factions in Iraq had backed
al-Abadi, saying only a new leader could
unify a country under siege from Sunni
extremists of the Islamic State group that
have captured large swathes of Iraqi territo-
ry.
Al-Maliki said his decision to throw his
support behind al-Abadi reflected a desire to
“safeguard the high interests of the coun-
try,” adding that he would not be the cause of
any bloodshed. “My position is your trust in
me, and no position is higher than your
trust,” he declared in a televised address.
Al-Maliki’s refusal to give up his position
after eight years in power had provoked a
political crisis that escalated this week in
Baghdad, where armed guards patrolled most
major bridges, intersections and roadways.
Study blames humans
for most of melting glaciers
WASHINGTON — More than two-thirds of
the recent rapid melting of the world’s gla-
ciers can be blamed on humans, a new study
finds.
Scientists looking at glacier melt since
1851 didn’t see a human fingerprint until
about the middle of the 20th century. Even
then only one-quarter of the warming wasn’t
from natural causes.
But since 1991, about 69 percent of the
rapidly increasing melt was man-made, said
Ben Marzeion, a climate scientist at the
University of Innsbruck in Austria.
“Glaciers are really shrinking rapidly
now,” he said. “I think it’s fair to say most of
it is man-made.”
Scientists fault global warming from the
burning of coal, oil and gas as well as
changes in land use near glaciers and soot
pollution. Glaciers in Alaska and the Alps in
general have more human-caused melting
than the global average, Marzeion said.
The study is published Thursday in the
journal Science. The research is the first to
calculate just how much of the glacial melt-
ing can be attributed to people and “the jump
from about a quarter to roughly 70 percent of
total glacier mass loss is significant and con-
cerning,” said University of Alaska
Fairbanks geophysicist Regine Hock, who
wasn’t part of the study.
Sentencing panel to
weigh economic crime penalties
WASHINGTON — The federal panel that
sets sentencing policy announced Thursday
that it plans in the coming year to consider
changes to sentencing guidelines for some
white-collar crimes.
The U.S. Sentencing Commission, which
earlier this year reduced guideline ranges for
drug crimes, unanimously approved its latest
set of priorities. The top priority will be con-
tinuing to work with Congress on reducing
the scope and severity of mandatory mini-
mum penalties, but another goal will be eval-
uating the fairness of sentences for econom-
ic crimes like fraud, the commission said.
The panel had been reviewing data for sev-
eral years, but plans to hear more from
judges, victims and others to decide “whether
there are ways the economic crime guidelines
could work better,” the commission’s chair-
woman, Patti Saris, a federal judge in
Massachusetts, said in a statement.
By Robert Burns and Ken Dilanian
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — President Barack
Obama on Thursday promised to expand
U.S. humanitarian relief to Iraqis threatened
by the advancing army of the Islamic State
militants. He took credit for alleviating the
genocide threat to thousands trapped on a
mountaintop but said the situation “remains
dire” throughout the country.
Obama also said U.S. airstrikes would
continue to protect Americans and U.S.
facilities in Iraq, and he said Washington
has increased its delivery of military assis-
tance to Iraqi and Kurdish forces fighting the
Islamic State.
But he gave no indication he intends to
shift from the limited, defensive military
campaign he announced last week to one
designed to use American might to push
back and eventually defeat an emboldened
Islamic State army, which has made rapid
and broad advances across western and
northern Iraq since June.
“We’re going to be
working with our interna-
tional partners to provide
humanitarian assistance
to those who are suffering
in northern Iraq wherever
we have capabilities and
we can carry out effective
missions like the one we
carried out on Mount
Sinjar without commit-
ting combat troops on the ground,” Obama
said in a statement.
His remarks highlighted the gap between
the administration’s increasingly dire
assessment of the threat posed by the
Islamic State group and the limited air cam-
paign it has so far undertaken, which mili-
tary officials acknowledge has had only a
temporary, local effect and is not likely to
blunt the group’s momentum or ambitions.
On Thursday, some of the most senior
U.S. intelligence experts on terrorism
briefed reporters in detail on the Islamic
State group.
Obama: No Iraq rescue;
further airdrops unlikely
Nouri al-Maliki
REUTERS
Displaced people from the minority Yazidi sect,fleeing the violence in the Iraqi town of Sinjar,
re-enter Iraq from Syria.
Barack Obama
Around the nation
NATION/WORLD 7
Friday • Aug. 15, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
MICRO-START XP-1 
World's smallest Portable Jump Starter and
Back-up Power Supply
By Matthew Daly
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — ADemocratic
congressman plans to introduce a
bill to restrict a Defense
Department program that provides
machine guns and other surplus
military equipment for free to
local law enforcement agencies
across the country.
Rep. Hank Johnson, D-Ga., said
Thursday that the death of an
unarmed teenager who was shot by
a police officer in a St. Louis sub-
urb highlights the need for the leg-
islation, which has been in the
works for months. The bill comes
as members of Congress have
called for the Justice Department
to investigate the shooting of a
black teen by a police officer in
Ferguson, Mo.
Police in riot gear and military
garb have clashed nightly with
protesters since Aug. 9 shooting
of Michael Brown and at times
have trained weapons on them
from armored trucks.
A spokesman for the Defense
Logistics Agency, the govern-
ment’s combat logistics support
agency, said the Ferguson Police
Department has been part of the
surplus equipment program. It
received two tactical vehicles —
both Humvees — as well as a gen-
erator and a trailer and may have
received other equipment, DLA
spokesman Joe Yoswa said.
Johnson said city streets should
be a place for businesses and fami-
lies, “not tanks and M16s.” He
said a Pentagon program that
transfers surplus military equip-
ment to state and local law
enforcement has led to police
agencies resembling paramilitary
forces.
Congressman wants to curb
military surplus program
By Alexander Roslyakov
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
KAMENSK-SHAKHTINSKY,
Russia — Raising the stakes in
Ukraine’s conflict, a Russian aid
convoy of more than 200 trucks
pushed up to the border on
Thursday but then stopped,
provocatively poised to cross into
rebel-held territory.
The Ukrainian government
threatened to use all means avail-
able to block the convoy if the
Red Cross was not allowed to
inspect the cargo. Such an inspec-
tion would ease concerns that
Russia could use the aid shipment
as cover for a military incursion in
support of the separatists, who
have come under growing pressure
from government troops.
The United States has warned
Russia that it needs to secure
Ukraine’s permission for the con-
voy to enter.
“We’ve made that very clear to
the Russians that they should not
move these trucks in, without tak-
ing all of the steps the Ukrainian
government has outlined,” U.S.
State Department spokeswoman
Marie Harf said Thursday.
Amid the tensions surrounding
the convoy, European
Commission chief Jose Manuel
Barroso called Russian and
Ukrainian leaders to arrange three-
way consultations on ways to de-
escalate the crisis. Barroso’s office
said that details will be worked out
through diplomatic channels.
Ukraine announced it was organ-
izing its own aid shipment to the
war-wracked separatist region of
Luhansk.
Complicating the dispute over
the dueling missions, Ukraine said
Thursday it has gained control
over a key town near Luhansk city,
thereby giving it the means to
block the presumed route that the
Russian convoy would take to the
city.
The town, Novosvitlivka, lies
about 40 kilometers (25 miles)
from the border, so if the Russian
trucks did enter the country, they
potentially could unload some-
where other than city itself.
The Russian convoy set out
Thursday morning from a military
depot in the southern Russian city
of Voronezh where it had been
parked since late Tuesday. Moscow
says the convoy has 262 vehicles,
including about 200 trucks carry-
ing aid.
Ukraine and Russia parry
over Russian aid convoy
By David McHugh
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
FRANKFURT, Germany —
Well, that didn’t last long.
After four quarters of meager
growth, the fragile economic
recovery in the 18-country euro-
zone creaked to a halt in the sec-
ond quarter.
Growth was zero. After only
0.2 percent in the first quarter.
Now who will get out and push?
The European Central Bank, with
a further monetary stimulus? Or
governments in France and Italy,
which have dragged their heels in
making their economies more
business-friendly?
Either or both could help.
Especially if the Ukraine crisis
mushrooms with a Russian inva-
sion that would scare off business
investment even more — and
extend one bad quarter into an
outright recession.
Few economists think the
eurozone will slip back into its
third recession in six years.
Most expect only a slow recov-
ery as Europe continues to work
down its debts and that’s not
ideal for a global economy that’s
a long way short of firing on all
cylinders.
In short, the eurozone remains
a potential drag on the rest of the
world.
“I don’t think today’s numbers
make that picture any worse,”
said Tom Rogers, senior econom-
ic adviser to the EY eurozone
forecast. “It’s still going to be a
slow recovery for the eurozone
and it will be a slow recovery for
eurozone markets for imports
from the rest of the world.”
Eurozone recovery grinds
to halt amid Ukraine fear
REUTERS
Activist Najee Ali , left, and Jenifer Lewis, center, speak out against the fatal
shooting by Ferguson, Mo.
LOCAL/NATION 8
Friday • Aug. 15, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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Monday August 18th 2:00PM to 4:00PM
Sapore Italiano Restaurant
1447 Burlingame Avenue
Burlingame, CA 94010
Wednesday August 20th 6:00PM to 8:00PM
Peninsula Jewish Community Center
800 Foster City Blvd.
Foster City, CA 94404, Conference Room A
(THIS EVENT/PROGRAM IS NOT SPONSORED BY THE PJCC)
Tuesday August 19th 10:00AM to 12:00PM
Mimi’s Café
2208 Bridgepointe Parkway
San Mateo, CA 94404
Thursday August 21st 9:30AM to 11:30AM
City of Belmont Twin Pines Lodge
40 Twin Pines Lane
Belmont, CA 94002
Tuesday August 19th 2:00PM to 4:00PM
CyBelle’s Front Room Restaurant
1385 9th Avenue
San Francisco, CA 94122
(Sunset District)
Thursday August 21st 2:00PM to 4:00PM
Jewish Center of San Francisco –Room 209
3200 California Street
San Francisco, CA 94118
THIS IS NOT A PROGRAM BY THE JCCSF
(Parking is available underneath building
Bring Self-Parking Ticket into Seminar for Validation)
Wednesday August 20th 9:30AM to 11:30AM
Millbrae Library – Room A
1 Library Lane
Millbrae, CA 94030
Thursday August 21st 6:00PM to 8:00PM
San Bruno Public Library – Community Room
701 Angus Avenue West
San Bruno, CA 94406
Wednesday August 20th 1:30PM to 3:30PM
Hawthorn Suites by Wyndham
1628 Webster Street
Alameda, CA 94501
Friday August 22nd 10:00AM to 12:00PM
Hampton Inn & Suites – Skyline Room
2700 Junipero Serra Blvd.
Daly City, CA 94015
T
he Coastside Land Trust Gallery is hosting
an opening reception for its Cal i forni a
Agriculture show on Friday . The exhibition
celebrates the coastside’s agricultural, scenic and cultural
heritage as interpreted by local artists. Hors d’oeuvres
will be provided by Pasta Moon. The show runs
through Oct. 24 and gallery hours are 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Thursday and Friday and 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Sundays. The
opening reception is 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. at 788 Main St.,
Half Moon Bay.
The CLTis also hosting its second Purissima Old
Town Si te habitat restoration workday 10 a.m. to 2
p.m. on Saturday, Aug. 23. The CLTwas awarded the
property just south of Half Moon Bay in January 2013
by the California Coastal Conservancy. The CLT
is seeking volunteers to help clear brush and restore the
historic property to a publicly usable natural resource.
For more information visit coastsidelandtrust.org.
***
The San Mateo Public Library Foundation was
successfully able to open three library branches earlier
due to a successful fundraiser and is asking the public to
continue to donate to keep it that way.
Starting in July, the Main Library now opens 10
a.m. Monday through Saturday, the Marina branch opens
at 1 p.m. Monday and 10 a.m. Saturday, the Hillsdale
branch now opens 1 p.m. Tuesday and 10 a.m. Saturday.
The increased hours were funded by the foundation’s
annual Author’s Gala in May. For more information or
to donate visit www.smlibraryfoundation.org.
***
The newly launched San Mateo County Sheriff ’s
Activities League Clean Teamspent the past few
weeks of Wednesday afternoons cleaning Middlefield
Road and reaching out to merchants. The clean team
reports graffiti, illegal dumping and large trash items and
each Thursday is joined by the league’s Green Teamt o
clean up local neighborhoods. To date, the teams have
collected about 12 bags of trash each week.
***
Celebrate the birthday of horror fiction author
Howard Phillips Lovecraft at the South San
Francisco Main Library, 840 W. Orange Ave. in South
San Francisco 4 p.m.-6 p.m. Wednesday, Aug. 20.
The event will include displays of work from
Lovecraft, birthday treats and a sneak peak of
Lovecraftian games in anticipation of International
Games at Your Library Day in November.
Call 829-3860 for more information.
***
Hatch chiles, known for their sweet, spicy taste and
many uses in Latin and Southwestern dishes, are com-
ing. Mol l i e St one’s stores are welcoming the chiles
through several events where shoppers can have their
chiles roasted on site during their short six-week sea-
son. The events are noon-4 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 7 at the
Burlingame store at 1477 Chapin Ave. and noon-4 p.m.
Saturday, Sept. 13 at the San Bruno store at 22 Bayhill
Shopping Center.
***
The South San Francisco Cultural Art s
Commi ssi on is hosting its annual Cultural Art s
Summer Barbecue 12:30 p.m.-2:30 p.m. Sunday, Aug.
17 at the Joseph A. Fernekes Building in Orange
Memorial Park, 781 Tennis Drive in South San
Francisco. Tickets are $15 for adults and $5 for children
16 and under.
There will be barbecued chicken and grilled hot dogs,
drinks and dessert. Event activities include live music by
DJ Tro y, a silent auction for an array of gift certificates
or art and craft items and a live auction featuring four
baseball tickets to the San Francisco Giants vs.
the Milwaukee Brewers game with parking included.
All proceeds will support South San Francisco
Cultural Art s programs.
Tickets for the Cultural Arts Summer Barbecue
can be obtained at the South San Francisco Parks
and Recreation Department at 33 Arroyo Drive or at
550 North Canal. For more information call the Parks
and Recreation Department at 829-3800.
***
Another accolade for South San Francisco resident
LeAnn Thornton. The previously named USO
Volunteer of the Quarter has just been named the
2014 Volunteer of the Year for the continental
United States. Thornton focuses her attention on the
USO’s Fami l i es of the Fallen and Wel come
Home programs and supports the operational center
San Francisco International Airport. She recently
housed 90 Marines who had a 16-hour layover at SFO,
coordinating meals, expediting security and showing the
troops hospitality. She now competes against the vol-
unteers of the year from other USO regions around the
world and the winner will be named in September.
The Reporters’ Notebook is a weekly collection of facts culled
from the notebooks of the Daily Journal staff. It appears in the
Friday edition.
Reporters’ notebook
By Josk Boak
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — More people
applied for U.S. unemployment bene-
fits last week, although jobless claims
continue to be close to pre-recession
levels.
Weekly applications for unemploy-
ment aid climbed 21,000 to a seasonal-
ly adjusted 311,000, the Labor
Department said Thursday. The prior
week’s was revised up slightly to
290,000.
The four-week average, a less
volatile measure, rose 2,000 to
295,750. That continues to be close to
averages that predate the beginning of
the Great Recession in late 2007.
“Stepping back from the weekly
volatility,” said Jennifer Lee, senior
economist at BMO Capital Markets,
“the trend is still very encouraging and
points to continued job growth.”
Applications are a proxy for layoffs.
When fewer employers shed workers, it
suggests potentially rising incomes,
increased hiring activity and confi-
dence that the economy is improving.
Employers are searching for more
workers.
In June, they advertised the most
monthly job openings in more than 13
years, the government reported
Tuesday. Employers posted 4.67 mil-
lion jobs that month, up 2.1 percent
from May’s total of 4.58 million,
according to the Labor Department.
The number of advertised openings was
the highest since February 2001, sug-
gesting that hiring should continue to
be solid in the coming months.
Still, the openings report showed
that the hiring rate has not risen over
the past year as quickly as the number
of positions being advertised.
Job openings have increased 17.6
percent during the past 12 months,
while hiring has risen 9.3 percent dur-
ing the same period.
Yet the monthly net job gains have
been solid in the past six months.
Employers added 209,000 jobs in
July, the sixth straight month of job
gains above 200,000. The economy
has now produced an average 244,000
jobs a month since February.
The recent spurt of hiring has
encouraged more people to start look-
ing for work, causing the unemploy-
ment rate to inch up to 6.2 percent
from 6.1 percent. The government
only counts people searching for jobs
as unemployed.
Hiring has yet to boost wages by
much. Wage growth has slightly out-
paced inflation since the recession
ended more than five years ago.
But the greater the number of people
with jobs, the greater the total number
of paychecks, which could drive con-
sumer spending and growth.
U.S. jobless aid applications rise to 311K
OPINION 9
Friday • Aug. 15, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
CSM parking blues
Editor,
Sigh. So it begins again. No room
for students. College of San Mateo stu-
dents received emails this week saying
there will be no parking in the huge
lots on the north end of campus, nor
can CSM students park in lots “belong-
ing to private businesses,” i.e.
SolarCity and GoPro. Taxpayers have
spent millions of bond dollars (suppos-
edly) to support students, not to pro-
vide corporate parking. Can’t find a
place to park? Too bad. Students will
either be ticketed or towed.
And the college district is asking for
another one-third of a billion dollars to
support students? Please.
Donna Bischoff
San Mateo
The issue of private property
Editor,
Aneighbor’s child walks through an
open gate and drowns in your pool. Do
you get sued? You bet. Achild walks
through an open gate onto private
property at Martin’s beach and gets
injured or drowns. Does the owner get
sued? Maybe, but he shouldn’t have to
go to court because the government
forced him to keep the gate open.
I haven’t seen anything in state Sen.
Jerry Hill’s comments where the gov-
ernment will indemnify the owner
against any lawsuit stemming from an
injury or will reimburse the owner from
any damage done to the property by a
member of the public. If he felt that
public access was so important, per-
haps he should have used taxpayers’
money to buy the beach when it was for
sale.
The Legislature has certainly wasted
more money than this in the past on
less important ventures. Private proper-
ty is just that — it’s private. It is up to
the owner to grant access. The idea that
the current owner has to provide access
because previous owners did so borders
on the ludicrous. The current owner
shouldn’t be penalized because he is
rich and previous owners generously
allowed others to cross their land.
If we do not want the government
telling us that we have to leave the gate
to our backyard open to allow the pub-
lic to enjoy our patio and pool then we
should not require that of others, regard-
less of the history of the property.
Steven Howard
Redwood City
Let’s keep Millbrae clean
Editor,
Diana Taylor’s letter to the editor on
Aug. 13 is so right (“Millbrae:
Polluted by its own people”). Very few
of the merchants keep sidewalks and
storefronts clean, and there is rarely a
clean and old-poster/fingerprint-free
window. Restaurants are unappetizing
— in the 40 years I have lived here,
it’s never been worse.
Yes, councilmembers, please take a
good look and enforce some policies of
cleanliness.
June Yoshida
Millbrae
Honey bees can’t wait
Editor,
In honor of Honey Bee Day on Aug.
16, we should honor pollinators criti-
cal to our food system by urging
President Obama and his agencies to
create the best protections possible for
the nation’s bees.
In the next few months, a joint task
force led by Obama’s EPAand USDA
will release a plan of action for address-
ing bee declines. And one of the most
critical steps they can take is to restrict
the use of pesticides called neonicoti-
noids, a driving force in bee declines.
Bayer, Syngenta, Monsanto and the
rest of the pesticide industry will con-
tinue to try and confuse the science and
the discussion about what needs to be
done, but the reality is that we can’t
afford to wait around while these pesti-
cides further contaminate our air, water
and soil and contribute to an untenable
burden for bees, beekeepers and our
agricultural economy.
David Aylward
Mountain View
Letters to the editor
Orange County Register
T
wo new reports were out this
week that, taken together,
provide a pretty good picture
of how the U.S. labor force has fared
since the economic recovery began in
June 2009.
On Monday, the U.S. Conference of
Mayors released a report, prepared by
IHS Global Insight, noting that U.S.
payroll employment reached an all-
time high this spring, finally surpass-
ing the prerecession peak of 138.4
million jobs, reached in the first quar-
ter of 2008.
Then, the Labor Department report-
ed Tuesday that there were 4.7 million
job openings on the last business day
in June, not only a slight uptick from
May, but also the highest number of
openings in 13 years.
If the reports stopped there, it
would be cause for celebration, from
Orange County, California, to Orange
County, Florida. But, as a wise man
famously advised, all that glitters is
not gold.
Indeed, the Conference of Mayors
report laments that jobs gained during
the economic recovery pay an average
23 percent less than jobs lost during
the so-called Great Recession.
The annual wage was $61,637 in
sectors where jobs were lost in the
economic downturn, which began in
December 2007, while the average
wage of new jobs gained through the
second quarter of this year was only
$47,171. “This wage gap,” said the
report, “represents $93 billion in lost
wages.”
As to the Labor Department’s
monthly report on Job Openings and
Labor Turnover — known as JOLTS —
it has been held out by Federal
Reserve chief Janet Yellen as an
important barometer of the state of
the nation’s job market.
Continued strength in the next sev-
eral JOLTS reports could portend a
move by the Fed to ratchet up short-
term interest rates, which would be
most welcomed by inflation hawks,
who complain that the nation’s cen-
tral bank has kept short-term rates
too low for too long.
But Ms. Yellen and the Fed’s board
of governors are not strictly looking
at job openings. They also are look-
ing at the number of workers who vol-
untarily quit jobs and the number of
workers hired.
Indeed, when workers voluntarily
leave their employers, it usually
means they have found better — usu-
ally higher-paying — jobs. That’s a
sign of a dynamic labor market.
Similarly, when that nation’s
employers are competing with each
other to hire workers to fill job open-
ings, it’s a sign of robust economic
growth.
In June, some 2.53 million workers
quit a job, the most since June 2008.
Meanwhile, some 4.8 million
Americans were hired in June.
Regrettably, that quit rate was a
mere 1.8 percent in June, which is
trending somewhat upward, but
remains at a historically low level.
And, while monthly hires are trending
in the right direction, they have yet
to return to prerecession levels.
So, American workers are to be for-
given if they are not especially bull-
ish about the nation’s labor market.
After five years of putative economic
recovery, they almost certainly
expected more.
More jobs available, but for less pay
This crisis did
not go to waste
N
ever let a good crisis go to waste was British
Prime Minister Winston Churchill’s famous
adage adopted by Rahm Emanuel when dis-
cussing the financial crisis that met the Obama White
House when he was chief of staff.
Emanuel’s theory was that a crisis can solve long-
standing issues and allow the gathering of ideas so
everyone gets a little something out of a larger deal.
And that is the case with the state’s most recent water
bond measure passed by both houses of the California
Legislature and signed by the governor Wednesday
night.
The legislation places a $7.5 billion water plan
before voters in November and replaces an existing
$11.1 billion bond
previously
approved by the
Legislature that was
considered too cost-
ly and filled with
pork.
Gov. Jerry Brown,
the ultimate Zen
politician, stripped
down his proposal
last week to about
$6 billion sans the
water storage com-
ponent touted by
Republican leader-
ship. His ostensible
rationale is that a
lower amount would
be more fiscally
prudent. However,
adding the water storage component to gain Republican
votes would add money and he could place the blame for
the escalating cost squarely on the traditionally fiscal-
ly conservative GOP, thus negating the argument that
the plan is too costly when presented to voters.
And the end result is that the cost is contained and
projects will have to compete for the limited revenue,
with the rationale that the best projects will win out.
So it’s survival of the fittest — another concept that
will surely limit debate.
The end package does indeed have something for
everyone. It invests in the state’s water infrastructure
and builds reservoirs. It cleans up groundwater and will
promote new technology that will save water. It only
had two no votes in the Assembly and unanimously
passed the state Senate. Even legislation pronouncing
that kittens are cute wouldn’t get that kind of support.
And so it goes onto the ballot as Proposition 1, with
the full support of the governor, the Legislature and all
the special interests corralled in Sacramento for much
of this week hammering out a deal.
The essence of this deal is that we are in a drought cri-
sis and something needs to be done. If Sacramento can-
not agree on at least some initial steps to ensure our
water quality and supply into the future, then there is
not much point in having elected officials spend so
much time in the Capitol right? The writing was on the
wall, and after several stops and starts for such a water
bond proposal, it was evident this was the time for put-
ting everything on the table and eliminating special
projects to keep costs down.
The statewide water shortage has brought up all sorts
of unique ideas such as new regulations for well water
on which so many farmers depend and reignited the
long-standing fight between Northern California and
Southern California over which way the water flows and
which is more important, the farming industry or the
fishing industry. It was starting to get ugly and, if
Sacramento hadn’t acted, we were to be faced with a
water bond that was probably more expensive than it
needed to be and less popular than what was passed this
week.
We have now a scaled-back version of a bond with
something for everyone to like and something for
everyone not to like. But there is more in it to like and
it is a plan that shows our representatives in
Sacramento do know we must plan well and come
together for the future of our state. Churchill would be
proud. Maybe even Emanuel too.
Jon Mays is the editor in chief of the Daily Journal. He
can be reached at jon@smdailyjournal.com. Follow Jon
on Twitter @jonmays.
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BUSINESS 10
Friday • Aug. 15, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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Dow 16,713.58 +61.78 10-Yr Bond 2.40 -0.01
Nasdaq 4,453.00 +18.88 Oil (per barrel) 95.33
S&P 500 1,955.18 +8.46 Gold 1,314.40
By Matthew Craft
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEWYORK — Better corporate earn-
ings helped nudge the stock market up
on Thursday in one of the quietest ses-
sions this year.
Health-care companies led the major
indexes to slight gains, while
Berkshire Hathaway crossed another
milestone, trading above $200,000 a
share for the first time.
With many who work in the markets
on vacation, trading volume on the New
York Stock Exchange thinned out: just
2.6 billion shares on Thursday. An
average day this year is nearly 1 billion
higher.
Stronger profits for Perrigo, a drug-
maker, drove its stock up 7 percent, the
biggest gain in the Standard & Poor’s
500 index. Perrigo jumped $10.14 to
end at $149.29. Another drugmaker,
Merck, gained 93 cents, or 2 percent,
to $58.78 following news that it won
federal approval for a new sleeping
pill.
The S&P500 climbed up 8.46 points,
or 0.4 percent, to close at 1,955.18.
Health care companies led nine of the
10 industry groups in the S&P 500 up.
The Dow Jones industrial average
rose 61.78 points, or 0.4 percent, to
16,713.58 while the Nasdaq compos-
ite climbed 18.88 points, or 0.4 per-
cent, to 4,453.00.
Markets often slip into a summertime
lull in August. Trading desks remain
short-staffed until people return from
vacation after the Labor Day holiday.
Without any major developments, trad-
ing volume usually dries up and stock
indexes turn sleepy, as if stuck in their
beach chairs.
The S&P 500 is still hovering near
record highs, leading some analysts to
fret that the market looks too expen-
sive. Lawrence Creatura, a fund manager
at Federated Investors, argued that the
solid second-quarter earnings season,
which is nearly wrapped up, should put
investors’ worries about high prices to
rest.
The S&P 500, for instance, has
gained nearly 6 percent this year.
“That’s an interesting number: 6 per-
cent just happens to be the average
earnings growth rate over the very long
term,” he said.
In Thursday trading, the Class A
shares of Warren Buffett’s Berkshire
Hathaway conglomerate crossed the
$200,000 mark, making the highest-
priced U.S. stock even more expensive.
Buffett has never split Berkshire’s A
shares to make them cheaper, although
Berkshire created more affordable
Class B shares, which closed
Thursday at $135.30 Berkshire’s
Class Ashares rose $3,241, or 2 per-
cent, to end at $202,850.
Kohl’s, a department-store chain,
turned in quarterly profits that were
slightly better than analysts’ expecta-
tions. Sales slipped but the company
cut costs. Kohl’s surged $1.80, or 3 per-
cent, to $56.91.
After the market closed Wednesday,
Cisco Systems reported falling quarter-
ly sales and profits. The technology
company also announced plans to lay
off 6,000 workers, roughly 8 percent of
its workforce. Cisco’s stock dropped 66
cents, or 3 percent, to $24.54.
In Europe, more reports showed the
region’s economic recovery has stalled.
Germany’s economy shrank 0.2 per-
cent from April to June, while the
French economy stagnated. But both
France’s CAC 40 and Germany’s DAX
closed with gains of 0.3 percent.
Britain’s FTSE 100 rose 0.4 percent.
“Investors appear to be betting that
the continued raft of disappointing eco-
nomic data could compel the European
Central Bank to take further steps to
help try and boost economic activity
before the end of the year,” said Michael
Hewson, chief market analyst at CMC
Markets.
In the market for U.S. government
bonds, the yield on the 10-year
Treasury note fell to 2.40 percent.
Earlier, it touched 2.38 percent, its low-
est level this year.
Stocks creephigher following earnings news
Stocks that moved substantially or traded heavily Thursday on the New
York Stock Exchange and the Nasdaq Stock Market:
NYSE
Kohl’s Corp., up $1.80 to $56.91
The retailer reported profit that remained nearly flat during the second-
quarter, but the results beat Wall Street expectations.
Wal-Mart Stores Inc., up 36 cents to $74.39
The retailer posted slightly higher quarterly profits,but said sales remained
sluggish and the company trimmed its outlook.
Ultra Petroleum Corp., up 65 cents to $23.11
The oil company will pay $925 million to buy Marcellus Shale properties
from a Royal Dutch Shell unit and expand production.
Nasdaq
Keurig Green Mountain Inc., up 25 cents to $114.30
The coffee company will raise prices by up to 9 percent in November
because of higher costs for unroasted coffee and materials.
Cisco Systems Inc., down 66 cents to $24.54
The company will lay off up to 6,000 workers worldwide, or 8 percent of
its workforce, as part of a restructuring program.
Plug Power Inc., up 25 cents to $6.11
The fuel cell company reported a doubling in quarterly revenue,topping
expectations, on an increase in demand for its units.
Noodles & Co., down $4.05 to $21.16
The restaurant company reported worse-than-expected quarterly
financial results and projected an outlook below expectations.
Red Robin Gourmet Burgers Inc., down $11.92 to $52.63
The restaurant company reported a drop in quarterly profit and revenue
that fell far short of Wall Street expectations.
Big movers
By Fenit Nirappil
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SACRAMENTO — Abill that gener-
ated spirited debate over the leverage
corporations such as McDonald’s and
Subway can hold over their franchise
owners narrowly passed the Assembly
on Thursday.
SB610 would make it harder for cor-
porations to cancel franchise agree-
ments and would add requirements that
must be met when a franchisee’s busi-
ness is sold. The debate spilling across
party lines is fueled by intense lobby-
ing from two sides: unions teaming up
with franchisees, and business groups
that say restricting corporate control
could lead to lower food standards, dirty
bathrooms and closed stores.
The legislation strikes at the balance
of power between franchisees that prof-
it from the reputation of major brands
that in turn mandate how businesses are
operated. It heads to the Senate after
passing on a 41-27 vote, the minimum
needed.
The bill authored by Sen. Hannah-
Beth Jackson, D-Santa Barbara, was
inspired by stories of small-business
owners who say they had their liveli-
hoods taken away.
“Franchise agreements are so one-
sided,” Kathryn Carter, who runs a
McDonald’s restaurant in Daly City,
said in a statement. “Franchisees have
virtually no say in the businesses
we’ve risked our life savings and dedi-
cated years of our lives to build.”
The bill creates a higher standard for
canceling a franchise agreement early,
which supporters say gives them the
same rights during contract disputes as
other businesses in California. At least
eight other states, including
Connecticut and Nebraska, have a sim-
ilar standard in place, according to
Jackson’s office.
Other provisions would protect fran-
chisees from having their business
sold or transferred with little notice.
Opponents of the bill say the state
shouldn’t meddle in private contracts,
arguing that the existing system works
to protect internationally recognized
brands from rogue business owners.
“They go into that field as a fran-
chisee with their eyes open,” said
Assemblyman Donald Wagner, R-
Irvine. “We are not talking here about
contracts that are convoluted and writ-
ten in lots of legalese that they can’t
understand.”
The International Franchise
Association says it will continue its
fight against the bill, which has
included Web videos saying the bill
undermines California’s economic
recovery.
Assembly passes bill expanding franchisee rights
Coca-Cola bets on
energy drinks with Monster stake
ATLANTA— Coca-Cola is buying a 16.7 percent stake
in Monster Beverage for $2.15 billion, with the world’s
biggest soda maker hoping to benefit from the surging
popularity of energy drinks.
The Atlanta-based company said Thursday it will also
place two directors on Monster’s board as part of the
deal.
Analysts had suggested for some time that Coca-Cola
might acquire Monster at a time when its flagship soda
business is flagging in developed markets such as the
United States.
Business brief
PHOTO COURTESY OF MENLO COLLEGE ATHLETICS
David Tufo, right, was hired by Menlo College head coach Jake McKinley to be his No. 1
assistant for the 2014-15 season. Tufo, a 2005 Burlingame graduate, got into the coaching
ranks soon after his playing days ended.This is his second stint at Menlo, having served as an
assistant from 2011 to 2013.
By Nathan Mollat
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
David Tufo, a 2005 Burlingame graduate,
was the starting second baseman for the
2004 Burlingame baseball Central Coast
Section championship team. Like a lot of
players from that year’s Panthers squad,
Tufo went on to play college baseball, find-
ing a spot at Willamette University in
Salem, Oregon, graduating in 2009.
When Tufo was done playing, however, he
wasn’t finished with the game. While many
players will simply hang up their spikes,
Tufo kept his and has embarked on a journey
he hopes will lead to a
college head coaching
position.
“Ideally, (I would be
running a program) in the
next three to five years,”
said Tufo, who will turn
28 in December.
“I’m ready to keep put-
ting in the hours.”
It was Tufo’s dedication
and drive at being the best coach he can be
that drew Menlo College manager Jake
McKinley to him. McKinley hired Tufo to be
his No. 1 assistant with Menlo this coming
season. McKinley, who wrapped up his first
season this past spring, led the Oaks to a
record of 29-28 overall, 13-15 in CalPac
Conference play.
“David Tufo is an exceptional hire for us,”
McKinley said in a press release. “Not only
is he very familiar with Menlo, he is a great
infield guy who has a great knowledge base
of offensive production. I think he is one of
the top up-and-coming coaches in college
baseball.”
McKinley also promoted second-year
assistant Jason Ochart to the role of hitting
coach for the Oaks during the 2014-15 year.
This will be Tufo’s second go-around with
the Menlo baseball program. He was an
assistant for three seasons, 2011 to 2013,
before taking a position with Santa Clara
Tufo still in the game
By Fred Goodall
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Win or lose, youngsters from Chicago will
leave a lasting impression on the Little League
World Series.
The Jackie Robinson West team is com-
prised of all African-American players. On
Thursday, their league will make its first
appearance in 31 years in South Williamsport,
Pennsylvania — the latest indicator that base-
ball is making small strides in an effort to lure
young African-Americans back to the game.
The number of African-Americans in the
major leagues has dwindled steadily since the
mid-1980s, when they comprised about 19
percent of rosters; the number stood at 8.1 per-
cent on opening day this year.
Jackie Robinson West, representing the
Great Lakes, got off to a good start. It beat
Northwest champion Lynnwood Pacific 12-2
in its first game Thursday.
Still, No one is ready to proclaim the sport is
back in talent-rich inner city neighborhoods
because of Jackie Robinson West’s success.
However, programs such as the Little League
Urban Initiative, Major League Baseball’s RBI
(Reviving Baseball In Inner Cities) and Urban
Youth Academy clearly are making a difference.
David James, senior director of MLB’s RBI
program is familiar with the team’s history and
is delighted to see it back on Little League’s
biggest stage.
“All of us at MLB is talking about that
team,” said James, a native of Williamsport
and a former head of the Little League Urban
Initiative. “It’s really good for the game.”
The RBI program has grown over the years
and now has a presence in 200 cities with
about 230,000 participants.
Jackie Robinson West, which bears the
name of the first black player in the major
leagues, has a storied history. Joseph Haley
founded the league that’s grown to include 28
teams. Haley’s son, Bill, runs the program and
it is one of the Urban Initiative success stories.
It’s the first all-black team from Chicago to
Jackie Robinson
making impact
at World Series
See LLWS, Page 13
See TUFO, Page 14
<<< Page 13, Tarpley ready to
fill leadership void for Stanford
LEGALIZE IT?: NFL AND PLAYERS LOOKING TO CLARIFY MARIJUANA USAGE >> PAGE 12
Friday • Aug. 15, 2014
Following his playing days, 2005 Burlingame grad got into coaching
By Ronald Blum
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
BALTIMORE — Rob Manfred was elected
baseball’s 10th commissioner Thursday and
will succeed Bud Selig in January.
Alabor lawyer who has worked for Major
League Baseball since 1998, Manfred beat
out Boston Red Sox Chairman Tom Werner
in the first contested vote for a new commis-
sioner in 46 years. The third candidate,
MLB Executive Vice President of Business
Tim Brosnan, dropped out just before the
start of voting.
“I am tremendously honored by the confi-
dence owners showed in me today,” Manfred
said. “I have very big shoes to fill.”
The 55-year-old Manfred, who grew up in
Rome, New York — about an hour’s drive
from the Hall of Fame in Cooperstown—
must address issues that include decreased
interest in baseball among younger people
and longer games. He has served as MLB’s
chief operating officer for the past year.
“There is no doubt in my mind he has the
temperament, the training, the experience,”
Selig said.
Selig turned 80 last month and has ruled
baseball since September
1992, when he was
among the owners who
forced Commissioner Fay
Vincent’s resignation. He
said he intends to retire in
January.
Manfred fell one vote
shy of the 23 out of 30
owners needed in the first
ballot earlier Thursday.
On the second ballot, he
won unanimously, sever-
al owners confirmed.
Each candidate spoke to
owners for about an hour
Wednesday and met in
sessions Thursday morn-
ing with groups of 10
teams.
Werner was supported
by Chicago White Sox
owner Jerry Reinsdorf and Los Angeles
Angels owner Arte Moreno. Other teams
have said Reinsdorf wanted a commissioner
who would take a harsher stance in labor
negotiations.
Manfred elected new
baseball commissioner
By Josh Dubow
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
OAKLAND — Two days of practice in
front of boisterous Raiders supporters gave
Oakland’s newcomers a taste of the passion
of the fan base.
They will get to see more of that Friday
night when the Raiders play their first home
exhibition game of the season against the
Detroit Lions.
The atmosphere in the Coliseum doesn’t
figure to be quite as intense as it was in
Oxnard this week when fans were packed
around the two practice fields to watch the
Raiders work with the Dallas Cowboys.
The Raiders fans greatly outnumbered
Dallas supporters and provided the sound-
track for the practice with loud cheers and
derogatory chants toward the Cowboys. One
fan even got involved in a brawl, swinging
a helmet at a Cowboys defender.
“These are some of the best fans I have
ever laid my eyes on,” new defensive tackle
Antonio Smith said. “They get down with
you.”
One Raiders newcomer needs little intro-
duction to the team’s nation of supporters.
Running back Maurice Jones-Drew is a
longtime Raiders fan who grew up in the
Bay Area and went to games at the Coliseum
as a child.
Jones-Drew got hurt the past two years as
a visitor in Oakland but is looking forward
to his first home game in front of his home-
town fans.
“It’s going to be exciting to have every-
one there, people that I grew up with that are
Raider fans, season-ticket holders,” he said.
“It’s going to be exciting. I just want to go
out there, try and play a perfect game, strive
to be perfect, and we’ll see how it goes.”
The Raiders were far from perfect in their
exhibition opener, a 10-6 loss at
Minnesota. There were 13 penalties, numer-
ous dropped passes, missed tackles and
blown coverages as the first-team offense
led by new quarterback Matt Schaub generat-
ed just one first down on three drives and the
starting defense struggled to get off the
field.
Coach Dennis Allen said he expects to see
a far different team Friday following two
intense practices against the Cowboys.
“I’m hoping to see improvement,” Allen
said. “We’ve got to clean up the penalties.
Raiders hoping to carry
emotion into Lions game
See RAIDERS, Page 14
Rob Manfred
Bud Selig
See BASEBALL, Page 14
David Tufo
SPORTS 12
Friday • Aug. 15, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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University of Texas hires ex-QB
Vince Young for community relations
AUSTIN, Texas — Former Texas quarterback Vince Young
has been hired by the school for community relations and
fundraising.
UT spokeswoman Leslie Blair said Thursday that Young
will earn $100,000 annually.
Young led the Longhorns to the 2005 national champi-
onship before turning pro. He hasn’t played in an NFL reg-
ular-season NFL game since 2011.
Young spent five seasons with Tennessee. He started three
games for the Eagles in 2011. He spent part of two presea-
sons with Buffalo and Green Bay. Young was signed May 1
by Cleveland, but released after the Browns drafted Texas
A&M’s Johnny Manziel, who as a freshman won the
Heisman Trophy.
Young, who in 2013 earned a bachelor’s degree from UTi n
applied learning and development, will work in programs
supporting first-generation college students and students
from low-income backgrounds.
Browns starting Hoyer,
not Manziel versus Redskins
CLEVELAND — Browns coach Mike Pettine will start
quarterback Brian Hoyer ahead of rookie Johnny Manziel in
Cleveland’s second exhibition game.
Pettine said Thursday that Hoyer will begin Monday
night’s game in Washington against the Redskins. Pettine
says the team is “comfortable” with Hoyer starting and that
“it’s little overblown as to who the starter is going to be.”
Hoyer and Manziel will both get snaps with Cleveland’s
starting offense. The two quarterbacks have been competing
for the starting job since training camp opened last month.
Hoyer started the preseason opener at Detroit and
Manziel, the popular first-round pick from Texas A&M,
only played with the second-stringers.
Pettine wants to name his starter for the Sept. 7 season
opener at Pittsburgh before the Browns’ third preseason
game on Aug. 23.
Sports briefs
By Eddie Pells
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Marijuana is casting an ever-thicken-
ing haze across NFL locker rooms, and
it’s not simply because more players
are using it.
As attitudes toward the drug soften,
and science slowly teases out marijua-
na’s possible benefits for concussions
and other injuries, the NFL is reaching
a critical point in navigating its tenu-
ous relationship with what is recog-
nized as the analgesic of choice for
many of its players.
“It’s not, let’s go smoke a joint,”
retired NFL defensive lineman Marvin
Washington said. “It’s, what if you
could take something that helps you
heal faster from a concussion, that pre-
vents your equilibrium from being off
for two weeks and your eyesight for
being off for four weeks?”
One challenge the NFL faces is how
to bring marijuana into the game as a
pain reliever without condoning its use
as a recreational drug. And facing a law-
suit filed on behalf of hundreds of for-
mer players complaining about the
effects of prescription painkillers they
say were pushed on them by team train-
ers and doctors, the NFL is looking for
other ways to help players deal with the
pain from a violent game.
AGallup poll last year found 58 per-
cent of Americans believe marijuana
should be legalized. That’s already hap-
pened in Colorado and Washington —
the states that are home of last season’s
Super Bowl teams.
The World Anti-Doping Agency has
said it does not need to catch out-of-
competition marijuana users. And at
least one high-profile coach, Pete
Carroll of the champion Seahawks,
publicly said he’d like to see the NFL
study whether marijuana can help play-
ers.
There are no hard numbers on how
many NFLplayers are using marijuana,
but anecdotal evidence, including the
arrest or league discipline of no fewer
than a dozen players for pot over the
past 18 months, suggests use is
becoming more common.
Washington Redskins defensive
back Ryan Clark didn’t want to pin-
point the number of current NFL play-
ers who smoke pot but said, “I know a
lot of guys who don’t regularly smoke
marijuana who would use it during the
season.”
Washington wouldn’t put a specific
number on it but said he, too, knew his
share of players who weren’t shy about
lighting up when he was in the league,
including one guy “who just hated the
pain pills they were giving out at the
time.” Another longtime defensive
lineman, Marcellus Wiley, estimates
half the players in the average NFL
locker room were using it by the time
he shut down his career in 2006.
“They are leaning on it to cope with
the pain,” said Wiley, who played
defensive line in the league for 10 sea-
sons. “They are leaning on it to cope
with the anxiety of the game.”
The NFL is fighting lawsuits on two
fronts — concussions and painkillers
— both of which, some argue, could be
positively influenced if marijuana were
better tolerated by the league.
The science, however, is slow-mov-
ing and expensive and might not ever
be conclusive, says behavioral psy-
chologist Ryan Vandrey, who studies
marijuana use at John Hopkins.
Marijuana may work better for some
people, while narcotics and other
painkillers might be better for others.
“Different medicines work differently
from person to person,” Vandrey said.
“There’s pretty good science that
shows marijuana does have pain reliev-
ing properties. Whether it’s a better
pain reliever than the other things
available has never been evaluated.”
NFL seeks right answer for pot use
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
TURIN, N.Y. — They came to grieve
and share stories about Kevin Ward
Jr., who was born into a racing family
and buried with racing flags in his cas-
ket.
A high school auditorium over-
flowed with friends, family and racing
enthusiasts Thursday in tribute to the
20-year-old driver, who was hit on a
dirt track by a car driven by NASCAR
champion Tony Stewart.
With Ward in an open casket piled
with orange flowers, his family’s
team colors, mourners wept and
laughed at favorite stories about the
boy who began racing not long after
he began walking. The 90-minute
service was held at
the South Lewis
Senior High
School to accom-
modate crowds
from this tight rac-
ing community in
central New York.
“Even if he had
rough day, he
always had a
smile,” a tearful Dylan Swiernick said
of his best friend and car-obsessed
buddy. “We were just two small-town
boys trying to make it in the big
world. He was always working on
something. It was unbelievable how
smart he was. He never got down on
himself when things weren’t going
his way. ”
Ward, a 2012 South Lewis graduate,
was buried in his nearby hometown of
Port Leyden, 55 miles from Syracuse.
“He was an amazing sprint car driv-
er and had a family like no other, ”
cousin Amanda Ward said in a eulogy.
“We used to tell him before every race,
‘Drive it like you stole it.’ He never
let us down.”
Sister Kayla Herring said the orange
and white lapel ribbons worn by fam-
ily and friends were to signify that the
team colors would remain bright,
even in the darkest times.
A recording of the Dixie Chicks
singing “Godspeed (Sweet Dreams)”
was played at the request of Ward’s
mother.
Praise for ’small-town boy’ hit by Stewart’s car
Kevin Ward Jr.
SPORTS 13
Friday • Aug. 15, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
reach the World Series since 1983 and the
first Urban Initiative affiliate to earn a berth
since Harlem in 2002.
While the Urban Initiative helps provide
resources essential to running successful
leagues, its director — Demiko Ervin — is
reluctant to take credit for Jackie Robinson
West’s success, noting that the program has
been around since 1971.
“Everybody wants to talk about the Urban
Initiative League and how we’ve helped”
Jackie Robinson West,” Ervin said.
“They’ve benefited from the program, but
I’ve got to give so much credit to the folks
in that league and folks in that community.
“It doesn’t work if you don’t have the
coaches and the volunteers that come out,
support them and do the things that it takes
to run a league,” Ervin added. “They’re one
of the better Urban Initiative Leagues in the
country. ”
The players’ parents got an assist from
some major leaguers.
Atlanta Braves outfielders Justin and B.J.
Upton were among those contacted by
Colorado Rockies pitcher LaTroy Hawkins
about chipping in to pay the travel costs to
Pennsylvania.
“I know when I was a kid, I wanted my
family to be there to support me and see me
play,” Justin Upton said. “I thought it would
be cool for them to see the experience with
the kids.
“It’s good to see young African-American
kids playing and having a team full of
young kids enjoying the game. Hopefully,
it can be something that makes them think
‘I’d like to play on that stage, so maybe I
should pursue baseball.”’
Detroit’s Torii Hunter said he got texts
about helping out from Hawkins, and former
major leaguers Jacque Jones and Junior
Spivey, “all the boys I kind of grew up in
this game with.”
“It’s inner city, so it’s what I love to do,
give those guys the life experiences more
than anything,” Hunter said. “Their fami-
lies, the kids, get a chance to travel and go
somewhere and see something different. I
think if you give more inner-city kids those
life experiences, it changes everything.”
Jackie Robinson West is one of nearly
200 Urban Initiative Leagues in about 100
cities across the country, although no
records are available on how many young
African-Americans are involved because
most registration forms don’t request infor-
mation on nationality or race.
“We don’t keep those kinds of statistics,”
Ervin said.
“A lot of people think it has to do with
leagues having a predominate number of
African-Americans, and that’s not it. It’s
more of a need-based program,” Ervin added.
“We want to make sure all of our leagues, all
communities, all neighborhoods, from the
affluent to the disadvantaged have the
opportunity to play Little League. That’s
what it about.”
Continued from page 11
LLWS
By Antonio Gonzalez
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
STANFORD — A.J. Tarpley heard all off-
season how Stanford would need to replace
the production and locker room leadership
linebackers Shayne Skov and Trent Murphy
provided on defense.
He heard how the departures of defensive
coordinator Derek Mason and inside line-
backers coach David Kotulski to Vanderbilt
could complicate the Cardinal’s transition.
And he heard how the linebackers left behind,
most notably himself, could be set up for a
major setback this season.
Tarpley’s response? He has heard this all
before.
“Look at Coach Shaw. When everyone said,
‘Coach Harbaugh’s leaving, how are you
going to replace his excitement, his determi-
nation for the game?’ He just said he’s David
Shaw. He has his way of doing things,”
Tarpley said. “To me, that’s worked out pretty
well.”
Tarpley is at the forefront of Stanford’s lat-
est leadership shift.
With Skov and Murphy in NFL training
camps, the fifth-year senior middle line-
backer is the most experienced and decorated
player on defense. He has led the team with
216 tackles over the last three seasons,
though his success has often been overlooked
because of those playing next to him.
“I think Shayne’s personality and Shayne’s
big plays that he made maybe put A.J. in the
shadow a little bit,” Shaw said. “But when
you go back and watch the film, A.J. was
extremely productive. And that’s what you’re
looking for, a guy that makes the plays he’s
supposed to make and that maybe makes the
plays he’s not supposed to make.”
Tarpley is expected to become a more
proactive leader and public face of Stanford’s
defense this season, especially with the
Mohawk-sporting, eye-black wearing Skov
fighting for a spot on the San Francisco 49ers
now. Tarpley said he’s ready to take on what-
ever role is needed to help the two-time
defending Pac-12 champions to another title.
But he won’t be somebody that he’s not.
Instead, Tarpley intends to lead teammates
by the way he plays and the way he works. He
admits there are roles that will have to be
filled, such as leading the breakdowns after
practices and games, but he believes that’s
just part of the natural evolution of any
Stanford player.
“You become a leader through your whole
career here,” Tarpley said. “It’s not some-
thing that you’re automatically respected
when you’re a senior. You’re respected
because of what you’ve done, how you’ve car-
ried yourself through the years.”
Tarpley began to emerge after Skov’s sea-
son-ending knee injury in 2011 — wearing a
liberal display of eye black to honor his
injured teammate — and has remained a con-
stant contributor since. He finished that sea-
son with 57 tackles, had 66 in 2012 and 93
last season.
Shaw said Tarpley started to make an
impression on the coaching staff in his red-
shirt freshman season in 2010 during the
team’s scrimmages. But there were All-
Americans and all-conference performers in
front of him, so the former Minnesota
Gatorade Football Player of the Year would
have to wait his turn to shine on Saturdays.
“It is not surprising at all to see A.J.
Tarpley be successful on the field. That dude
works just as hard as anybody on this team, if
not harder,” senior safety Jordan Richards
said. “He’s kind of been outshined by some
guys that have a little more media personali-
t y, but that’s a darn good football player.”
Tarpley came through in some of the
biggest moments for Stanford last year.
He had four solo tackles, one sack, one
forced fumble and one pass breakup to help
Stanford beat North Division rival Oregon.
He finished with seven tackles against
Arizona State in the Pac-12 title game, and he
had a crucial interception in the win over
Washington.
With rigorous road games at Oregon,
UCLA, Arizona State and Notre Dame this
season, Stanford might tap Tarpley’s talents
more than it ever has before. Just don’t expect
him to embrace the cameras the way Skov so
often did.
A.J. Tarpley’s time in Stanford spotlight arrives
Exp. 9/15/14
University to work in baseball operations
during the 2014 season.
But McKinley lured Tufo away and it’s
another upward step in Tufo’s plan. The two
first met during a recruiting stop in
Sacramento — Tufo scouting for the Oaks
and McKinley for Sacramento State. They
hit it off and stayed in contact with one
another over the last couple of years.
Back to Menlo
When McKinley had a spot open up on his
bench, he put the call in to Tufo.
“Dave wants to be a head coach, that’s
what drew me to him,” McKinley said in a
telephone interview. “He’s super dependable
and super knowledgeable. During the inter-
view process, he was far more prepared (than
the other candidates). Not only with what he
teaches but why he teaches it.”
Tufo will handle the Oaks’ offensive game
and work with the infielders, while at the
same time serving as sounding board to
manager McKinley.
“He’s been an assistant for all these years,
but he’s never been the right-hand man,”
McKinley said. “He’s truly going to get his
first crack at being a top assistant.”
Preparing for the future
Whether he knew it or not at the time,
Tufo said his playing days in high school
and college prepared him to be a coach. Tufo
was an undersized, but scrappy, infielder, but
what he may have lacked in physical abili-
t y, he more than made up for with his mental
game.
“I wasn’t the greatest player, so I had to
use tools that weren’t necessarily physical
tools. I felt if I was blessed with more ath-
leticism, maybe I wouldn’t have set up this
(coaching) path,” Tufo said. “I don’t regret
not having those (physical) abilities. I just
had to find a way to beat my competition by
being one step ahead mentally. ”
Tufo credits his high school coach, Rich
Sciutto, for helping him look at the game
from a coach’s point of view. Tufo said dur-
ing his high school years, he and Sciutto
would sit around and talk about the nuances
of the game.
“He’s been a big influence. I believe he
was a big help for me becoming the type of
player that led me here,” Tufo said. “We
would talk strategy — why he would send
the runner, or why he had me bunting here.
… We still talk to this day. We talk a lot
about the game, the coaching aspect.”
Starting a coaching career
When Tufo’s playing days came to end fol-
lowing the summer of his senior year, he
figured he might as well do something with
his degree in economics. However, after
only a couple months in “the real world,”
Tufo decided to he needed to get back in the
game. He started volunteering at Stanford
and other baseball camps before being hired
as an assistant at Menlo.
The summer following his first year at
Menlo, Tufo got the opportunity to coach in
the Coastal Plains League and has returned
for the last four summers. Tufo credits that
move as crucial to his development because
this season we was tabbed to serve as head
coach for the Forest City Owls in 2013 and
the Fayetteville (North Carolina)
SwampDogs in 2014, leading the
SwampDogs to a 25-29 record this summer.
“I was hesitant because … I was two
months into coaching college baseball. I
didn’t know if I could coach at that level,”
Tufo said. “What I’ve been able to learn just
from coaching school ball to going out to
summer league the last years (is immeasura-
ble). It gave me a much bigger understand-
ing of the game.”
On the right path
Add to that education the time spent at
Santa Clara last season, dealing with the
administrative side of running a college
program, and Tufo is poised to capitalize on
his next opportunity — but realizing he
still can learn plenty working with
McKinley and the Menlo program.
“I feel for where I’m at right now, I’m on a
good track. I know there is still a lot of work
to be done. Having this opportunity is
going to allow me to solidify me efforts and
my beliefs of who I am as a coach,” Tufo
said. “There are a lot of pieces that need to
come together to really feel confident that
this is what you want to be doing.”
McKinley is just hoping that as Tufo
grows as a coach, the Menlo program grows
along with him.
“I think he gets it. He gets the whole
process of being a head coach,” McKinley
said. “Not only be a guy who can get our
guys better, but he can get better, too.”
SPORTS 14
Friday • Aug. 15, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
That’s obviously been a big point of
emphasis. I’m looking for us to go out and
make some plays both offensively and
defensively. Our guys have worked extreme-
ly hard and I think these couple of days
against the Cowboys will help us in getting
ready for that.”
The Lions didn’t get to see much at all
from their offense in their exhibition open-
ing 13-12 win over the Cleveland Browns.
Quarterback Matthew Stafford played just
one series, going 2 for 4 for 18 yards and
leading Detroit to a field goal.
Star receiver Calvin Johnson was a
healthy scratch as the Lions are being extra
careful with their top player after offseason
surgeries on his finger and knees.
Coach Jim Caldwell hasn’t said how much
time, if any, those two stars will get against
the Raiders.
But the Lions hope that just making this
cross-country trip will be beneficial prepa-
ration for the season when they will have to
make a couple of long flights.
“Going out there is good for us,” running
back Reggie Bush said. “We’re going to
play at Arizona this season and there’s
London, so it’s good to get out of the time
zone. It’s nice to have that in a preseason
game.”
Continued from page 11
RAIDERS
Selig is the second-longest-serving head
of baseball behind Kenesaw Mountain
Landis (1920-44). The trio of candidates
was picked by a seven-man succession com-
mittee chaired by St. Louis Cardinals chair-
man Bill DeWitt Jr.
Manfred has been involved in baseball
since 1987, starting as a lawyer with
Morgan, Lewis & Bockius who assisted in
collective bargaining. He became MLB’s
executive vice president for labor relations
and human resources in 1998, received an
expanded role of executive vice president of
economics and league affairs in 2012 and
last September was promoted to chief oper-
ating officer. He helped lead negotiations
for baseball’s last three labor contracts with
players and the joint drug agreement that
was instituted in 2002 and has been repeat-
edly strengthened.
Werner, 64, was the controlling owner of
the San Diego Padres from 1990-94, trig-
gering fan criticism for the payroll-paring
departures of Fred McGriff, Gary Sheffield,
Tony Fernandez, Randy Myers and Benito
Santiago. He has been part of the Red Sox
ownership group since 2002, a period that
included three World Series titles. While
working at ABC, he helped develop Robin
Williams’ “Mork & Mindy” and later was
executive producer of “The Cosby Show”
and “Roseanne” at The Carsey-Werner Co.
MLB’s last contested election for com-
missioner was after Spike Eckert was fired in
December 1968. With the requirement then a
three-quarters majority in both the
American and National leagues, teams split
between San Francisco Giants vice presi-
dent Chub Feeney and Yankees president
Michael Burke and failed to elect anyone
during 19 ballots.
Bowie Kuhn, counsel to baseball’s Player
Relations Committee, was elected commis-
sioner pro-tem on Feb. 4, 1969, with a one-
year term. He was voted a seven-year term
that August and remained in office until
October 1984, when he was replaced by Los
Angeles Olympics head Peter Ueberroth.
Former Yale President A. Bartlett Giamatti
took over from Ueberroth in April 1989,
died later that September and was replaced
by his deputy commissioner, Fay Vincent.
Selig, then the Milwaukee Brewers owner,
teamed with Reinsdorf to head the group
that pressured for Vincent’s forced resigna-
tion in September 1992.
Selig led baseball as head of the executive
council for nearly six years, including the 7
1/2-month strike in 1994-95 that canceled
the World Series. He repeatedly said he
wouldn’t take the job fulltime before he for-
mally was voted commissioner in July
1998.
Ueberroth, Giamatti, Vincent and Selig
were elected unanimously.
Continued from page 11
BASEBALL
Continued from page 11
TUFO
Neuer, Ronaldo, Robben
vie for European honors
NYON, Switzerland — World Cup-win-
ning goalkeeper Manuel Neuer, Champions
League-winning forward Cristiano Ronaldo
and Dutch star Arjen Robben are vying for
honors as the best player in Europe.
The shortlist was announced Thursday by
European soccer’s governing body. The
three topped a poll of journalists from 54
member countries. Those voters selected the
original 10-candidate list. The winner will
be announced Aug. 28 at the Champions
League draw in Monaco.
Neuer, of Germany and Bayern Munich,
was honored as outstanding goalkeeper at
the World Cup. Ronaldo’s 17 Champions
League goals for Real Madrid was a competi-
tion record. Robben helped the Netherlands
and Bayern reach the semifinals of the
Champions League and World Cup.
Lionel Messi, Andres Iniesta and Franck
Ribery previously won the award.
Suarez’s 4-month playing ban upheld
The Court of Arbitration for Sport upheld
Luis Suarez’s four-month ban for biting an
opponent at the World Cup, but cleared him
Thursday to train with Barcelona.
CAS said FIFA’s sanctions against Suarez
are “generally proportionate to the offence
committed.”
Suarez cannot play for Barcelona until
Oct. 26, and he remains banned for
Uruguay’s next eight competitive matches.
Suarez has admitted to biting Italy defend-
er Giorgio Chiellini’s shoulder during
Uruguay’s 1-0 win at the World Cup.
“The sanctions imposed on the player by
FIFA have been generally confirmed,” the
court said in a statement.
Sports briefs
SPORTS 15
Friday • Aug. 15, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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East Division
W L Pct GB
Baltimore 69 50 .580 —
Toronto 63 59 .516 7 1/2
New York 61 58 .513 8
Tampa Bay 60 61 .496 10
Boston 55 65 .458 14 1/2
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Kansas City 66 54 .550 —
Detroit 65 54 .546 1/2
Cleveland 60 60 .500 6
Chicago 57 64 .471 9 1/2
Minnesota 54 65 .454 11 1/2
West Division
W L Pct GB
A’s 73 46 .613 —
Oakland 73 48 .603 —
Los Angeles 70 49 .588 2
Seattle 65 55 .542 7 1/2
Houston 50 72 .410 23 1/2
Texas 47 74 .388 26
Thursday’s Games
Detroit 5, Pittsburgh 2
Kansas City 7, Oakland 3
Boston 9, Houston 4
Tampa Bay 6, Texas 3
Friday’s Games
Baltimore (W.Chen 12-4) at Cleveland (Kluber
13-6), 4:05 p.m.
Seattle (Paxton 2-0) at Detroit (Porcello 13-7),
4:08 p.m.
Houston (Keuchel 10-8) at Boston (Buchholz 5-
7), 4:10 p.m.
N.Y.Yankees (McCarthy 4-1) at Tampa Bay (Cobb
7-6), 4:10 p.m.
Oakland (Hammel 1-4) at Atlanta (A.Wood 8-9),
4:35 p.m.
L.A. Angels (Richards 12-4) at Texas (N.Martinez
2-8), 5:05 p.m.
Kansas City (D.Duffy 7-10) at Minnesota (No-
lasco 5-7), 5:10 p.m.
Toronto (Stroman 7-3) at Chicago White Sox
(Noesi 6-8), 5:10 p.m.
Saturday’s Games
N.Y. Yankees at Tampa Bay, 1:10 p.m.
Baltimore at Cleveland, 4:05 p.m.
Seattle at Detroit, 4:08 p.m.
Houston at Boston, 4:10 p.m.
Kansas City at Minnesota, 4:10 p.m.
Oakland at Atlanta, 4:10 p.m.
Toronto at Chicago White Sox, 4:10 p.m.
L.A. Angels at Texas, 5:05 p.m.
Sunday’s Games
Baltimore at Cleveland, 10:05 a.m.
Seattle at Detroit, 10:08 a.m.
Houston at Boston, 10:35 a.m.
N.Y. Yankees at Tampa Bay, 10:40 a.m.
Kansas City at Minnesota, 11:10 a.m.
Toronto at Chicago White Sox, 11:10 a.m.
L.A. Angels at Texas, 12:05 p.m.
East Division
W L Pct GB
Washington 66 53 .555 —
Atlanta 61 60 .504 6
Miami 60 61 .496 7
New York 57 65 .467 10 1/2
Philadelphia 53 68 .438 14
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Milwaukee 67 55 .549 —
St. Louis 64 56 .533 2
Pittsburgh 64 57 .529 2 1/2
Cincinnati 60 61 .496 6 1/2
Chicago 52 68 .433 14
West Division
W L Pct GB
Los Angeles 70 53 .569 —
San Francisco 63 57 .525 5 1/2
San Diego 57 63 .475 11 1/2
Arizona 52 69 .430 17
Colorado 47 74 .388 22
Thursday’s Games
L.A. Dodgers 6, Atlanta 4
Detroit 5, Pittsburgh 2
Milwaukee 6, Chicago Cubs 2
Miami 5, Arizona 4, 10 innings
Washington 4, N.Y. Mets 1
St. Louis 4, San Diego 3
Colorado 7, Cincinnati 3
Friday’s Games
Pittsburgh (Morton 5-11) at Washington (Roark
11-7), 4:05 p.m.
Arizona (Cahill 2-8) at Miami (Hand 2-4), 4:10
p.m.
Chicago Cubs ( T.Wood 7-9) at N.Y. Mets
(Za.Wheeler 7-8), 4:10 p.m.
Oakland (Hammel 1-4) at Atlanta (A.Wood 8-9),
4:35 p.m.
San Diego (T.Ross 11-10) at St. Louis (Lynn 12-8),
5:15 p.m.
Cincinnati (Cueto 14-6) at Colorado (F.Morales 5-
6), 5:40 p.m.
Milwaukee (J.Nelson 2-3) at L.A. Dodgers
(Greinke 12-8), 7:10 p.m.
Philadelphia (Hamels 6-6) at San Francisco (Bum-
garner 13-9), 7:15 p.m.
Saturday’s Games
Philadelphia at San Francisco, 1:05 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Washington, 4:05 p.m.
Arizona at Miami, 4:10 p.m.
Chicago Cubs at N.Y. Mets, 4:10 p.m.
Oakland at Atlanta, 4:10 p.m.
San Diego at St. Louis, 4:15 p.m.
Cincinnati at Colorado, 5:10 p.m.
Milwaukee at L.A. Dodgers, 6:10 p.m.
Sunday’s Games
Arizona at Miami, 10:10 a.m.
Chicago Cubs at N.Y. Mets, 10:10 a.m.
San Diego at St. Louis, 11:15 a.m.
Philadelphia at San Francisco, 1:05 p.m.
Cincinnati at Colorado, 1:10 p.m.
NL GLANCE AL GLANCE
AMERICANCONFERENCE
East W L T Pct PF PA
N.Y. Jets 1 0 0 1.000 13 10
Buffalo 1 1 0 .500 33 35
Miami 0 1 0 .000 10 16
New England 0 1 0 .000 6 23
South W L T Pct PF PA
Jacksonville 1 0 0 1.000 16 10
Tennessee 1 0 0 1.000 20 16
Houston 0 1 0 .000 0 32
Indianapolis 0 1 0 .000 10 13
North W L T Pct PF PA
Baltimore 1 0 0 1.000 23 3
Cleveland 0 1 0 .000 12 13
Pittsburgh 0 1 0 .000 16 20
Cincinnati 0 1 0 .000 39 41
West W L T Pct PF PA
Denver 1 0 0 1.000 21 16
Kansas City 1 0 0 1.000 41 39
San Diego 1 0 0 1.000 27 7
Oakland 0 1 0 .000 6 10
NATIONALCONFERENCE
East W L T Pct PF PA
N.Y. Giants 2 0 0 1.000 37 29
Washington 1 0 0 1.000 23 6
Dallas 0 1 0 .000 7 27
Philadelphia 0 1 0 .000 28 34
South W L T Pct PF PA
Atlanta 1 0 0 1.000 16 10
New Orleans 1 0 0 1.000 26 24
Carolina 0 1 0 .000 18 20
Tampa Bay 0 1 0 .000 10 16
North W L T Pct PF PA
Chicago 1 0 0 1.000 34 28
Minnesota 1 0 0 1.000 10 6
Detroit 1 0 0 1.000 13 12
Green Bay 0 1 0 .000 16 20
West W L T Pct PF PA
Arizona 1 0 0 1.000 32 0
San Francisco 0 1 0 .000 3 23
Seattle 0 1 0 .000 16 21
St. Louis 0 1 0 .000 24 26
Thursday, Aug. 14
Jacksonville at Chicago, late
Friday, Aug. 15
Philadelphia at New England, 4:30 p.m.
Tennessee at New Orleans, 5 p.m.
San Diego at Seattle, 7 p.m.
Detroit at Oakland, 7 p.m.
Saturday, Aug. 16
Green Bay at St. Louis, 4 p.m.
Baltimore at Dallas, 4 p.m.
N.Y. Giants at Indianapolis, 4 p.m.
N.Y. Jets at Cincinnati, 4 p.m.
Buffalo at Pittsburgh, 4:30 p.m.
Miami at Tampa Bay, 4:30 p.m.
Atlanta at Houston, 5 p.m.
NFL PRESEASON GLANCE
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
KANSAS CITY, Mo. — Nori Aoki
and Billy Butler each drove in two
runs in a five-run seventh and the
surging Kansas City Royals rallied to
defeat the Oakland Athletics 7-3
Thursday.
The Royals have won 18 of 22 to
move 12 games above .500 for the
first time since July 20, 2003.
The Royals took the season series,
winning five of seven against the
Athletics, who have the best record in
the majors.
Aoki’s two-run triple put the
Royals ahead 5-3. Butler’s single
scored Aoki and Alcides Escobar.
Jarrod Dyson fouled off four consecu-
tive pitches before hitting an RBI
single to right for the first run of the
inning.
Right-hander Jeff Samardzija (3-2)
took the loss, giving up four runs,
three earned, and eight hits in 6 2-3
innings.
He left with a 3-2 lead, but Ryan
Cook failed to hold it, facing three
batters and all scored. Cook’s streak
of 21 consecutive scoreless innings
ended.
Aaron Crow (6-1), the third of six
Kansas City pitchers, picked up the
victory, retiring the only batter he
faced.
Starter James Shields gave up three
runs and seven hits in six innings and
has a 1.94 ERA in his past eight
starts. Greg Holland earned the final
two outs for his 36th save in 38
opportunities.
The A’s scored two runs in the sixth
when Dyson lost Josh Reddick’s high
fly in the sun for a triple, which scored
Stephen Vogt.
Alberto Callaspo drove in two
Oakland runs with a single and a sac-
rifice fly.
On deck
Athletics: RHP Jason Hammel
will start the opener of a weekend
series at Atlanta. The A’s last played at
Atlanta in 2008, losing two of three.
A’s bullpen gets
ripped by Royals
Royals 7, Atheltics 3
Oakland abr h bi Royals ab r h bi
Crisp dh 5 0 1 0 Aoki rf 4 1 1 2
Jaso c 2 0 0 0 S.Perez c 0 0 0 0
DNorrs ph-c20 0 0 AEscor ss 3 1 0 0
Dnldsn 3b 4 0 0 0 AGordn lf 4 1 1 0
Moss lf 5 1 2 0 BButler 1b 4 0 2 2
Vogt 1b 4 1 3 0 Wlngh dh 4 0 0 0
Reddck rf 4 1 2 1 Mostks 3b 4 0 1 1
Callasp 2b 3 0 1 2 Kratz c 3 1 2 0
Fuld cf 4 0 1 0 L.Cain pr-rf 1 1 1 0
Sogard ss 4 0 1 0 C.Colon 2b 4 1 3 0
JDyson cf 3 1 1 2
Totals 37 3 113 Totals 34 7 12 7
Oakland 000 102 000 — 3
Kansas City 001 100 50x — 7
E—Callaspo (8).DP—Oakland 1.LOB—
Oakland 10,Kansas City 5.2B—Reddick
(11), C.Colon (4). 3B—Reddick (5), Aoki
(4). SB—A.Gordon (8), L.Cain (17),
C.Colon (1). SF—Callaspo, J.Dyson.
Oakland IP H R ER BB SO
Samardzija L,3-2 6 1-38 4 3 0
5
Cook BS,1-2 0 2 3 3 1 0
Abad 1-3 0 0 0 0 1
Gregerson 1-3 1 0 0 0 1
Doolittle 1 1 0 0 0 1
Kansas City IP H R ER BB SO
Shields 6 7 3 3 1 5
Bueno 2-3 0 0 0 0 0
Crow W,6-1 1-3 0 0 0 0 1
W.Davis 1 2 0 0 0 3
Frasor 1-3 2 0 0 0 0
G.Holland S,36 2-3 0 0 0 1 0
Cook pitched to 3 batters in the 7th.
WP—Samardzija, Shields.
Umpires—Home, Tripp Gibson; First, Chris
Guccione; Second, Eric Cooper; Third, Tom
Hallion.
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
CAMP TONTOZONA, Ariz. —
Chip Sarafin watched the others
before him break down the barri-
ers, athletes like Jason Collins
and Michael Sam who let the world
know they were gay.
The Arizona State offensive
lineman had already told his team-
mates and coaches long before,
without causing so much as a rip-
ple.
But when Sarafin finally took his
turn to pass through the door, he
was a little surprised to find what
was on the other side.
“I was a little nervous when it
came to my attention what a big
influence this was having,” Sarafin
said Thursday. “I did not intend for
it to get to the magnitude that it
did.”
Sarafin became the first active
openly-gay Division I football
player when he talked to Compete,
a Tempe-based magazine for gay
sports, about his sexual orienta-
tion for a story in its August issue.
The fifth-year senior follows in
the footsteps of Sam, the St. Louis
Rams linebacker who came out
after his playing days at Missouri
were over. Sam became the first
openly-gay player to be drafted in
the NFL and is competing for a
roster spot with the Rams.
Collins set the original prece-
dent, becoming the first openly-
gay athlete in the four major U.S.
sports when he came out to Sports
Illustrated in April 2013. He
broke another barrier when he
played for the Brooklyn Nets late
last season.
Numerous other athletes have
come out since then, including
Massachusetts sophomore Derrick
Gordon, the first active openly-
gay player in Division I basket-
ball.
With so many precedent-setters
before him, Sarafin figured his
announcement would be treated
with little more than a shrug.
ASU player gets plenty of support after coming out
By Derrik J. Lang
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
In its third incarnation, “The
Expendables” has become, well,
expendable.
Despite some ruthless new tac-
tics, there’s no saving “The
Expendables 3,” the overpopulat-
ed third outing of Sylvester
Stallone’s all-star action ensem-
ble.
Perhaps recognizing its own
mortality, “Expendables 3” goes
for a kitchen-sink approach.
There’s the injection of AARP-
eligible action stars like Wesley
Snipes, Mel Gibson and Harrison
Ford into the already bursting-at-
the-seams cast, as well the addi-
tion of some junior Expendables.
Those extra bodies don’t add any
oomph to the stiff dialogue or
predictable plot.
After liberating a long-lost
Expendables comrade (Snipes)
and watching another (Terry
Crews) go down in a battle with
Gibson’s maniacal arms dealer,
the third installment finds team
leader Barney (a more puffy yet
still personable Stallone) booting
his pals (Jason Statham, Dolph
Lundgren, Randy Couture) in
favor of younger, prettier models.
Barney plods across North
America with a guerrilla recruiter
No saving ‘Expendables 3’
By Louise Dixon
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LONDON — Sylvester
Stallone may come across as the
ultimate guy’s guy. But he says
action stars like him are “the
hardest characters to sell” to
other men.
“Men are very competitive,”
Stallone said ahead of the world
premiere of “The Expendables 3.”
“They go, `Who’s that? I’m
sure he takes diuretic steroids,
you know, he’s shorter than he
looks.’”
“It’s very hard to do it. People
think ‘Oh it’s really easy,’” said
Stallone. “It’s good to jump
around but to get other men to
like you, it’s very difficult. Men
are kind of stand-offish that
Stallone: It’s hard to
get men to like you
See REVIEW, Page 18
See STALLONE, Page 18
WEEKEND JOURNAL 17
Friday • Aug. 15, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Reservations 650.742.1003
1390 El Camino Real, Millbrae 94030
(located in La Quinta Hotel. Free Parking)
www.bashamichirestaurant.com
Come Join Us for Dinner
and enjoy the best Japanese cuisine on the
Peninsula including the most delectable
Satsuma Wagyu beef steak around!
MUSEUM GOTTA SEE ‘UM
By Susan Cohn
DAILY JOURNAL
SENIOR CORRESPONDENT
HANDCRAFTED WORK BYJEN-
NIFER CRUPI AT THE MUSEUM
OF CRAFT AND DESIGN IN SAN
FRANCISCO. Jennifer Crupi: A
Display of Gestures, organized by the
Museum of Craft and Design, is the first
presentation of this conceptual-metal-
smith artist’s work on the West Coast.
This exhibition includes 13 handcrafted
works of art made from sterling silver
and aluminum that address ways we com-
municate with each other through body
language and specific movements.
Crupi’s wearable, articulated and interac-
tive objects become instruments for
gestural behavior, often taking a humor-
ous approach to pointing out actions we
make to express concealed frustration or
anxiety. By exploring gesture as orna-
ment, Crupi creates a physical “prompt”
akin to choreography that can be
observed and even traced. By scripting
gestures for the wearer, Crupi blurs the
distinction between object maker and
theatrical/performance director. Crupi is
a Full Professor at Kean University,
Union, New Jersey, where she has
taught since 1999. Her work is in the
permanent collection of the
Smithsonian American Art Museum,
Washington, D.C. Jennifer Crupi: A
Display of Gestures may be seen
through Oct. 5.
The Museum of Craft and Design is
located in the American Industrial
Center at 2569 Third St. at 22nd in the
historic Dogpatch neighborhood of San
Francisco. MCD offers a variety of pro-
gramming for adults, ranging from
workshops to artist lectures to commu-
nity events. On Saturday, Sept. 6 from 2
p.m. to 5 p.m. there will be an Adult
Class in Making Terrariums. In this
hands-on workshop, you can learn how
to design with and care for succulents
and how to build a terrarium. Pick out
your succulents and make your very own
glass orb terrarium, with plenty of
design advice along the way. Tickets are
$50 for the general public or $45 for
museum members. Instructor Brandi
Chalker is the founder of Sunshine &
Succulents. Her terrariums have been
featured on ABC7 and she has taught
workshops for the San Francisco
Conservatory of Flowers. For informa-
tion visit www.sfmcd.org or call (415)
773-0303.
SEAPLANE ADVENTURE AND
HIGH SIERRA MYSTERIES AT
HILLER AVIATION MUSEUM. A
taste of romance alights at the Hiller
Aviation Museum during Seaplane
Adventure 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday,
Aug. 23 as Seaplane Adventure features a
fly-in of “amphibious” aircraft from
around the western United States. These
planes, which can operate from land as
well as water, arrive in the morning for
display at the Museum. In the early
CHRISTIAN LUIS
GESTURE AS ORNAMENT. Jennifer Crupi Ornamental Hands:
Figure Two (shown worn), made of sterling silver, acrylic and
inkjet print. One of the items on display in Jennifer Crupi: A
Display of Gestures,at the San Francisco Museum of Craft and
Design through Oct. 5.
See MUSEUM, Page 18
18
Friday • Aug. 15, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
WEEKEND JOURNAL
º 6reat Food º N|crobrews º F0|| 8ar º Sports TV
º Poo| º 8aog0et Fac|||t|es º Fam||y Fr|eod|y 0|o|og
S|oce 1995
344-6050
EXPIRES: August 31, 2014
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Sun, Tues, Wed, Thur: 11AM – 9:30PM ;
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Chinese Cuisine
LUNCH * DINNER * WKND BREAKFAST
After 26 Years in Redwood City,
Copenhagen Restaurant has moved
to San Mateo with a new name!
Featuring Scandinavian &
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Prime Rib Served Every Night
Join Us For Happy Hour Dinner!
Everyday 4-6PM
4 Courses with your Choice of Soup or Salad,
Select Entrees, Glass of House WIne,
Dessert & Coffee
742 Polhemus Road (Hi 92 De Anza Blvd. Exit)
San Mateo Near Crystal Springs Shopping Center
(650) 372-0888
scandiarestaurant.com
Open Everyday
(Kelsey Grammer) to assemble the
Expendables 2.0: an angst-filled soldier
(Kellan Lutz), a lippy hacker (Glen Powell),
a cocky weapons guru (Victor Ortiz) and a
lady bouncer (mixed-martial artist Ronda
Rousey), who is unfortunately reminded
every time she’s on screen that — yeah, bro
— she’s female.
The unmemorable Millennials are kid-
napped almost as quickly as they’re intro-
duced. Obviously, it’s up to the old-timers to
save the day. It doesn’t really matter how or
why they do it though. Ultimately, it feels
like every one other than series shepherd
Stallone is merely here to be another face on
the crowded 16-person poster, not to actual-
ly play any sort of character.
Arnold Schwarzenegger and Antonio
Banderas provide the film’s comic relief.
Banderas does so intentionally as a motor-
mouthed, out-of-work assassin who really
wants to be on the team, while
Schwarzenegger’s return as Expendables
associate Trench is just laughably bad. Of
course, acting isn’t why anyone goes to one
of these “Expendables” movies.
It’s the explosions, fights and chases fea-
turing the likes of Terminator and Rambo!
Yes, the shoot-’em-up action from director
Patrick Hughes and cinematographer Peter
Menzies Jr. is as tight as a “Call of Duty”
match-up, especially the brainless, bloodless
climatic battle through an abandoned Eastern
European hotel complex. However, the film’s
sporadic set pieces simply aren’t captivating
enough to forgive all the movie’s other faults.
It’s frustrating because the cast and crew are
definitely old enough to know better.
Continued from page 16
REVIEW
way.” The third installment of “The
Expendables” sees the team come into con-
flict with a ruthless arms dealer, played by
Mel Gibson. Harrison Ford and Wesley
Snipes join the cast of action legends. And
there’s new blood, including “Twilight”
heartthrob Kellan Lutz and mixed martial
arts fighter Ronda Rousey. The extended
team of Expendables battle it out to bring
down the bad guys and save the world.
Continued from page 16
STALLONE
years of aviation, airplane technology
advanced in leaps and bounds — yet airport
development lagged behind. Into this void
came the seaplane, an aircraft able to fly with-
out need of runways to any destination near an
ocean or lake. By the 1930s seaplanes held
absolute speed records and inaugurated air
travel between the continents. Just a decade
later, however, a boom in airport construc-
tion during World War II had rendered most
obsolete. Today, seaplanes fly primarily for
recreation — a unique intersection of the
romance of boating and excitement of gener-
al aviation.
Inside the Museum, in the new centerpiece
exhibit, is a Grumman HU-16 Albatross, the
last and largest of the famed Grumman
amphibians. The Museum’s aircraft, N44RD,
participated in an around-the-world flight fol-
lowing the path originally flown by Amelia
Earhart in 1937. The Museum’s Albatross was
graciously donated by local businessman and
philanthropist Mr. Reid Dennis. At the end of
the day, the Museum will bid farewell to many
of the Grumman, Republic and Lake amphib-
ians as they depart for their home airports.
The Seaplane event is included in Museum
admission.
On Sunday, Aug. 24 at 1 p.m. Author Peter
Stekel discusses an aviation mystery. In
October 2005, two mountaineers climbing
above Mendel Glacier in the High Sierra found
the mummified remains of a man in a World
War II uniform, entombed in the ice. Stekel
tells the story of the man, his aircraft and his
mission as well as the circumstances of his
doomed flight and the efforts to piece togeth-
er the mystery of his fate. The author will con-
clude with a signing opportunity for his book
Final Flight.
The Hiller Aviation Museum is located at
601 Skyway Road, San Carlos. The Hiller
Museum Store has a large collections of avia-
tion toys, books, flight wear, models and
memorabilia. For information about Hiller
Museum, telephone (650) 654-0200 or visit
www.hiller.org.
SEPT. 20 CURIODYSSEY GALA.
Celebrate 60 years of science learning at
CuriOdyssey, the San Mateo-based science
and wildlife center for children and families, at
its spectacular annual signature fundraising
event on Saturday, Sept. 20. Dinner, entertain-
ment and an auction at a private Hillsborough
estate. Information at www.curiodyssey.org or
contact Tavi Haberman at
THaberman@CuriOdyssey.org or 340-7573.
Continued from page 17
MUSEUM
WEEKEND JOURNAL 19
Friday • Aug. 15, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Assembly Appropriations Committee 12-5
and will head to the floor for a vote next
week. If it passes the Assembly, it will
return to the Senate floor for a concurrence
vote as it was amended.
“I love the coast of California from one
end to the other. It is beautiful and unique,
every inch is different and it’s something
that does belong to everyone,” Hill said.
“Because of its beauty and recreational
potential and the fact that the state law
requires that the public have access to it, I
don’t want a part of San Mateo County to be
deprived, residents of California to be
deprived of that beautiful beach.”
Hill said he was pleasantly surprised to
receive full Democratic support in the
Appropriations Committee as Khosla hired
lobbyists who have vigorously worked
against SB 968.
California Strategies’ Rusty Areias, a for-
mer coastal commissioner, and Ted Harris
were hired by Khosla and are lobbying
against the bill. Areias and Harris argue that
Martin’s Beach is private property, that
opening it to the public would force Khosla
to run it as a business, impose financial
commitments and that enacting legislation
in a complicated case hinders negotiations.
The bill, which easily passed the state
Senate in May, had a setback and was strick-
en of its most forceful language in the
Assembly Committee on Natural Resources
in June, Hill said, due to misinformation
Areias spread. The bill originally instructed
the SLC to use eminent domain if a compro-
mise with Khosla cannot be met by Jan. 1,
2015.
As amended, the bill now encourages,
instead of requires, the SLC to take an ease-
ment in the interests of public beach access.
Although specific language was removed
from the bill, the semantics remain the same
as the SLC already retains the authority to
use eminent domain and could still acquire a
right-of way access through condemnation.
However, the SLC has never used condem-
nation.
“What the bill says today, is it gives the
state a year to negotiate with him over some
resolution to access,” Hill said. “Because
it’s tied so closely to the State Lands
Commission, which has the authority to
condemn the property if they felt that there
was a need in order to gain access, that’s
why the fight is so hard.”
‘Fairy tale’
There are two pending civil lawsuits that
seek to reopen Martin’s Beach and the
California Coastal Commission has a sur-
vey asking the public to provide testimony
to affirm the land was treated as though it
were public for at least five years. Martin’s
Beach was previously accessible to the pub-
lic for nearly 100 years.
Areias said the media has created an inac-
curate fairy tale and, when the previous own-
ers decided to sell the property, California
State Parks, the Midpeninsula Regional
Open Space District and the Nature
Conservancy turned it down.
Harris and Areias said the legal and geo-
graphical issues at Martin’s Beach have
been oversimplified. Last year, San Mateo
County Superior Court Judge Gerald
Buchwald found the beach was subject to the
Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo, so it originat-
ed from a Mexican land grant that was con-
firmed by a federal patent and the U.S.
Supreme Court. Unlike most beaches where
public land begins at the tide lines, due to a
century of erosion, the private property line
ends a few hundred feet into the ocean,
Areias said.
“I can’t think of a worse case to apply
condemnation than Martin’s Beach because
you’re applying it to a beach that has clear-
ly has unique property rights as a rancho
with a patent through the Supreme Court and
it almost certainly would increase the tem-
perature, fuel the media circus, lead to addi-
tional litigation and hinder a genuine solu-
tion,” Harris said.
Opening the gate
Areias and Harris said Khosla was willing
to open the gate through the end of the year
but hasn’t because it would be a media fren-
zy and there are concerns over trespassing.
Hill said opening the gate through the end
of the year was not a compromise and wants
an agreement to keep it open in perpetuity.
An appeal is currently pending in the
Buchwald case and a lawsuit filed by the
Surfrider Foundation, which alleges Khosla
violated the California Coastal Act by fail-
ing to garner mandated permits before clos-
ing the gate, is awaiting a ruling.
‘It doesn’t have to be 24/7’
Hill said Areias has lobbied hard against a
bill that simply seeks to negotiate a reason-
able and fair settlement and also acknowl-
edges Khosla’s property rights but, more
importantly, empowers the public to have
access to a beloved piece of coast.
“All he has to do is come to the table and
seriously negotiate a settlement on perma-
nent access to the beach. That is the goal. It
doesn’t have to be 24/7, it doesn’t have to
be every day of the year, but he needs to do
something that’s permanent,” Hill said. “He
feels that he’s holding all the cards and that
whatever he negotiates would be out of his
generosity and magnanimous of him. … He
will not out of his generosity, I don’t
believe, open the beach in any permanent
form. So the legislative and legal process is
moving forward … to put the public in a bet-
ter position to negotiate a fair settlement.”
SB 968 will be taken up on the Assembly
floor and likely voted on either Tuesday or
Wednesday. Should it pass, it would return to
the Senate for a concurrence vote as it was
amended in the Assembly.
samantha@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 106
Continued from page 1
BEACH
By Lynn Elber
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LOS ANGELES — Robin Williams was in
the early stages of Parkinson’s disease at
the time of his death, his wife said Thursday.
In a statement, Susan Schneider said that
Williams, 63, was struggling with depres-
sion, anxiety and the Parkinson’s diagnosis
when he died Monday in his Northern
California home. Authorities said he com-
mitted suicide.
“Robin’s sobriety was intact and he was
brave as he struggled with his own battles of
depression, anxiety as well as early stages
of Parkinson’s disease, which he was not
yet ready to share publicly,” Schneider said.
Schneider did not offer details on when the
actor comedian had been diagnosed or his
symptoms.
The Marin County Sheriff’s Department,
which said Williams hanged himself, is con-
ducting toxicology tests and interviews
before issuing a final ruling. Lt. Keith Boyd
of the Marin County Sheriff’s Department
did not return phone calls and email mes-
sages from the Associated Press seeking
comment on Schneider’s statement.
Williams’ death shocked fans and friends
alike, despite his candor about decades of
struggle with substance abuse and mental
health. With Parkinson’s, Williams faced
shouldering yet another challenge.
Parkinson’s disease is an incurable nerv-
ous system disorder that involves a loss of
brain cells controlling movement. Tremors,
sometimes starting out in just one hand, are
among the early symptoms.
It can also cause rigid, halting walking,
slowed speech and sometimes dementia.
Symptoms worsen over time and can often
be treated with drugs.
Robin Williams’ wife says
he had Parkinson’s disease
WEEKEND JOURNAL 20
Friday • Aug. 15, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
FRIDAY, AUG. 15
Guest Speaker: Paul Council,
Community Services Manager,
City of San Mateo. 7:30 a.m. Crystal
Springs Golf Course, 6650 Golf
Course Drive, Burlingame. Breakfast
included. $15. For more information
and to RSVP call 515-5891.
Rummage sale. 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Messiah Lutheran Church, 1835
Valota Road, Redwood City.
Continues on Aug. 16 from 8 a.m. to
2 p.m. Portions of proceeds will ben-
efit Redwood Family House and
Second Harvest Food Bank. For more
information email massiahluth@sbc-
global.net.
August Summer Fun Western
Party: Dance lessons with Kathy
Scmidt, music by the California
Cowboys and a barbecue lunch. 10
a.m. to 1 p.m. San Bruno Senior
Center, 1555 Crystal Springs Road,
San Bruno. Tickets available at the
front desk. For more information call
616-7150.
Senior Picnic. 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Joseph A. Fernekes Recreation
Building at Orange Memorial Park,
781 Tennis Drive, South San
Francisco. For registration informa-
tion call 829-3820.
Senior Citizens: How to Avoid
Scams. Noon. San Mateo County
Law Library, 710 Hamilton St.,
Redwood City. Come listen to
Attorney Jay White discuss what
you need to know to avoid scams
and what to do if you or someone
you know has fallen prey to one.
Free. For more information call 363-
4913.
Twentieth Century History and
Music Class. 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. San
Bruno Senior Center, 1555 Crystal
Springs Road, San Bruno. $2 drop-in
fee. For more information call 616-
7150.
Armchair Travel and Adventure:
‘The Irish Country House.’ 1 p.m.
City of San Mateo Senior Center,
2645 Alameda de las Pulgas, San
Mateo. Free. For more information
call 522-7490.
Music on the Square: Steel ‘n’
Chicago. 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.
Courthouse Square, 2200 Broadway,
Redwood City. Steely Dan and
Chicago tribute. Free. For more infor-
mation call 780-7311.
San Carlos Music in the Park. 6
p.m. to 8 p.m. Burton Park, San
Carlos. For more information call
802-4382. Free. Every Friday until
Aug. 15.
Roger Glenn Latin Jazz Ensemble.
7 p.m. Angelicas, 863 Main St.,
Redwood City. $21 for regular table
seating and $26 for premier table
seating. For more information go to
angelicasllc.com.
Reel Destination Film: ‘McCabe
and Mrs. Miller.’ 7 p.m. Belmont
Library, 1110 Alameda de las Pulgas,
Belmont. Free. For more information
email belmont@smcl.org.
Peninsula Rose Society Meeting:
Photographing Roses. 7:30 p.m.
Redwood City Veterans Memorial
Senior Center, 1455 Madison Ave.,
Redwood City. Judith Cody, master
gardener, rose lover and award-win-
ning photographer, will present
photographing roses and answer
questions. For more information call
465-3967 or visit www.peninsularos-
esociety.org.
Dragon Theatre presents
‘Moonlight and Magnolias.’ 8 p.m.
The Dragon Theatre, 2120 Broadway,
Redwood City. Celebrate the 75th
anniversary of ‘Gone With the Wind’
with ‘Moonlight and Magnolias,’ a
look back at the golden age of
Hollywood and the making of an
iconic American film. Opening night
reception after the show. Tickets are
$30 for general admission seats. For
more information and to purchase
tickets go to http://dragonproduc-
tions.net.
Movie Night in the Park: ‘The Lego
Movie.’ 8 p.m. Orange Memorial
Park, Joseph A. Fernekes Building,
South San Francisco. Admission is
free and snacks will be sold. Bring
sleeping bags, blankets or low-
lounge chairs. No alcohol or pets. For
more information call 829-3800.
Pacifica Spindrift Players presents
‘Meet Me in St. Louis, the Musical.’
8 p.m. Pacifica Spindrift Players, 1050
Crespi Drive, Pacifica. The musical
surrounds the Smith family at the
1904 World’s Fair. Runs through
Sept. 7. Tickets are $25 for adults
and $20 for seniors and students
and can be purchased at
www.pacificaspindriftplayers.org.
For more information email
Barbara Williams at dramamamaxl-
nt@comcast.net.
Summer movie night: ‘Free
Birds.’ 8:30 p.m. Laureola Park, San
Carlos. Free. For more information
call 802-4382.
SATURDAY, AUG. 16
Rummage sale. 8 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Messiah Lutheran Church, 1835
Valota Road, Redwood City. Portions
of proceeds will benefit Redwood
Family House and Second Harvest
Food Bank. For more information
email massiahluth@sbcglobal.net.
San Carlos Tennis Club benefit for
the Leukemia and Lymphoma
Society: ‘Light the Night.’ 8:30 a.m.
to 4 p.m. Carlmont High School, 1400
Alameda de las Pulgas, Belmont.
Tennis, food and fun will be provid-
ed. For more information call 595-
0259.
Walk with a Doc at Beresford Park
in San Mateo. 10 a.m. to 11 a.m.
Beresford Park, 2720 Alameda de las
Pulgas, San Mateo. Enjoy a stroll with
physician volunteers who can
answer your health-related ques-
tions along the way. Free. For more
information contact
smcma@smcma.org.
Mollie Stone’s job fair at San
Bruno. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. 22 Bayhill
Shopping Center, San Bruno. Hiring
for all positions at Peninsula stores
and new ACE Hardware in the San
Bruno location.
Flea Market. 10 p.m. to 4 p.m.
Burlingame Center, 1400 Floribunda
Ave., Burlingame. Furniture, house-
hold goods, jewelry, clothes, art sup-
plies and more. Free. For more infor-
mation call 483-7800.
Burlingame on the Avenue. 10 a.m.
to 6 p.m. Burlingame Avenue,
Burlingame. Formerly known as
Burlingame ArtzFest, Burlingame on
the Avenue offers art, food and other
presentations. Free. Continues on
Aug. 17. For more information go to
www.burlingamechamber.org or
contact Georgette Naylor at 344-
1735.
Victorian Days Walking Tour. 10
a.m. Union Cemetery, located at
Woodside Road and El Camino Real,
Redwood City. For more information
call 593-1793.
End of Summer Party. 10:30 a.m. to
12:30 p.m. Belmont Library, 1110
Alameda de las Pulgas, Belmont. Live
music in the park. Bring your
Summer Learning Log to the library
by the end of August to get a free
book and to be eligible to win a
$1,000 scholarship. Used clothing
and new school supplies available
for free at the Swap Shop. Free. For
more information call 591-8286.
Victorian Days Walking Tour. 2 p.m.
Intersection of San Mateo Avenue
and El Camino Real, San Bruno. For
more information call 592-5822.
Book Signing and Presentation:
‘How to Make Characters and
Stories’ by Gene Luen Yang. 2 p.m.
Oak Room, San Mateo Main Library,
55 W. Third Ave., San Mateo. Bring
paper, pencil, eraser and something
hard to write on. Gene Luen Yang is
the author of several graphic novels.
Books will be available for purchase.
For more information email aspan-
bock@cityofsanmateo.org or call
522-7813.
Reception for Retrospective: Forty
Years of Sculpture and Painting. 5
p.m. to 8 p.m. The Coastal Arts
Museum, 300 Main St., Half Moon
Bay. Exhibit runs Aug. 8 to Sept. 7 and
the museum is open Friday through
Monday, noon to 5 p.m. For more
information call 726-6335 or go to
www.coastalartsleague.com.
Shakespeare in the Park 2014. 7:30
p.m. 1201 Brewster Ave. at Broadway,
Redwood City. For more information
call 780-7311.
Dragon Theatre presents
‘Moonlight and Magnolias.’ 8 p.m.
The Dragon Theatre, 2120 Broadway,
Redwood City. Celebrate the 75th
anniversary of ‘Gone With the Wind’
with ‘Moonlight and Magnolias,’ a
look back at the golden age of
Hollywood and the making of an
iconic American film. Tickets are $30
for general admission seats. For more
information and to purchase tickets,
go to http://dragonproductions.net.
Pacifica Spindrift Players presents
‘Meet Me in St. Louis, the Musical.’
8 p.m. Pacifica Spindrift Players, 1050
Crespi Drive, Pacifica. Runs through
Sept. 7. Tickets are $25 for adults and
$20 for seniors and students and can
be purchased at www.pacificaspin-
driftplayers.org or by calling 359-
8002. For more information email
Barbara Williams at dramamamaxl-
nt@comcast.net.
SUNDAY, AUG. 17
Burlingame on the Avenue. 10 a.m.
to 6 p.m. Burlingame Avenue,
Burlingame. Formerly known as
Burlingame ArtzFest, Burlingame on
the Avenue offers attendees the
opportunity to explore art, food and
other presentations. Free. For more
information go to
www.burlingamechamber.org or
contact Georgette Naylor at 344-
1735.
Calendar
For more events visit
smdailyjournal.com, click Calendar.
return for no prison time. They were
immediately sentenced to a year in
jail with credit of 24 days followed
by three years supervised probation.
The five others arrested in the bust
are Mario Gonzalez, 36, Juan
Hernandez, 39, Juan Valdez Lopez,
50, and Phin Vo Vorn, 33. On
Thursday, Gonzalez’s defense asked
to continue the scheduled preliminary
hearing but the other defendants
objected. Judge Craig Parsons refused
to split the cases and continued the
hearing for all until Aug. 27.
Authorities have not said which
defendants were in the van and which
came in the panga boat holding the
180 bales of marijuana. Some are res-
idents of Sinaloa, Mexico, and the
others San Diego and San Jose.
The Department of Homeland
Security alerted the San Mateo
County Narcotics Task Force that
marijuana boats might be landing off
the county coast and, at 10:15 p.m.
Aug. 1, agents spotted the vans
entering the beach to meet the boat
landing on the beach. Bales of mari-
juana were moved from the boat to the
vans and agents stopped them as they
drove onto
Highway 101.
On the beach,
agents reported
finding an inflat-
able raft, rain
gear and cell-
phones. A local
fisherman spot-
ted the
unmanned panga
boat which was recovered by the U.S.
Coast Guard.
The case has similarities to another
maritime smuggling incident in
Pescadero. More than 1,000 pounds
of marijuana were discovered at
Pescadero State Beach after the
Sheriff’s Office responded to reports
a boat was spotted along the coast
and a SUV stuck in the sand. Southern
California has also had incidents of
drug smuggling using boats to carry
the product from Mexico.
michelle@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 102
Continued from page 1
DRUGS
Juan Hernandez Luis Gonzalez Luis Mendoza Esteban Salazar
Joan Sicairos
Juan Lopez
Mark Teixeira Mario Gonzalez Phin Vorn
tors know what to do or the police,”
Zilversmit said. “It’s really a night-
mare for ordinary citizens.”
Zilversmit said he is weighing
whether to ask the state Supreme Court
to reconsider or appealing to the U.S.
Supreme Court. In the meantime, a San
Mateo County Superior Court judge
will re-examine whether Tom invoked
his Fifth Amendment right in any fash-
ion. If the judge agrees, the judgment
is affirmed and Tom will face a return to
prison.
Tom, 52, was halfway through serv-
ing a seven-year sentence for the crash
that killed Ng and severely injured her
sister when an appellate court in 2012
overturned conviction. Tom was
released on $300,000 bail after its rul-
ing.
Tom was “obviously disappointed”
in yesterday’s decision, Zilversmit
said.
Prosecutors said Tom, who had been
drinking with a friend at home before
leaving for his son’s house, broad-
sided the Ng family’s Nissan Maxima
with his Mercedes Benz as it made its
way across Woodside Road.
Hours after the crash, Tom’s alcohol
level measured .04 percent. Using sci-
entific rates of alcohol processing, the
prosecution contended Tom was actual-
ly at 0.98 at the time of the crash.
However, jurors acquitted Tom of alco-
hol-related charges.
During closing arguments, Chang
told the jury Tom never inquired about
the other car’s occupants.
“I’m not saying that he has to say
sorry as an expression of his guilt or
as some kind of confession but simply
as an expression of his regret,” Chang
told jurors.
Justice Goodwin Liu, in a dissenting
opinion, said that seems “a bit much”
to expect from a suspect taken into
custody at an accident scene described
by an officer as fairly chaotic. Liu also
questioned what a suspect must exactly
say to invoke his or her right to
remain silent.
Justice Kathryn Werdegar, also dis-
sented but on a more technical point.
She wrote in her opinion that Tom’s
defense never objected during trial to
the use of his silence which left the
California Supreme Court unable to
review the issue.
San Mateo County District Attorney
Steve Wagstaffe said he was pleased
with the court’s reversal and the state
Attorney General’s Office’s willing-
ness to appeal the lower court’s deci-
sion.
“It is vindication for prosecutor
Chang,” he said.
michelle@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 102
Continued from page 1
TOM
themes in her art like silver and
turquoise gemstones. She has made
more than 500 items in the last few
years and enjoys using Etsy to sell her
$30-$100 items.
“They’re fairly low priced, but made
with good materials,” she said. “You’re
a salesperson running your own web-
site through Etsy. … It gives me so
much flexibility for being an individ-
ual business owner. ”
Etsy became her online venue to sell
since the site started becoming more
popular and is in the realm of people’s
awareness.
“So I tried it and found it was easy to
use and it’s such a great community
because they have a lot of educational
materials and they have community
forums,” she said. “It’s very well set up
for the individual craftsperson to have
an online presence.”
Shray also sells at craft fairs along
the Peninsula. This is her first time at
the annual Burlingame festival.
“I jumped at the chance because it’s
such a great location,” she said. “I love
jewelry. I love to wear jewelry
all the time. Luckily, I don’t
have to buy any jewelry now. ”
The free event, formerly
named Burlingame ArtzFest,
runs 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Saturday,
Aug. 16 and Sunday, Aug. 17
and includes musical entertain-
ment, with more than 150
artists, a home, garden and
green venue spread throughout
the event, gourmet food and a
children’s area. The festival is
produced by the Burlingame
Chamber of Commerce in con-
junction with California
Artists. For more information,
go to burlingamechamber.org/
b u r l i n g a m e -
event s/ burl i ngame-on-t he-
avenue.
For more information on
Wendy Shray Designs, go to
e t s y . c o m / s h o p
/WendyShrayDesigns/about.
angela@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 105
Continued from page 1
AVENUE
COMICS/GAMES
8-15-14
THURSDAY’S PUZZLE SOLVED
PREVIOUS
SUDOKU
ANSWERS
Want More Fun
and Games?
Jumble Page 2 • La Times Crossword Puzzle Classifieds
Tundra & Over the Hedge Comics Classifieds
Boggle Puzzle Everyday in DateBook


Each row and each column must contain the
numbers 1 through 6 without repeating.

The numbers within the heavily outlined boxes,
called cages, must combine using the given operation
(in any order) to produce the target numbers in the
top-left corners.

Freebies: Fill in single-box cages with the number in
the top-left corner.
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ACROSS
1 Popular pet
4 Air rifle pellets
7 1040 pro
10 — been had!
11 Cartoon shrieks
13 Make small talk
14 Prohibit
15 Big continent
16 Ready to eat
17 Winter sport
19 Joie de vivre
20 Blended whiskey
21 PC note
23 Hearty laughs
26 Young ladies
28 Passport datum
29 Cowboy — Maynard
30 Filter
34 Moon position
36 Charge
38 Earth, in combos
39 Misspellings
41 Ballad writer
42 Rustle
44 Snapshot
46 Domed tent
47 Homer’s sailor
52 Fuel cartel
53 Hammer’s target
54 Med. scan
55 Gross!
56 Berlin single
57 — de mer
58 Sitcom planet
59 U.S. Army rank
60 Mi. above sea level
DOWN
1 Claims
2 Egg-shaped
3 Mr. Wilder
4 Small and shiny
5 Attack
6 Onion covering
7 Dish with beans
8 Pontifical
9 Nefertiti’s god
12 More judicious
13 Wrinkle
18 JAMA readers
22 Mme.’s daughter
23 Kennel sound
24 How disgusting!
25 Green parrot
27 Data
29 Piano’s 88
31 Way back when
32 Average grade
33 Like stolen goods
35 Make a seam
37 Glimpsing
40 Cellular device
41 Mac rivals
42 Fabulous
43 Demolish
45 Archipelago dot
46 Fluctuate (hyph.)
48 Podium
49 Ms. Lazarus
50 River in Russia
51 Fine sediment
DILBERT® CROSSWORD PUZZLE
HOLY MOLE®
PEARLS BEFORE SWINE®
GET FUZZY®
FRIDAY, AUGUST 15, 2014
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) — Get involved with people
who work in a field that interests you. Use your time
to gain the help and knowledge needed to get your
plans up and running.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) — Do whatever it takes to
take the stress out of your home environment. Add to
the comfort of your surroundings or make changes to
your current living arrangements. Protect your assets.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) — Breathe some new life
into old, stale relationships. Reconnect with friends
or distant family members by phone or social
media. A pleasure trip will give you the chance to
recharge your batteries.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) — Refrain from making
an impulsive move. If things are to run smoothly, minor
details must be ironed out first. Take note of what
others are doing and plan your actions accordingly.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) — Financial
issues can prove challenging. Take control of your
situation by setting up a new budget and reviewing
any agreements or commitments. Talk to your
financial adviser.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) — Protect what’s
yours. Keep careful records and documentation. It’s
in your best interest to stay on top of your assets.
Don’t lose sight of what you have given others.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) — You will not be able
to see a situation clearly. Get all of the facts and do
some research to verify the way you feel. There may
be a hidden issue that needs to be reviewed.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) — You have a lot
to contribute. Conditions are favorable for joint
ventures, but make sure you are given equal
opportunity. Get everything in writing regarding
who is responsible for what.
ARIES (March 21-April 19) — This is not a good
time to gamble or begin costly projects. Financial
decisions should wait for a later date. Spend quality
time with family or close friends.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20) — Don’t take a financial
risk. You can look at an investment, but don’t make
an impulsive move that could jeopardize your current
standard of living. Time is on your side.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20) — Embark on a new
project. Get together with people who have similar
interests for added inspiration. Travel will increase your
networking opportunities. Display what you have to
offer and see what happens.
CANCER (June 21-July 22) — Look for a way to
make a living doing something you love. Check into an
unusual profession that has the potential to sustain
your interest and pay the bills.
COPYRIGHT 2014 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.
Friday • Aug 15, 2014 21
THE DAILY JOURNAL
22
Friday • Aug 15, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
BUS DRIVER JOBS
AVAILABLE TODAY
AT MV TRANSPORTATION
Join us in providing safe, reliable and professional community
transportation in San Mateo County.
Positions available in Redwood City,
San Carlos,
and South San Francisco.
Please call (650) 482-9359
CDL Drivers needed immediately for Passenger Vehicle and
Small Bus routes.
Paid classroom and behind-the-wheel training from exception-
al instructors and trainers. The future is bright for Bus Drivers
with an expected 12.5% growth in positions over the next ten
years!
MV Transportation, Inc. provides equal employment and affir-
mative action opportunities to minorities, females, veterans,
and disabled individuals, as well as other protected groups.
DELIVERY
DRIVER
PENINSULA
ROUTES
Wanted: Independent Contractor to provide
delivery of the Daily Journal six days per week,
Monday thru Saturday, early morning.
Experience with newspaper delivery required.
Must have valid license and appropriate insurance
coverage to provide this service in order to be
eligible. Papers are available for pickup in down-
town San Mateo at 3:30 a.m.
Please apply in person Monday-Friday, 9am to
4pm at The Daily Journal, 800 S. Claremont St
#210, San Mateo.
GOT JOBS?
The best career seekers
read the Daily Journal.
We will help you recruit qualified, talented
individuals to join your company or organization.
The Daily Journal’s readership covers a wide
range of qualifications for all types of positions.
For the best value and the best results,
recruit from the Daily Journal...
Contact us for a free consultation
Call (650) 344-5200 or
Email: ads@smdailyjournal.com
104 Training
TERMS & CONDITIONS
The San Mateo Daily Journal Classi-
fieds will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion, and its lia-
bility shall be limited to the price of one
insertion. No allowance will be made for
errors not materially affecting the value
of the ad. All error claims must be sub-
mitted within 30 days. For full advertis-
ing conditions, please ask for a Rate
Card.
110 Employment
CAREGIVERS
2 years experience
required.
Immediate placement
on all assignments.
Call (650)777-9000
CAREGIVERS WANTED -- Home Care
for Elderly - Hourly or Live-in, Day or
Night Shifts, Top Pay, Immediate Place-
ment. Required: Two years paid experi-
ence with elderly or current CNA certifi-
cation; Pass background, drug and other
tests; Drive Car; Speak and write English
Email resume to: jobs@starlightcaregiv-
ers.com Call: (650) 600-8108
Website: www.starlightcaregivers.com
HOUSECLEANERS FOR HIRE
No nights, no weekends
Call (650)369-6243
110 Employment
HOME CARE AIDES
Multiple shifts to meet your needs. Great
pay & benefits, Sign-on bonus, 1yr exp
required.
Matched Caregivers (650)839-2273,
(408)280-7039 or (888)340-2273
WAREHOUSE POSITION -
Good Pay, Full Benefits,
Monday thru Friday. 7:00-3:30 or 3:30 to
Midnight, Apply in person 9:00-3:00.
Merrill’s Packaging, 1529 Rollins Rd.,
BURLINGAME
110 Employment
NEWSPAPER INTERNS
JOURNALISM
The Daily Journal is looking for in-
terns to do entry level reporting, re-
search, updates of our ongoing fea-
tures and interviews. Photo interns al-
so welcome.
We expect a commitment of four to
eight hours a week for at least four
months. The internship is unpaid, but
intelligent, aggressive and talented in-
terns have progressed in time into
paid correspondents and full-time re-
porters.
College students or recent graduates
are encouraged to apply. Newspaper
experience is preferred but not neces-
sarily required.
Please send a cover letter describing
your interest in newspapers, a resume
and three recent clips. Before you ap-
ply, you should familiarize yourself
with our publication. Our Web site:
www.smdailyjournal.com.
Send your information via e-mail to
news@smdailyjournal.com or by reg-
ular mail to 800 S. Claremont St #210,
San Mateo CA 94402.
RETAIL -
RETAIL JEWELRY SALES +
EXPERIENCED DIAMOND
SALES ASSOC& ASST MGR
Benefits-Bonus-No Nights!
650-367-6500 FX 367-6400
jobs@jewelryexchange.com
SALES/MARKETING
INTERNSHIPS
The San Mateo Daily Journal is looking
for ambitious interns who are eager to
jump into the business arena with both
feet and hands. Learn the ins and outs
of the newspaper and media industries.
This position will provide valuable
experience for your bright future.
Email resume
info@smdailyjournal.com
129 Cemetery Plots
FOR SALE - Prime cemetery property at:
Skylawn Memorial Park, San Mateo
California, Sunset Circle lot 44 section B
space 2 Single plot $18,000
contact Lillian Lemus (916)435-1547
203 Public Notices
CASE# CIV 529740
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Katharine Ann Foley and Javier
Alberto Saldena on behalf of
Sebastian Luca Saldena
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner Katharine Ann Foley and Javi-
er Alberto Saldena filed a petition with
this court for a decree changing name
as follows:
Present name: Sebastian Luca Saldena
Propsed Name: Sebastian Thomas Sal-
dena
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on September
11, 2014 at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room 2J,
at 400 County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks pri-
or to the date set for hearing on the peti-
tion in the following newspaper of gener-
al circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 07/29/2014
/s/ Robert D. Foiles /
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 07/29/2014
(Published, 08/01/2014, 08/08/2014,
08/15/2014, 08/22/2014)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #261616
The following person is doing business
as: Speck; Speck Products, 177 Bovet
Rd., Ste. 200, SAN MATEO, CA 94402 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Speculative Product Design, LLC, CA.
The business is conducted by a Limited
Libility Company. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on June 1, 2014.
/s/ Jill Briggs /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 07/18/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/25/14, 08/01/14, 08/08/14, 08/15/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #261582
The following person is doing business
as: C Jane Productions, 888 N. San Ma-
teo Dr., #13307, SAN MATEO, CA
94401 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: C Jane Productions, LLC, CA.
The business is conducted by a Limited
Libility Company. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on.
/s/ Catherine Moore /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 07/16/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/25/14, 08/01/14, 08/08/14, 08/15/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #261598
The following person is doing business
as: Ardentkid, 727 Matsonia Dr., FOS-
TER CITY, CA 94404 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Omid
Ahoural, same address. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on 01/21/2013.
/s/ Omid Ahoural /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 07/17/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/25/14, 08/01/14, 08/08/14, 08/15/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #261762
The following person is doing business
as: Happy, 1720 El Camino Real, BUR-
LINGAME, CA 94010 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owners: Myo Zaw
79 Carleton Ave., Daly City, CA 94015
and Tommy Saine 243 Belhaven Ave.,
Daly City, CA 94015. The business is
conducted by a General Partnership. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on.
/s/ Myo Zaw/
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 07/31/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/01/14, 08/08/14, 08/15/14, 08/22/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #261597
The following person is doing business
as: Peninsula Allergy Associates, a Med-
ical Group, Inc., 1828 El Camino Real,
Ste 703, BURLINGAME, CA 94010 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Peninsula Allergy Associates, a Medical
Group, Inc., CA. The business is con-
ducted by a corporation. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on March 13, 1975.
/s/ Micheal Cowan/
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 07/17/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/01/14, 08/08/14, 08/15/14, 08/22/14).
23 Friday • Aug 15, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Tundra Tundra Tundra
Over the Hedge Over the Hedge Over the Hedge
EVENT MARKETING SALES
Join the Daily Journal Event marketing
team as a Sales and Business Development
Specialist. Duties include sales and
customer service of event sponsorships,
partners, exhibitors and more. Interface
and interact with local businesses to
enlist participants at the Daily Journal’s
ever expanding inventory of community
events such as the Senior Showcase,
Family Resource Fair, Job Fairs, and
more. You will also be part of the project
management process. But first and
foremost, we will rely on you for sales
and business development.
This is one of the fastest areas of the
Daily Journal, and we are looking to grow
the team.
Must have a successful track record of
sales and business development.
TELEMARKETING/INSIDE SALES
We are looking for a telemarketing whiz,
who can cold call without hesitation and
close sales over the phone. Experience
preferred. Must have superior verbal,
phone and written communication skills.
Computer proficiency is also required.
Self-management and strong business
intelligence also a must.
To apply for either position,
please send info to
jerry@smdailyjournal.com or call
650-344-5200.
The Daily Journal seeks
two sales professionals
for the following positions:
Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
HELP WANTED
SALES
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #261701
The following person is doing business
as: Smart Age Insurance Services, 6721
Mission St., DALY CITY, CA 94014 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Smart Insurance Services Inc., CA. The
business is conducted by a corporation.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on.
/s/ Nader Gheith /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 07/24/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/01/14, 08/08/14, 08/15/14, 08/22/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #261738
The following person is doing business
as: Assista Med Transport, 2006 Pioneer
Ct., SAN MATEO, CA 94403 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Assis-
ta Mobility & Transport, LLC, CA. The
business is conducted by a Limited Lia-
bility Company. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on 08/01/2014.
/s/ Ernesto W. Torrejon /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 07/29/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/01/14, 08/08/14, 08/15/14, 08/22/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #261664
The following person is doing business
as: AV.I.P Auto Technology, 4095 Pacific
Blvd., SAN MATEO, CA 94403 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Rami
Al-Zetawi, Inc., CA. The business is con-
ducted by a Corporation. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on.
/s/ Rami Al-Zetawi /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 07/21/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/01/14, 08/08/14, 08/15/14, 08/22/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #261710
The following person is doing business
as: 1) Quality Lock and Key, 2) Quality
Lock & Key, 520 S. El Dorado St., SAN
MATEO, CA 94402 is hereby registered
by the following owner: Pericles Pneu-
matikos, same address. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on.
/s/ Pericles Pneumatikos /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 07/24/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/01/14, 08/08/14, 08/15/14, 08/22/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #261822
The following person is doing business
as: 1) SMarty Works, 2) SMarty Cat Pet
Care, 3) SMarty Organizing, 4) SMarty
Consulting 192 Dexter Ave., REDWOOD
CITY, CA 94063 is hereby registered by
the following owner: Shauna Marty,
same address. The business is conduct-
ed by an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on N/A.
/s/ Shauna Marty /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/06/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/08/14, 08/15/14, 08/22/14, 08/29/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #261825
The following person is doing business
as: Voracious Audio, 1555 Marina Ct.,
Unit D, SAN MATEO, CA 94403 is here-
by registered by the following owners:
Sean Vora and Lindsay Vora. same ad-
dress. The business is conducted by a
General Partnership. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on N/A.
/s/ Sean Vora /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/05/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/08/14, 08/15/14, 08/22/14, 08/29/14).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #261807
The following person is doing business
as: XPO Global Logistics, 400 Oyster
Point Blvd., Ste 305, SOUTH SAN
FRANCISCO, CA 94080 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: RF Interna-
tional, Ltd., NY. The business is conduct-
ed by a Corporation The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on 07/29/2014
/s/ Gordon E. Devens /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/05/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/08/14, 08/15/14, 08/22/14, 08/29/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #261827
The following person is doing business
as: Brainercize Tutors, 287 Lorton Ave.,
#201, BURLINGAME, CA 94010 is here-
by registered by the following owners:
Sadaf Malik and Siraj Shabber, same ad-
dress. The business is conducted by a
Married Couple. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on N/A.
/s/ Sadaf Malik /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/06/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/08/14, 08/15/14, 08/22/14, 08/29/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #261824
The following person is doing business
as: Multiplyd, 855 Woodland Ave., MEN-
LO PARK, CA 94025 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Pallav
Sharda, same address. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on 23, June 2014.
/s/ Pallav Sharda /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/06/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/08/14, 08/15/14, 08/22/14, 08/29/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #261711
The following person is doing business
as: Amigos Grill, 2974 S. Norfolk St.,
SAN MATEO, CA 94403 hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Pilar Con-
treras, 2808 San Juan Blvd., Belmont CA
94002. The business is conducted by an
individual. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on .
/s/ Pilar Contreras /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 07/24/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/15/14, 08/22/14, 08/29/14, 09/05/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #261903
The following person is doing business
as: 1) Half Moon Brewing Company, 2)
The Brewery on Half Moon Bay, Inc. 935
Washington St. hereby registered by the
following owner: Brew4U LLC, CA. The
business is conducted by a Limited Lia-
bility Company. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on.
/s/ Kristiann Garrett /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/13/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/15/14, 08/22/14, 08/29/14, 09/05/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #261911
The following person is doing business
as: Bay Heating and Air, 2316 Kent St.,
SAN MATEO, CA 94403 hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Karla Go-
mez, same address. The business is
conducted by an individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on .
/s/ Karla Gomez /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/13/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/15/14, 08/22/14, 08/29/14, 09/05/14).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #261913
The following person is doing business
as: Carzone, 909A North Amphlett Blvd.,
SAN MATEO, CA 94401 hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Wen Ben
Li, 2609A San Bruno Ave., CA 94066.
The business is conducted by an individ-
ual. The registrants commenced to trans-
act business under the FBN on .
/s/ Wen Ben Li /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/13/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/15/14, 08/22/14, 08/29/14, 09/05/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #261832
The following person is doing business
as: Corpuz Realty & Investment, 1101
National Ave. #1404, SAN BRUNO, CA
94066 hereby registered by the following
owners: 1)Villamor Corpuz, same ad-
dress 2) HIlda Garcia, 43A Appian, So
SF, CA 94080. The business is conduct-
ed by a General Partnership. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on
/s/ Villamor Corpuz/Hilda Garcia/
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/07/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/15/14, 08/22/14, 08/29/14, 09/05/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #261907
The following person is doing business
as: M.C.Barr Co.. 109A Clarendon Rd.,
BURLINGAME, CA 94010 hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Michael
Barr, same address. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on .
/s/ Michael Barr/
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/13/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/15/14, 08/22/14, 08/29/14, 09/05/14).
STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT OF
THE USE OF A FICTITIOUS BUSINESS
NAME STATEMENT #256306
The following person is abandoning the
use of the fictitious business name: Pho
Vinh, 1065 Holly St, Suite A, SAN CAR-
LOS, CA 94070. The fictitious business
name was filed on 6/12/13 in the County
of San Mateo. The business was con-
ducted by: Pho Vinh, Inc., CA. The busi-
ness was conducted by a Corporation.
/s/ Kaitlin Nguyen /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk-Recorder of San Mateo
County on 07/23/2014. (Published in the
San Mateo Daily Journal, 07/25/2014,
08/01/2014, 08/08/2014, 08/15/2014).
PETITION FOR DISSOLUTION OF
MARRIAGE
CASE# 118232
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA ,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO
400 COUNTY CENTER RD
REDWOOD CITY, CA 94063
MARRIAGE OF
PETITIONER: Gary F. Tensfeldt Jr.
RESPONDENT: Lindsay Dunlap
1. RESIDENCE: Petitoner and Respond-
ent have been a resident of this state for
at least six months and of this county for
at least three months immedialety pre-
ceding the filing of this Petition for Disso-
lution of Marriage.
2. STATISTICAL FACTS:
a) Date of marriage: 1-29-09
b) Date of separation: 7-10-12
c) Time from date of marriage to date of
separation: 3 years, 3 months.
3. DECLARATION REGARDING MI-
NOR CHILDREN: The minor children are
Riley Tensfeldy, Birthdate: 8-20-06, Age:
6 Sex: F
Maya Tensfeldt , Birthdate : 8-22-09,
Age: 3 Sex: F
5. DECLARATION REGARDING COM-
MUNITY AND QUASI-COMMUNITY AS-
SETS AND DEBTS AS CURRENTLY
KNOWN: There are no such assets or
debts subject to disposition by the court
in this proceeding.
6. Petitioner Requests dissolution of the
marriage based on irreconcilabe differan-
ces (Fam. Code, §2310(a).)
7. Petitioner requests that the court grant
the above relief and make injunctive (in-
203 Public Notices
cluding restraining) and other orders as
follows:
a) Legal custody of the children to the
Petitioner.
b) Physical custody of children to the Pe-
titioner
c) Child visitation be granted to: No visi-
tation to Respondent.
d) Determination of parentage of any
children born to the Petitioner and Re-
spondent to the marriage.
g) Terminate the court’s jurisdiction (abili-
ty) to award spousal support to the Re-
spondent.
8. Child support -if there are minor chil-
dren born to or adopted by the Petition-
er and Repondent before or during theis
marriage, the court will make orders for
the support of the children upon request
and submission of financial forms by the
requesting party. An earnings assign-
ment may br issued without further no-
tice. any party required to pay support
must pay intrest on overdue amounts at
the “legal” rate, which is currently 10 per-
cent.
9. I HAVE READ THE RESTRAINING
ORDERS ON THE BACK OF THE SUM-
MONS AND I UNDERSTAND THAT
THEY APPLY TO ME WHEN THIS PE-
TITION IS FILED
/s/ Gary F. Tensfeldt /
(Signature if Petitioner)
Dated: 4/16/2013
FILED ON: Aug. 1, 2013
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal
July 25, August 1, 8, 15, 2014
SUMMONS
(FAMILY LAW)
CASE NUMBER: 118232
NOTICE TO RESPONDENT: (Aviso
AlDemandado): Lindsay Dunlap.You are
being sued by Petitioner: (Lo estademan-
dando el demandante): Gary Francis
Tensfeldt, Jr.
NOTICE! You have 30 calendar days af-
ter this summons and legal petition are-
served on you to file a response (formFL-
120 or FL-123) at the court and havea
copy served on the petitioner. A letteror
phone call will not protect you.If you do
not file your response on time,the court
may make orders affecting yourmarriage
or domestic partnership, yourchildren.
You maybe ordered to pay sup-port and
attorney fees and costs, If youcannot pay
the filing fee, ask the clerk fora fee waiv-
er form.If you want legal advice, contact
a law-yer immediately. You can get infor-
mationabout finding lawyers at the Cali-
fornia’sCourts Online Self-Help
Center(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), at
theCalifornia Legal Services web
site(www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), or by
con-tacting your local county bar associ-
ation.Tiene 30 dias corridos despues de
haberrecibido le entrega legal de esta
Citacio y peticion pare presentar una Re-
spuesta (formulario FL-120 o FL-123)
ante lacorte o llamada telefonica no bas-
ta paraprotegerlo.Si no presenta su Re-
spuesta a tiempo lacorte puede dar or-
denes que afecten sumatrimonio o pare-
ja de hecho sus bienesy la custodia de
sus hijos. La corte tam-bien le puede or-
denar que pague manu-tencion, y hono-
rarios y costos legales. Sino puede pa-
gar la cuita de presentacion,pida al sec-
retario in formulario de exen-cionSi de-
sea obtener asesoramiento legal,pon-
gase encontacto de inmediato con un-
abogado. Puede obtener informacion-
para encontrar a un abogado en el Cen-
tro de Ayuda de las Cortes de
California(www.sucorte.ca.gov), en el si-
tio Web delos Servicios Legales de Cali-
fornia(www.lawhelpcalifornia.org) o po-
nien-dose en contacto con el colegio de
abo-gados de su condado.
NOTICE:
If a judgment or support orderis entered,
the court may order you topay all or part
of the fees and costs thatthe court
waived for yourself or for theother party.
If this happens, the party or-dered to pay
fees shall be given noticeand an opportu-
nity to request a hearingto set aside the
order to pay waived courtfees.
AVISO:
Si se emite un fallo u orden demanuten-
cion, la corte pude ordenar queusted pa-
gue parte de, o todas las cuotasy costos
de la corte previamente exentasa peti-
cion de usted o de la orta parte. Siesto
ocurre, la parte ordenada apagarestas
cuotas debe recibir aviso y la opor-tuni-
dad de solicitar una audiencia paraanular
la orden de pagar las cuotas ex-entas.
The name and address of the court
are(El nombre y direccion de la corte
son): Superior Court of California:
400 County Center
Redwood City, CA 94063
The name, address, and telephone num-
ber of the petitioner’s attorney or the peti-
tioner with out an attorney are (El nom-
bre, direccion y numero de telefono dela-
bogado del dermandante, o del deman-
dante si no tiene abogado, son);
Gary F. Tensfeldt
203 Public Notices
171 Starlite Dr.
San Mateo, CA 94402
(650) 389-4638
Date: (Fecha) March 05, 2013
John C. Fitton, Clerk(Adjunto)
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal
July 25, August 1, 8, 15, 2014
210 Lost & Found
FOUND - silver locket on May 6, Crest-
view and Club Dr. Call to describe:
(650)598-0823
FOUND: KEYS (3) on ring with 49'ers
belt clip. One is car key to a Honda.
Found in Home Depot parking lot in San
Carlos on Sunday 2/23/14.
Call 650 490-0921 - Leave message if no
answer.
FOUND: RING Silver color ring found
on 1/7/2014 in Burlingame. Parking Lot
M (next to Dethrone). Brand inscribed.
Gary @ (650)347-2301
LOST AFRICAN GRAY PARROT -
(415)377-0859 REWARD!
LOST DOG-SMALL TERRIER-$5000
REWARD Norfolk Terrier missing from
Woodside Rd near High Rd on Dec 13.
Violet is 11mths, 7lbs, tan, female, no
collar, microchipped. Please help bring
her home! (650)568-9642
LOST GOLD Cross at Carlmont Shop-
ping Center, by Lunardi’s market
(Reward) (415)559-7291
LOST GOLD WATCH - with brown lizard
strap. Unique design. REWARD! Call
(650)326-2772.
LOST SET OF CAR KEYS near Millbrae
Post Office on June 18, 2013, at 3:00
p.m. Reward! Call (650)692-4100
LOST: SMALL diamond cross, silver
necklace with VERY sentimental
meaning. Lost in San Mateo 2/6/12
(650)578-0323.
210 Lost & Found
LOST: MEN’S WEDDING BAND plain
gold, , engraving inside band. Last seen
downtown San Carlos. REWARD Please
call (650)591-2720
Books
16 BOOKS on History of WWII Excellent
condition. $95 all obo, (650)345-5502
50 SHADES of Grey Trilogy, Excellent
Condition $25. (650)615-0256
BOOK "LIFETIME" WW1 $12.,
(408)249-3858
BOOKS, PAPERBACK/HARD cover,
Coonts, Higgins, Thor, Follet, Brown,
more $20.00 for 60 books,
(650)578-9208
JONATHAN KELLERMAN - Hardback
books, (5) $3. each, (650)341-1861
24
Friday • Aug 15, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ACROSS
1 Classic beginning
or ending?
6 __ bag
10 Some NYSE
traders
14 Playwright
Fugard
15 Smart Simpson
16 Wet course
17 Cause of brittle
cigars?
19 “This __ Song”:
Petula Clark hit
20 Intention
21 Bit
22 Artistic
surroundings?
24 Inventor for
whom a N.J.
township is
named
25 Said “You’re on!”
to
27 Friar __ de
Torquemada
29 Rebuke a
revolutionary?
32 NYSE event
34 Tortilla dough
35 Manipulate
illegally
36 Bouncer’s
demand, and this
puzzle’s title
41 Jan. honoree
42 7UP’s opposite?
43 “Pioneer
Woman”
cookbook writer
Drummond
44 Tolerate a
Midwest capital?
49 Red head
50 7UP, e.g.
51 Olympic diver’s
ideal
54 Former vice
presidential
family
57 “... from __ far
country blows”:
Housman
58 Kitchenware
giant
59 Actor Wilson
60 God of
honeymoon truck
rentals?
63 Vintner’s quantity
64 Certain tunnelers
65 Virtual
transaction
66 Batik artist
67 Garden
headache
68 Obliterates
DOWN
1 Tackled
2 Heart chambers
3 Sound mostly the
same
4 “I should have
thought of that!”
5 Shifting aid
6 Moved smoothly
7 Free
8 Since
9 Epstein-__ virus
10 Heinlein
contemporary
11 “The Dick Van
Dyke Show”
actress
12 Hitches
13 Furtive sort
18 Wailuku’s
county
23 Crackerjack
group
26 Humiliates
28 Lose some
support
29 Camp sight
30 Natural resource
31 Mil. morale
booster
32 “That’s my
vacation time”
33 Typically long-
haired breed
37 Dramatic division
38 Sonora sun
39 Timothy
Omundson’s role
on “Xena”
40 Coastal raptor
41 Content
beginning?
45 “What’s for __?”
46 Least
straightforward
47 Burning sulfur
quality
48 Cavalry soldier
51 November
birthstone
52 Napoleon,
ultimately
53 Meeting places
55 Stole, for one
56 January 1 word
59 It typically
involves
repetitive
behavior, briefly
61 Sot’s woe
62 Ryder Cup team
By Jeffrey Wechsler
(c)2014 Tribune Content Agency, LLC
08/15/14
08/15/14
ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:
Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
xwordeditor@aol.com
Books
TIME LIFE Nature Books, great condition
19 different books. $5.00 each OBO
(650)580-4763
295 Art
ALASKAN SCENE painting 40" high 53"
wide includes matching frame $99 firm
(650)592-2648
ALASKAN SCENE painting 40" high 53"
wide includes matching frame $99 firm
(650)592-2648
BOB TALBOT Marine Lithograph (Sign-
ed Framed 24x31 Like New. $99.
(650)572-8895
LANDSCAPE PICTURES (3) hand
painted 25" long 21" wide, wooden
frame, $60 for all 3, (650)201-9166
POSTER, LINCOLN, advertising Honest
Ale, old stock, green and black color.
$15. (650)348-5169
296 Appliances
CHEFMATE TOASTER oven, brand
new, bakes, broils, toasts, adjustable
temperature. $25 OBO. (650)580-4763
OMELETTE MAKER $10. also hot pock-
ets, etc. EZ clean 650-595-3933
PONDEROSA WOOD STOVE, like
new, used one load for only 14 hours.
$1,200. Call (650)333-4400
RADIATOR HEATER, oil filled, electric,
1500 watts $25. (650)504-3621
RED DEVIL VACUUM CLEANER - $25.,
(650)593-0893
ROCKET GRILL Brand new indoor grill.
Cooks fast with no mess. $70 OBO.
(650)580-4763
SANYO MINI REFRIGERATOR- $40.,
(415)346-6038
SANYO REFRIGERATOR with size 33”
high & 20" wide in very good condition
$85. 650-756-9516.
SEARS KENMORE sewing machine in a
good cabinet style, running smoothly
$99. 650-756-9516.
297 Bicycles
GIRLS BIKE 18” Pink, Looks New, Hard-
ly Used $80 (650)293-7313
MAGNA 26” Female Bike, like brand
new cond $80. (650)756-9516. Daly City
298 Collectibles
1920'S AQUA Glass Beaded Flapper
Purse (drawstring bag) & Faux Pearl
Flapper Collar. $50. 650-762-6048
1940 VINTAGE telephone bench maple
antiques collectibles $75 (650)755-9833
1982 PRINT 'A Tune Off The Top Of My
Head' 82/125 $80 (650) 204-0587
2 VINTAGE Light Bulbs circa 1905. Edi-
son Mazda Lamps. Both still working -
$50 (650)-762-6048
ARMY SHIRT, long sleeves, with pock-
ets. XL $15 each (408)249-3858
CASINO CHIP Collection Original Chips
from various casinos $99 obo
(650)315-3240
COLORIZED TERRITORIAL Quarters
uncirculated with Holder $15/all,
(408)249-3858
JOE MONTANA signed authentic retire-
ment book, $39., (650)692-3260
MEMORABILIA CARD COLLECTION,
large collection, Marilyn Monroe, James
Dean, John Wayne and hundreds more.
$3,300/obo.. Over 50% off
(650)319-5334.
SCHILLER HIPPIE poster, linen, Sparta
graphics 1968. Mint condition. $600.00.
(650)701-0276
TEA POTS - (6) collectables, good con-
dition, $10. each, (650)571-5899
299 Computers
1982 TEXAS Instruments TI-99/4A com-
puter, new condition, complete accesso-
ries, original box. $75. (650)676-0974
300 Toys
K'NEX BUILDING ideas $30.
(650)622-6695
LEGO DUPLO Set ages 1 to 5. $30
(650)622-6695
PILGRIM DOLLS, 15” boy & girl, new,
from Harvest Festival, adorable $25 650-
345-3277
PINK BARBIE 57 Chevy Convertible
28" long (sells on E-Bay for $250) in box
$49 (650)591-9769
RADIO CONTROL car; Jeep with off
road with equipment $99 OBO
(650)851-0878
SMALL WOOD dollhouse 4 furnished
rooms. $35. (650)558-8142
300 Toys
STEP 2 sandbox Large with cover $25
(650)343-4329
TOY - Barney interactive activity, musical
learning, talking, great for the car, $16.
obo, (650)349-6059
302 Antiques
1912 COFFEE Percolator Urn. perfect
condition includes electric cord $85.
(415)565-6719
ANTIQUE CRYSTAL/ARCADE Coffee
Grinder. $80. 650-596-0513
ANTIQUE ITALIAN lamp 18” high, $70
(650)387-4002
ANTIQUE KILIM RUNNER woven zig
zag design 7' by 6" by 4' $99.,
(650)580-3316
ANTIQUE OLD Copper Wash Tub, 30 x
12 x 13 with handles, $65 (650)591-3313
MAHOGANY ANTIQUE Secretary desk,
72” x 40” , 3 drawers, Display case, bev-
elled glass, $700. (650)766-3024
OLD VINTAGE Wooden “Sea Captains
Tool Chest” 35 x 16 x 16, $65
(650)591-3313
STERLING SILVER loving cup 10" circa
with walnut base 1912 $65
(650)520-3425
303 Electronics
46” MITSUBISHI Projector TV, great
condition. $400. (650)261-1541.
BLUE NINTENDO DS Lite. Hardly used.
$70 OBO. (760) 996-0767
BLUETOOTH WITH CHARGER - like
new, $20., (415)410-5937
COMBO COLOR T.V. 24in. Toshiba with
DVD VHS Flat Screen Remote. $95. Cell
number: (650)580-6324
COMBO COLOR T.V. Panasonic with
VHS and Radio - Color: White - 2001
$25. Cell number: (650)580-6324
FLIP CAMCORDER $50. (650)583-2767
JVC - DVD Player and video cassette re-
corder. NEW. $80. (650)345-5502
LEFT-HAND ERGONOMIC keyboard
with 'A-shape' key layout Num pad, $20
(650)204-0587
OLD STYLE 32 inch Samsung TV. Free
with pickup. Call 650-871-5078.
303 Electronics
SET OF 3 wireless phones all for $50
(650)342-8436
SONY PROJECTION TV 48" with re-
mote good condition $99 (650)345-1111
WESTINGHOUSE 32” Flatscreen TV,
model#SK32H240S, with HDMI plug in
and remote, excellent condition. Two
available, $175 each. (650)400-4174
304 Furniture
2 END Tables solid maple '60's era
$40/both. (650)670-7545
3 PIECE cocktail table with 2 end tables,
glass tops. good condition, $99.
(650)574-4021l
BATHTUB SEAT, electric. Bathmaster
2000. Enables in and out of bath safe-
ly.$99 650-375-1414
BURGUNDY VELVET reupholstered vin-
tage chair. $75. Excellent condition.
650-861-0088
CHAIRS 2 Blue Good Condition $50
OBO (650)345-5644
CHAIRS, WITH Chrome Frame, Brown
Vinyl seats $15.00 each. (650)726-5549
COMPUTER DESK $25 , drawer for key-
board, 40" x 19.5" (619)417-0465
COUCH, LEATHER, Dark brown, L
shaped, rarely used, excellent condition.
* SOLD *
DINING ROOM SET - table, four chairs,
lighted hutch, $500. all, (650)296-3189
DISPLAY CABINET 72”x 21” x39 1/2”
High Top Display, 2 shelves in rear $99
(650)591-3313
DRESSER (5 drawers) 43" H x 36" W
$40. (650)756-9516 DC.
DRUM TABLE - brown, perfect condi-
tion, nice design, with storage, $45.,
(650)345-1111
DURALINER ROCKING CHAIR, Maple
Finish, Cream Cushion w matching otto-
man $70 (650)583-4943.
ENTERTAINMENT CENTER with
shelves for books, pure oak. Purchased
for $750. Sell for $99. (650)348-5169
FREE SOFA and love seat set. good
condtion (650)630-2329
GRACO 40" x28"x28" kid pack 'n play
exc $40 (650) 756-9516 Daly City
KITCHEN CABINETS - 3 metal base
kitchen cabinets with drawers and wood
doors, $99., (650)347-8061
LAWN CHAIRS (4) White, plastic, $8.
each, (415)346-6038
LIVING & Dining Room Sets. Mission
Style, Trestle Table w/ 2 leafs & 6
Chairs, Like new $600 obo
(831)768-1680
LOUNGE CHAIRS - 2 new, with cover &
plastic carring case & headrest, $35.
each, (650)592-7483
LOVE SEAT, Upholstered pale yellow
floral $99. (650)574-4021
MIRROR, SOLID OAK. 30" x 19 1/2",
curved edges; beautiful. $85.00 OBO.
Linda 650 366-2135.
OAK BOOKCASE, 30"x30" x12". $25.
(650)726-6429
OCCASIONAL, END or Sofa Table. $25.
Solid wood in excellent condition. 20" x
22". (650)861-0088.
OTTOMANS, LIGHT blue, dark blue,
Storage, Versatile, Removable cover,
$25. for both OBO. (650)580-4763
OUTDOOR WOOD SCREEN - new $80
obo Retail $130 (650)873-8167
PAPASAN CHAIRS (2) -with cushions
$45. each set, (650)347-8061
PEDESTAL SINK $25 (650)766-4858
PIANO AND various furniture pieces,
golf bag. $100-$300 Please call for info
(650)740-0687
PORTABLE JEWELRY display case
wood, see through lid $45. 25 x 20 x 4 in-
ches. (650)592-2648.
ROCKING CHAIR fine light, oak condi-
tion with pads, $85.OBO 650 369 9762
ROCKING CHAIR Great condition,
1970’s style, dark brown, wooden,
suede cushion, photo availble, $99.,
(650)716-3337
ROCKING CHAIR, decorative wood /
armrest, it swivels rocks & rolls
$99.00.650-592-2648
ROCKING CHAIR, decorative wood /
armrest, it swivels rocks & rolls
$99.00.650-592-2648
SOFA - excelleNT condition. 8 ft neutral
color $99 OBO (650)345-5644
SOLID WOOD BOOKCASE 33” x 78”
with flip bar ask $75 obo (650)743-4274
STEREO CABINET walnut w/3 black
shelves 16x 22x42. $30, 650-341-5347
STURDY OAK TV or End Table. $35.
Very good condition. 30" x 24".
(650)861-0088
TEA/ UTILITY Cart, $15. (650)573-7035,
(650)504-6057
TEAK CABINET 28"x32", used for ster-
eo equipment $25. (650)726-6429
TRUNDLE BED - Single with wheels,
$40., (650)347-8061
TV STAND brown. $40.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
VIDEO CENTER 38 inches H 21 inches
W still in box $45., (408)249-3858
WALL CLOCK - 31 day windup, 26 “
long, $99 (650)592-2648
WALNUT CHEST, small (4 drawer with
upper bookcase $50. (650)726-6429
WOOD - wall Unit - 30" long x 6' tall x
17.5" deep. $90. (650)631-9311
304 Furniture
WHITE 5 Drawer dresser.Excellent con-
dition. Moving. Must sell $90.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
WOOD BOOKCASE unit - good condi-
tion $65.00 (650)504-6058
WOOD FURNITURE- one end table and
coffee table. In good condition. $30
OBO. (760)996-0767.
306 Housewares
"PRINCESS HOUSE” decorator urn
"Vase" cream with blue flower 13 inch H
$25., (650)868-0436
COFFEE MAKER, Makes 4 cups $12,
(650)368-3037
COOKING POTS (2) stainless steel,
temperature resistent handles, 21/2 & 4
gal. $5. (650) 574-3229.
COOLER/WARMER, UNOPENED, Wor-
thy Mini Fridge/warmer, portable, handle,
plug, white $30.00 (650) 578 9208
ELECTRIC FAN Wind Machine 20in.
Portable Round Plastic Adjustable $35
Cell Number (650)580-6324
HOUSE HEATER Excellent condition.
Works great. Must sell. $30.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
NEW FLOURESCENT lights, ten T-12
tubes, only $25 all 650-595-3933
PERSIAN TEA set for 8. Including
spoon, candy dish, and tray. Gold Plated.
$100. (650) 867-2720
QUEENSIZE BEDSPREAD w/2 Pillow
Shams (print) $30.00 (650)341-1861
SINGER ELECTRONIC sewing machine
model #9022. Cord, foot controller
included. $99 O.B.O. (650)274-9601 or
(650)468-6884
SOLID TEAK floor model 16 wine rack
with turntable $60. (650)592-7483
VACUUM EXCELLENT condition. Works
great.Moving. Must sell. $35.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
307 Jewelry & Clothing
LADIES GLOVES - gold lame' elbow
length gloves, size 7.5, $15. new,
(650)868-0436
308 Tools
AIR COMPRESSOR, 60 gallon, 2-stage
DeVilbiss. Very heavy. **SOLD**
BOSTITCH 16 gage Finish nailer Model
SB 664FN $99 (650)359-9269
CIRCULAR SKILL saw "craftman"7/1/4"
heavy duty never used in box $45.
(650)992-4544
CRACO 395 SP-PRO, electronic paint
sprayer.Commercial grade. Used only
once. $600/obo. (650)784-3427
CRAFTMAN JIG Saw 3.9 amp. with vari-
able speeds $65 (650)359-9269
CRAFTMAN RADIAL SAW, with cabinet
stand, $200 Cash Only, (650)851-1045
CRAFTSMAN 3/4 horse power 3,450
RPM $60 (650)347-5373
CRAFTSMAN 6" bench grinder $40.
(650)573-5269
CRAFTSMAN 9" Radial Arm Saw with 6"
dado set. No stand. $55 (650)341-6402
CRAFTSMAN BELT & disc sander $99.
(650)573-5269
DAYTON ELECTRIC 1 1/2 horse power
1,725 RPM $60 (650)347-5373
HUSKY POWER inverter 750wtts.adap-
tor/cables unused AC/DC.$50.
(650)992-4544
HYDRAULIC floor botle jack 10" H.
plus.Ford like new. $25.00 botlh
(650)992-4544
LOG CHAIN (HEAVY DUTY) 14' $75
(650)948-0912
MICROMETER MEASUREMENT
brake/drum tool new in box
$25.(650)992-4544
WHEELBARROW. BRAND new, never
used. Wood handles. $50 or best offer.
(650) 595-4617
310 Misc. For Sale
50” FRESNEL lens $99 (650)591-8062
ARTIFICIAL FICUS TREE 6 ft. life like,
full branches. in basket $55.
(650)269-3712
ELECTRIC TYPEWRITER selectric II
good condition, needs ribbon (type
needed attached) $35 San Bruno
(650)588-1946
ICE CHEST $15 (650)347-8061
310 Misc. For Sale
ELECTRONIC TYPEWRITER good
condition $50., (650)878-9542
GAME "BEAT THE EXPERTS" never
used $8., (408)249-3858
GOTT 10-GAL beverage cooler $20.
(650)345-3840 leave a clear Message
HARLEY DAVIDSON black phone, per-
fect condition, $65., (650) 867-2720
IGLOO COOLER - 3 gallon beverage
cooler, new, still in box, $15.,
(650)345-3840 leave a clear Message
KENNESAW ORIGINAL salute cannon
$30. (650)726-1037
LEATHER BRIEFCASE Stylish Black
Business Portfolio Briefcase. $20. Call
(650)888-0129
LITTLE PLAYMATE by IGLOO 10"x10",
cooler includes icepak. $20
(650)574-3229
MEDICINE CABINET - 18” X 24”, almost
new, mirror, $20., (650)515-2605
NATIVITY SET, new, beautiful, ceramic,
gold-trimmed, 11-pc.,.asking: $50.
Call: 650-345-3277 /message
NEW LIVING Yoga Tape for Beginners
$8. 650-578-8306
NEW SONICARE Toothbrush in box 3e
series, rechargeable, $49 650-595-3933
OVAL MIRROR $10 (650)766-4858
SHOWER DOOR custom made 48” x 69”
$70 (650)692-3260
ULTRASONIC JEWELRY Cleaning Ma-
chine Cleans jewelry, eyeglasses, den-
tures, keys. Concentrate included. $30
OBO. (650)580-4763
VASE WITH flowers 2 piece good for the
Holidays, $25., (650) 867-2720
VINTAGE WHITE Punch Bowl/Serving
Bowl Set with 10 cups plus one extra
$35. (650)873-8167
WICKER PICNIC basket, mint condition,
handles, light weight, pale tan color.
$10. (650)578-9208
311 Musical Instruments
BALDWIN GRAND PIANO, 6 foot, ex-
cellent condition, $8,500/obo. Call
(510)784-2598
GUITAR AMP, Line 6-AK2-2-125. Like
new. $95.00 or BO - 650-345-7352.
GUITAR SPL effects, pedal, Boss OS-2
overdrive, distoration-new $25.00 or BO.
650-345-7352
GUITAR, BLUES effects pedal, Boss
blues driver B. D. 2. New. $25.00 or BO
- 650-345-7352
GUITAR, BLUES effects pedal, Boss
blues driver B. D. 2. New. $25.00 or BO
- 650-345-7352
GULBRANSEN BABY GRAND PIANO -
Appraised @$5450., want $3500 obo,
(650)343-4461
HAILUN PIANO for sale, brand new, ex-
cellent condition. $6,000. (650)308-5296
HAMMOND B-3 Organ and 122 Leslie
Speaker. Excellent condition. $8,500. pri-
vate owner, (650)349-1172
KEYBOARD AMP, Peavey KB 300, wks
gt $95.00 or BO - 650-345-7352
PA SYSTEM, Yamaha 8 channel hd,
Traynor spkrs.$95/OBO - 650-345-7352
ROLAND GW-7 Workstation/Keyboard,
with expression pedal, sustain pedal, and
owner’s manual. $500. (415)706-6216
WURLITZER PIANO, console, 40” high,
light brown, good condition. $490.
(650)593-7001
YAMAHA PIANO, Upright, Model M-305,
$750. Call (650)572-2337
312 Pets & Animals
AQUARIUM,” MARINA Cool 10”, 2.65
gallons, new pump. $20. (650)591-1500
BAMBOO BIRD Cage - very intricate de-
sign - 21"x15"x16". $50 (650)341-6402
DELUX"GLASS LIZARD cage unused ,
rock open/close window Decoration
21"Wx12"Hx8"D,$20.(650)992-4544
GECKO GLASS case 10 gal.with heat
pad, thermometer, Wheeled stand if
needed $20. (650)591-1500
PARROT CAGE, Steel, Large - approx
4 ft by 4 ft, Excellent condition $300
(650)245-4084
PARROT CAGE, Steel, Large, Excellent
Condition, $275 (650)245-4084
25 Friday • Aug 15, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Building
Customer
Satisfaction
º New Construction
º Additions
º Remodels
º Green Building
Specialists
Technology Solutions for
Building and Living
Locally owned in Belmont
650-832-1673
www. tekhomei nc. com
CA# B-869287
Cleaning
Concrete
ASP CONCRETE
LANDSCAPING
• All kinds of Concrete
• Retaining Wall • Tree Service
• Roofing • Fencing
• New Lawns
Free Estimates
(650)544-1435 • (650)834-4495
315 Wanted to Buy
WE BUY
Gold, Silver, Platinum
Always True & Honest values
Millbrae Jewelers
Est. 1957
400 Broadway - Millbrae
650-697-2685
316 Clothes
ALPINESTAR JEANS - Tags Attached.
Twin Stitched. Knee Protection. Never
Used! Blue/Grey Sz34 $65.
(650)357-7484
BLACK Leather pants Mrs. made in
France size 40 $99. (650)558-1975
BLACK LEATHER tap shoes 9M great
condition $99. (650)558-1975
DAINESE BOOTS - Zipper/Velcro Clo-
sure. Cushioned Ankle. Reflective Strip.
Excellent Condition! Unisex EU40 $65.
(650)357-7484
LADIES FUR Jacket (fake) size 12 good
condition $30 (650)692-3260
NIKE PULLOVER mens heavy jacket
Navy Blue & Red, Reg. price $200 sell-
ing for $59 (650)692-3260
PROM PARTY Dress, Long sleeveless
size 6, magenta, with shawl like new $40
obo (650)349-6059
VELVET DRAPE, 100% cotton, new
beautiful burgundy 82"X52" W/6"hems:
$45 (415)585-3622
VINTAGE 1970’S Grecian made dress,
size 6-8, $35 (650)873-8167
317 Building Materials
30 FLUORESCENT Lamps 48" (brand
new in box) $75 for all (650)369-9762
BATHROOM VANITY, antique, with top
and sink: - $65. (650)348-6955
BRAND NEW Millgard window + frame -
$85. (650)348-6955
FLOORING - Carolina Pine, 1x3 T and
G, approximately 400+ sq. ft. $650. CAll
(415)516-4964
318 Sports Equipment
3 WHEEL golf cart by Bagboy. Used
twice, New $160 great price $65
(650)200-8935
BODY BY JAKE AB Scissor Exercise
Machine w/instructions. $50.
(650)637-0930
DIGITAL PEDOMETER, distance, calo-
ries etc. $7.50 650-595-3933
G.I. ammo can, medium, good cond.
$25.00. Call (650) 591-4553, days only.
G.I. AMMO can, small, good cond.,
$20.00. Call (650) 591-4553, days only.
HJC MOTORCYCLE Helmet, size large,
perfect cond $29 650-595-3933
IN-GROUND BASKETBALL hoop, fiber-
glass backboard, adjustable height, $80
obo 650-364-1270
MENS ROLLER Blades size 101/2 never
used $25 (650)520-3425
NORDIC TRACK Pro, $95. Call
(650)333-4400
POWER PLUS Exercise Machine $99
(650)368-3037
SOCCER BALL, unopened, unused,
Yellow, pear shaped, unique. $5.
(650)578 9208
TWO SPOTTING Scopes, Simmons and
Baraska, $80 for both (650)579-0933
VINTAGE ENGLISH ladies ice skates -
up to size 7-8, $40., (650)873-8167
WET SUIT - medium size, $95., call for
info (650)851-0878
WOMEN'S LADY Cougar gold iron set
set - $25. (650)348-6955
322 Garage Sales
AWESOME
YARD SALE
AUG 16-17
8am-4pm
1537 Locust St.,
San Mateo
Lots of boys toddler clothes and
toys. Items for home, women’s
clothing, jewelry, sports trading
cards, CDs, DVDs, books.
And lots more!
HUGE GARAGE SALE
SATURDAY ONLY
8am to 3pm
1680 Marlborough Rd
Hillsborough
322 Garage Sales
INDOOR
GARGE SALE
8/16 and 8/23
10am to 5pm
730 El Camino Real
Belmont
Tables, desks, couches,
file cabinets, Mongoose
biike, really new
refrigerator freezer!
GARAGE SALES
ESTATE SALES
Make money, make room!
List your upcoming garage
sale, moving sale, estate
sale, yard sale, rummage
sale, clearance sale, or
whatever sale you have...
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500 readers
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
325 Estate Sales
335 Garden Equipment
2 FLOWER pots with Gardenia's both for
$20 (650)369-9762
340 Camera & Photo Equip.
SONY CYBERSHOT DSC-T-50 - 7.2 MP
digital camera (black) with case, $175.,
(650)208-5598
YASAHICA 108 model 35mm SLR Cam-
era with flash and 2 zoom lenses $79
(415)971-7555
345 Medical Equipment
WALKER - brand new, $20., SSF,
(415)410-5937
WALKER WITH basket $30. Invacare
Excellent condition (650)622-6695
WHEEL CHAIR asking $75 OBO
(650)834-2583
WHEEL CHAIR, heavy duty, wide, excel-
lent condition. $99.(650)704-7025
379 Open Houses
OPEN HOUSE
LISTINGS
List your Open House
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500
potential home buyers &
renters a day,
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
470 Rooms
HIP HOUSING
Non-Profit Home Sharing Program
San Mateo County
(650)348-6660
470 Rooms
Rooms For Rent
Travel Inn, San Carlos
$49.- $59.daily + tax
$294.-$322. weekly + tax
Clean Quiet Convenient
Cable TV, WiFi & Private Bathroom
Microwave and Refrigerator & A/C
950 El Camino Real San Carlos
(650) 593-3136
Mention Daily Journal
620 Automobiles
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $42!
We’ll run it
‘til you sell it!
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
CHEVY HHR ‘08 - Grey, spunky car
loaded, even seat warmers, $9,500.
(408)807-6529.
DODGE ‘99 Van, Good Condition,
$2,800 OBO (650)481-5296
HONDA ‘96 LX SD Parts Car, all power,
complete, runs. $1000 OBO, Jimmie
Cassey (650)271-1056 or
(650)481-5296 - Joe Fusilier
MERCEDES ‘06 C230 - 6 cylinder, navy
blue, 60K miles, 2 year warranty,
$18,000, (650)455-7461
625 Classic Cars
FORD ‘63 THUNDERBIRD Hardtop, 390
engine, Leather Interior. Will consider
$6,500 /OBO (650)364-1374
630 Trucks & SUV’s
DODGE ‘01 DURANGO, V-8 SUV, 1
owner, dark blue, CLEAN! $5,000/obo.
Call (650)492-1298
635 Vans
‘67 INTERNATIONAL Step Van 1500,
Typical UPS type size. $1,950/OBO,
(650)364-1374
FORD E150 VAN, 2007, 56k miles, al-
most perfect! $12,000 (650)591-8062
640 Motorcycles/Scooters
1973 FXE Harley Shovel Head 1400cc
stroked & balanced motor. Runs perfect.
Low milage, $6,600 Call (650)369-8013
BMW ‘03 F650 GS, $3899 OBO. Call
650-995-0003
HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘04 Heritage Soft
Tail ONLY 5,400 miles. $11,000. Call
(650)342-6342.
MOTORCYCLE GLOVES - Excellent
condition, black leather, $35. obo,
(650)223-7187
MOTORCYCLE SADDLEBAGS sales,
with mounting hardware $35.
(650)670-2888
650 RVs
COLEMAN LARAMIE pop-up camper,
Excellent Condition, $2750. Call
(415)515-6072
670 Auto Service
YAO'S AUTO SERVICES
(650)598-2801
Oil Change Special $24.99
most cars
San Carlos Smog Check
(650)593-8200
Cash special $26.75 plus cert.
96 & newer
1098 El Camino Real San Carlos
670 Auto Parts
AUTO REFRIGERATION gauges. R12
and R132 new, professional quality $50.
(650)591-6283
CAR TOWchain 9' $35 (650)948-0912
HONDA SPARE tire 13" $25
(415)999-4947
SHOP MANUALS 2 1955 Pontiac
manual, 4 1984 Ford/Lincoln manuals, 1
gray marine diesel manual $40
(650)583-5208
SHOP MANUALS for GM Suv's
Year 2002 all for $40 (650)948-0912
SNOW CHAIN cables made by Shur
Grip - brand new-never used. In the
original case. $25 650-654-9252.
SNOW CHAINS metal cambell brand
never used 2 sets multi sizes $20 each
obo (650)591-6842
USED BIG O 4 tires, All Terrain
245/70R16, $180 (650)579-0933
680 Autos Wanted
Wanted 62-75 Chevrolets
Novas, running or not
Parts collection etc.
So clean out that garage
Give me a call
Joe 650 342-2483
Cabinetry
FOR YOUR CABINET NEEDS
" TRUST EXPERIENCE"
FOCAL POINT KITCHENS & BATH
Modular & Custom cabinets
Over 30 Years in Business !
1222 So. El Camino Real
San Mateo
(650)345-0355
www.focalpointkitchens.com
Contractors
MENA PLASTERING
Interior and Exterior
Lath and Plaster/Stucco
All kinds of textures
35+ years experience
(415)420-6362
CA Lic #625577
Concrete
Construction
Construction
MOE
CONSTRUCTION
Remodels- Kitchen,
Bath, New
Foundation - Driveway,
Concrete, Paver Stones
Retaining Wall - Rocks,
Blocks, Brick Walls
Licensed and Insured
Free Estimates
(415)215-8899
DEVOE
CONSTRUCTION
Kitchen & Bath
Remodeling
Belmont/Castro Valley, CA
(650) 318-3993
LEMUS CONSTRUCTION
(650)271-3955
Dry Rot • Decks • Fences
• Handyman • Painting
• Bath Remodels & much more
Based in N. Peninsula
Free Estimates ... Lic# 913461
O’SULLIVAN
CONSTRUCTION
• New Construction,
• Remodeling,
• Kitchen/Bathrooms,
• Decks/ Fences
(650)589-0372
Licensed and Insured
Lic. #589596
REMODELING
Chad Heeley
(650)892-8300
David Blum
(650)207-3559
Lic#676437
Decks & Fences
MARSH FENCE
& DECK CO.
State License #377047
Licensed • Insured • Bonded
Fences - Gates - Decks
Stairs - Retaining Walls
10-year guarantee
Quality work w/reasonable prices
Call for free estimate
(650)571-1500
VICTOR FENCES
and House Painting
• Interior • Exterior
Power Washing
•Driveways •Sidewalks •Gutters
FREE ESTIMATES
(650)583-1270
or (650) 296-8089
Lic #106767
Draperies
MARLA’S DRAPERIES
& ALTERATIONS
Custom made drapes & pillows
Alterations for men & women
Free Estimates
(650)703-6112
(650)389-6290
2140A S. El Camino, SM
by Greenstarr
Rambo
Concrete
Works
• Walkways
• Driveways
• Patios
• Colored
• Aggregate
• Block Walls
• Retaining walls
• Stamped Concrete
• Ornamental concrete
• Swimming pool removal
Tom 650.834.2365
Licensed Bonded and Insured
www.yardboss.net
Since 1985 License # 752250
26
Friday • Aug 15, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ADVERTISE
YOUR SERVICE
in the
HOME & GARDEN SECTION
Offer your services to 76,500 readers a day, from
Palo Alto to South San Francisco
and all points between!
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
Electricians
ALL ELECTRICAL
SERVICE
650-322-9288
for all your electrical needs
ELECTRIC SERVICE GROUP
ELECTRICIAN
For all your
electrical needs
Residential, Commercial,
Troubleshooting,
Wiring & Repairing
Call Ben (650)685-6617
Lic # 427952
INSIDE OUT
ELECTRIC INC
Service Upgrades
Remodels / Repairs
The tradesman you will
trust and recommend
Lic# 808182
(650)515-1123
Gardening
KEEP YOUR LAWN
LOOKING GREEN
Time to Aerate your lawn
We also do seed/sod of lawns
Spring planting
Sprinklers and irrigation
Pressure washing
Call Robert
STERLING GARDENS
650-703-3831 Lic #751832
Flooring
SHOP
AT HOME
WE WILL
BRING THE
SAMPLES
TO YOU.
Call for a
FREE in-home
estimate
FLAMINGO’S FLOORING
CARPET
VINYL
LAMINATE
TILE
HARDWOOD
650-655-6600
Housecleaning
CONSUELOS HOUSE
CLEANING & WINDOWS
Bi-Weekly/Once a Month,
Moving In & Out
28 yrs. in Business
Free Estimates, 15% off First Visit
(650)278-0157
Lic#1211534
Gutters
O.K.’S RAINGUTTER
New Rain Gutter, Down Spouts,
Gutter Cleaning & Screening,
Gutter & Roof Inspections
Friendly Service
CA Lic# 794353/Bonded
CALL TODAY
(650)556-9780
Handy Help
CONTRERAS HANDYMAN
SERVICES
• Fences • Decks
• Concrete Work • Arbors
We can do any job big or small
Free Estimates
(650)288-9225
(650)350-9968
contrerashandy12@yahoo.com
DISCOUNT HANDYMAN
& PLUMBING
Kitchen/Bathroom Remodeling,
Tile Installation,
Door & Window Installation
Priced for You! Call John
(650)296-0568
Free Estimates
Lic.#834170
HONEST HANDYMAN
Remodeling, Plumbing.
Electrical, Carpentry,
General Home Repair,
Maintenance,
New Construction
No Job Too Small
Lic.# 891766
(650)740-8602
Hardwood Floors
KO-AM
HARDWOOD FLOORING
•Hardwood & Laminate
Installation & Repair
•Refinish
•High Quality @ Low Prices
Call 24/7 for Free Estimate
800-300-3218
408-979-9665
Lic. #794899
Hauling
AAA RATED!
INDEPENDENT HAULERS
$40 & UP
HAUL
Since 1988/Licensed & Insured
Monthly Specials
Fast, Dependable Service
Free Estimates
A+ BBB Rating
(650)341-7482
Hauling
CHAINEY HAULING
Junk & Debris Clean Up
Furniture / Appliance / Disposal
Tree / Bush / Dirt / Concrete Demo
Starting at $40& Up
www.chaineyhauling.com
Free Estimates
(650)207-6592
CHEAP
HAULING!
Light moving!
Haul Debris!
650-583-6700
FRANK’S HAULING
Junk and Debris
Furniture, bushes,
concrete and more
FREE ESTIMATES
(650)361-8773
Landscaping
by Greenstarr
Yard Boss
º 0omp|ete |andscape
construct|on and remova|
º Fu|| tree care |nc|ud|ng
hazard eva|uat|on,
tr|mm|ng, shap|ng,
remova| and stump
gr|nd|ng
º 8eta|n|ng wa||s
º 0rnamenta| concrete
º Sw|mm|ng poo| remova|
Tom 650. 834. 2365
Licensed Bonded and Insured
www.yardboss.net
Since 1985 License # 752250
Landscaping
Moving
BAY AREA
RELOCATION SERVICES
Specializing In:
Homes, Apts, Storages
Professional, Friendly, Careful
Peninsula Personal mover
(650)248-6343
Fully Lic & Bonded Cal-T190632
Painting
CORDERO PAINTING
Commercial & Residential
Exterior & Interior
Free Estimates
(650)372-8361
Lic # 35740 Insured
GODINEZ PAINTING
Reasonable PrIces
Free estimates
References
• Commercial • Residential
• Interior and Exterior
Fully Insured • Lic. 770844
(415)806-1091
JON LA MOTTE
PAINTING
Interior & Exterior
Quality Work, Reasonable
Rates, Free Estimates
(650)368-8861
Lic #514269
NICK MEJIA PAINTING
A+ Member BBB • Since 1975
Large & Small Jobs
Residential & Commercial
Classic Brushwork, Matching, Stain-
ing, Varnishing, Cabinet Finishing
Wall Effects, Murals, More!
(415)971-8763
Lic. #479564
Plumbing
MEYER PLUMBING SUPPLY
Toilets, Sinks, Vanities,
Faucets, Water heaters,
Whirlpools and more!
Wholesale Pricing &
Closeout Specials.
2030 S Delaware St
San Mateo
650-350-1960
Plumbing
Roofing
NATE’S
LANDSCAPING
Roof Maintaince • Raingutters • Water
proofing coating • Repairing •
Experieced
Excellent Referances
Free Estimates
(650)353-6554
Lic# 973081
Screens
DON’T SHARE
YOUR HOUSE
WITH BUGS!
We repair and install all types of
Window & Door Screens
Free Estimates
(650)299-9107
PENINSULA SCREEN SHOP
Mention this ad for 20% OFF!
MARTIN SCREEN SHOP
Quality Screens
Old Fashion Workmanship
New & Repair
Pick up, delivery & installation
(650)591-7010
301 Old County Rd. San Carlos
since 1957
Tree Service
Hillside Tree
Service
LOCALLY OWNED
Family Owned Since 2000
• Trimming Pruning
• Shaping
• Large Removal
• Stump Grinding
Free
Estimates
Mention
The Daily Journal
to get 10% off
for new customers
Call Luis (650) 704-9635
Tile
CUBIAS TILE
• Entryways • Kitchens
• Decks • Bathrooms
• Tile Repair • Floors
• Grout Repair • Fireplaces
Call Mario Cubias for Free Estimates
(650)784-3079
Lic.# 955492
Window Washing
Windows
Notices
NOTICE TO READERS:
California law requires that contractors
taking jobs that total $500 or more (labor
or materials) be licensed by the Contrac-
tor’s State License Board. State law also
requires that contractors include their li-
cense number in their advertising. You
can check the status of your licensed
contractor at www.cslb.ca.gov or 800-
321-CSLB. Unlicensed contractors taking
jobs that total less than $500 must state
in their advertisements that they are not
licensed by the Contractors State Li-
cense Board.
by Greenstarr
&
Chris’s Hauling
• Yard clean up - attic,
basement
• Junk metal removal
including cars, trucks and
motorcycles
• Demolition
• Concrete removal
• Excavation
• Swimming pool removal
Tom 650. 834. 2365
Chri s 415. 999. 1223
Licensed Bonded and Insured
www.yardboss.net
Since 1985 License # 752250
27 Friday • Aug 15, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Accounting
ALAN CECCHI EA
Tax Preparation
& Representation
Bookkkeeping - Accounting
Phone 650-245-7645
alancecchi@yahoo .com
Attorneys
INJURY
LAWYER
LOWER FEES
San Mateo Since 1976
650-366-5800
www.BlackmanLegal.com
Law Office of Jason Honaker
BANKRUPTCY
Chapter 7 &13
Call us for a consultation
650-259-9200
www.honakerlegal.com
Cemetery
LASTING
IMPRESSIONS
ARE OUR FIRST
PRIORITY
Cypress Lawn
1370 El Camino Real
Colma
(650)755-0580
www.cypresslawn.com
Clothing
$5 CHARLEY'S
Sporting apparel from your
49ers, Giants & Warriors,
low prices, large selection.
450 W. San Bruno Ave.
San Bruno
(650)771-6564
Dental Services
ALBORZI, DDS, MDS, INC.
$500 OFF INVISALIGN TREATMENT
a clear alternative to braces even for
patients who have
been told that they were not invisalign
candidates
235 N SAN MATEO DR #300,
SAN MATEO
(650)342-4171
MILLBRAE SMILE CENTER
Valerie de Leon, DDS
Implant, Cosmetic and
Family Dentistry
Spanish and Tagalog Spoken
(650)697-9000
15 El Camino Real,
MILLBRAE, CA
RUSSO DENTAL CARE
Dental Implants
Free Consultation& Panoramic
Digital Survey
1101 El Camino RL ,San Bruno
(650)583-2273
www.russodentalcare.com
Food
ALOFT SFO
invites you to mix & mingle at
replay on
Friday, August 15th
from 7pm till midnight!
Live DJs and specialty cocktails at W
XYZ bar to start your weekend!
401 East Millbrae Ave. Millbrae
(650)443-5500
Food
CROWNE PLAZA
Foster City-San Mateo
The Clubhouse Bistro
Wedding, Event &
Meeting Facilities
(650) 295-6123
1221 Chess Drive Foster City
Hwy 92 at Foster City Blvd. Exit
GET HAPPY!
Happy Hour 4-6• M-F
Steelhead Brewing Co.
333 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)344-6050
www.steelheadbrewery.com
GRILL & VINE
Try Grill & Vine’s
new Summer menu with
2 for 1 entrée specials
every Saturday in August!
1 Old Bayshore, Millbrae
(650)872-8141
JACK’S
RESTAURANT
Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner
1050 Admiral Ct., #A
San Bruno
(650)589-2222
JacksRestaurants.com
PANCHO VILLA
TAQUERIA
Because Flavor Still Matters
365 B Street
San Mateo
www.sfpanchovillia.com
PRIME STEAKS
SUPERB VALUE
BASHAMICHI
Steak & Seafood
1390 El Camino Real
Millbrae
www.bashamichirestaurant.com
SCANDIA
RESTAURANT & BAR
Lunch• Dinner• Wknd Breakfast
OPEN EVERYDAY
Scandinavian &
American Classics
742 Polhemus Rd. San Mateo
HI 92 De Anza Blvd. Exit
(650)372-0888
SEAFOOD FOR SALE
FRESH OFF THE BOAT
(650) 726-5727
Pillar Point Harbor:
1 Johnson Pier
Half Moon Bay
Oyster Point Marina
95 Harbor Master Rd..
South San Francisco
Financial
UNITED AMERICAN BANK
San Mateo , Redwood City,
Half Moon Bay
Call (650)579-1500
for simply better banking
unitedamericanbank.com
Furniture
Bedroom Express
Where Dreams Begin
2833 El Camino Real
San Mateo - (650)458-8881
184 El Camino Real
So. S. Francisco -(650)583-2221
www.bedroomexpress.com
Bedroom Express
Where Dreams Begin
2833 El Camino Real
San Mateo - (650)458-8881
184 El Camino Real
So. S. Francisco -(650)583-2221
www.bedroomexpress.com
Furniture
CALIFORNIA
STOOLS*BAR*DINETTES
(650)591-3900
Tons of Furniture to match
your lifestyle
Peninsula Showroom:
930 El Camino Real, San Carlos
Ask us about our
FREE DELIVERY
Guns
PENINSULA GUNS
(650) 588-8886
Handguns.Shotguns.Rifles
Tactical and
Hunting Accessories
Buy.Sell.Trade
360 El Camino Real, San Bruno
Health & Medical
BACK, LEG PAIN OR
NUMBNESS?
Non-Surgical
Spinal Decompression
Dr. Thomas Ferrigno D.C.
650-231-4754
177 Bovet Rd. #150 San Mateo
BayAreaBackPain.com
DENTAL
IMPLANTS
Save $500 on
Implant Abutment &
Crown Package.
Call Millbrae Dental
for details
650-583-5880
EYE EXAMINATIONS
579-7774
1159 Broadway
Burlingame
Dr. Andrew Soss
OD, FAAO
www.Dr-AndrewSoss.net
NCP COLLEGE OF NURSING
& CAREER COLLEGE
Train to become a Licensed
Vocational Nurse in 12 months or a
Certified Nursing Assistant in as little
as 8 weeks.
Call (800) 339-5145 for more
information or visit
ncpcollegeofnursing.edu and
ncpcareercollege.com
SLEEP APNEA
We can treat it
without CPAP!
Call for a free
sleep apnea screening
650-583-5880
Millbrae Dental
Housing
CALIFORNIA
MENTOR
We are looking for quality
caregivers for adults
with developmental
disabilities. If you have a
spare bedroom and a
desire to open your
home and make a
difference, attend an
information session:
Thursdays 11:00 AM
1710 S. Amphlett Blvd.
Suite 230
San Mateo
(near Marriott Hotel)
Please call to RSVP
(650)389-5787 ext.2
Competitive Stipend offered.
www.MentorsWanted.com
Insurance
AANTHEM BLUE
CROSS
www.ericbarrettinsurance.com
Eric L. Barrett,
CLU, RHU, REBC, CLTC, LUTCF
President
Barrett Insurance Services
(650)513-5690
CA. Insurance License #0737226
AFFORDABLE
HEALTH INSURANCE
Personal & Professional Service
JOHN LANGRIDGE
(650) 854-8963
Bay Area Health Insurance Marketing
CA License 0C60215
a Diamond Certified Company
Jewelers
KUPFER JEWELRY
est. 1979
We Buy Coins, Jewelry, Watches,
Platinum, Diamonds.
Expert fine watch & jewelry repair.
Deal with experts.
1211 Burlingame Ave. Burlingame
www.kupferjewelry.com
(650) 347-7007
LOST RING?
Professional
Metal Detecting
In sand, grass or water
Serving Peninsula & Bay Area.
Contact Marshall
at (800) 214-8534 or
marshall.smith@theringfinders.com
Legal Services
LEGAL
DOCUMENTS PLUS
Non-Attorney document
preparation: Divorce,
Pre-Nup, Adoption, Living Trust,
Conservatorship, Probate,
Notary Public. Response to
Lawsuits: Credit Card
Issues, Breach of Contract
Jeri Blatt, LDA #11
Registered & Bonded
(650)574-2087
legaldocumentsplus.com
"I am not an attorney. I can only
provide self help services at your
specific direction."
Loans
REVERSE MORTGAGE
Are you age 62+ & own your
home?
Call for a free, easy to read
brochure or quote
650-453-3244
Carol Bertocchini, CPA
Marketing
GROW
YOUR SMALL BUSINESS
Get free help from
The Growth Coach
Go to
www.buildandbalance.com
Sign up for the free newsletter
Massage Therapy
ACUHEALTH
Best Asian Healing Massage
$29/hr
with this ad
Free Parking
(650)692-1989
1838 El Camino #103, Burlingame
sites.google.com/site/acuhealthSFbay
ASIAN MASSAGE
$55 per Hour
Open 7 days, 10 am -10 pm
633 Veterans Blvd., #C
Redwood City
(650)556-9888
Massage Therapy
COMFORT PRO
MASSAGE
Foot Massage $19.99
Body Massage $44.99/hr
10 am - 10 pm
1115 California Dr. Burlingame
(650)389-2468
ENJOY THE BEST
ASIAN MASSAGE
$40 for 1/2 hour
Angel Spa
667 El Camino Real, Redwood City
(650)363-8806
7 days a week, 9:30am-9:30pm
GRAND OPENING
Aria Spa,
Foot & Body Massage
9:30 am - 9:30 pm, 7 days
1141 California Dr (& Broadway)
Burlingame.
(650) 558-8188
HEALING MASSAGE
• Newly remodeled
• New Masseuses every two
weeks
$50/Hr. Special
2305-A Carlos St.,
Moss Beach
(Cash Only)
OSETRA WELLNESS
MASSAGE THERAPY
Prenatal, Reiki, Energy
$20 OFF your First Treatment
(not valid with other promotions)
(650)212-2966
1730 S. Amphlett Blvd. #206
San Mateo
osetrawellness.com
Pet Services
CATS, DOGS,
POCKET PETS
Mid-Peninsula Animal Hospital
Free New Client Exam
(650) 325-5671
www.midpen.com
Open Nights & Weekends
Real Estate Loans
REAL ESTATE LOANS
We Fund Bank Turndowns!
Equity based direct lender
Homes • Multi-family
Mixed-use • Commercial
Good or Bad Credit
Purchase / Refinance/
Cash Out
Investors welcome
Loan servicing since 1979
650-348-7191
Wachter Investments, Inc.
Real Estate Broker #746683
Nationwide Mortgage
Licensing System ID #348268
CA Bureau of Real Estate
Retirement
Independent Living, Assisted Liv-
ing, and Memory Care. full time R.N.
Please call us at (650)742-9150 to
schedule a tour, to pursue your life-
long dream.
Marymount Greenhills
Retirement Center
1201 Broadway
Millbrae, Ca 94030
www.greenhillsretirement.com
Schools
HILLSIDE CHRISTIAN
ACADEMY
Where every child is a gift from God
K-8
High Academic Standards
Small Class Size
South San Francisco
(650)588-6860
ww.hillsidechristian.com
Seniors
AFFORDABLE
24-hour Assisted Living Care
located in Burlingame
Mills Estate Villa
Burlingame Villa
Short Term Stays
Dementia & Alzheimers Care
Hospice Care
(650)692-0600
Lic.#4105088251/
415600633
CARE ON CALL
24/7 Care Provider
www.mycareoncall.com
(650)276-0270
1818 Gilbreth Rd., Ste 127
Burlingame
CNA, HHA & Companion Help
NAZARETH VISTA
Best Kept Secret in Town !
Independent Living, Assisted Living
and Skilled Nursing Care.
Daily Tours/Complimentary Lunch
650.591.2008
900 Sixth Avenue
Belmont, CA 94002
crd@belmontvista.com
www.nazarethhealthcare.com
Travel
FIGONE TRAVEL
GROUP
(650) 595-7750
www.cruisemarketplace.com
Cruises • Land & Family vacations
Personalized & Experienced
Family Owned & Operated
Since 1939
1495 Laurel St. SAN CARLOS
CST#100209-10
28
Friday • Aug. 15, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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OYSTER PERPETUAL YACHT-MASTER II

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