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ASSIGNMENT PR 01

DATE ISSUED:
DATE DUE:

NOVEMBER 22, 2013

NOVEMBER 25, 2013

ACTIVITY DESCRIPTION:

OUTLINE THE 9-POINT CONTINUUM FRAMEWORK FOR MULTIPLE


SYSTEM OF INQUIRY RESEARCH METHOD
BY MICHAEL JOROFF AND STANLEY MORSE

STUDENT:

TOPINIO, FLOMERLITA

A CONTINUUM FRAMEWORK FOR MULTIPLE SYSTEM INQUIRY


by Michael Joroff and Stanley Morse
Michael Joroff and Stanleys Morse
In 1984, during the early years of the emergent development of architectural research in
the academy, they sought to review the range and scope of architectural research and
provide an integrative framework for clarifying the types or forms of that research
The effort is diagrammed as a nine-point continuum, from informal observation on the
one hand to laboratory research on the other.
Nine Point Continuum Framework for Multiple System of Inquiry Research Method
Observation occurs when an observer (usually
the researcher or trained observer)
1. Observation
systematically plans and implements viewing of
people and their behaviours or viewing how an
environment is used.
Design is the creation of
a plan or convention for the construction of an
2. Design
object or a system (as in architectural
blueprints, engineering drawings, business
processes, circuit diagrams and sewing patterns).
A precedent or authority is a principle or rule
established in a previous legal case that is either
binding on or persuasive for a court or other
tribunal when deciding subsequent cases with
similar issues or facts. The general principle
3. Review of Precedents
in common law legal systems is that similar
cases should be decided so as to give similar and
predictable outcomes, and the principle of
precedent is the mechanism by which that goal
is attained.
A manifesto is a published verbal declaration of
the intentions, motives, or views of the issuer, be
it an individual, group, political party or
government. A manifesto usually accepts a
previously published opinion or public
4. Manifesto
consensus and/or promotes a new idea with
prescriptive notions for carrying out changes the
author believes should be made. It often
is political or artistic in nature, but may present
an individual's life stance.
any theory which seeks to explain or predict
what would happen under theoretical
5. Normative Theory
constraints; what ought to be, such as perfect
competition, rather than what is, or will be
(imperfect competition).
6. Development of Prototypes
A prototype is often used as part of the product
design process to allow engineers and designers

the ability to explore design alternatives, test


theories and confirm performance prior to
starting production of a new product. Engineers
use their experience to tailor the prototype
according to the specific unknowns still present
in the intended design. In general, an iterative
series of prototypes will be designed,
constructed and tested as the final design
emerges and is prepared for production. With
rare exceptions, multiple iterations of prototypes
are used to progressively refine the design. A
common strategy is to design, test, evaluate and
then modify the design based on analysis of the
prototype.

7. Scholarship

8. Social Science Research

9. Laboratory Research

Scholarship can be defined as those activities


that systematically advance the research,
through rigorous inquiry that 1) is significant to
the profession, 2) is creative, 3) can be
documented, 4) can be replicated or elaborated,
and 5) can be peer-reviewed through various
methods.
the application of scientific logic and methods to
social phenomena. Social science seeks to
understand social behavior through (a) the
measurement of social phenomena, (b) the
discovery of social regularities, and (c) the
creation of social theories.
also called clinical trials or field research,
research in which the researcher seeks to control
conditions and variables to determine whether a
clinical intervention produced the desired effects
or if other factors were responsible for the
desired effects

The conceptual framework identifies full range of architectural research areas


representing different systems of inquiry
The concept of organization for the continuum is essentially consistent with the
dichotomous model
DEGREE OF SYSTEMATIZATION
- It is the underlying concept that organizes the scalar order in which it is
based from the characteristics of the different methods
-

2 Basic Ideas suggested:


1. The idea that there is a reality out there; and

2. The assumption that to know this reality requires objective


methods.
The proposed scalar framework mirrors the objective vs. subjective concept of the
dichotomous model.
Subjective
Objective

Introduced as an overall integrating context for divergent research efforts,


Proposed that the framework is indeed to distinguish research from other
activities in which architects may engage.
Subjective Paradigm
- Joroff and Morse invoke a variety of cautions, none of which are applied
to the more objective and systematic examples on the right
Objective Paradigm
- Systematic with the belief that there is a reality out there,
- They are essentially arguing that real research exists only at the object
end of the scale.

Two of the Problematic Features


Research types are hardly comparable
Research types are in effect a mix of apples and oranges
For instance, the term laboratory-type research invokes an experimental model
and shares a place on the continuum with a kind of theory (normative, but what
of other theory type?), and observations (a possible data collection tactic)
Nevertheless!
Joroff and Morses continuum represents a historically significant effort to identify and
validate the potential value and contributions of a multifaceted body of architectural
research